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Walking poles through airport security?


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davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#2
Has anyone had any experience with brining folding walking/hiking poles in their carryon bags with EasyJet? They are non-pointy with large rubber ends.
Hi, Bruno, and welcome to the Forum :)

What do you mean 'non-pointy'? Are the metal tips merely covered by the rubber ends, or are the rubber ends all that there is on the end of the poles? If the rubber pads are simply over the top of metal tips, it is still the same as having metal tips.

The official answer is based on that countries airport security agency and procedures. That is not determined by the airline. However, once past airport security there are other rules which are made by each airline for its passengers. But, again, that is secondary to the national airport agency's security policies. If you get past airport security with your trekking poles, you should have no issue with EasyJet.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#3
Has anyone had any experience with brining folding walking/hiking poles in their carryon bags with EasyJet? They are non-pointy with large rubber ends.
Hi, Bruno,

You're not the first person to ask this question. Although Dave already kinda answer your question you might use the search function on this forum or check the EasyJet policy on the topic. Or even the airports you will be flying to/from.
But to answer your question. I guess at least a quarter of forum members have an experience with carry-on walking poles. Be it confiscated by airport security (Santiago airport is famous for that) or allowed onto the plane.

Buen Camino!
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#4
I flew EasyJet Gatwick-SdC in May. Two ladies on front of me each had two poles sticking out of their carry on packs. Oddly they both had larger packs in the hold.

I asked how they did it and they said they just smiled.

It might work for you - how's your smile? :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2001) (2018)
#5
Thanks everyone for your replies. Update; after readin some other posts about hiking poles we have decided not to risk confiscation or waiting for our checked bags to arrive.
We will instead buy something in SJPP, hopefully inexpensive. We arrive on the 18th.
Thanks again and Buen Camino!
 

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davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#6
Thanks everyone for your replies. Update; after readin some other posts about hiking poles we have decided not to risk confiscation or waiting for our checked bags to arrive.
We will instead buy something in SJPP, hopefully inexpensive. We arrive on the 18th.
Thanks again and Buen Camino!
That's actually a great strategy. If I had to check my poles, I would do the same thing.... I don't do baggage claim :)

I fly out of a small airport to connect to the Seattle airport, so if (it has never happened yet) my trekking poles are refused, I can easily step out of line and hand them to the person who is dropping me at the airport. Yeah, it's really Mayberry-style, small town stuff :) The neat thing though, is that when I go through TSA security here, I am already done for SeaTac. I don't have to re-do the screening process there, I just go to the gate for the international flight.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2001) (2018)
#7
That's actually a great strategy. If I had to check my poles, I would do the same thing.... I don't do baggage claim :)

I fly out of a small airport to connect to the Seattle airport, so if (it has never happened yet) my trekking poles are refused, I can easily step out of line and hand them to the person who is dropping me at the airport. Yeah, it's really Mayberry-style, small town stuff :) The neat thing though, is that when I go through TSA security here, I am already done for SeaTac. I don't have to re-do the screening process there, I just go to the gate for the international flight.
Thanks again.
We only do carry on as well and same as you, we fly out of a small municipal airport, connect in Vancouver and although we clear security all the way through to Paris, in the past, we have had to “exit” through customs and re-enter through security screening again to get to our connection on EasyJet. And then there is the concern of security screening coming back from Santiago to Paris, Paris to Toronto...Too many things to worry about. This is a “leave all our worries behind” kind of spiritual journey so that is what we’ll do.

Thanks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#8
I understand that you absolutely will not be able to carry on your poles at the Santiago airport, but that the airlines that fly from there will check them for free for you. This is specific to the Santiago airport only.
 
#9
We realize that this is a moving target and that things change (in fact, several people have not been able to take pole through Madrid security this year, though I continue to be lucky, I guess). My advice to anyone who hopes to carry the poles on would be to have a Plan B so that they can easily be checked. I carry a duffel bag for that purpose, just in case.

NOTE FROM MODS:

Several months back, when some of the posts were getting very belligerent on the topic of whether you can carry your hiking poles onto the plane, several members put their heads together to come up with a non-judgmental (yes, believe it or not, some people do get judgmental on this topic) summary of what can be said factually about the topic. People continue to want to do it, either because of short connections, the hassles created if they go missing (that was the trigger for me), etc.

Thanks to those clear thinkers:

1. Written or posted guidance provided by airlines and security agencies often specifies "No hiking poles," without clarification of type or size. However, in many countries, the actual legally binding documents do not say hiking poles are prohibited. If asked, the airlines generally say "No hiking poles."

2. In practice you will likely not be permitted to carry full-size uncollapsed hiking poles into the cabin.

3.Many people who carry folded-up poles are allowed to carry them on (see the last point for the one clear exception).

4.Walking aids are permitted if the passenger needs them for mobility.

5.The security agents at all airports have authority to prohibit anything they decide is a potential hazard. It is not a good idea to argue with them. The security staff are not connected with the airlines.

6. If you want to carry your poles into the cabin, no matter what type, go prepared with time and an alternative packing plan in case you are not permitted to take them.

7. Finally, poles are never allowed through security at Santiago airport, when you are leaving, so you must have them as checked luggage. According to a direct communication from the Santiago airport in early 2018, all airlines will allow passengers leaving Santiago to check their poles for free.

Since these are generalizations, there will be lots of different individual experiences, but this list should help you decide what the risks are and how to go to the airport prepared with a plan B.

Thanks everyone a civil discussioin of what is sometimes a contentious topic!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#10
Thanks everyone for your replies. Update; after readin some other posts about hiking poles we have decided not to risk confiscation or waiting for our checked bags to arrive.
We will instead buy something in SJPP, hopefully inexpensive. We arrive on the 18th.
Thanks again and Buen Camino!
I'm just guessing here but if you will fly to Biarritz (or coming by train from Paris) then maybe try to buy poles in one of Bayonne's sports equipment stores. Also a way for some sight seeing.
Otherwise you can get them slightly more expensive in SJPdP.
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#11
Thanks again.
We only do carry on as well and same as you, we fly out of a small municipal airport, connect in Vancouver and although we clear security all the way through to Paris, in the past, we have had to “exit” through customs and re-enter through security screening again to get to our connection on EasyJet. And then there is the concern of security screening coming back from Santiago to Paris, Paris to Toronto...Too many things to worry about. This is a “leave all our worries behind” kind of spiritual journey so that is what we’ll do.

Thanks.
That is a potential for problems.

Paris (CDG) to Biarritz via a flight (not sure now if it was EasyJet) wasn't a problem through airport security at all for me (anecdotal), even though the trekking poles were in plain sight in a side pocket of the pack. Coming back out of Spain, I mailed my poles and Opinel knife home so I didn't need to worry about checking anything into baggage.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#12
That is a potential for problems.

Paris (CDG) to Biarritz via a flight (not sure now if it was EasyJet) wasn't a problem through airport security at all for me (anecdotal), even though the trekking poles were in plain sight in a side pocket of the pack. Coming back out of Spain, I mailed my poles and Opinel knife home so I didn't need to worry about checking anything into baggage.
You know what, Dave?

Maybe we should just left out walking poles and knives etc. in Spain and as repeat offenders we would just pick them up one year later. No problem with airport security ;)
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, portuguesa, st olav, via de la plata
#13
Has anyone had any experience with brining folding walking/hiking poles in their carryon bags with EasyJet? They are non-pointy with large rubber ends.
Not with Easyjet but they are a no no on Ryan Air. I now use Black Diamond X-poles as they fold into 3 and fit into my checked in backpack.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Too many caminos to list in the permitted 100 characters!!
#14
I've used two options -

1. Use folding poles, put them and your back-pack into a cheap large bag, and take them as hold luggage. On arrival, discard the cheap large bag. You will then have problems on the return journey unless you can find another cheap, large bag.
2. Don't take poles. Buy them when you're in Spain. I found some for only 6 euros in a "Chinese Bazaar". That's cheaper than in the UK. On my return I then left them at the Pilgrim Office in SdC for another pilgrim to use.

Option 2 will be my choice next April/May for my "final" camino!
 

JohnJocys

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata
#15
I brought poles in my carry-on pack on Ryanair, Manchester to Madrid in April.
No problem getting them INTO Spain but they were confiscated on leaving Spain.
Now back in Spain, with poles - this time they're in hold luggage so no problem.
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#16
I have seen several posts, in a few threads, which say that a person had their trekking poles "confiscated" by airport security in Spain. I would like a bit of clarification on the "confiscation".

My experience, which admittedly is anecdotal, was that security at Madrid airport would not let me pass through with my trekking poles. They gave me the option of going back to the airline counter so that the poles could be checked in as luggage.

Given the press for time, I could not take their offer to do so. The officer was concerned that I did not understand him and called another officer over to his station, and the second officer explained in better English how I could check my poles in luggage, but could not go to the boarding area with my poles. I told him that I was grateful for his advice, but did not have time to return to the line at the airline counter, check my poles, then again enter the line and wait to pass through security.

After a bit of discussion between the two officers, I was gently told that the only options were to go to the Correos office and try to mail them, check them as baggage, or leave them with security. The officers clearly did not feel good about my leaving my poles with them, which I ended up doing in order to make my flight.

The second officer sorta shrugged, smiled, and went back to his area. The first officer offered a lo siento as I handed him the poles.

My poles were not 'confiscated', as I voluntarily left them behind. So, did anyone else truly have poles 'confiscated'... in other words, involuntarily taken from them?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances planned for October 3-mid November (2018)
#17
I've bought much less expensive poles than my original poles to take. These less expensive ones have held up well over the summer to take on the Camino when my very expensive Black Diamond poles failed me on a descent over the summer. The primary reason for this is due to the chance that they be left behind. I'll be starting in Pamplona and have already found sporting goods stores there to "re-supply" the poles and purchase a multi tool since I'll only be carrying on my pack due to time constraints.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#18
I have seen several posts, in a few threads, which say that a person had their trekking poles "confiscated" by airport security in Spain. I would like a bit of clarification on the "confiscation".

My experience, which admittedly is anecdotal, was that security at Madrid airport would not let me pass through with my trekking poles. They gave me the option of going back to the airline counter so that the poles could be checked in as luggage.

Given the press for time, I could not take their offer to do so. The officer was concerned that I did not understand him and called another officer over to his station, and the second officer explained in better English how I could check my poles in luggage, but could not go to the boarding area with my poles. I told him that I was grateful for his advice, but did not have time to return to the line at the airline counter, check my poles, then again enter the line and wait to pass through security.

After a bit of discussion between the two officers, I was gently told that the only options were to go to the Correos office and try to mail them, check them as baggage, or leave them with security. The officers clearly did not feel good about my leaving my poles with them, which I ended up doing in order to make my flight.

The second officer sorta shrugged, smiled, and went back to his area. The first officer offered a lo siento as I handed him the poles.

My poles were not 'confiscated', as I voluntarily left them behind. So, did anyone else truly have poles 'confiscated'... in other words, involuntarily taken from them?
Your experience there is exactly why I do not recommend putting too much effort in bringing trekking poles while traveling to walk the Camino. That is traveling via aircraft, especially involving multiple aircraft changes and security screenings. Just buy some when you arrive.
I just have no interest in delays, hassles etc when I travel, especially when they can be avoided, and especially when they involve a piece of tubular aluminium or graphite probably inexpensively manufactured by workers at poverty wages.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2001) (2018)
#20
I've used two options -

1. Use folding poles, put them and your back-pack into a cheap large bag, and take them as hold luggage. On arrival, discard the cheap large bag. You will then have problems on the return journey unless you can find another cheap, large bag.
2. Don't take poles. Buy them when you're in Spain. I found some for only 6 euros in a "Chinese Bazaar". That's cheaper than in the UK. On my return I then left them at the Pilgrim Office in SdC for another pilgrim to use.

Option 2 will be my choice next April/May for my "final" camino!
Option #2 were my thoughts exactly. Thanks.
 
#21
Hi Bruno,

Buying poles cheap in SJPP does not happen. It is a, "captured audience."

Some options have been provided and I will not repeat.

One question. Do you consider hiking poles to be medically necessary? I have had leg problems for several years now and they are medically necessary. When presented at TSA, I have been flagged through most of the time. At SdC, I was required to go to Customer Service and request assistance in boarding. After messing up my left quads last May, that was very helpful, and again, my poles came with me on and off the plane. But that was my situation.

The other option is to have poles that will fit inside the pack and check it in as baggage so there is no issue or carry on.

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#23
You know what, Dave?

Maybe we should just left out walking poles and knives etc. in Spain and as repeat offenders we would just pick them up one year later. No problem with airport security ;)
@ivar Time for you to offer storage in St Jean ;) (or elsewhere)

At the end of the Camino we can check our gear with you and have it sent back to the start point, for next time :)
 

Flem

"The old man"
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Frances
2016 Finisterre-Muxia, Portogues
2017 del Norte, Ingles
(2018 Via de la Plata)
#24
We realize that this is a moving target and that things change (in fact, several people have not been able to take pole through Madrid security this year, though I continue to be lucky, I guess). My advice to anyone who hopes to carry the poles on would be to have a Plan B so that they can easily be checked. I carry a duffel bag for that purpose, just in case.

NOTE FROM MODS:

Several months back, when some of the posts were getting very belligerent on the topic of whether you can carry your hiking poles onto the plane, several members put their heads together to come up with a non-judgmental (yes, believe it or not, some people do get judgmental on this topic) summary of what can be said factually about the topic. People continue to want to do it, either because of short connections, the hassles created if they go missing (that was the trigger for me), etc.

Thanks to those clear thinkers:

1. Written or posted guidance provided by airlines and security agencies often specifies "No hiking poles," without clarification of type or size. However, in many countries, the actual legally binding documents do not say hiking poles are prohibited. If asked, the airlines generally say "No hiking poles."

2. In practice you will likely not be permitted to carry full-size uncollapsed hiking poles into the cabin.

3.Many people who carry folded-up poles are allowed to carry them on (see the last point for the one clear exception).

4.Walking aids are permitted if the passenger needs them for mobility.

5.The security agents at all airports have authority to prohibit anything they decide is a potential hazard. It is not a good idea to argue with them. The security staff are not connected with the airlines.

6. If you want to carry your poles into the cabin, no matter what type, go prepared with time and an alternative packing plan in case you are not permitted to take them.

7. Finally, poles are never allowed through security at Santiago airport, when you are leaving, so you must have them as checked luggage. According to a direct communication from the Santiago airport in early 2018, all airlines will allow passengers leaving Santiago to check their poles for free.

Since these are generalizations, there will be lots of different individual experiences, but this list should help you decide what the risks are and how to go to the airport prepared with a plan B.

Thanks everyone a civil discussioin of what is sometimes a contentious topic!
We realize that this is a moving target and that things change (in fact, several people have not been able to take pole through Madrid security this year, though I continue to be lucky, I guess). My advice to anyone who hopes to carry the poles on would be to have a Plan B so that they can easily be checked. I carry a duffel bag for that purpose, just in case.

NOTE FROM MODS:

Several months back, when some of the posts were getting very belligerent on the topic of whether you can carry your hiking poles onto the plane, several members put their heads together to come up with a non-judgmental (yes, believe it or not, some people do get judgmental on this topic) summary of what can be said factually about the topic. People continue to want to do it, either because of short connections, the hassles created if they go missing (that was the trigger for me), etc.

Thanks to those clear thinkers:

1. Written or posted guidance provided by airlines and security agencies often specifies "No hiking poles," without clarification of type or size. However, in many countries, the actual legally binding documents do not say hiking poles are prohibited. If asked, the airlines generally say "No hiking poles."

2. In practice you will likely not be permitted to carry full-size uncollapsed hiking poles into the cabin.

3.Many people who carry folded-up poles are allowed to carry them on (see the last point for the one clear exception).

4.Walking aids are permitted if the passenger needs them for mobility.

5.The security agents at all airports have authority to prohibit anything they decide is a potential hazard. It is not a good idea to argue with them. The security staff are not connected with the airlines.

6. If you want to carry your poles into the cabin, no matter what type, go prepared with time and an alternative packing plan in case you are not permitted to take them.

7. Finally, poles are never allowed through security at Santiago airport, when you are leaving, so you must have them as checked luggage. According to a direct communication from the Santiago airport in early 2018, all airlines will allow passengers leaving Santiago to check their poles for free.

Since these are generalizations, there will be lots of different individual experiences, but this list should help you decide what the risks are and how to go to the airport prepared with a plan B.

Thanks everyone a civil discussioin of what is sometimes a contentious topic!
hi Peregrino2000
Interesting the debate on the poles in carryon bags.
On a question to the Airport I got this answer from Oficina de Información, aeripuerto de Santiago de Compistela:
Quote
Object with sharp point are not allowed in the cabin of the aircraft.....
Unquote

As I read that the poles is allowed if they do not have sharp points.
Anybody have comments????
 
#25
hi Peregrino2000
Interesting the debate on the poles in carryon bags.
On a question to the Airport I got this answer from Oficina de Información, aeripuerto de Santiago de Compistela:
Quote
Object with sharp point are not allowed in the cabin of the aircraft.....
Unquote

As I read that the poles is allowed if they do not have sharp points.
Anybody have comments????
Of all the many uncertainties about carrying on hiking poles, this is not one of them. You cannot carry any hiking poles of any sort through Santiago airport security. The airlines all allow you to check them for free.

Buen camino, Flem!
 

Flem

"The old man"
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Frances
2016 Finisterre-Muxia, Portogues
2017 del Norte, Ingles
(2018 Via de la Plata)
#26
Of all the many uncertainties about carrying on hiking poles, this is not one of them. You cannot carry any hiking poles of any sort through Santiago airport security. The airlines all allow you to check them for free.

Buen camino, Flem!
Well - as my expirience is - and it is only mine with my five times traveling out of SdC - that as long I carry my poles INSIDE my racksack and they ard WITHOUT the sharp points the securityguys said ok.
And yes the good thing is thr free incheck in worst case.
 

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