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Luggage Transfer Correos

2019 update on the Mozárabe

2020 Camino Guides

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
I've just reached Granada after walking from Almería.

I thought it was fabulous when I first did it three years ago, but the infrastructure is, amazingly, even better now:

- they've put what must be an enormous amount of work into the ascent out of the riverbed 4km from Alboloduy, turning it from a slightly scary scrambling goat track into a steep but very manageable and safe path.

- the new albergue at Alboloduy is *****, a pilgrim parador. Right in the village centre, lovely roof terrace to enjoy a sunset drink, excellent kitchen and washing facilities.

- the new system of key codes for all the amigos' albergues works really well. Each morning a WhatsApp message gives you the four number code, so you can get straight in the moment you arrive, rather than hoping the village bar is open or somebody is around to let you in.

- there are now small heaters in most of the bedrooms, which is kind, especially in early December and in the chillier upland places.

- last time I couldn't get into the albergue at Abla so stayed at the Mirasierra, a perfectly fine hostal. But the albergue is great, and I also had a very convivial evening in the Plaza bar, even being joined by one of the Almería amigos who was visiting a friend in the village.

- the lovely casa de la escultora in Guadix no longer takes pilgrims, but there are plenty of other options in town - I stayed at the Casona de la Luz, which was fine. The albergue Lacho now seems to be the only option in Alquife, but Manolo is busy extending it to add more bedrooms, so it shouldn't be a problem.

- I can't recommend the new detour to Tocón de Quéntar highly enough. It's a very pretty small hill village with a permanent population of about 40. The bar is open from breakfast to long past my bedtime. It does generous tapas with your drink, or a decent range of salads and grills etc, with a nice warm fire burning huge olive logs. The house red is a very tasty DOC Ribiera del Duero. Because my booking at Quéntar was dishonoured on a holiday weekend, the amigos very kindly let me stay two nights in Tocón's albergue, so the time I didn't spend in the bar I walked up the track to a hilltop at about 2000m, seeing only one bicyclist all day.

- the signage on this camino was good three years ago and is even better now. Arrows at all necessary places, and APOC-funded granite hitos at strategic intervals, including the 100km marker (which also thanks the Americans for their funding) under Calahorra castle.

Getting to Granada last night I was sorely tempted simply to take a bus back to Almería and just start again. Sadly, I think I'll have to head home to vote and perhaps remind some of my family of what I look like for the first time since September.

Everybody says it, but there is no harm in repeating that the Almería amigos are a wonderful group of people: generous, energetic, kind, thoughtful and, most importantly, fantastically efficient and effective.

DSC_1686.JPG
The Sierra Nevada yesterday, from the high point (literally and metaphorically) of the Mozárabe between Almería and Granada.
 
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jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2017
Primitivo 2018
Madrid 2019
Kumano Kodo 2019
Sounds amazing! It’s one of the next two caminos I’d like to walk along with the Olvidado-Invierno combination.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
“ the lovely casa de la escultora in Guadix no longer takes pilgrims,”
(I had hit the copy button instead of Quote)

The Casa de la Escultora still operates as a hotel. Stayed there in April this year. And I very agree with your comment on the helpful camino amigos!
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
The Casa de la Escultora still operates as a hotel. Stayed there in April this year. And I very agree with your comment on the helpful camino amigos!
Yes. It is still possible to book the stylish Casa de la Escultora online (through Airbnb and other sites). I heard that the owner opened up the house for pilgrims to help out the association at a time when there weren't other albergue style accommodations in Guadix. In truth it was several grades above an albergue.
Casona de la Luz is not as stylish as the Casa de la Escultora, but it is also a historic house, with foundations that may go back to Roman times. Accommodation is dormitory style and prices are pilgrim prices. The breakfast room has a beautiful view ... It's a great place to stay.
There are also pilgrim rates at the cave apartments in the north of the city and other places (check the guide).
 
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p_mci

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, Inglés, Portugués (2014) Norte, Primitivo (2015) Vía de la Plata (2017) Mozárabe (2018)
Thank you for the update!
 

Ghislaine

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francès(2006)
Le Puy/Conques(2009)
Del Norte(2012)
Portuguese(2018)
Thank you so much for sharing. As September 2020, it will be my next Camino starting in Almeria to Merida and continuing on Via de la Plata. I hear great comments about the Association and I also join their Facebook group, which provide lots of good informations. Good feed back is always encouraging.



I've just reached Granada after walking from Almería.

I thought it was fabulous when I first did it three years ago, but the infrastructure is, amazingly, even better now:

- they've put what must be an enormous amount of work into the ascent out of the riverbed 4km from Alboloduy, turning it from a slightly scary scrambling goat track into a steep but very manageable and safe path.

- the new albergue at Alboloduy is *****, a pilgrim parador. Right in the village centre, lovely roof terrace to enjoy a sunset drink, excellent kitchen and washing facilities.

- the new system of key codes for all the amigos' albergues works really well. Each morning a WhatsApp message gives you the four number code, so you can get straight in the moment you arrive, rather than hoping the village bar is open or somebody is around to let you in.

- there are now small heaters in most of the bedrooms, which is kind, especially in early December and in the chillier upland places.

- last time I couldn't get into the albergue at Abla so stayed at the Mirasierra, a perfectly fine hostal. But the albergue is great, and I also had a very convivial evening in the Plaza bar, even being joined by one of the Almería amigos who was visiting a friend in the village.

- the lovely casa de la escultora in Guadix no longer takes pilgrims, but there are plenty of other options in town - I stayed at the Casona de la Luz, which was fine. The albergue Lacho now seems to be the only option in Alquife, but Manolo is busy extending it to add more bedrooms, so it shouldn't be a problem.

- I can't recommend the new detour to Tocón de Quéntar highly enough. It's a very pretty small hill village with a permanent population of about 40. The bar is open from breakfast to long past my bedtime. It does generous tapas with your drink, or a decent range of salads and grills etc, with a nice warm fire burning huge olive logs. The house red is a very tasty DOC Ribiera del Duero. Because my booking at Quéntar was dishonoured on a holiday weekend, the amigos very kindly let me stay two nights in Tocón's albergue, so the time I didn't spend in the bar I walked up the track to a hilltop at about 2000m, seeing only one bicyclist all day.

- the signage on this camino was good three years ago and is even better now. Arrows at all necessary places, and APOC-funded granite hitos at strategic intervals, including the 100km marker (which also thanks the Americans for their funding) under Calahorra castle.

Getting to Granada last night I was sorely tempted simply to take a bus back to Almería and just start again. Sadly, I think I'll have to head home to vote and perhaps remind some of my family of what I look like for the first time since September.

Everybody says it, but there is no harm in repeating that the Almería amigos are a wonderful group of people: generous, energetic, kind, thoughtful and, most importantly, fantastically efficient and effective.

View attachment 67580
The Sierra Nevada yesterday, from the high point (literally and metaphorically) of the Mozárabe between Almería and Granada.
 
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago
I've just reached Granada after walking from Almería.

I thought it was fabulous when I first did it three years ago, but the infrastructure is, amazingly, even better now:

- they've put what must be an enormous amount of work into the ascent out of the riverbed 4km from Alboloduy, turning it from a slightly scary scrambling goat track into a steep but very manageable and safe path.

- the new albergue at Alboloduy is *****, a pilgrim parador. Right in the village centre, lovely roof terrace to enjoy a sunset drink, excellent kitchen and washing facilities.

- the new system of key codes for all the amigos' albergues works really well. Each morning a WhatsApp message gives you the four number code, so you can get straight in the moment you arrive, rather than hoping the village bar is open or somebody is around to let you in.

- there are now small heaters in most of the bedrooms, which is kind, especially in early December and in the chillier upland places.

- last time I couldn't get into the albergue at Abla so stayed at the Mirasierra, a perfectly fine hostal. But the albergue is great, and I also had a very convivial evening in the Plaza bar, even being joined by one of the Almería amigos who was visiting a friend in the village.

- the lovely casa de la escultora in Guadix no longer takes pilgrims, but there are plenty of other options in town - I stayed at the Casona de la Luz, which was fine. The albergue Lacho now seems to be the only option in Alquife, but Manolo is busy extending it to add more bedrooms, so it shouldn't be a problem.

- I can't recommend the new detour to Tocón de Quéntar highly enough. It's a very pretty small hill village with a permanent population of about 40. The bar is open from breakfast to long past my bedtime. It does generous tapas with your drink, or a decent range of salads and grills etc, with a nice warm fire burning huge olive logs. The house red is a very tasty DOC Ribiera del Duero. Because my booking at Quéntar was dishonoured on a holiday weekend, the amigos very kindly let me stay two nights in Tocón's albergue, so the time I didn't spend in the bar I walked up the track to a hilltop at about 2000m, seeing only one bicyclist all day.

- the signage on this camino was good three years ago and is even better now. Arrows at all necessary places, and APOC-funded granite hitos at strategic intervals, including the 100km marker (which also thanks the Americans for their funding) under Calahorra castle.

Getting to Granada last night I was sorely tempted simply to take a bus back to Almería and just start again. Sadly, I think I'll have to head home to vote and perhaps remind some of my family of what I look like for the first time since September.

Everybody says it, but there is no harm in repeating that the Almería amigos are a wonderful group of people: generous, energetic, kind, thoughtful and, most importantly, fantastically efficient and effective.

View attachment 67580
The Sierra Nevada yesterday, from the high point (literally and metaphorically) of the Mozárabe between Almería and Granada.
Thank you for providing this account. Sounds wonderful.
I am interested in walking Camino Mozarabe in May 2020.
Is there a Guidebook?
Can you give me an idea of kms walked each day please?
I can walk a maximum of 20km a day. Is it difficult to find accommodation at shorter intervals?
 
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago
Thank you so much for sharing. As September 2020, it will be my next Camino starting in Almeria to Merida and continuing on Via de la Plata. I hear great comments about the Association and I also join their Facebook group, which provide lots of good informations. Good feed back is always encouraging.
What is ‘the Association’ you mention?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, @NTange,

The Association is the Camino Association of Almería. They produce a guide, updated monthly, with complete information on accommodations, etc. You can find it on their webpage —http://www.almeriajacobea.es/
That guide will give you good information on distances, but I think it will be tough to keep the days all under 20. But take a look and if you find specific stages that seem problematic, ask here and there may be some more info that some Mozárabe veterans can provide.

The association also has renovated old buildings and maintains an amazing string of albergues on the route. They are friendly and will keep in touch with you via WhatsApp all the way to Granada.

IT’s an amazing camino, really one of the best. Buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago
Hi, @NTange,

The Association is the Camino Association of Almería. They produce a guide, updated monthly, with complete information on accommodations, etc. You can find it on their webpage —http://www.almeriajacobea.es/
That guide will give you good information on distances, but I think it will be tough to keep the days all under 20. But take a look and if you find specific stages that seem problematic, ask here and there may be some more info that some Mozárabe veterans can provide.

The association also has renovated old buildings and maintains an amazing string of albergues on the route. They are friendly and will keep in touch with you via WhatsApp all the way to Granada.

IT’s an amazing camino, really one of the best. Buen camino, Laurie
Thanks very much Laurie.
I had a quick look at the website.
I am learning Spanish but at present I am not very knowledgable!
Are you able to tell me which section is the Guide?
What is your opinion regarding safety on this Camino for a solo middle aged woman?
My husband would love to walk as well but we don’t think his knees will cooperate this time round.
Is it a route that would have transport for him whilst I walk?
 

Ghislaine

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francès(2006)
Le Puy/Conques(2009)
Del Norte(2012)
Portuguese(2018)
Thanks very much Laurie.
I had a quick look at the website.
I am learning Spanish but at present I am not very knowledgable!
Are you able to tell me which section is the Guide?
What is your opinion regarding safety on this Camino for a solo middle aged woman?
My husband would love to walk as well but we don’t think his knees will cooperate this time round.
Is it a route that would have transport for him whilst I walk?
There is also a facebook group Amis Camino Mozarabe Via de la Plata which is very useful.👍🏻
 

Ghislaine

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francès(2006)
Le Puy/Conques(2009)
Del Norte(2012)
Portuguese(2018)
Thanks Ghislaine, I shall check it out.
I find them quite helpful and it’s my pleasure as this will be my next Camino Sept. 2020. All the best in your research.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks very much Laurie.
I had a quick look at the website.
I am learning Spanish but at present I am not very knowledgable!
Are you able to tell me which section is the Guide?
What is your opinion regarding safety on this Camino for a solo middle aged woman?
My husband would love to walk as well but we don’t think his knees will cooperate this time round.
Is it a route that would have transport for him whilst I walk?
Hi, NTange,

On the home page, over on the right on the top, you will see in green “Guía del Camino.” Underneath you will see, Guía Almería - Granada. Click on it and the guide will come up. Here’s a link directly to the current version of the guide, but since it is updated very frequently, you should always access it from the website.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1t5UwI6YDSkbR3uooi9QRVLMbzTkXotE8/view

About your question on safety, I was with some other people, but frequently walked alone. I think it is perfectly safe. I know other women who walked alone and would agree with that assessment. As far as transportation goes, I don’t have any first hand knowledge, but looking at a Spanish roadmap, it looks like the camino roughly tracks the A-92 from Almería to Granada, and the N-432 from Granada to Córdoba, so I would expect there to be good bus service for that part. From Córdoba to Mérida, the camino seems to be far from highways, through towns connected by regional roads for the most part, so I imagine, but do not know for sure, that public transportation would be harder in that section.

Buen camino, Laurie
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
I think it will be tough to keep the days all under 20. But take a look and if you find specific stages that seem problematic, ask here and there may be some more info that some Mozárabe veterans can provide.
Between Almeria and Granada, there is one stage of 24km from Alquife to Guadix with no official accommodation between the two. The walk is downhill most of the way and most walkers do not find it challenging. At the halfway point of this stage, there is a village - Cogollos de Guadix - which has a bus service to Guadix and some private B and B places. But these are priced above 25 Euros (maximum price allowed for official accommodations).

On all other stages, there is never more than 20km from one official accommodation to the next. (Official accommodation comprises municipal albergue or private accommodation with pilgrim rates). You may have to accept some short stages to do it, but you will be able to walk from Almeria to Granda with only one stage of more than 20km (Alquife to Guadix).

From Granada to Cordoba, the network of municipal albergues is patchy and the local association not so visible. There are private inns with pilgrim rates but I haven't measured minimum distances. (You can do it if you download the guide from the Almeria association).

Overall, I feel comfortable recommending the section from Almeria to Granada to people who can walk independently. Elderly people and people with disabilities (one leg) have enjoyed it. From a safety perspective, I cannot say that any place in the world is 100% safe, but I have not heard complaints of safety concerns on this stretch of the way and I hope that it will stay like that.
 
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago
Between Almeria and Granada, there is one stage of 24km from Alquife to Guadix with no official accommodation between the two. The walk is downhill most of the way and most walkers do not find it challenging. At the halfway point of this stage, there is a village - Cogollos de Guadix - which has a bus service to Guadix and some private B and B places. But these are priced above 25 Euros (maximum price allowed for official accommodations).

On all other stages, there is never more than 20km from one official accommodation to the next. (Official accommodation comprises municipal albergue or private accommodation with pilgrim rates). You may have to accept some short stages to do it, but you will be able to walk from Almeria to Granda with only one stage of more than 20km (Alquife to Guadix).

From Granada to Cordoba, the network of municipal albergues is patchy and the local association not so visible. There are private inns with pilgrim rates but I haven't measured minimum distances. (You can do it if you download the guide from the Almeria association).

Overall, I feel comfortable recommending the section from Almeria to Granada to people who can walk independently. Elderly people and people with disabilities (one leg) have enjoyed it. From a safety perspective, I cannot say that any place in the world is 100% safe, but I have not heard complaints of safety concerns on this stretch of the way and I hope that it will stay like that.
Thank you Raggy for so much great information.
I am very keen to do this walk but a little apprehensive if I have to walk without my husband.
We both completed Camino Frances in 2017 but his knees have deteriorated significantly.
My understanding is that Mozarabe is a much less populated walk.?????
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
My understanding is that Mozarabe is a much less populated walk.?????
I think that there are stretches of the Via de la Plata where villages are fewer, further between, and less lively ... but yes, the Mozarabe takes you through some areas of low population density. If you want a walk with cafes at frequent intervals it's not the right Camino. Depending on the time of year, there might be a day or two when you might meet nobody at all on the Camino itself. Your only human contact on some stages might be at the and of the day in the town that you walked to. If you're walking alone from Almeria, the angels will check in on you every day via WhatsApp message - they're only a text message away. And if you speak a little Spanish, you'll find the locals in any town that you pass through are chatty and friendly.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago
Hi, NTange,

On the home page, over on the right on the top, you will see in green “Guía del Camino.” Underneath you will see, Guía Almería - Granada. Click on it and the guide will come up. Here’s a link directly to the current version of the guide, but since it is updated very frequently, you should always access it from the website.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1t5UwI6YDSkbR3uooi9QRVLMbzTkXotE8/view

About your question on safety, I was with some other people, but frequently walked alone. I think it is perfectly safe. I know other women who walked alone and would agree with that assessment. As far as transportation goes, I don’t have any first hand knowledge, but looking at a Spanish roadmap, it looks like the camino roughly tracks the A-92 from Almería to Granada, and the N-432 from Granada to Córdoba, so I would expect there to be good bus service for that part. From Córdoba to Mérida, the camino seems to be far from highways, through towns connected by regional roads for the most part, so I imagine, but do not know for sure, that public transportation would be harder in that section.

Buen camino, Laurie
Thanks again Laurie, your input in helping me make a decision is just what I need. It sounds like a wonderful walk and I would love to do it.
I would just like to be able to reconnect with my husband at the end of each day. He is VERY disappointed that he can’t actually walk it.
What would conditions be like in May?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Del Estrecho, Ruta Fray Leopoldo,
Vía Serrana, Camino Francés
I would just like to be able to reconnect with my husband at the end of each day. He is VERY disappointed that he can’t actually walk it.
What would conditions be like in May?
Hi NTange,
We just finished a camino with a partner who could only walk limited kilometers each day due to knee issues. We found the ‘live tracking’ feature of Wikiloc allowed him to know exactly where we were, and thus start his walk from our destination, walk out to meet us, and walk back with us a few kilometers a day. Let me know if you’d like any more info on using it.

For average weather in May, try Weatherspark. You can put the various villages along the way in the search bar.

Good luck,
Elaine
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks again Laurie, your input in helping me make a decision is just what I need. It sounds like a wonderful walk and I would love to do it.
I would just like to be able to reconnect with my husband at the end of each day. He is VERY disappointed that he can’t actually walk it.
What would conditions be like in May?
Hi NTange,
We just finished a camino with a partner who could only walk limited kilometers each day due to knee issues. We found the ‘live tracking’ feature of Wikiloc allowed him to know exactly where we were, and thus start his walk from our destination, walk out to meet us, and walk back with us a few kilometers a day. Let me know if you’d like any more info on using it.

For average weather in May, try Weatherspark. You can put the various villages along the way in the search bar.

Good luck,
Elaine
Hi, Ntange,
Even if you are a tech phobe, like I am, don’t be put off by @Islandwalker’s generous offer to help with that wikilocs idea. She is amazing and PATIENT!!! I am the beneficiary of her expertise. Elaine, I’m just curious — did you have a rental car or was public transportation the mode?

As far as weather, we started in mid April. I think that those forum members who made up the “Mozárabe mob” and started out at about the same time that year (it hit about 13,-15 I think) hit the weather sweet spot. It had been raining non-stop all winter, and the amigos told us that we arrived in Almería just as the rain moved out. We never had rain. Nor did we have high temps, which is another consideration. Almería is Spain’s only desert region, so it gets hotter the later you start. One other factor is the wildflowers — I know that the non-stop winter rains were a big factor, but the flowers we saw all the way along were just gorgeous.

Buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago
Hi NTange,
We just finished a camino with a partner who could only walk limited kilometers each day due to knee issues. We found the ‘live tracking’ feature of Wikiloc allowed him to know exactly where we were, and thus start his walk from our destination, walk out to meet us, and walk back with us a few kilometers a day. Let me know if you’d like any more info on using it.

For average weather in May, try Weatherspark. You can put the various villages along the way in the search bar.

Good luck,
Elaine
Thanks Elaine. I will get through Christmas and then definitely make contact with you. You say you finished ‘a camino’. Was it the Mozarabe? As it is a less popular one, I am wondering about transport options from town to town for hubby.
 
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago
Hi, Ntange,
Even if you are a tech phobe, like I am, don’t be put off by @Islandwalker’s generous offer to help with that wikilocs idea. She is amazing and PATIENT!!! I am the beneficiary of her expertise. Elaine, I’m just curious — did you have a rental car or was public transportation the mode?

As far as weather, we started in mid April. I think that those forum members who made up the “Mozárabe mob” and started out at about the same time that year (it hit about 13,-15 I think) hit the weather sweet spot. It had been raining non-stop all winter, and the amigos told us that we arrived in Almería just as the rain moved out. We never had rain. Nor did we have high temps, which is another consideration. Almería is Spain’s only desert region, so it gets hotter the later you start. One other factor is the wildflowers — I know that the non-stop winter rains were a big factor, but the flowers we saw all the way along were just gorgeous.

Buen camino, Laurie
Thanks Laurie, I will certainly check in with Elaine in the new year. Look forward to hearing Elaine’s response to your query regarding transport.
I will also look up posts from Mozarabe Mob.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Del Estrecho, Ruta Fray Leopoldo,
Vía Serrana, Camino Francés
Was it the Mozarabe? As it is a less popular one, I am wondering about transport options from town to town for hubby.
Hi NTange and Laurie,
Ned ended up using a rental car while Marie and I walked the Camino Francés. After weighing the options, it worked out the best for us. Pro: Ned could walk the flattest part of any day’s stage - or even several short parts of a stage. Con (a big one): We couldn’t use the communal albergues that are for walkers only. This might be a deal-breaker for you on the Mozárabe where the Camino Association of Almería provides so much help and accommodation. (Although if I remember correctly from previous checking, there are private accommodations in almost every village.) Rental cars are fairly inexpensive in Spain - 10 euros a day in the off-season. A link to our journal is below.
Looking forward to chatting with you after Christmas. I’ll be home from Spain then with access to my files.
Elaine (currently in Spain near the Camino Via Serrana enjoying days warm enough to walk in shirtsleeves!)
 
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Graham F.Quinn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept./Oct. 2017
Hi, NTange,

On the home page, over on the right on the top, you will see in green “Guía del Camino.” Underneath you will see, Guía Almería - Granada. Click on it and the guide will come up. Here’s a link directly to the current version of the guide, but since it is updated very frequently, you should always access it from the website.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1t5UwI6YDSkbR3uooi9QRVLMbzTkXotE8/view

About your question on safety, I was with some other people, but frequently walked alone. I think it is perfectly safe. I know other women who walked alone and would agree with that assessment. As far as transportation goes, I don’t have any first hand knowledge, but looking at a Spanish roadmap, it looks like the camino roughly tracks the A-92 from Almería to Granada, and the N-432 from Granada to Córdoba, so I would expect there to be good bus service for that part. From Córdoba to Mérida, the camino seems to be far from highways, through towns connected by regional roads for the most part, so I imagine, but do not know for sure, that public transportation would be harder in that section.

Buen camino, Laurie
Is this guide available in English?
 

David Hobson

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sections of Frances in 2016
Portuguese Camino from Lisbon 2017
June 2018 Primitivo and Norte
Thank you for providing this account. Sounds wonderful.
I am interested in walking Camino Mozarabe in May 2020.
Is there a Guidebook?
Can you give me an idea of kms walked each day please?
I can walk a maximum of 20km a day. Is it difficult to find accommodation at shorter intervals?
I have now bought my flight to Malaga. Start walking to Santiago on 29 May 2020. Going to check available resources over this holiday period. I hope it will be more crowded than the Portuguese Camino i did recently, Lisbon to Oporto without meeting another peregrino.. Happy New year.
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
Con (a big one): We couldn’t use the communal albergues that are for walkers only. This might be a deal-breaker for you on the Mozárabe where the Camino Association of Almería provides so much help and accommodation. (Although if I remember correctly from previous checking, there are private accommodations in almost every village.)
If you have special needs and you come up with a solution like this - I.e. one member of your party using motorized transport for part of each stage - I would recommend having a chat with the Almeria association. I don’t think you necessarily have to assume that the albergues would be off limits to you.
I do not know what the Almeria assoc. would decide. It’s possible that they might be constrained by rules imposed by municipal authorities. But I think it’s worth asking. I have the feeling that they’re likely to take a more flexible view than some Camino organizations in other parts of the country.
Of course, if you rent a car, then it’s possib to reach private accommodation every night, even if you end a stage in a village with no accommodation at all.
 
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago
Hello Elaine, Laurie, Raggy & others
It is now February and we leave Australia on 25 April so I REALLY do need to make some decisions.
Hubby wants to commence walking and see what happens with his knees.
We will have about 3 weeks to walk and would like to keep days to 15-20km.
With this in mind, we need a camino that has villages/towns offering accommodation even if it is not always Albergues.
Public transport or taxi would also be handy if he needs it.

My quandary now is whether the Mozarabe is too ambitious or not.
We could start in either Almeria, Malaga, Granada.
What is your advice?
Is the first week of May already too hot for this walk?
Open to all suggestions. Have already walked Camino Frances, Finnisterre etc. Planning to do Camino Portuges in Feb 2021.
Thanks
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Del Estrecho, Ruta Fray Leopoldo,
Vía Serrana, Camino Francés
Hello Elaine, Laurie, Raggy & others
It is now February and we leave Australia on 25 April so I REALLY do need to make some decisions.
Hubby wants to commence walking and see what happens with his knees.
We will have about 3 weeks to walk and would like to keep days to 15-20km.
With this in mind, we need a camino that has villages/towns offering accommodation even if it is not always Albergues.
Public transport or taxi would also be handy if he needs it.

My quandary now is whether the Mozarabe is too ambitious or not.
We could start in either Almeria, Malaga, Granada.
What is your advice?
Is the first week of May already too hot for this walk?
Open to all suggestions. Have already walked Camino Frances, Finnisterre etc. Planning to do Camino Portuges in Feb 2021.
Thanks
Hi NTange,
I think it is quite possible for you to make a success of this if you are able to be flexible after your arrival and change to Plan B if Plan A doesn't work out. It looks like your main enemies for knee problems on the Mozarabe will be some steep downhill stretches and days where villages are more than 15-20 km apart. Here are some things that worked for us in the year just before my husband had his knee operation as well as the year after when he was recovering. Everyone's situation is different, so I don't know if any of them will work for you, but I'm guessing if you go with a full bag of tricks, you can make a success of your camino!
  • As Raggy suggested above, have a conversation with the association in Almeria before you go to see if you can use the albergues in spite of needing to use alternative transportation in special cases. Another question to ask them is if you can stay an extra day if his knees are stressed from the day before. While he is resting, you could make a day walk on a loop trail exploring the local area. Wikiloc will give you lots of possibilities from any village.
  • Use Wikiloc or another GPS app to see how much elevation loss there is on each section and how steep it is.
  • Once you have started walking and have found out what is doable for your situation in terms of downhill, have an alternative ready for sections that are just too painful. Bus - try Rome2Rio to see what's available. Taxi - check websites and have numbers ready before you leave. Taxis are not available in every village, but they will come from far away to transport you - eg. from Antequera on the Malaga route, and Almeria, Guadix, or Granada on the Almeria route. Car - have a car rental company in mind in case you decide enroute that you need it as an alternative. You could then take a day to go by bus or taxi to the nearest city to rent one.
  • For weather averages in any village, check Weatherspark.
Wishing you lots of luck,
Elaine
 
Last edited:

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
My "cut to the chase" recommendation is as follows:
1) Spend a day to see Malaga and finish by taking a bus to Junta de los Caminos
2) Take 11 days (or more) to walk from Junta to Baena. Association website shows only one stage over 20km
3) From Baena, take a bus (two buses) to Guadix and spend a day there
4) Take 6 days (or more) to walk from Guadix to Granada. (i.e. break each stage into two - there are accommodation possibilities at the midpoint of each stage).
5) Spend a day in Granada

I think that takes up 21 days. My thinking for this recommendation is below:

-----

With three weeks at 15 to 20km per day, you're looking at up to 400km but you probably need to sprinkle in some rest days. Realistically, you will use motorized transport sometimes. Rather than trying to do an integral end-to-end piece of Camino (e.g. 400km from Almeria to Cordoba or from Granada to Merida) why not pick nice bits from two routes. There are lots of possibilities.

Challenges on each route
  • Malaga - Quite a lot of up- and down- in the first days. But quite short stages appear possible. Only one stage is a fraction over 20km (Encinas Reales–Lucena)
  • Almeria - Riverbed walking in first days (poor stability is hard on knees). Steep climb (leaving Alboloduy) and steep descent (later the same day). Descent into Quentar is long and knee challenging too. But there is only one stage where you have to walk more than 20km (from Alquife to Guadix)
  • Jaen - Road walking on first day.
  • Granada - Boring exit from Granada then steep climb to Moclin. Relative lack of pilgrim infrastructure after Moclin. Long stages between Baena and Cordoba (this is true for all four routes)
So ... My suggestion for maximizing pleasant walking is to take the Malaga route at first. Walk short stages to get the hang of things. Stop at Baena where distances get more challenging and instead of continuing to Cordoba, try some of the most beautiful stages of the Almeria route.

Use Wikiloc or another GPS app to see how much elevation loss there is on each section and how steep it is.
You can find elevation profiles for each stage on the guides published by the local associations.
Malaga association page - https://caminomozarabedemalaga.com/...tramo-1o-malaga-junta-de-los-caminos-10-8-km/
Almeria association Facebook page to download the Guia -

-----

If you're determined to travel in a straight line toward Santiago, I would suggest;
Fly to Almeria
Take a bus to Abla.
Walk from Abla to Granada
Take a bus from Granada to Moclin
Walk from Moclin to Espejo
Take a bus from Espejo to Cordoba
With rest days and tourism days, that would be an enjoyable "straight line" for three weeks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago
Hi NTange,
I think it is quite possible for you to make a success of this if you are able to be flexible after your arrival and change to Plan B if Plan A doesn't work out. It looks like your main enemies for knee problems on the Mozarabe will be some steep downhill stretches and days where villages are more than 15-20 km apart. Here are some things that worked for us in the year just before my husband had his knee operation as well as the year after when he was recovering. Everyone's situation is different, so I don't know if any of them will work for you, but I'm guessing if you go with a full bag of tricks, you can make a success of your camino!
  • As Raggy suggested above, have a conversation with the association in Almeria before you go to see if you can use the albergues in spite of needing to use alternative transportation in special cases. Another question to ask them is if you can stay an extra day if his knees are stressed from the day before. While he is resting, you could make a day walk on a loop trail exploring the local area. Wikiloc will give you lots of possibilities from any village.
  • Use Wikiloc or another GPS app to see how much elevation loss there is on each section and how steep it is.
  • Once you have started walking and have found out what is doable for your situation in terms of downhill, have an alternative ready for sections that are just too painful. Bus - try Rome2Rio to see what's available. Taxi - check websites and have numbers ready before you leave. Taxis are not available in every village, but they will come from far away to transport you - eg. from Antequera on the Malaga route, and Almeria, Guadix, or Granada on the Almeria route. Car - have a car rental company in mind in case you decide enroute that you need it as an alternative. You could then take a day to go by bus or taxi to the nearest city to rent one.
  • For weather averages in any village, check Weatherspark.
Wishing you lots of luck,
Elaine
Thanks very much Elaine for all this info plus our personal chats.
 
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago
My "cut to the chase" recommendation is as follows:
1) Spend a day to see Malaga and finish by taking a bus to Junta de los Caminos
2) Take 11 days (or more) to walk from Junta to Baena. Association website shows only one stage over 20km
3) From Baena, take a bus (two buses) to Guadix and spend a day there
4) Take 6 days (or more) to walk from Guadix to Granada. (i.e. break each stage into two - there are accommodation possibilities at the midpoint of each stage).
5) Spend a day in Granada

I think that takes up 21 days. My thinking for this recommendation is below:

-----

With three weeks at 15 to 20km per day, you're looking at up to 400km but you probably need to sprinkle in some rest days. Realistically, you will use motorized transport sometimes. Rather than trying to do an integral end-to-end piece of Camino (e.g. 400km from Almeria to Cordoba or from Granada to Merida) why not pick nice bits from two routes. There are lots of possibilities.

Challenges on each route
  • Malaga - Quite a lot of up- and down- in the first days. But quite short stages appear possible. Only one stage is a fraction over 20km (Encinas Reales–Lucena)
  • Almeria - Riverbed walking in first days (poor stability is hard on knees). Steep climb (leaving Alboloduy) and steep descent (later the same day). Descent into Quentar is long and knee challenging too. But there is only one stage where you have to walk more than 20km (from Alquife to Guadix)
  • Jaen - Road walking on first day.
  • Granada - Boring exit from Granada then steep climb to Moclin. Relative lack of pilgrim infrastructure after Moclin. Long stages between Baena and Cordoba (this is true for all four routes)
So ... My suggestion for maximizing pleasant walking is to take the Malaga route at first. Walk short stages to get the hang of things. Stop at Baena where distances get more challenging and instead of continuing to Cordoba, try some of the most beautiful stages of the Almeria route.


You can find elevation profiles for each stage on the guides published by the local associations.
Malaga association page - https://caminomozarabedemalaga.com/...tramo-1o-malaga-junta-de-los-caminos-10-8-km/
Almeria association Facebook page to download the Guia -

-----

If you're determined to travel in a straight line toward Santiago, I would suggest;
Fly to Almeria
Take a bus to Abla.
Walk from Abla to Granada
Take a bus from Granada to Moclin
Walk from Moclin to Espejo
Take a bus from Espejo to Cordoba
With rest days and tourism days, that would be an enjoyable "straight line" for three weeks.
Hi Raggy
Thank you very much for all these details. I think between what you and Islandwalker have suggested, we will be able to form a plan for the Mozarabe.
We do like the occasional rest day so as we can be tourists and really explore amazing places.

I am now super excited and can’t wait to ‘hit the road’.
 

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