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We did it, walking part of the Frances and the all of the Primitivo as a family of 4.

mayfly

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino '23
I spent a year reading this forum and getting information and it really helped make the trip smooth for us in terms of equipment, packing, reservations, everything really!

We did it, we hiked the Camino for 30 days with a family of 4. Kids aged 9 and 16. Left June 10. We flew Boston - Iceland- Paris CDG, then cab to Orley, then fly to Biarritz, then Express Bourricut to SJPDP. It went off with no issues and we checked one bag! Phew!

We began in SJPDP and walked to Logrono, then rented a car for a day and drove to Oviedo and hiked the entire Primitivo from Oviedo to SDC. We took 30 days and had rest days in Pamplona, Oviedo (driving day) and Lugo, and of course an extra day in Santiago.

Starting in SJPDP was so worth it. The kids loved the horses, cows, sheep in the Pyrenees, the communal dinner at Orrison set the tone, it was magical. We also bought the best cheese I have ever had in my life in SJPDP and enjoyed eating it with the horses. Splitting the first leg into 2 after a 25 hour travel day was totally necessary! I am so glad we did it that way.

It was no where near as crowded as I was led to believe by the internet. Our first night at Orrison had 7 extra beds and Roncesvalles had 100+, the rest of the trip was like that also, plenty of places to stay and many days we saw very few people.

Primitivo - this was a great route for our family, we live in the mountains, the kids love going up and down, seeing the wild horses in the fog and rain and wind was pure magic. There were fewer towns and places to get bread/ food than on the Frances, so we really had to plan ahead. Every single grocery store in Lugo was closed on Sunday and the next 2 days had no real grocery, two mornings in a row we had to walk 6km and 8km for breakfast, but each place sold use stuff for lunch and the hostel sold us some bread and cheese. The kids were amazing!

Rooms - Even with plenty of rooms for an idividual, family rooms were harder to get and I was very glad I booked in advance as we had a private bunk space often with our own bathroom or a guesthouse/ hotel room to ourselves and that helped a lot! I used Booking for 90% of it and then contacted some places through whats app, I found most places either on Booking, Gronze, Wise Pilgrim guide book. We always stayed right on the camino in town, that was key with kids.

A 16 year old is almost like hiking with an adult, but they need more food more frequently, can hike further, faster and do not get sore, and can get impatient waiting for adults to catch up! They get hangry and need to be fed often. The camino deepened our relationship!

A 9 year old has a lot of energy out of gate, recovers quickly for the next day, but wanes fast and has a hard 20km stop. They need a lot of chocolate to survive. We met another family who suggested baguette with a chocolate bar between the layers, and it was amazing! 9 year olds can really only do 20K. She got bruised heals when did any more, even after a visit to a shoe store to get new padded insoles (gel proved impossible to find in that small a size). Any day over 20K, she and I got a cab for the last 4/6/8km and that really helped her morale. You could often find her skipping around town in the evenings after a few hours of reading and eating. Her highlight was the Irache wine fountain, she could not get over how cool it was, as well as the blacksmith right next to it, we bought some amazing pieces from him.

Luggage Transport -I used Correos and it was perfect, no issues at all. We sent one duffle bag ahead every day, it had our toiletries, sleeping bag liners, rain gear(on days we did not need it) and spare outfit. My 9 year old only weights 45lbs, so she could carry her water, kindle e-reader (this saved the trip) bird book, water proof notebook, fleece, spare socks, rain coat some days and tiny stuffed octopus.

The camino is pretty social in the afternoons/ evenings and the kids just needed to zone out and ignore the world around them, the kindle e-readers let them have unlimited books from the library. We had a deck of cards and played a lot of games.

Phones- I ended up just paying AT&T for the international plan so we could FaceTime my parents (actually my dad who shares a plan with us paid as a present, bc he wanted to talk to the kids!). My husbands phone was not unlocked so he just used wifi, we got my daughter an orange sim card in Pamplona ($20 for 40 days). When she and my husband separated from us, then they could text us and let us know their ETA (some days the little one and I had to take a cab the last bit, and 2 days her heals really hurt and she and I just took a bus to the next town and it was great!). My oldest also wanted her phone working so she could post her walks each day on Strava.

Food - we are a vegetarian family and had zero issues at all. We even managed to eat before 7pm and get everyone into bed by 9 all but about 10 nights. We were and up and out early kind of group. A few times we just got hummus and carrots and fruit and cheese and wine and bread and had picnics and the hostel, but most places we found delicious, nutritious food for vegetarians. In Vilar de cars, and Berecuda, we had 2 of the best soups of our lives!!!!! The wine was fantastic and the kids fell in love with the Cola Cao in the morning, the little one even learned how to order in Spanish sin leche, con caliente agua. They also loved the Kaz lemon and orange soda for mid day breaks!

Expenses- we spent $2700 on places to stay and about 4k on food, which is about $34 a person per day (that number also includes keepsakes, a few cab rides, bus tickets, museum tickets and a new pair of Tevas for me :). We you factor in 4 people, cabs, private rooms, often come to similar per person prices and a bed in a bigger room at the private Albergue.

Fun things- We climbed the Gothic Tower at the Church in Oviedo, and did the roof our in Santiago. We did a few fun things in Pamplona and rented a car to drive from Logrono to Oviedo.

We are planning our next camino, the whole family is in, it was amazing and I can’t wait to do it again.

Observations overall - I had heard the Camino gives you what you need, and for our family, it totally did. As a college professor, I have noticed over the last few years a decline in the ability to easily start small talk and chit chat amount the 20/30 somethings. Watching this age group on the Camino left me full of hope, the Camino gave them back personal one:eek:ne relationships. It was fun to watch the awkwardness at first and then the ease of development as they days went by. I loved seeing that age group without phones and chatting it up with strangers, it made my heart happy. That is what the Camino is giving right now, and I am grateful.
 
Join our full-service guided tour of the Basque Country and let us pamper you!
I spent a year reading this forum and getting information and it really helped make the trip smooth for us in terms of equipment, packing, reservations, everything really!

We did it, we hiked the Camino for 30 days with a family of 4. Kids aged 9 and 16. Left June 10. We flew Boston - Iceland- Paris CDG, then cab to Orley, then fly to Biarritz, then Express Bourricut to SJPDP. It went off with no issues and we checked one bag! Phew!

We began in SJPDP and walked to Logrono, then rented a car for a day and drove to Oviedo and hiked the entire Primitivo from Oviedo to SDC. We took 30 days and had rest days in Pamplona, Oviedo (driving day) and Lugo, and of course an extra day in Santiago.

Starting in SJPDP was so worth it. The kids loved the horses, cows, sheep in the Pyrenees, the communal dinner at Orrison set the tone, it was magical. We also bought the best cheese I have ever had in my life in SJPDP and enjoyed eating it with the horses. Splitting the first leg into 2 after a 25 hour travel day was totally necessary! I am so glad we did it that way.

It was no where near as crowded as I was led to believe by the internet. Our first night at Orrison had 7 extra beds and Roncesvalles had 100+, the rest of the trip was like that also, plenty of places to stay and many days we saw very few people.

Primitivo - this was a great route for our family, we live in the mountains, the kids love going up and down, seeing the wild horses in the fog and rain and wind was pure magic. There were fewer towns and places to get bread/ food than on the Frances, so we really had to plan ahead. Every single grocery store in Lugo was closed on Sunday and the next 2 days had no real grocery, two mornings in a row we had to walk 6km and 8km for breakfast, but each place sold use stuff for lunch and the hostel sold us some bread and cheese. The kids were amazing!

Rooms - Even with plenty of rooms for an idividual, family rooms were harder to get and I was very glad I booked in advance as we had a private bunk space often with our own bathroom or a guesthouse/ hotel room to ourselves and that helped a lot! I used Booking for 90% of it and then contacted some places through whats app, I found most places either on Booking, Gronze, Wise Pilgrim guide book. We always stayed right on the camino in town, that was key with kids.

A 16 year old is almost like hiking with an adult, but they need more food more frequently, can hike further, faster and do not get sore, and can get impatient waiting for adults to catch up! They get hangry and need to be fed often. The camino deepened our relationship!

A 9 year old has a lot of energy out of gate, recovers quickly for the next day, but wanes fast and has a hard 20km stop. They need a lot of chocolate to survive. We met another family who suggested baguette with a chocolate bar between the layers, and it was amazing! 9 year olds can really only do 20K. She got bruised heals when did any more, even after a visit to a shoe store to get new padded insoles (gel proved impossible to find in that small a size). Any day over 20K, she and I got a cab for the last 4/6/8km and that really helped her morale. You could often find her skipping around town in the evenings after a few hours of reading and eating. Her highlight was the Irache wine fountain, she could not get over how cool it was, as well as the blacksmith right next to it, we bought some amazing pieces from him.

Luggage Transport -I used Correos and it was perfect, no issues at all. We sent one duffle bag ahead every day, it had our toiletries, sleeping bag liners, rain gear(on days we did not need it) and spare outfit. My 9 year old only weights 45lbs, so she could carry her water, kindle e-reader (this saved the trip) bird book, water proof notebook, fleece, spare socks, rain coat some days and tiny stuffed octopus.

The camino is pretty social in the afternoons/ evenings and the kids just needed to zone out and ignore the world around them, the kindle e-readers let them have unlimited books from the library. We had a deck of cards and played a lot of games.

Phones- I ended up just paying AT&T for the international plan so we could FaceTime my parents (actually my dad who shares a plan with us paid as a present, bc he wanted to talk to the kids!). My husbands phone was not unlocked so he just used wifi, we got my daughter an orange sim card in Pamplona ($20 for 40 days). When she and my husband separated from us, then they could text us and let us know their ETA (some days the little one and I had to take a cab the last bit, and 2 days her heals really hurt and she and I just took a bus to the next town and it was great!). My oldest also wanted her phone working so she could post her walks each day on Strava.

Food - we are a vegetarian family and had zero issues at all. We even managed to eat before 7pm and get everyone into bed by 9 all but about 10 nights. We were and up and out early kind of group. A few times we just got hummus and carrots and fruit and cheese and wine and bread and had picnics and the hostel, but most places we found delicious, nutritious food for vegetarians. In Vilar de cars, and Berecuda, we had 2 of the best soups of our lives!!!!! The wine was fantastic and the kids fell in love with the Cola Cao in the morning, the little one even learned how to order in Spanish sin leche, con caliente agua. They also loved the Kaz lemon and orange soda for mid day breaks!

Expenses- we spent $2700 on places to stay and about 4k on food, which is about $34 a person per day (that number also includes keepsakes, a few cab rides, bus tickets, museum tickets and a new pair of Tevas for me :). We you factor in 4 people, cabs, private rooms, often come to similar per person prices and a bed in a bigger room at the private Albergue.

Fun things- We climbed the Gothic Tower at the Church in Oviedo, and did the roof our in Santiago. We did a few fun things in Pamplona and rented a car to drive from Logrono to Oviedo.

We are planning our next camino, the whole family is in, it was amazing and I can’t wait to do it again.

Observations overall - I had heard the Camino gives you what you need, and for our family, it totally did. As a college professor, I have noticed over the last few years a decline in the ability to easily start small talk and chit chat amount the 20/30 somethings. Watching this age group on the Camino left me full of hope, the Camino gave them back personal one:eek:ne relationships. It was fun to watch the awkwardness at first and then the ease of development as they days went by. I loved seeing that age group without phones and chatting it up with strangers, it made my heart happy. That is what the Camino is giving right now, and I am grateful.
Thankyou for this synopsis. I really love how in tune and positive you are with your kids. Your family Camino sounds magical and memorable.
 
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So great to hear of your experience and all the details. We are planning on going from SJPDP - Pamplona next year with our three (7,9 and 13), before doing the whole CF the following year. Just wondering whether the prices for communal meals/accommodation are cheaper for children??
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
So great to hear of your experience and all the details. We are planning on going from SJPDP - Pamplona next year with our three (7,9 and 13), before doing the whole CF the following year. Just wondering whether the prices for communal meals/accommodation are cheaper for children??
They are not. Most were 10-15pp and a lot of food. A few places told us they hate food waste and asked if my girls could "split" a portion and we happily accepted. Especially for the younger 2, it doesn't hurt to ask, we found most places really don't like food waste. Breakfasts were mostly 5 euro pp. We always bought bread, cheese, chocolate, apples and nuts for lunches and ate on the walk.

Laundry- with 5 people, if you try to do it yourself, you will be doing it all night and let's face it, the kids can't really help, they don't rinse or ring out well :). Most places had a washer for 4 euro and dryer for 2-3, and in zubiri, for 9 euro they did our first 3 days worth of laundry (literally all at the clothes we brought) for 9 euro and brought it back to us.

SJPDP to Pamplona is magical for kids. Everyday is full of exciting things, they will get hooked! Great choice! We stayed at Orrison the first night, the hotel in Roncesvalles the second night, got a hostel room for 4 with private bath in Zubiri, in Pamplona we got a "hotel". it was a bunk room right off the main square and we toured the cathedral and did the bull fighting museum. The kids LOVED Pamplona and want to go back.
 
They are not. Most were 10-15pp and a lot of food. A few places told us they hate food waste and asked if my girls could "split" a portion and we happily accepted. Especially for the younger 2, it doesn't hurt to ask, we found most places really don't like food waste. Breakfasts were mostly 5 euro pp. We always bought bread, cheese, chocolate, apples and nuts for lunches and ate on the walk.

Laundry- with 5 people, if you try to do it yourself, you will be doing it all night and let's face it, the kids can't really help, they don't rinse or ring out well :). Most places had a washer for 4 euro and dryer for 2-3, and in zubiri, for 9 euro they did our first 3 days worth of laundry (literally all at the clothes we brought) for 9 euro and brought it back to us.

SJPDP to Pamplona is magical for kids. Everyday is full of exciting things, they will get hooked! Great choice! We stayed at Orrison the first night, the hotel in Roncesvalles the second night, got a hostel room for 4 with private bath in Zubiri, in Pamplona we got a "hotel". it was a bunk room right off the main square and we toured the cathedral and did the bull fighting museum. The kids LOVED Pamplona and want to go back.
Thank you so much for all the great tips!! We were either going to go Pamplona to Longrono but the kids prefer mountains to the flats! You've given us food for thought for the following year to also do Primitivo instead of CF the whole way. Thanks for the advice re laundry. Our kids don't each much either, but they do love chocolate though....so as long as that's easy to find we should be happy. You've made me excited!!
 
A guide to speaking Spanish on the Camino - enrich your pilgrim experience.
If anyone with kids is reading this and the thought of paying for laundry and eating out makes them nervous, because they need to save every cent, then my family's experience might be encouraging. My kids did their own washing every afternoon (from the six year old up) and even taught some twenty-something pilgrims how to twist their clothes around a chair leg to really squeeze all the water out! They also did most of our cooking - over numerous caminos we have eaten out only a handful of times. We would buy breakfast supplies the evening before from a supermercado. We also used albergues almost exclusively and loved it.
It's great that there as many ways to do a camino as there are people who do it.
 
I spent a year reading this forum and getting information and it really helped make the trip smooth for us in terms of equipment, packing, reservations, everything really!

We did it, we hiked the Camino for 30 days with a family of 4. Kids aged 9 and 16. Left June 10. We flew Boston - Iceland- Paris CDG, then cab to Orley, then fly to Biarritz, then Express Bourricut to SJPDP. It went off with no issues and we checked one bag! Phew!

We began in SJPDP and walked to Logrono, then rented a car for a day and drove to Oviedo and hiked the entire Primitivo from Oviedo to SDC. We took 30 days and had rest days in Pamplona, Oviedo (driving day) and Lugo, and of course an extra day in Santiago.

Starting in SJPDP was so worth it. The kids loved the horses, cows, sheep in the Pyrenees, the communal dinner at Orrison set the tone, it was magical. We also bought the best cheese I have ever had in my life in SJPDP and enjoyed eating it with the horses. Splitting the first leg into 2 after a 25 hour travel day was totally necessary! I am so glad we did it that way.

It was no where near as crowded as I was led to believe by the internet. Our first night at Orrison had 7 extra beds and Roncesvalles had 100+, the rest of the trip was like that also, plenty of places to stay and many days we saw very few people.

Primitivo - this was a great route for our family, we live in the mountains, the kids love going up and down, seeing the wild horses in the fog and rain and wind was pure magic. There were fewer towns and places to get bread/ food than on the Frances, so we really had to plan ahead. Every single grocery store in Lugo was closed on Sunday and the next 2 days had no real grocery, two mornings in a row we had to walk 6km and 8km for breakfast, but each place sold use stuff for lunch and the hostel sold us some bread and cheese. The kids were amazing!

Rooms - Even with plenty of rooms for an idividual, family rooms were harder to get and I was very glad I booked in advance as we had a private bunk space often with our own bathroom or a guesthouse/ hotel room to ourselves and that helped a lot! I used Booking for 90% of it and then contacted some places through whats app, I found most places either on Booking, Gronze, Wise Pilgrim guide book. We always stayed right on the camino in town, that was key with kids.

A 16 year old is almost like hiking with an adult, but they need more food more frequently, can hike further, faster and do not get sore, and can get impatient waiting for adults to catch up! They get hangry and need to be fed often. The camino deepened our relationship!

A 9 year old has a lot of energy out of gate, recovers quickly for the next day, but wanes fast and has a hard 20km stop. They need a lot of chocolate to survive. We met another family who suggested baguette with a chocolate bar between the layers, and it was amazing! 9 year olds can really only do 20K. She got bruised heals when did any more, even after a visit to a shoe store to get new padded insoles (gel proved impossible to find in that small a size). Any day over 20K, she and I got a cab for the last 4/6/8km and that really helped her morale. You could often find her skipping around town in the evenings after a few hours of reading and eating. Her highlight was the Irache wine fountain, she could not get over how cool it was, as well as the blacksmith right next to it, we bought some amazing pieces from him.

Luggage Transport -I used Correos and it was perfect, no issues at all. We sent one duffle bag ahead every day, it had our toiletries, sleeping bag liners, rain gear(on days we did not need it) and spare outfit. My 9 year old only weights 45lbs, so she could carry her water, kindle e-reader (this saved the trip) bird book, water proof notebook, fleece, spare socks, rain coat some days and tiny stuffed octopus.

The camino is pretty social in the afternoons/ evenings and the kids just needed to zone out and ignore the world around them, the kindle e-readers let them have unlimited books from the library. We had a deck of cards and played a lot of games.

Phones- I ended up just paying AT&T for the international plan so we could FaceTime my parents (actually my dad who shares a plan with us paid as a present, bc he wanted to talk to the kids!). My husbands phone was not unlocked so he just used wifi, we got my daughter an orange sim card in Pamplona ($20 for 40 days). When she and my husband separated from us, then they could text us and let us know their ETA (some days the little one and I had to take a cab the last bit, and 2 days her heals really hurt and she and I just took a bus to the next town and it was great!). My oldest also wanted her phone working so she could post her walks each day on Strava.

Food - we are a vegetarian family and had zero issues at all. We even managed to eat before 7pm and get everyone into bed by 9 all but about 10 nights. We were and up and out early kind of group. A few times we just got hummus and carrots and fruit and cheese and wine and bread and had picnics and the hostel, but most places we found delicious, nutritious food for vegetarians. In Vilar de cars, and Berecuda, we had 2 of the best soups of our lives!!!!! The wine was fantastic and the kids fell in love with the Cola Cao in the morning, the little one even learned how to order in Spanish sin leche, con caliente agua. They also loved the Kaz lemon and orange soda for mid day breaks!

Expenses- we spent $2700 on places to stay and about 4k on food, which is about $34 a person per day (that number also includes keepsakes, a few cab rides, bus tickets, museum tickets and a new pair of Tevas for me :). We you factor in 4 people, cabs, private rooms, often come to similar per person prices and a bed in a bigger room at the private Albergue.

Fun things- We climbed the Gothic Tower at the Church in Oviedo, and did the roof our in Santiago. We did a few fun things in Pamplona and rented a car to drive from Logrono to Oviedo.

We are planning our next camino, the whole family is in, it was amazing and I can’t wait to do it again.

Observations overall - I had heard the Camino gives you what you need, and for our family, it totally did. As a college professor, I have noticed over the last few years a decline in the ability to easily start small talk and chit chat amount the 20/30 somethings. Watching this age group on the Camino left me full of hope, the Camino gave them back personal one:eek:ne relationships. It was fun to watch the awkwardness at first and then the ease of development as they days went by. I loved seeing that age group without phones and chatting it up with strangers, it made my heart happy. That is what the Camino is giving right now, and I am grateful.
 
Congratulations! My family and I did 3 caminos in 2015, 2017 and 2019, including the Camino Portuguese. It was affordable at the time and a wonderful experience which helped to bind us together. We were often lucky enough to be offered a room for 4 in an abergue. Each one walked at his own pace and we would meet at the next coffee shop or village. I hope you as a family will be able to do this again! Kind regards
 
St James' Way - Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading to Southampton, 110 kms
I spent a year reading this forum and getting information and it really helped make the trip smooth for us in terms of equipment, packing, reservations, everything really!

We did it, we hiked the Camino for 30 days with a family of 4. Kids aged 9 and 16. Left June 10. We flew Boston - Iceland- Paris CDG, then cab to Orley, then fly to Biarritz, then Express Bourricut to SJPDP. It went off with no issues and we checked one bag! Phew!

We began in SJPDP and walked to Logrono, then rented a car for a day and drove to Oviedo and hiked the entire Primitivo from Oviedo to SDC. We took 30 days and had rest days in Pamplona, Oviedo (driving day) and Lugo, and of course an extra day in Santiago.

Starting in SJPDP was so worth it. The kids loved the horses, cows, sheep in the Pyrenees, the communal dinner at Orrison set the tone, it was magical. We also bought the best cheese I have ever had in my life in SJPDP and enjoyed eating it with the horses. Splitting the first leg into 2 after a 25 hour travel day was totally necessary! I am so glad we did it that way.

It was no where near as crowded as I was led to believe by the internet. Our first night at Orrison had 7 extra beds and Roncesvalles had 100+, the rest of the trip was like that also, plenty of places to stay and many days we saw very few people.

Primitivo - this was a great route for our family, we live in the mountains, the kids love going up and down, seeing the wild horses in the fog and rain and wind was pure magic. There were fewer towns and places to get bread/ food than on the Frances, so we really had to plan ahead. Every single grocery store in Lugo was closed on Sunday and the next 2 days had no real grocery, two mornings in a row we had to walk 6km and 8km for breakfast, but each place sold use stuff for lunch and the hostel sold us some bread and cheese. The kids were amazing!

Rooms - Even with plenty of rooms for an idividual, family rooms were harder to get and I was very glad I booked in advance as we had a private bunk space often with our own bathroom or a guesthouse/ hotel room to ourselves and that helped a lot! I used Booking for 90% of it and then contacted some places through whats app, I found most places either on Booking, Gronze, Wise Pilgrim guide book. We always stayed right on the camino in town, that was key with kids.

A 16 year old is almost like hiking with an adult, but they need more food more frequently, can hike further, faster and do not get sore, and can get impatient waiting for adults to catch up! They get hangry and need to be fed often. The camino deepened our relationship!

A 9 year old has a lot of energy out of gate, recovers quickly for the next day, but wanes fast and has a hard 20km stop. They need a lot of chocolate to survive. We met another family who suggested baguette with a chocolate bar between the layers, and it was amazing! 9 year olds can really only do 20K. She got bruised heals when did any more, even after a visit to a shoe store to get new padded insoles (gel proved impossible to find in that small a size). Any day over 20K, she and I got a cab for the last 4/6/8km and that really helped her morale. You could often find her skipping around town in the evenings after a few hours of reading and eating. Her highlight was the Irache wine fountain, she could not get over how cool it was, as well as the blacksmith right next to it, we bought some amazing pieces from him.

Luggage Transport -I used Correos and it was perfect, no issues at all. We sent one duffle bag ahead every day, it had our toiletries, sleeping bag liners, rain gear(on days we did not need it) and spare outfit. My 9 year old only weights 45lbs, so she could carry her water, kindle e-reader (this saved the trip) bird book, water proof notebook, fleece, spare socks, rain coat some days and tiny stuffed octopus.

The camino is pretty social in the afternoons/ evenings and the kids just needed to zone out and ignore the world around them, the kindle e-readers let them have unlimited books from the library. We had a deck of cards and played a lot of games.

Phones- I ended up just paying AT&T for the international plan so we could FaceTime my parents (actually my dad who shares a plan with us paid as a present, bc he wanted to talk to the kids!). My husbands phone was not unlocked so he just used wifi, we got my daughter an orange sim card in Pamplona ($20 for 40 days). When she and my husband separated from us, then they could text us and let us know their ETA (some days the little one and I had to take a cab the last bit, and 2 days her heals really hurt and she and I just took a bus to the next town and it was great!). My oldest also wanted her phone working so she could post her walks each day on Strava.

Food - we are a vegetarian family and had zero issues at all. We even managed to eat before 7pm and get everyone into bed by 9 all but about 10 nights. We were and up and out early kind of group. A few times we just got hummus and carrots and fruit and cheese and wine and bread and had picnics and the hostel, but most places we found delicious, nutritious food for vegetarians. In Vilar de cars, and Berecuda, we had 2 of the best soups of our lives!!!!! The wine was fantastic and the kids fell in love with the Cola Cao in the morning, the little one even learned how to order in Spanish sin leche, con caliente agua. They also loved the Kaz lemon and orange soda for mid day breaks!

Expenses- we spent $2700 on places to stay and about 4k on food, which is about $34 a person per day (that number also includes keepsakes, a few cab rides, bus tickets, museum tickets and a new pair of Tevas for me :). We you factor in 4 people, cabs, private rooms, often come to similar per person prices and a bed in a bigger room at the private Albergue.

Fun things- We climbed the Gothic Tower at the Church in Oviedo, and did the roof our in Santiago. We did a few fun things in Pamplona and rented a car to drive from Logrono to Oviedo.

We are planning our next camino, the whole family is in, it was amazing and I can’t wait to do it again.

Observations overall - I had heard the Camino gives you what you need, and for our family, it totally did. As a college professor, I have noticed over the last few years a decline in the ability to easily start small talk and chit chat amount the 20/30 somethings. Watching this age group on the Camino left me full of hope, the Camino gave them back personal one:eek:ne relationships. It was fun to watch the awkwardness at first and then the ease of development as they days went by. I loved seeing that age group without phones and chatting it up with strangers, it made my heart happy. That is what the Camino is giving right now, and I am grateful.
What a great post. Sounds like a terrific experience and you are creating mem for you children that will last a lifetime.
 
Very glad that you posted -- I look forward to the day when my grandchildren, now ages 9 and 11, can join me on the Camino. I so enjoyed reading your story!
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I spent a year reading this forum and getting information and it really helped make the trip smooth for us in terms of equipment, packing, reservations, everything really!

We did it, we hiked the Camino for 30 days with a family of 4. Kids aged 9 and 16. Left June 10. We flew Boston - Iceland- Paris CDG, then cab to Orley, then fly to Biarritz, then Express Bourricut to SJPDP. It went off with no issues and we checked one bag! Phew!

We began in SJPDP and walked to Logrono, then rented a car for a day and drove to Oviedo and hiked the entire Primitivo from Oviedo to SDC. We took 30 days and had rest days in Pamplona, Oviedo (driving day) and Lugo, and of course an extra day in Santiago.

Starting in SJPDP was so worth it. The kids loved the horses, cows, sheep in the Pyrenees, the communal dinner at Orrison set the tone, it was magical. We also bought the best cheese I have ever had in my life in SJPDP and enjoyed eating it with the horses. Splitting the first leg into 2 after a 25 hour travel day was totally necessary! I am so glad we did it that way.

It was no where near as crowded as I was led to believe by the internet. Our first night at Orrison had 7 extra beds and Roncesvalles had 100+, the rest of the trip was like that also, plenty of places to stay and many days we saw very few people.

Primitivo - this was a great route for our family, we live in the mountains, the kids love going up and down, seeing the wild horses in the fog and rain and wind was pure magic. There were fewer towns and places to get bread/ food than on the Frances, so we really had to plan ahead. Every single grocery store in Lugo was closed on Sunday and the next 2 days had no real grocery, two mornings in a row we had to walk 6km and 8km for breakfast, but each place sold use stuff for lunch and the hostel sold us some bread and cheese. The kids were amazing!

Rooms - Even with plenty of rooms for an idividual, family rooms were harder to get and I was very glad I booked in advance as we had a private bunk space often with our own bathroom or a guesthouse/ hotel room to ourselves and that helped a lot! I used Booking for 90% of it and then contacted some places through whats app, I found most places either on Booking, Gronze, Wise Pilgrim guide book. We always stayed right on the camino in town, that was key with kids.

A 16 year old is almost like hiking with an adult, but they need more food more frequently, can hike further, faster and do not get sore, and can get impatient waiting for adults to catch up! They get hangry and need to be fed often. The camino deepened our relationship!

A 9 year old has a lot of energy out of gate, recovers quickly for the next day, but wanes fast and has a hard 20km stop. They need a lot of chocolate to survive. We met another family who suggested baguette with a chocolate bar between the layers, and it was amazing! 9 year olds can really only do 20K. She got bruised heals when did any more, even after a visit to a shoe store to get new padded insoles (gel proved impossible to find in that small a size). Any day over 20K, she and I got a cab for the last 4/6/8km and that really helped her morale. You could often find her skipping around town in the evenings after a few hours of reading and eating. Her highlight was the Irache wine fountain, she could not get over how cool it was, as well as the blacksmith right next to it, we bought some amazing pieces from him.

Luggage Transport -I used Correos and it was perfect, no issues at all. We sent one duffle bag ahead every day, it had our toiletries, sleeping bag liners, rain gear(on days we did not need it) and spare outfit. My 9 year old only weights 45lbs, so she could carry her water, kindle e-reader (this saved the trip) bird book, water proof notebook, fleece, spare socks, rain coat some days and tiny stuffed octopus.

The camino is pretty social in the afternoons/ evenings and the kids just needed to zone out and ignore the world around them, the kindle e-readers let them have unlimited books from the library. We had a deck of cards and played a lot of games.

Phones- I ended up just paying AT&T for the international plan so we could FaceTime my parents (actually my dad who shares a plan with us paid as a present, bc he wanted to talk to the kids!). My husbands phone was not unlocked so he just used wifi, we got my daughter an orange sim card in Pamplona ($20 for 40 days). When she and my husband separated from us, then they could text us and let us know their ETA (some days the little one and I had to take a cab the last bit, and 2 days her heals really hurt and she and I just took a bus to the next town and it was great!). My oldest also wanted her phone working so she could post her walks each day on Strava.

Food - we are a vegetarian family and had zero issues at all. We even managed to eat before 7pm and get everyone into bed by 9 all but about 10 nights. We were and up and out early kind of group. A few times we just got hummus and carrots and fruit and cheese and wine and bread and had picnics and the hostel, but most places we found delicious, nutritious food for vegetarians. In Vilar de cars, and Berecuda, we had 2 of the best soups of our lives!!!!! The wine was fantastic and the kids fell in love with the Cola Cao in the morning, the little one even learned how to order in Spanish sin leche, con caliente agua. They also loved the Kaz lemon and orange soda for mid day breaks!

Expenses- we spent $2700 on places to stay and about 4k on food, which is about $34 a person per day (that number also includes keepsakes, a few cab rides, bus tickets, museum tickets and a new pair of Tevas for me :). We you factor in 4 people, cabs, private rooms, often come to similar per person prices and a bed in a bigger room at the private Albergue.

Fun things- We climbed the Gothic Tower at the Church in Oviedo, and did the roof our in Santiago. We did a few fun things in Pamplona and rented a car to drive from Logrono to Oviedo.

We are planning our next camino, the whole family is in, it was amazing and I can’t wait to do it again.

Observations overall - I had heard the Camino gives you what you need, and for our family, it totally did. As a college professor, I have noticed over the last few years a decline in the ability to easily start small talk and chit chat amount the 20/30 somethings. Watching this age group on the Camino left me full of hope, the Camino gave them back personal one:eek:ne relationships. It was fun to watch the awkwardness at first and then the ease of development as they days went by. I loved seeing that age group without phones and chatting it up with strangers, it made my heart happy. That is what the Camino is giving right now, and I am grateful.
Such an uplifting Camino Way! Thank you for sharing it! Congratulations!
 
I'm always looking for ways to squeeze more water out if my hand washed clothing - how exactly do you do this?
First of all you need someone to sit on the chair;-)
Then....if it's long pants, fold them in half lengthwise with the fold around the chair leg and start twisting. Also works for long sleeved shirts. If you want to do smaller items like this you can lay them out on your travel towel, fold it over to contain the pieces and then continue as above.
I think it's easier because you can use both hands to twist one way - whether it is MORE effective, I cannot say.
 
I spent a year reading this forum and getting information and it really helped make the trip smooth for us in terms of equipment, packing, reservations, everything really!

We did it, we hiked the Camino for 30 days with a family of 4. Kids aged 9 and 16. Left June 10. We flew Boston - Iceland- Paris CDG, then cab to Orley, then fly to Biarritz, then Express Bourricut to SJPDP. It went off with no issues and we checked one bag! Phew!

We began in SJPDP and walked to Logrono, then rented a car for a day and drove to Oviedo and hiked the entire Primitivo from Oviedo to SDC. We took 30 days and had rest days in Pamplona, Oviedo (driving day) and Lugo, and of course an extra day in Santiago.

Starting in SJPDP was so worth it. The kids loved the horses, cows, sheep in the Pyrenees, the communal dinner at Orrison set the tone, it was magical. We also bought the best cheese I have ever had in my life in SJPDP and enjoyed eating it with the horses. Splitting the first leg into 2 after a 25 hour travel day was totally necessary! I am so glad we did it that way.

It was no where near as crowded as I was led to believe by the internet. Our first night at Orrison had 7 extra beds and Roncesvalles had 100+, the rest of the trip was like that also, plenty of places to stay and many days we saw very few people.

Primitivo - this was a great route for our family, we live in the mountains, the kids love going up and down, seeing the wild horses in the fog and rain and wind was pure magic. There were fewer towns and places to get bread/ food than on the Frances, so we really had to plan ahead. Every single grocery store in Lugo was closed on Sunday and the next 2 days had no real grocery, two mornings in a row we had to walk 6km and 8km for breakfast, but each place sold use stuff for lunch and the hostel sold us some bread and cheese. The kids were amazing!

Rooms - Even with plenty of rooms for an idividual, family rooms were harder to get and I was very glad I booked in advance as we had a private bunk space often with our own bathroom or a guesthouse/ hotel room to ourselves and that helped a lot! I used Booking for 90% of it and then contacted some places through whats app, I found most places either on Booking, Gronze, Wise Pilgrim guide book. We always stayed right on the camino in town, that was key with kids.

A 16 year old is almost like hiking with an adult, but they need more food more frequently, can hike further, faster and do not get sore, and can get impatient waiting for adults to catch up! They get hangry and need to be fed often. The camino deepened our relationship!

A 9 year old has a lot of energy out of gate, recovers quickly for the next day, but wanes fast and has a hard 20km stop. They need a lot of chocolate to survive. We met another family who suggested baguette with a chocolate bar between the layers, and it was amazing! 9 year olds can really only do 20K. She got bruised heals when did any more, even after a visit to a shoe store to get new padded insoles (gel proved impossible to find in that small a size). Any day over 20K, she and I got a cab for the last 4/6/8km and that really helped her morale. You could often find her skipping around town in the evenings after a few hours of reading and eating. Her highlight was the Irache wine fountain, she could not get over how cool it was, as well as the blacksmith right next to it, we bought some amazing pieces from him.

Luggage Transport -I used Correos and it was perfect, no issues at all. We sent one duffle bag ahead every day, it had our toiletries, sleeping bag liners, rain gear(on days we did not need it) and spare outfit. My 9 year old only weights 45lbs, so she could carry her water, kindle e-reader (this saved the trip) bird book, water proof notebook, fleece, spare socks, rain coat some days and tiny stuffed octopus.

The camino is pretty social in the afternoons/ evenings and the kids just needed to zone out and ignore the world around them, the kindle e-readers let them have unlimited books from the library. We had a deck of cards and played a lot of games.

Phones- I ended up just paying AT&T for the international plan so we could FaceTime my parents (actually my dad who shares a plan with us paid as a present, bc he wanted to talk to the kids!). My husbands phone was not unlocked so he just used wifi, we got my daughter an orange sim card in Pamplona ($20 for 40 days). When she and my husband separated from us, then they could text us and let us know their ETA (some days the little one and I had to take a cab the last bit, and 2 days her heals really hurt and she and I just took a bus to the next town and it was great!). My oldest also wanted her phone working so she could post her walks each day on Strava.

Food - we are a vegetarian family and had zero issues at all. We even managed to eat before 7pm and get everyone into bed by 9 all but about 10 nights. We were and up and out early kind of group. A few times we just got hummus and carrots and fruit and cheese and wine and bread and had picnics and the hostel, but most places we found delicious, nutritious food for vegetarians. In Vilar de cars, and Berecuda, we had 2 of the best soups of our lives!!!!! The wine was fantastic and the kids fell in love with the Cola Cao in the morning, the little one even learned how to order in Spanish sin leche, con caliente agua. They also loved the Kaz lemon and orange soda for mid day breaks!

Expenses- we spent $2700 on places to stay and about 4k on food, which is about $34 a person per day (that number also includes keepsakes, a few cab rides, bus tickets, museum tickets and a new pair of Tevas for me :). We you factor in 4 people, cabs, private rooms, often come to similar per person prices and a bed in a bigger room at the private Albergue.

Fun things- We climbed the Gothic Tower at the Church in Oviedo, and did the roof our in Santiago. We did a few fun things in Pamplona and rented a car to drive from Logrono to Oviedo.

We are planning our next camino, the whole family is in, it was amazing and I can’t wait to do it again.

Observations overall - I had heard the Camino gives you what you need, and for our family, it totally did. As a college professor, I have noticed over the last few years a decline in the ability to easily start small talk and chit chat amount the 20/30 somethings. Watching this age group on the Camino left me full of hope, the Camino gave them back personal one:eek:ne relationships. It was fun to watch the awkwardness at first and then the ease of development as they days went by. I loved seeing that age group without phones and chatting it up with strangers, it made my heart happy. That is what the Camino is giving right now, and I am grateful.
Loved reading your experience. So happy that you all enjoyed it and are planning your next route. I think it builds such character and teaches your young children so many life lessons along the way. Kudos to you for organizing it so well and listening to everyone’s needs along the way. Thank you for sharing.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I spent a year reading this forum and getting information and it really helped make the trip smooth for us in terms of equipment, packing, reservations, everything really!

We did it, we hiked the Camino for 30 days with a family of 4. Kids aged 9 and 16. Left June 10. We flew Boston - Iceland- Paris CDG, then cab to Orley, then fly to Biarritz, then Express Bourricut to SJPDP. It went off with no issues and we checked one bag! Phew!

We began in SJPDP and walked to Logrono, then rented a car for a day and drove to Oviedo and hiked the entire Primitivo from Oviedo to SDC. We took 30 days and had rest days in Pamplona, Oviedo (driving day) and Lugo, and of course an extra day in Santiago.

Starting in SJPDP was so worth it. The kids loved the horses, cows, sheep in the Pyrenees, the communal dinner at Orrison set the tone, it was magical. We also bought the best cheese I have ever had in my life in SJPDP and enjoyed eating it with the horses. Splitting the first leg into 2 after a 25 hour travel day was totally necessary! I am so glad we did it that way.

It was no where near as crowded as I was led to believe by the internet. Our first night at Orrison had 7 extra beds and Roncesvalles had 100+, the rest of the trip was like that also, plenty of places to stay and many days we saw very few people.

Primitivo - this was a great route for our family, we live in the mountains, the kids love going up and down, seeing the wild horses in the fog and rain and wind was pure magic. There were fewer towns and places to get bread/ food than on the Frances, so we really had to plan ahead. Every single grocery store in Lugo was closed on Sunday and the next 2 days had no real grocery, two mornings in a row we had to walk 6km and 8km for breakfast, but each place sold use stuff for lunch and the hostel sold us some bread and cheese. The kids were amazing!

Rooms - Even with plenty of rooms for an idividual, family rooms were harder to get and I was very glad I booked in advance as we had a private bunk space often with our own bathroom or a guesthouse/ hotel room to ourselves and that helped a lot! I used Booking for 90% of it and then contacted some places through whats app, I found most places either on Booking, Gronze, Wise Pilgrim guide book. We always stayed right on the camino in town, that was key with kids.

A 16 year old is almost like hiking with an adult, but they need more food more frequently, can hike further, faster and do not get sore, and can get impatient waiting for adults to catch up! They get hangry and need to be fed often. The camino deepened our relationship!

A 9 year old has a lot of energy out of gate, recovers quickly for the next day, but wanes fast and has a hard 20km stop. They need a lot of chocolate to survive. We met another family who suggested baguette with a chocolate bar between the layers, and it was amazing! 9 year olds can really only do 20K. She got bruised heals when did any more, even after a visit to a shoe store to get new padded insoles (gel proved impossible to find in that small a size). Any day over 20K, she and I got a cab for the last 4/6/8km and that really helped her morale. You could often find her skipping around town in the evenings after a few hours of reading and eating. Her highlight was the Irache wine fountain, she could not get over how cool it was, as well as the blacksmith right next to it, we bought some amazing pieces from him.

Luggage Transport -I used Correos and it was perfect, no issues at all. We sent one duffle bag ahead every day, it had our toiletries, sleeping bag liners, rain gear(on days we did not need it) and spare outfit. My 9 year old only weights 45lbs, so she could carry her water, kindle e-reader (this saved the trip) bird book, water proof notebook, fleece, spare socks, rain coat some days and tiny stuffed octopus.

The camino is pretty social in the afternoons/ evenings and the kids just needed to zone out and ignore the world around them, the kindle e-readers let them have unlimited books from the library. We had a deck of cards and played a lot of games.

Phones- I ended up just paying AT&T for the international plan so we could FaceTime my parents (actually my dad who shares a plan with us paid as a present, bc he wanted to talk to the kids!). My husbands phone was not unlocked so he just used wifi, we got my daughter an orange sim card in Pamplona ($20 for 40 days). When she and my husband separated from us, then they could text us and let us know their ETA (some days the little one and I had to take a cab the last bit, and 2 days her heals really hurt and she and I just took a bus to the next town and it was great!). My oldest also wanted her phone working so she could post her walks each day on Strava.

Food - we are a vegetarian family and had zero issues at all. We even managed to eat before 7pm and get everyone into bed by 9 all but about 10 nights. We were and up and out early kind of group. A few times we just got hummus and carrots and fruit and cheese and wine and bread and had picnics and the hostel, but most places we found delicious, nutritious food for vegetarians. In Vilar de cars, and Berecuda, we had 2 of the best soups of our lives!!!!! The wine was fantastic and the kids fell in love with the Cola Cao in the morning, the little one even learned how to order in Spanish sin leche, con caliente agua. They also loved the Kaz lemon and orange soda for mid day breaks!

Expenses- we spent $2700 on places to stay and about 4k on food, which is about $34 a person per day (that number also includes keepsakes, a few cab rides, bus tickets, museum tickets and a new pair of Tevas for me :). We you factor in 4 people, cabs, private rooms, often come to similar per person prices and a bed in a bigger room at the private Albergue.

Fun things- We climbed the Gothic Tower at the Church in Oviedo, and did the roof our in Santiago. We did a few fun things in Pamplona and rented a car to drive from Logrono to Oviedo.

We are planning our next camino, the whole family is in, it was amazing and I can’t wait to do it again.

Observations overall - I had heard the Camino gives you what you need, and for our family, it totally did. As a college professor, I have noticed over the last few years a decline in the ability to easily start small talk and chit chat amount the 20/30 somethings. Watching this age group on the Camino left me full of hope, the Camino gave them back personal one:eek:ne relationships. It was fun to watch the awkwardness at first and then the ease of development as they days went by. I loved seeing that age group without phones and chatting it up with strangers, it made my heart happy. That is what the Camino is giving right now, and I am grateful.
That is soooo awesome!! I am so happy for your family & to plan another Camino! That is great! We also are also a family of 4. Our two boys were older, 16 & just turned 18, so they were always way ahead of Mom & Dad & would find a bench to wait on until we caught up. They made so many friends of varying ages so they had people to walk with. They acquired the name The Fellowship; from USA, Mexico, Canada, England, Germany, S. Korea & Israel. We journeyed end of April to end of May 2014 the common Frances from SJPDP. The same months in 2017, my older son & Mom started in Lisbon & found we should have started in Porto. Too many close calls walking on busy roadways & way too much car exhaust that we quit in Porto & took train to Leon & finished the Camino from there. In 2020, my younger son & I were geared up to do the Camino the same months, then Feb. everything shut down. Hope to replan in future. I appreciate your news as to beds available & I hadn’t heard how doing Primitivo was like until your stating it, so that will be a possibility for us. We heard about the fire this year closing part of it. Am wondering how much was devastated & if the majority of the trail is still natural looking.
 
That is soooo awesome!! I am so happy for your family & to plan another Camino! That is great! We also are also a family of 4. Our two boys were older, 16 & just turned 18, so they were always way ahead of Mom & Dad & would find a bench to wait on until we caught up. They made so many friends of varying ages so they had people to walk with. They acquired the name The Fellowship; from USA, Mexico, Canada, England, Germany, S. Korea & Israel. We journeyed end of April to end of May 2014 the common Frances from SJPDP. The same months in 2017, my older son & Mom started in Lisbon & found we should have started in Porto. Too many close calls walking on busy roadways & way too much car exhaust that we quit in Porto & took train to Leon & finished the Camino from there. In 2020, my younger son & I were geared up to do the Camino the same months, then Feb. everything shut down. Hope to replan in future. I appreciate your news as to beds available & I hadn’t heard how doing Primitivo was like until your stating it, so that will be a possibility for us. We heard about the fire this year closing part of it. Am wondering how much was devastated & if the majority of the trail is still natural looking.
The fire was evident, the trees in large swaths were charred but still standing with cows and bells grazing under them and abundant wildflowers growing up. Nature was reclaiming the hillside, it was eerie and beautiful.

Overall the raw beauty of the Primitivo was intense. As we crossed the Hospitales route, it was 50F, foggy and super windy with mist and rain. Just as the little one was getting cold and complaining, a pack of wild horses came out of the fog, she started laughing, we tossed a down jacket under her raincoat, ate some chocolate and stared in awe at what we were witnessing, the horses just stood around us, it was incredible. The little villages were wonderful, the accommodations perfect! The ups and downs are certainly hard, it is not an easy route by any means, but it is not technically challenging (lost ledges, ladders, wires), it is a lot of steep up and steep down, but the vistas and beauty and wild/farm life are worth the sore legs and toes.

The churches and statues on the Primitivo were also incredible. We finished with a huge sense of accomplishment.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
Can you expand a little on your decision to move from the Frances to the Primitivo? Do you have a public video, pictures, or blog about your camino?
 
I spent a year reading this forum and getting information and it really helped make the trip smooth for us in terms of equipment, packing, reservations, everything really!

We did it, we hiked the Camino for 30 days with a family of 4. Kids aged 9 and 16. Left June 10. We flew Boston - Iceland- Paris CDG, then cab to Orley, then fly to Biarritz, then Express Bourricut to SJPDP. It went off with no issues and we checked one bag! Phew!

We began in SJPDP and walked to Logrono, then rented a car for a day and drove to Oviedo and hiked the entire Primitivo from Oviedo to SDC. We took 30 days and had rest days in Pamplona, Oviedo (driving day) and Lugo, and of course an extra day in Santiago.

Starting in SJPDP was so worth it. The kids loved the horses, cows, sheep in the Pyrenees, the communal dinner at Orrison set the tone, it was magical. We also bought the best cheese I have ever had in my life in SJPDP and enjoyed eating it with the horses. Splitting the first leg into 2 after a 25 hour travel day was totally necessary! I am so glad we did it that way.

It was no where near as crowded as I was led to believe by the internet. Our first night at Orrison had 7 extra beds and Roncesvalles had 100+, the rest of the trip was like that also, plenty of places to stay and many days we saw very few people.

Primitivo - this was a great route for our family, we live in the mountains, the kids love going up and down, seeing the wild horses in the fog and rain and wind was pure magic. There were fewer towns and places to get bread/ food than on the Frances, so we really had to plan ahead. Every single grocery store in Lugo was closed on Sunday and the next 2 days had no real grocery, two mornings in a row we had to walk 6km and 8km for breakfast, but each place sold use stuff for lunch and the hostel sold us some bread and cheese. The kids were amazing!

Rooms - Even with plenty of rooms for an idividual, family rooms were harder to get and I was very glad I booked in advance as we had a private bunk space often with our own bathroom or a guesthouse/ hotel room to ourselves and that helped a lot! I used Booking for 90% of it and then contacted some places through whats app, I found most places either on Booking, Gronze, Wise Pilgrim guide book. We always stayed right on the camino in town, that was key with kids.

A 16 year old is almost like hiking with an adult, but they need more food more frequently, can hike further, faster and do not get sore, and can get impatient waiting for adults to catch up! They get hangry and need to be fed often. The camino deepened our relationship!

A 9 year old has a lot of energy out of gate, recovers quickly for the next day, but wanes fast and has a hard 20km stop. They need a lot of chocolate to survive. We met another family who suggested baguette with a chocolate bar between the layers, and it was amazing! 9 year olds can really only do 20K. She got bruised heals when did any more, even after a visit to a shoe store to get new padded insoles (gel proved impossible to find in that small a size). Any day over 20K, she and I got a cab for the last 4/6/8km and that really helped her morale. You could often find her skipping around town in the evenings after a few hours of reading and eating. Her highlight was the Irache wine fountain, she could not get over how cool it was, as well as the blacksmith right next to it, we bought some amazing pieces from him.

Luggage Transport -I used Correos and it was perfect, no issues at all. We sent one duffle bag ahead every day, it had our toiletries, sleeping bag liners, rain gear(on days we did not need it) and spare outfit. My 9 year old only weights 45lbs, so she could carry her water, kindle e-reader (this saved the trip) bird book, water proof notebook, fleece, spare socks, rain coat some days and tiny stuffed octopus.

The camino is pretty social in the afternoons/ evenings and the kids just needed to zone out and ignore the world around them, the kindle e-readers let them have unlimited books from the library. We had a deck of cards and played a lot of games.

Phones- I ended up just paying AT&T for the international plan so we could FaceTime my parents (actually my dad who shares a plan with us paid as a present, bc he wanted to talk to the kids!). My husbands phone was not unlocked so he just used wifi, we got my daughter an orange sim card in Pamplona ($20 for 40 days). When she and my husband separated from us, then they could text us and let us know their ETA (some days the little one and I had to take a cab the last bit, and 2 days her heals really hurt and she and I just took a bus to the next town and it was great!). My oldest also wanted her phone working so she could post her walks each day on Strava.

Food - we are a vegetarian family and had zero issues at all. We even managed to eat before 7pm and get everyone into bed by 9 all but about 10 nights. We were and up and out early kind of group. A few times we just got hummus and carrots and fruit and cheese and wine and bread and had picnics and the hostel, but most places we found delicious, nutritious food for vegetarians. In Vilar de cars, and Berecuda, we had 2 of the best soups of our lives!!!!! The wine was fantastic and the kids fell in love with the Cola Cao in the morning, the little one even learned how to order in Spanish sin leche, con caliente agua. They also loved the Kaz lemon and orange soda for mid day breaks!

Expenses- we spent $2700 on places to stay and about 4k on food, which is about $34 a person per day (that number also includes keepsakes, a few cab rides, bus tickets, museum tickets and a new pair of Tevas for me :). We you factor in 4 people, cabs, private rooms, often come to similar per person prices and a bed in a bigger room at the private Albergue.

Fun things- We climbed the Gothic Tower at the Church in Oviedo, and did the roof our in Santiago. We did a few fun things in Pamplona and rented a car to drive from Logrono to Oviedo.

We are planning our next camino, the whole family is in, it was amazing and I can’t wait to do it again.

Observations overall - I had heard the Camino gives you what you need, and for our family, it totally did. As a college professor, I have noticed over the last few years a decline in the ability to easily start small talk and chit chat amount the 20/30 somethings. Watching this age group on the Camino left me full of hope, the Camino gave them back personal one:eek:ne relationships. It was fun to watch the awkwardness at first and then the ease of development as they days went by. I loved seeing that age group without phones and chatting it up with strangers, it made my heart happy. That is what the Camino is giving right now, and I am grateful.
Wow… you have given your kids/ family a wonderful gift! On the Primitivo now. Started in Irun ( del norte)… my 5 th Camino… AZ Jane
 
Can you expand a little on your decision to move from the Frances to the Primitivo? Do you have a public video, pictures, or blog about your camino?
We don't have any public anything. I am still sorting through pictures.

As we began to plan as a family, and were reading everything we could about each route, my 16 year old got hooked on the Hospitales and really wanted to do the Primitivo. So we started looking into it. Then she kept going back and forth about wanting to start in SJPDP and do part of the Frances as did I. When we realized we only had 30 days and that was took long for the Primitivo but too short for the Frances, especially if we wanted some rest days, we decided to do both. So, we started back from the day we needed to leave to head back to the states and planned out the Primitivo. Then we started on the day we could land in France and planned the Frances as far as we could go. It really worked out well.

Now we want to come back and do the entire Frances and the Portuguese way and the Norte . . . . . It is a lovely way to be.

While not a traditional pathway, it worked for us and turned out to be amazing.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Here are some photos from our journey. My kids found every friendly dog/ cat/ horse/ cow to pose with.
 

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We don't have any public anything. I am still sorting through pictures.

As we began to plan as a family, and were reading everything we could about each route, my 16 year old got hooked on the Hospitales and really wanted to do the Primitivo. So we started looking into it. Then she kept going back and forth about wanting to start in SJPDP and do part of the Frances as did I. When we realized we only had 30 days and that was took long for the Primitivo but too short for the Frances, especially if we wanted some rest days, we decided to do both. So, we started back from the day we needed to leave to head back to the states and planned out the Primitivo. Then we started on the day we could land in France and planned the Frances as far as we could go. It really worked out well.

Now we want to come back and do the entire Frances and the Portuguese way and the Norte . . . . . It is a lovely way to be.

While not a traditional pathway, it worked for us and turned out to be amazing.
Thank you for that answer. It sounds like you came up with a great way to give your daughter some agency in the endeavor. Well done all around.
 
If you are getting a pilgrim menu or menu del día you can also ask for a half menu, which would be just one plate plus dessert and beverage.
This is so great to know! I'm taking my 8 year old next year and I didn't know this was an option.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
The fire was evident, the trees in large swaths were charred but still standing with cows and bells grazing under them and abundant wildflowers growing up. Nature was reclaiming the hillside, it was eerie and beautiful.

Overall the raw beauty of the Primitivo was intense. As we crossed the Hospitales route, it was 50F, foggy and super windy with mist and rain. Just as the little one was getting cold and complaining, a pack of wild horses came out of the fog, she started laughing, we tossed a down jacket under her raincoat, ate some chocolate and stared in awe at what we were witnessing, the horses just stood around us, it was incredible. The little villages were wonderful, the accommodations perfect! The ups and downs are certainly hard, it is not an easy route by any means, but it is not technically challenging (lost ledges, ladders, wires), it is a lot of steep up and steep down, but the vistas and beauty and wild/farm life are worth the sore legs and toes.

The churches and statues on the Primitivo were also incredible. We finished with a huge sense of accomplishment.
Wow, wow, WOW! That is so amazing to experience the horses! I wondered why there was literally no wildlife on the Frances both times. Did hear a cow bell. Now I know. Do the Primitivo. It’s their refuge from the flocks of people. Thank you for the wonderful picture in my head!
 
Primitivo only … then to Finsterre for the dessert! This allows necessary rest and weather days…. Don’t push it too hard with the kids! 😀….. slow it down and smell the eucalyptus!
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!

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