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All About Osprey

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
I spent last week up in Dolores, Colorado, staying with my friends, Mike and Diane. Mike and I have now been friends for 50 years (!) since we hiked and camped together as young teenagers. He owns, and founded, Osprey Backpacks. I used to tease him because he liked to sew. I said that there were two kinds of people who backpacked; those who use the gear to get out into the wilderness and those who go out into the wilderness in order to play with their gear. Mike was the gear-fiddler. I worried back then about him ever holding down a real job, because he was such a dreamer.

He has a workshop on his property (with marmots tunneling under it and bears wandering around outside some nights), and there is a big new headquarters in Cortez, Colorado. He showed me all the new space-age materials he is working with, and how he's experimenting with mesh pads of various densities with a 3D press. I had no idea there was something that could do this. We toured the new building - complete with a ping pong room, a beer tap in the kitchen, full showers and lockers for those riding their bikes to work, and a kennel for the dogs who come to work, too. There's a show room with practically every Osprey pack that's ever been made right next to the Customer Service department. When people call with questions about their packs, the reps can look at the actual pack while they talk to the customers, even if the pack is no longer made.

Another, older building in Cortez houses their earlier factory, now devoted to repair and storage of parts (after moving from Santa Cruz, California, Osprey opened their first Colorado operation in Dolores). A few Navajo workers in the older Cortez building have been with the company for 25 years. One guy there who does repair work in the shop collects used backpacks to distribute to disadvantaged folks in SE Asia, Africa and elsewhere in the world who can really use them. Two rooms full of backpacks were ready to be delivered.

Most fascinating to me was the large warehouse full of parts; shelves and shelves with box drawers of thousands of different kinds of buckles, straps and other parts, labeled with the name and year of the packs they belonged to. Osprey has a lifetime warranty, so they need to keep all those things in stock. I'm telling you; don't hesitate to send your pack back to them for repairs or call them for help.

You may know that Osprey has a very lightweight pack (I saw a lot of them on the Camino) called the Exos for men and the Eja for women. It's a very good balance between durability, comfort and weight-savings. Now they make a superlight pack called the Lumina for women and Levity for men. They're about a pound and a half in weight.

Oh, and I recommended a name for a new pack, the Ultreia. I like the idea of an embroidered scallop shell on the pack flap. I don't know about the shell advice, but he did really like the name idea, so we will see...
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPDP-SDC (2014, 2015, 2016, 2017) , Norte 2018
Pilgrim Office 2018, Hospitalero Acebo 2019
I have three Kestral's from Osprey. I love them and all three have been on the Camino many times. Great pack for the Camino and I certainly highly recommend it for Pilgrims. These packs seem to have the right pockets in all the right places for a good Pilgrimage...

I twice had a broken buckle and a cloth piece come apart on me. Called Osprey and new part expressed to me.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Camino Frances SJPP / 2014 Camino Portugues / 2015 Camino Ingles / 2015 Hospitalero Training
2016 (fall) Camino Sanabre / Hospitalero?
I spent last week up in Dolores, Colorado, staying with my friends, Mike and Diane. Mike and I have now been friends for 50 years (!) since we backpacked together as young teenagers. He owns, and founded, Osprey Backpacks. I used to tease him because he liked to sew. I said that there were two kinds of people who backpacked; those who use the gear to get out into the wilderness and those who go out into the wilderness in order to play with their gear.

Mike has never stopped dreaming up new designs and use of innovative materials. He's handed over much of the management of the company now, but is still heavily involved in design. He has a big workshop/personal playhouse on his property, as well as a state-of-the-art headquarters in Cortez, Colorado. We toured the new building - complete with a ping pong room, a beer tap in the kitchen, full showers and lockers for those riding their bikes to work, and a kennel for the dogs who come to work, too. A show room with practically every Osprey pack that's ever been made right next to the Customer Service department. When people call with questions about their packs, the reps can look at the actual pack while they talk to the customers.

Another, older building in Cortez houses their earlier factory, now devoted to repair and storage of parts (after moving from Santa Cruz, California, Osprey opened their first Colorado operation in Dolores). A few Navajo workers in the older Cortez building have been with the company for over 25 years. Another worker, with dreadlocks, He does repair work in the shop and also collects used backpacks to distribute to disadvantaged folks in SE Asia, Africa and elsewhere in the world who can really use them. Two rooms full of backpacks were ready to be delivered. He led the first African American group up Kilimanjaro.

Most fascinating to me was the large warehouse full of parts; shelves and shelves with box drawers of thousands of different kinds of buckles, straps and other parts, labeled with the name and year of the packs they belonged to. Osprey has a lifetime warranty, so they need to keep all those things in stock. Quite the enterprise!

You may know that Osprey has a very lightweight pack (I saw a lot of them on the Camino) called the Exos for men and the Eja for women. It's a very good balance between durability, comfort and weight-savings. Now they have an even astonishingly superlight pack called the Lumina for women and Levity for men. They're about a pound and a half in weight. Unbelievable.

Osprey also has a well-run operation in Vietnam, with Vietnamese managers and even independent designers. Mike and the family lived in Vietnam for many years and he still spends a lot of time over there. The main reason they moved some of their company to Vietnam was because, while Osprey packs became more and more popular, they could not source the materials they needed in the US or maintain the kind of workforce they needed. Mike and my brother are getting ready for their yearly dirt bike ride around the remote parts of the country next month.

Best of all was sitting on the back patio of their property with a glass of wine, looking out at Sleeping Ute mountain while Mike cooked dinner. And hiking many miles along a river on their vast land. I will post some pictures later. It's a bit of paradise.

Oh, and I recommended a name for a new pack, the Ultreia. I like the idea of an embroidered scallop shell on the pack flap, too. I don't know about the shell advice, but he did really like the name idea, so we will see...
The “Ultreya” might be high visibility and with reflective strips.
 

ranthr

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C Frances 2005, 2007
Le Puy en Velay -SdC 2009
Via de la Plata 2011
gr 653 from Oloron to Puente la Reina 2012
Gr65 from le Puy to Figeac 2013
Irun to Santander 2013
Porto to SdC 2014
Astorga to SdC 2015
I must admit that I have quite a number of different items, with a Lumina 60 longing for being tried out on the next camino. Since I have tried out different generations of Exos, I miss the zipped pockets outside on the elder ones. But the newer model is better to carry.
The Norwegian Bergans also make excellent lightweight backpack suitable for caminowalking, like Helium Lady 55 and Rondane Lady in different sizes, 46 and 65 both weighing nearly the same as Exos 48. So if you want to change from Osprey, look to Norway😉😊
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
Sounds great, another very happy customer here! I don't suppose you could very gently suggest that this Ultreia pack could be the one model that's missing from their range - a larger Talon/Tempest panel loader, say 30-35 L, with the same pole holder and back system and two top compression straps for sandals ... ? ;)
 

andrienettefourie

New Member
I spent last week up in Dolores, Colorado, staying with my friends, Mike and Diane. Mike and I have now been friends for 50 years (!) since we backpacked together as young teenagers. He owns, and founded, Osprey Backpacks. I used to tease him because he liked to sew. I said that there were two kinds of people who backpacked; those who use the gear to get out into the wilderness and those who go out into the wilderness in order to play with their gear.

Mike has never stopped dreaming up new designs and use of innovative materials. He's handed over much of the management of the company now, but is still heavily involved in design. He has a big workshop/personal playhouse on his property, as well as a state-of-the-art headquarters in Cortez, Colorado. We toured the new building - complete with a ping pong room, a beer tap in the kitchen, full showers and lockers for those riding their bikes to work, and a kennel for the dogs who come to work, too. A show room with practically every Osprey pack that's ever been made right next to the Customer Service department. When people call with questions about their packs, the reps can look at the actual pack while they talk to the customers.

Another, older building in Cortez houses their earlier factory, now devoted to repair and storage of parts (after moving from Santa Cruz, California, Osprey opened their first Colorado operation in Dolores). A few Navajo workers in the older Cortez building have been with the company for over 25 years. Another worker, with dreadlocks, He does repair work in the shop and also collects used backpacks to distribute to disadvantaged folks in SE Asia, Africa and elsewhere in the world who can really use them. Two rooms full of backpacks were ready to be delivered. He led the first African American group up Kilimanjaro.

Most fascinating to me was the large warehouse full of parts; shelves and shelves with box drawers of thousands of different kinds of buckles, straps and other parts, labeled with the name and year of the packs they belonged to. Osprey has a lifetime warranty, so they need to keep all those things in stock. Quite the enterprise!

You may know that Osprey has a very lightweight pack (I saw a lot of them on the Camino) called the Exos for men and the Eja for women. It's a very good balance between durability, comfort and weight-savings. Now they have an even astonishingly superlight pack called the Lumina for women and Levity for men. They're about a pound and a half in weight. Unbelievable.

Osprey also has a well-run operation in Vietnam, with Vietnamese managers and even independent designers. Mike and the family lived in Vietnam for many years and he still spends a lot of time over there. The main reason they moved some of their company to Vietnam was because, while Osprey packs became more and more popular, they could not source the materials they needed in the US or maintain the kind of workforce they needed. Mike and my brother are getting ready for their yearly dirt bike ride around the remote parts of the country next month.

Best of all was sitting on the back patio of their property with a glass of wine, looking out at Sleeping Ute mountain while Mike cooked dinner. And hiking many miles along a river on their vast land. I will post some pictures later. It's a bit of paradise.

Oh, and I recommended a name for a new pack, the Ultreia. I like the idea of an embroidered scallop shell on the pack flap, too. I don't know about the shell advice, but he did really like the name idea, so we will see...
I am so jealous of you being right there in the midst of all the Osprey activity!!
I am an avid Osprey lover and has hike all the major hikes in SA, the Camino, the Choquiquirao Trek up to Macchu Pichu and many other very long arduous Treks with my Osprey. I also use their normal travel luggage and absolutely adore all of it.

I am doing the Camino again next year in May/June and as I am not so young any longer I would like to buy the latest and LIGHTEST bag possible. What would be the best to buy? I live outside of Cape Town in South Africa and would like to get a list of suppliers of where to find the bag you suggest - please help? Many thanks AF
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
I spent last week up in Dolores, Colorado, staying with my friends, Mike and Diane. Mike and I have now been friends for 50 years (!) since we backpacked together as young teenagers. He owns, and founded, Osprey Backpacks. I used to tease him because he liked to sew. I said that there were two kinds of people who backpacked; those who use the gear to get out into the wilderness and those who go out into the wilderness in order to play with their gear.

Mike has never stopped dreaming up new designs and use of innovative materials. He's handed over much of the management of the company now, but is still heavily involved in design. He has a big workshop/personal playhouse on his property, as well as a state-of-the-art headquarters in Cortez, Colorado. We toured the new building - complete with a ping pong room, a beer tap in the kitchen, full showers and lockers for those riding their bikes to work, and a kennel for the dogs who come to work, too. A show room with practically every Osprey pack that's ever been made right next to the Customer Service department. When people call with questions about their packs, the reps can look at the actual pack while they talk to the customers.

Another, older building in Cortez houses their earlier factory, now devoted to repair and storage of parts (after moving from Santa Cruz, California, Osprey opened their first Colorado operation in Dolores). A few Navajo workers in the older Cortez building have been with the company for over 25 years. Another worker, with dreadlocks, He does repair work in the shop and also collects used backpacks to distribute to disadvantaged folks in SE Asia, Africa and elsewhere in the world who can really use them. Two rooms full of backpacks were ready to be delivered. He led the first African American group up Kilimanjaro.

Most fascinating to me was the large warehouse full of parts; shelves and shelves with box drawers of thousands of different kinds of buckles, straps and other parts, labeled with the name and year of the packs they belonged to. Osprey has a lifetime warranty, so they need to keep all those things in stock. Quite the enterprise!

You may know that Osprey has a very lightweight pack (I saw a lot of them on the Camino) called the Exos for men and the Eja for women. It's a very good balance between durability, comfort and weight-savings. Now they have an even astonishingly superlight pack called the Lumina for women and Levity for men. They're about a pound and a half in weight. Unbelievable.

Osprey also has a well-run operation in Vietnam, with Vietnamese managers and even independent designers. Mike and the family lived in Vietnam for many years and he still spends a lot of time over there. The main reason they moved some of their company to Vietnam was because, while Osprey packs became more and more popular, they could not source the materials they needed in the US or maintain the kind of workforce they needed. Mike and my brother are getting ready for their yearly dirt bike ride around the remote parts of the country next month.

Best of all was sitting on the back patio of their property with a glass of wine, looking out at Sleeping Ute mountain while Mike cooked dinner. And hiking many miles along a river on their vast land. I will post some pictures later. It's a bit of paradise.

Oh, and I recommended a name for a new pack, the Ultreia. I like the idea of an embroidered scallop shell on the pack flap, too. I don't know about the shell advice, but he did really like the name idea, so we will see...
Wow! Thanks for that insight. 🙂 I have their last backpack, the Lumina... For health reasons I needed to go as light as possible. whilst still having some comfort....
Wonderful people!
Thank them for me 🙂
Ultreia!
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
I am so jealous of you being right there in the midst of all the Osprey activity!!
I am an avid Osprey lover and has hike all the major hikes in SA, the Camino, the Choquiquirao Trek up to Macchu Pichu and many other very long arduous Treks with my Osprey. I also use their normal travel luggage and absolutely adore all of it.

I am doing the Camino again next year in May/June and as I am not so young any longer I would like to buy the latest and LIGHTEST bag possible. What would be the best to buy? I live outside of Cape Town in South Africa and would like to get a list of suppliers of where to find the bag you suggest - please help? Many thanks AF
I would ask Domigee about the Lumina. I haven't tried it myself. I carry the Sirrus and plan to get an Eja next. It's a much lighter weight pack than mine, but not as light as the Lumina. I'm sure Osprey has a dealer in South Africa. I'd recommend going into a shop and trying them on (and other brands too, of course).
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Sounds great, another very happy customer here! I don't suppose you could very gently suggest that this Ultreia pack could be the one model that's missing from their range - a larger Talon/Tempest panel loader, say 30-35 L, with the same pole holder and back system and two top compression straps for sandals ... ? ;)
What I liked about the Sirrus (not true with the newest model) is that it was both top loading and had a zippered front panel. The top loading feature is best for cramming stuff in. The zippered panel was good for retrieving stuff from lower down in the pack when you needed it, so you didn't need to layer your kit just according to what you might need to get out of the pack before the end of the day. I am guessing that larger panel loaders would put a lot more stress on zippers, if you have a lot of stuff. You might look at their travel packs and see if there is one like that.

But keep the ideas coming and I'll pitch them to Mike for a real Camino pack! (even though he usually just laughs at me when I give him input, for example about shoulder strap water bottle holders) I like the idea of reflective tape.
 
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VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
I don't suppose you could very gently suggest that this Ultreia pack could be the one model that's missing from their range - a larger Talon/Tempest panel loader, say 30-35 L, with the same pole holder and back system and two top compression straps for sandals ... ? ;)
Maybe suggest we crowd-design it? :eek:;)🤣
 

andycohn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (12-15); Muxia (15); Portuguese, Primitivo (17); Norte, Ingles, VF partial (18), Le Puy (19)
I spent last week up in Dolores, Colorado, staying with my friends, Mike and Diane. Mike and I have now been friends for 50 years (!) since we hiked and camped together as young teenagers. He owns, and founded, Osprey Backpacks. I used to tease him because he liked to sew. I said that there were two kinds of people who backpacked; those who use the gear to get out into the wilderness and those who go out into the wilderness in order to play with their gear. Mike was the gear-fiddler. I worried back then about him ever holding down a real job, because he was such a dreamer.

He has a workshop on his property (with marmots tunneling under it and bears wandering around outside some nights), and there is a big new headquarters in Cortez, Colorado. He showed me all the new space-age materials he is working with, and how he's experimenting with mesh pads of various densities with a 3D press. I had no idea there was something that could do this. We toured the new building - complete with a ping pong room, a beer tap in the kitchen, full showers and lockers for those riding their bikes to work, and a kennel for the dogs who come to work, too. There's a show room with practically every Osprey pack that's ever been made right next to the Customer Service department. When people call with questions about their packs, the reps can look at the actual pack while they talk to the customers, even if the pack is no longer made.

Another, older building in Cortez houses their earlier factory, now devoted to repair and storage of parts (after moving from Santa Cruz, California, Osprey opened their first Colorado operation in Dolores). A few Navajo workers in the older Cortez building have been with the company for 25 years. One guy there who does repair work in the shop collects used backpacks to distribute to disadvantaged folks in SE Asia, Africa and elsewhere in the world who can really use them. Two rooms full of backpacks were ready to be delivered.

Most fascinating to me was the large warehouse full of parts; shelves and shelves with box drawers of thousands of different kinds of buckles, straps and other parts, labeled with the name and year of the packs they belonged to. Osprey has a lifetime warranty, so they need to keep all those things in stock. I'm telling you; don't hesitate to send your pack back to them for repairs or call them for help.

You may know that Osprey has a very lightweight pack (I saw a lot of them on the Camino) called the Exos for men and the Eja for women. It's a very good balance between durability, comfort and weight-savings. Now they make a superlight pack called the Lumina for women and Levity for men. They're about a pound and a half in weight.

Oh, and I recommended a name for a new pack, the Ultreia. I like the idea of an embroidered scallop shell on the pack flap. I don't know about the shell advice, but he did really like the name idea, so we will see...
Hi Jill: My wife and I are great fans of Osprey packs, but there are some other Ospreys that are cheaper and lighter than those you mention. The Lumina / Levity 45 that you refer to is indeed under 2 pounds, but it is very expensive — retails for $250. The smallest Exos pack (38 liters) weighs 2.5 lbs, and costs $180 retail. However, Osprey offers several other packs in the 30 liter range (which is all you need on the Camino) that are cheaper and lighter. These include the Skarab 30 (1.5 lbs / $130); the Skimmer 28 (women’s only - 1.7 lbs. / $130); Hikelite 32 (1.75 lbs. / $55 - $110); Talon 33 (1.9 lbs. / $140; and the Tempest 30 (for women only — 1.8 lbs. / $130).

I carry the Talon 33 and my wife carries the Skimmer 28, and we are both happy with these.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
I am doing the Camino again next year in May/June and as I am not so young any longer I would like to buy the latest and LIGHTEST bag possible. What would be the best to buy?
Hi! The Osprey Exos (48) is by far my favourite pack (it has everything, imo!) and only weighs 1.1 kg. It is big enough to carry camping gear etc and served me well on many Caminos and all the way to Jerusalem. The smaller version (38) would be more than enough I’m sure for a ‘normal’ Camino...
Still, I bought the Lumina (45) last Spring because I HAD TO go as light as possible....
This Summer was my second camino with it and I can recommend it if ‘lightest’ is your issue, whilst retaining all the comfort features.... It was expensive when I bought it and - in the UK - could only be bought online. Pm me if you need more details 🙂
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Hi Jill: My wife and I are great fans of Osprey packs, but there are some other Ospreys that are cheaper and lighter than those you mention. The Lumina / Levity 45 that you refer to is indeed under 2 pounds, but it is very expensive — retails for $250. The smallest Exos pack (38 liters) weighs 2.5 lbs, and costs $180 retail. However, Osprey offers several other packs in the 30 liter range (which is all you need on the Camino) that are cheaper and lighter. These include the Skarab 30 (1.5 lbs / $130); the Skimmer 28 (women’s only - 1.7 lbs. / $130); Hikelite 32 (1.75 lbs. / $55 - $110); Talon 33 (1.9 lbs. / $140; and the Tempest 30 (for women only — 1.8 lbs. / $130).

I carry the Talon 33 and my wife carries the Skimmer 28, and we are both happy with these.
The Skarab, Skimmer and Hikelite lack many of the structural, ventilation and comfort features of the Exos, Kestrel, Tempest, etc.. The suspensions on those are more geared toward day packs than backpacks, which is why they aren't listed on the website under "backpacking". The hipbelts and shoulder straps on all of those you mentioned (except the Talon you carry) are much simpler and thinner. These are features I wouldn't compromise on for walking the camino, myself, but everyone is different and finds what works best for them, obviously!
 
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Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
I started my outdoor life with the blue Fjällräven rucksacks , 50 and 70 ltrs. They lasted forever and now the sturdy aluminium frames can hold a guitar hardbag or will be hauling firewood for long distances through the forest...
For a colder climate a lot of stuff had to brought along, 70 ltrs was nescessary.

Now Kestrel fullfill my needs: 48ltrs for the caminos and 28 ltrs for walking for my job all year round ...
Talon 18 for my wife...
Exos, I find too flimsy and baggy, but thats just me...

The "new" Ultreya / Ultreïa backpack should rightly have a holder for the container tube with your Compostela to be carried triumphantly on your way home, too....shouldn´t it ?
 
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TaraWalks

Peregrina without a skateboard
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016 & 2018, planning for Le Puy 2019/2020ish and for some shorter Caminos stacked
I spent last week up in Dolores, Colorado, staying with my friends, Mike and Diane. Mike and I have now been friends for 50 years (!) since we hiked and camped together as young teenagers. He owns, and founded, Osprey Backpacks. I used to tease him because he liked to sew. I said that there were two kinds of people who backpacked; those who use the gear to get out into the wilderness and those who go out into the wilderness in order to play with their gear. Mike was the gear-fiddler. I worried back then about him ever holding down a real job, because he was such a dreamer.

He has a workshop on his property (with marmots tunneling under it and bears wandering around outside some nights), and there is a big new headquarters in Cortez, Colorado. He showed me all the new space-age materials he is working with, and how he's experimenting with mesh pads of various densities with a 3D press. I had no idea there was something that could do this. We toured the new building - complete with a ping pong room, a beer tap in the kitchen, full showers and lockers for those riding their bikes to work, and a kennel for the dogs who come to work, too. There's a show room with practically every Osprey pack that's ever been made right next to the Customer Service department. When people call with questions about their packs, the reps can look at the actual pack while they talk to the customers, even if the pack is no longer made.

Another, older building in Cortez houses their earlier factory, now devoted to repair and storage of parts (after moving from Santa Cruz, California, Osprey opened their first Colorado operation in Dolores). A few Navajo workers in the older Cortez building have been with the company for 25 years. One guy there who does repair work in the shop collects used backpacks to distribute to disadvantaged folks in SE Asia, Africa and elsewhere in the world who can really use them. Two rooms full of backpacks were ready to be delivered.

Most fascinating to me was the large warehouse full of parts; shelves and shelves with box drawers of thousands of different kinds of buckles, straps and other parts, labeled with the name and year of the packs they belonged to. Osprey has a lifetime warranty, so they need to keep all those things in stock. I'm telling you; don't hesitate to send your pack back to them for repairs or call them for help.

You may know that Osprey has a very lightweight pack (I saw a lot of them on the Camino) called the Exos for men and the Eja for women. It's a very good balance between durability, comfort and weight-savings. Now they make a superlight pack called the Lumina for women and Levity for men. They're about a pound and a half in weight.

Oh, and I recommended a name for a new pack, the Ultreia. I like the idea of an embroidered scallop shell on the pack flap. I don't know about the shell advice, but he did really like the name idea, so we will see...
I LOVE Osprey packs. Geez if I could be a rep for them, I would!

The Ultreia pack is a great idea too. One suggestion - it needs to be able to stand a hot clothes dryer! I’m serious!

The Tempest 40, with an attached lid, built in rain cover and the ability to handle a hot dryer for 30mins (to kill the chinches) would be the ultimate Camino pack for me! Tell Mike and Dianne for me 😉
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
I still find users that are not aware of the distress whistle in the front buckle..
I would recommend him to make the plug in the hole in the bottom of the said whistle should be in the distress red/orange colour to make it curious enough for people to find out the use thereof ...
 
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Martin Cole

Love being a pilgrim walker
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2019 French x3 Portugese x2 Primitivo x1 English x1, Muxia x1 Cancelled 2020!!
Could you ask your friend why the top bags always seem to be secured upside down, so when in a hostel with it flat you have to lift it up to get anything out because the zip is on the bottom!!
I have three bags (kyte, aether and fanpoint) so a fan, but all the same, it makes no sense.
Good to hear about the passion.
Cheers
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
I LOVE this thread. I am on my third Osprey rucksack and loved them all. Their customer service is among the best I’ve seen anywhere in any industry.

I also really like the idea of crowd-sourcing the ideal Camino rucksack. We already have a starting point, using the Exos as a foundation or platform. IMHO, I would include:

- A neon safety color option, like lime yellow.
- Reflective patches front, rear and sides, perhaps embroidered Conchas...
- “Stow-and-go” pole management system.
- Large (5” x 7”), gusseted, mesh, waist pockets, with zips.
- Top lid pockets, I preferred two, like on my old Kestrel 48-liter. You could make the top lid removable (like the Exos) for those who desire to save weight.
- Water bladder capable
- Stretch, gusseted, mesh pockets (expandable to 4” x 8”) on the shoulder straps for small items you want quick to hand. Ideally, they should accept .5 liter water bottles or mobile phones, etc.
- optional plastic snap clips to hold an umbrella shaft on the shoulder strap. The best system now on the market anchors the handle using the wrist strap at the waist belt to pull down to stabilize the very long shaft umbrella.
- click fastener attachment points for a chest pack option on each shoulder strap.

This chest pack would be color matched to the main rucksack, or could be ordered in a different color, as the buyer chose. It would have a large 4-5 liter main compartment, two bottle holders, bungee cords to tie down things like a poncho, gloves or a light jacket. The best one I’ve seen also had a horizontal, top sleeve that would hold a 1.5 liter bottle for this long, Meseta or de la Plata days.

I use a chest pack, sometimes worn lower, at gut, or waist level, but suspended from my shoulder straps.

I know this sounds very busy. But I have been using aftermarket products to achieve this level of utility. I would rather my rucksack have these features built-in instead of cobbled together and added on.

Also, I encourage using lightweight rips top fabric, possible sip-nylon or something like cubes fiber. Yes I know it will be expensive, but ultimately, I feel it would be worth it.

Hope this helps the dialog.
 
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Leigh Lorayne

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino del Norte Irun to Ribadasella (2016)
Camino Primitivo Oviedo to Santiago (2016)
What I liked about the Sirrus (not true with the newest model) is that it was both top loading and had a zippered front panel. The top loading feature is best for cramming stuff in. The zippered panel was good for retrieving stuff from lower down in the pack when you needed it, so you didn't need to layer your kit just according to what you might need to get out of the pack before the end of the day. I am guessing that larger panel loaders would put a lot more stress on zippers, if you have a lot of stuff. You might look at their travel packs and see if there is one like that.

But keep the ideas coming and I'll pitch them to Mike for a real Camino pack! (even though he usually just laughs at me when I give him input, for example about shoulder strap water bottle holders) I like the idea of reflective tape.
I am also an Osprey fan. I second the vote for shoulder strap water bottle holders!
 

2704hein

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
I am so jealous of you being right there in the midst of all the Osprey activity!!
I am an avid Osprey lover and has hike all the major hikes in SA, the Camino, the Choquiquirao Trek up to Macchu Pichu and many other very long arduous Treks with my Osprey. I also use their normal travel luggage and absolutely adore all of it.

I am doing the Camino again next year in May/June and as I am not so young any longer I would like to buy the latest and LIGHTEST bag possible. What would be the best to buy? I live outside of Cape Town in South Africa and would like to get a list of suppliers of where to find the bag you suggest - please help? Many thanks AF
Hi Andrienette,
You can look at https://www.futurama.co.za in Somerset West and Sportsman Warehouse also sell Osprey.
I bought a Osprey Talon 33l from Futurama last month, and they are the cheapest. We are doing 100k from Sarria to SdC during the September 19 school holidays.
Regards.
Hein.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
:eek: @t2andreo I never thought I would disagree with you but now I do - on one small thing. Any and all trampoline mesh covered back systems will start creaking at some point, some really badly, and some are not shaped the way people are and start digging into them. I much prefer the ridged foam and mesh, unbreakable, un-digging-in, cool-when-it's-hot-and-not-cold-in-the-cold back system like the Talon/Tempest, Kestrel/Kyte, Escapist etc models. Totally agree with most of the other stuff though, or at least a wider range of Osprey add-ons like umbrella holders, water bottle holders on the straps etc. Plus please top compression straps! Reversible are good. When do we start on the colour ranges?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011), Camino Frances (2015), Camino Ingles (2017), Camino Muxia (2017), LePuy(2019)
The Osprey Talon 33 has been my Camino pack since 2015. It is one of the lightest packs in the 30-40liter range, and it replaced my original camino pack, the Golite Jam. I like the dual mesh pockets on the sides. They are big enough for quart or liter bottles, but I do wish they were angled so I could reach the bottle without taking off the pack! And I wish there were a better cinching or design system to prevent the bottle falling out. I like the device for attaching my poles and the whistle (could be louder).. I like the adjustable range of the length of the pack. I have had the back mesh pocket develop holes, and I wonder if there is a fabric defect. I would also like some kind of expandable (mesh?) pocket on the shoulder straps. Mine does have a small one- so small I have yet to figure out what to do with it! Since my Talon is 2015, I wonder if the back venting system has improved - definitely like a little more airflow in the "Ultreia." And a side or bottom zipper for easier access during the day. I wish the hip pockets were a little larger so I could slip in a cellphone or subcompact camera. I use a front waist pack to compensate for what the Talon doesn't do. I chose the Talon over the Tempest because it fit better, but I am thinking of giving the Tempest another try. I was not aware of the Osprey lighter packs mentioned - and my local REI doesn't seem to stock every model. Does Osprey have a policy whereby you could order a pack or two to try out and return, if not suitable, without paying the return cost?
Please pass on all the forum suggestions and let us know when the "Ultreia" is ready to be field tested. I suspect there would be lots of forum members willing to try it out!!!
 

marilyn van graan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012) VDLP (2014) Portuguese (2015)
I am so jealous of you being right there in the midst of all the Osprey activity!!
I am an avid Osprey lover and has hike all the major hikes in SA, the Camino, the Choquiquirao Trek up to Macchu Pichu and many other very long arduous Treks with my Osprey. I also use their normal travel luggage and absolutely adore all of it.

I am doing the Camino again next year in May/June and as I am not so young any longer I would like to buy the latest and LIGHTEST bag possible. What would be the best to buy? I live outside of Cape Town in South Africa and would like to get a list of suppliers of where to find the bag you suggest - please help? Many thanks AF
Hi there - I am also from Cape Town - phone the agents - they are in Muizenberg - just sent my bag in to have the mesh pockets seen to. Very helpful and will let you know which outdoor shops stock them - buen camino for next year.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Could you ask your friend why the top bags always seem to be secured upside down, so when in a hostel with it flat you have to lift it up to get anything out because the zip is on the bottom!!
I have three bags (kyte, aether and fanpoint) so a fan, but all the same, it makes no sense.
Good to hear about the passion.
Cheers
I can't picture this. Can you post a pic?
 

marilyn van graan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012) VDLP (2014) Portuguese (2015)
:eek: @t2andreo I never thought I would disagree with you but now I do - on one small thing. Any and all trampoline mesh covered back systems will start creaking at some point, some really badly, and some are not shaped the way people are and start digging into them. I much prefer the ridged foam and mesh, unbreakable, un-digging-in, cool-when-it's-hot-and-not-cold-in-the-cold back system like the Talon/Tempest, Kestrel/Kyte, Escapist etc models. Totally agree with most of the other stuff though, or at least a wider range of Osprey add-ons like umbrella holders, water bottle holders on the straps etc. Plus please top compression straps! Reversible are good. When do we start on the colour ranges?
Oh my we are getting really fancy now with our packs!!! Hahaha
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
I am also an Osprey fan. I second the vote for shoulder strap water bottle holders!
I showed Mike my system for shoulder strap water bottles, which works great. He just laughed. I think he likes the reservoir system better, but I don't think that's for everybody. I prefer water bottles that are accessible.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
A thought about the camino pack design. Large mesh pocket on the back for drying items or sticking a reflective sheet inside. That would face inside when drying things and facing against the mesh for the early morning walkers. Probably similar for a chest unit.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
I chose the Talon over the Tempest because it fit better, but I am thinking of giving the Tempest another try.
The Tempest is the women's version of the Talon. Size isn't the only difference; they are shaped differently for narrower shoulders, hip shape and torso length. Try to find somebody in your local shop that can fit you with the appropriate pack.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Mike told me that, at a recent trade show, he accidentally went in and put down his stuff in the wrong company booth. Other companies have copied so many of his designs that he thought at first glance that the packs on display in that booth were his.
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I showed Mike my system for shoulder strap water bottles, which works great. He just laughed. I think he likes the reservoir system better, but I don't think that's for everybody. I prefer water bottles that are accessible.
This is a great thread. I am now in the unenviable position of considering a replacement for my 19 year old Mountainsmith Ghost and of course everyone recommends Osprey. I know you can’t please everyone, but anyone making a pack that is going to be marketed to people on the camino should know that the average age for that cohort is probably a fair bit higher than the average age user of other packs. And I cannot tell you how many reservoir system users I have seen on the camino over the years with the inside of their packs drenched from a leak, or an empty reservoir in the middle of nowhere because they couldn’t see (and weren’t paying attention to, obviously) the water level.
 

Martin Cole

Love being a pilgrim walker
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2019 French x3 Portugese x2 Primitivo x1 English x1, Muxia x1 Cancelled 2020!!
Pict of bag. Not full and zipped open for access. Bag at top of rucksack is effectively upside down as the zip in on the floor without disconnecting it (on this model anyway.) Contents fall out. Be better if zip was on top (or front).
Heard others comment too, my Kyte the bag cannot be disconnected. But heyho everything still falls out!
Cheers
15656230826061330937214767995293.jpg
 

JaWie

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CPI und Finisterre 2018, plan to do combo of Vasco/Frances/Salvador/Primitive Aug 19 to Oct 19
A thought about the camino pack design. Large mesh pocket on the back for drying items or sticking a reflective sheet inside. That would face inside when drying things and facing against the mesh for the early morning walkers. Probably similar for a chest unit.
Same here, huge mesh compartment like UL backpacks have plus waterbottle and Smartphone/camera holder on the frontstraps, slightly bigger hip belt pockets and all the great Osprey features they already have (like the airscape mesh back panel) and voila we have the Osprey Ultreia <3. (In love with my Kyte 36 and Tempest 30)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Could you ask your friend why the top bags always seem to be secured upside down, so when in a hostel with it flat you have to lift it up to get anything out because the zip is on the bottom!!
I have three bags (kyte, aether and fanpoint) so a fan, but all the same, it makes no sense.
Good to hear about the passion.
Cheers
I think I know why at least two members can't picture what you mean.

Your desciption of a zipper of top bag is up/down or top/bottom because that is correct when the backpack is lying with the back side (where the straps are) on the floor.

Well, for me that's not really usual, logical and natural position of a backpack when you describing something like that. The natural is vertical position whether you carry it or you put it down on the floor while resting for example or in an albergue not to use too much space between bunks.

So if the backpack is in vertical position your "bottom" would be (more correctly) "backside". With my backpack properly loaded I can reach for that zipper and opened it even while walking. Also I would never put my backpack on the floor with its backside down except when taking something out of the lower compartment.

Apart from that I have never ever seen the backpack with a top bag zipper on the outside-side (that would be your "front" side). Maybe backpacks for travelling have that but hiking backpacks surely not and I had (and still have) a few of them different brands and models ;)
 
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Martin Cole

Love being a pilgrim walker
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2019 French x3 Portugese x2 Primitivo x1 English x1, Muxia x1 Cancelled 2020!!
I think I know why at least two members can't picture what you mean.

Your desciption of a zipper of top bag is up/down or top/bottom because that is correct when the backpack is lying with the back side (where the straps are) on the floor.

Well, for me that's not really usual, logical and natural position of a backpack when you describing something like that. The natural is vertical position whether you carry it or you put it down on the floor while resting for example or in an albergue not to use too much space between bunks.

So if the backpack is in vertical position your "bottom" would be (more correctly) "backside". With my backpack properly loaded I can reach for that zipper and opened it even while walking. Also I would never put my backpack on the floor with its backside down except when taking something out of the lower compartment.

Apart from that I have never ever seen the backpack with a top bag zipper or the outside-side (that would be your "front" side). Maybe backpacks for travelling have that but hiking backpacks surely not and I had (still) have a few of them different brands and models ;)

Hey Kinky
I can see what you are saying and I guess it varies on the usage, my bag has a back loading zip which means that it is preferably lying straps down for access to main compartment. I tend to use the top bag as my snacks larder after having all my drugs, first aid and wash kit tumble out several times!
Small issues for good times and a very comfy bag.
Cheers
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hey Kinky
I can see what you are saying and I guess it varies on the usage, my bag has a back loading zip which means that it is preferably lying straps down for access to main compartment. I tend to use the top bag as my snacks larder after having all my drugs, first aid and wash kit tumble out several times!
Small issues for good times and a very comfy bag.
Cheers
It doesn't matter what you use your top bag for just put the backpack in upright position and problem solved ;)
Also I don't think you need access to your main compartment if you are taking a snack or do you? :D
 

TAF

Member
Camino(s) past & future
July/Aug 2019 Logrono to Sahagun
May 2020 SJPP to Logrono
I have just done my first Camino, and the first time I have ever carried a pack. I can honestly say that I loved my Osprey Tempest which I bought after having done lots of research. The only thing I would have added is a separate zipped compartment at the base - please shake Mike's hand for me - my pack felt like an old friend by the time I had finished!
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Pict of bag. Not full and zipped open for access. Bag at top of rucksack is effectively upside down as the zip in on the floor without disconnecting it (on this model anyway.) Contents fall out. Be better if zip was on top (or front).
Heard others comment too, my Kyte the bag cannot be disconnected. But heyho everything still falls out!
Cheers
View attachment 62391
Huh, I never thought of this. I think the trick is to keep the zippers closed on the top bag so things don't fall out :). The zippers are on the "back" (near your back when you are carrying the pack) I think to protect the opening from wear and tear, to make it accessible to you when the pack is on your back (for some people). I'll ask about that.
 
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jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
Thanks for this post, @JillGat. I live in the Denver area and will make a point to stop by there the next time I get down in the 4-corners region.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
I have just done my first Camino, and the first time I have ever carried a pack. I can honestly say that I loved my Osprey Tempest which I bought after having done lots of research. The only thing I would have added is a separate zipped compartment at the base - please shake Mike's hand for me - my pack felt like an old friend by the time I had finished!
Most of the packs have a bottom compartment for a sleeping bag. You must have the Tempest 30, because the Tempest 40 has one. Many of the other packs in that size range have them. The closest to yours that has one I think is the Sirrus 36.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Thanks for this post, @JillGat. I live in the Denver area and will make a point to stop by there the next time I get down in the 4-corners region.
I don't know that they generally give tours of the building, but if you call ahead you may be able to arrange that!
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
:eek: @t2andreo I never thought I would disagree with you but now I do - on one small thing. Any and all trampoline mesh covered back systems will start creaking at some point, some really badly, and some are not shaped the way people are and start digging into them. I much prefer the ridged foam and mesh, unbreakable, un-digging-in, cool-when-it's-hot-and-not-cold-in-the-cold back system like the Talon/Tempest, Kestrel/Kyte, Escapist etc models. Totally agree with most of the other stuff though, or at least a wider range of Osprey add-ons like umbrella holders, water bottle holders on the straps etc. Plus please top compression straps! Reversible are good. When do we start on the colour ranges?
I love the trampoline mesh back system, myself. And yes, colors! Osprey has some real oddballs I wonder if anyone buys.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Huh, I never thought of this. I think the trick is to keep the zippers closed on the top bag so things don't fall out :). The zippers are on the "back" (near your back when you are carrying the pack) I think to protect the opening from wear and tear, to make it accessible to you when the pack is on your back (for some people). I'll ask about that.
For me placing the top bag zipper to the front side would be wrong especially when commuting and carrying a backpack. Very easy access for pickpockets because they assume you carry some valuables in top bag.

But OTOH they could easily cut the fabric :D
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Okay, disagreement is healthy. I did not suggest a particular back panel system, except to say that IMHO this Camino-centric lightweight rucksack should be based on the Osprey Exos. All the mesh bits I was talking about were pockets.

Hope this clarifies. In the end, Osprey can start with whatever rucksack they think will produce the lightest, most fully featured and reliable end product. I have COMPLETE faith in Osprey’s design capabilities.

Hope this helps.


:eek: @t2andreo I never thought I would disagree with you but now I do - on one small thing. Any and all trampoline mesh covered back systems will start creaking at some point, some really badly, and some are not shaped the way people are and start digging into them. I much prefer the ridged foam and mesh, unbreakable, un-digging-in, cool-when-it's-hot-and-not-cold-in-the-cold back system like the Talon/Tempest, Kestrel/Kyte, Escapist etc models. Totally agree with most of the other stuff though, or at least a wider range of Osprey add-ons like umbrella holders, water bottle holders on the straps etc. Plus please top compression straps! Reversible are good. When do we start on the colour ranges?
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
@t2andreo Sorry, I thought you meant the Exos back system as well and as comfy as it is I wonder how long it will be creakless? My husband's started getting noisy on the way to Finisterre... But maybe it, like us, didn't want it to end?

Oh and @JillGat if there is an Ultreia pack, surely the ladies' version should be a Suseia? 😄
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
As I've mentioned elsewhere on the Forum in another related thread, the back pack brand I saw the most often on the Camino Frances was the Osprey. The one I never once saw was the pack I wore, the ULA Circuit. I now have a Kestral 48 (dragon red), and will take it on my next camino.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Oh and [USER=47729]@JillGat if there is an Ultreia pack, surely the ladies' version should be a Suseia? 😄
That is EXACTLY what I just pitched to Mike: Ultreia and Suseia. Onward and upward! I listed the features recommended so far on this thread, so keep the ideas coming. I love the reflective tape/hi-vis color options. And this pack should be fully featured but on the small side: 36-48 L (since most pilgrims don't carry tents, stoves, camping gear).

I briefly described the many pilgrimages around the world that are gaining popularity like crazy. I also mentioned that 2021 will be a Holy Year, which would be an excellent time to introduce such a pack (though that's probably too short a turn-around time)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I have Kilimanjaro Zermatt 40+10 for almost 20 years now. It's all scruffy, taped etc. but I wouldn't change it if you pay me :D

Or maybe I would ;)
 
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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
That is EXACTLY what I just pitched to Mike: Ultreia and Suseia. Onward and upward! I listed the features recommended so far on this thread, so keep the ideas coming. I love the reflective tape/hi-vis color options. And this pack should be fully featured but on the small side: 36-48 L (since most pilgrims don't carry tents, stoves, camping gear).

I briefly described the many pilgrimages around the world that are gaining popularity like crazy. I also mentioned that 2021 will be a Holy Year, which would be an excellent time to introduce such a pack (though that's probably too short a turn-around time)
Does that mean that we men would still have to walk but you ladies could fly???
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
We are just about to set off in three weeks time for Spain. With 3 Osprey packs, my old one fits my grandson perfectly, the new one we bought for my husband 4 months ago, and the newish one I treated myself on my 2017 Camino. A great advert for Osprey.
My main issue has been explaining to my husband why he shouldn't take certain items. Minimalism is a new concept. I've lost count of the odd things he thought he would take.
(Coming from a man who hasn't hiked since he left the army 35 years ago - he keeps telling me what his pack was like then plus a rifle!)
 

TAF

Member
Camino(s) past & future
July/Aug 2019 Logrono to Sahagun
May 2020 SJPP to Logrono
Most of the packs have a bottom compartment for a sleeping bag. You must have the Tempest 30, because the Tempest 40 has one. Many of the other packs in that size range have them. The closest to yours that has one I think is the Sirrus 36.
I had to get the 30 as I could only take on cabin baggage. Still a great pack 👍
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
That is EXACTLY what I just pitched to Mike: Ultreia and Suseia. Onward and upward! I listed the features recommended so far on this thread, so keep the ideas coming. I love the reflective tape/hi-vis color options. And this pack should be fully featured but on the small side: 36-48 L (since most pilgrims don't carry tents, stoves, camping gear).

I briefly described the many pilgrimages around the world that are gaining popularity like crazy. I also mentioned that 2021 will be a Holy Year, which would be an excellent time to introduce such a pack (though that's probably too short a turn-around time)
But....but.... I can’t afford yet another Osprey 😱 Also just treated my husband to a new Exos 😁
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
I had to get the 30 as I could only take on cabin baggage. Still a great pack 👍
The Sirrus 36 fits in the cabin, too.
 
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alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Listed in my signature
Pict of bag. Not full and zipped open for access. Bag at top of rucksack is effectively upside down as the zip in on the floor without disconnecting it (on this model anyway.) Contents fall out. Be better if zip was on top (or front).
Heard others comment too, my Kyte the bag cannot be disconnected. But heyho everything still falls out!
Cheers
View attachment 62391
I see what your saying, that the contents in the "brain" fall out when the bag is placed on the floor. However, I like to access the brain while walking and can usually do so myself with only a wee bit of stretching. I couldn't do so if the zipper on the brain was facing the other way.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
DESCRIPTION
Enjoying a fine glass of vino from a rooftop bar in whatever-the-new-hip-city is great, there's no doubt about it. But take that same situation and slap it smack dab in the middle of Yosemite, Moab or the Catskills and and you've taken it to the next level. The Camping Wine Glass from Silipint and Osprey doesn't care what kind of wine you put in it. Could be poured from a foil bag previously removed from a cardboard box at the trailhead, or a fine bottle of Pinot Noir from the Willamette Valley transported carefully, wrapped in down garments and brought out as a surprise treat coupled with chocolates or cheeses. Silipint makes their products from non-toxic, BPA-free, heat- and cold-safe, insulating and flexible silicone. It never breaks, is incredibly durable, even toddler-proof but why is a toddler using a wine glass anyway? We're not sure, but we are sure that just like our packs, the Camping Wine Glass from Silipint Pint will be one of your favorite pieces of gear for years to come.
READ MORE
FEATURES
  • 100% Food-grade silicone, a non-petroleum based polymer derived from silica
  • FDA-approved
  • BPA-free
  • Microwave-safe
  • Heat beverages for short intervals, checking frequently until desired temperature is reached
  • Test temperature of beverage before giving to child
  • Dishwasher-safe
  • Freezer-safe
  • Insulates Hot & Cold
  • Withstands temps -58 C up to 450 F
  • Silicone-based inks will not wear off, chip or fade
  • Outer surface is grip honed, inner surface is polished smooth
  • Patented
  • Will not break, crack, chip, fade or scratch
  • Sturdy enough to hold liquids, flexible enough to carry in your pocket
  • Perfect companion for indoor & outdoor dining, camping, tailgating, commuting
  • Reusable cup reduces waste
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Here is a picture of one of my very early Osprey packs. The raw felt shoulder pads worked wonderfully, but they didn't market well, unfortunately.
early osprey2.jpg
 

marilyn van graan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012) VDLP (2014) Portuguese (2015)
Pict of bag. Not full and zipped open for access. Bag at top of rucksack is effectively upside down as the zip in on the floor without disconnecting it (on this model anyway.) Contents fall out. Be better if zip was on top (or front).
Heard others comment too, my Kyte the bag cannot be disconnected. But heyho everything still falls out!
Cheers
View attachment 62391
okay I see what you mean - not practical at all for me - I can access mine from top and side if needed - really happy with mine - thanks for showing us this.
 

Sal Miller

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances
I spent last week up in Dolores, Colorado, staying with my friends, Mike and Diane. Mike and I have now been friends for 50 years (!) since we hiked and camped together as young teenagers. He owns, and founded, Osprey Backpacks. I used to tease him because he liked to sew. I said that there were two kinds of people who backpacked; those who use the gear to get out into the wilderness and those who go out into the wilderness in order to play with their gear. Mike was the gear-fiddler. I worried back then about him ever holding down a real job, because he was such a dreamer.

He has a workshop on his property (with marmots tunneling under it and bears wandering around outside some nights), and there is a big new headquarters in Cortez, Colorado. He showed me all the new space-age materials he is working with, and how he's experimenting with mesh pads of various densities with a 3D press. I had no idea there was something that could do this. We toured the new building - complete with a ping pong room, a beer tap in the kitchen, full showers and lockers for those riding their bikes to work, and a kennel for the dogs who come to work, too. There's a show room with practically every Osprey pack that's ever been made right next to the Customer Service department. When people call with questions about their packs, the reps can look at the actual pack while they talk to the customers, even if the pack is no longer made.

Another, older building in Cortez houses their earlier factory, now devoted to repair and storage of parts (after moving from Santa Cruz, California, Osprey opened their first Colorado operation in Dolores). A few Navajo workers in the older Cortez building have been with the company for 25 years. One guy there who does repair work in the shop collects used backpacks to distribute to disadvantaged folks in SE Asia, Africa and elsewhere in the world who can really use them. Two rooms full of backpacks were ready to be delivered.

Most fascinating to me was the large warehouse full of parts; shelves and shelves with box drawers of thousands of different kinds of buckles, straps and other parts, labeled with the name and year of the packs they belonged to. Osprey has a lifetime warranty, so they need to keep all those things in stock. I'm telling you; don't hesitate to send your pack back to them for repairs or call them for help.

You may know that Osprey has a very lightweight pack (I saw a lot of them on the Camino) called the Exos for men and the Eja for women. It's a very good balance between durability, comfort and weight-savings. Now they make a superlight pack called the Lumina for women and Levity for men. They're about a pound and a half in weight.

Oh, and I recommended a name for a new pack, the Ultreia. I like the idea of an embroidered scallop shell on the pack flap. I don't know about the shell advice, but he did really like the name idea, so we will see...
 

Sal Miller

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances
Yah, well, thanks for the advertisement. My wife and I both took Ospreys on our Camino in October 2018. Based on recommendations from REI. I found that my Osprey was difficult to deal with, especially when loading, as it wanted to tip backwards. Felt like I was wrestling a football, if you know what I mean. Hers had the center of gravity sticking way out from her back. We saw lots of nicer rigs that other people were using, especially those hikers from Italy and Brazil.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Yah, well, thanks for the advertisement. My wife and I both took Ospreys on our Camino in October 2018. Based on recommendations from REI. I found that my Osprey was difficult to deal with, especially when loading, as it wanted to tip backwards. Felt like I was wrestling a football, if you know what I mean. Hers had the center of gravity sticking way out from her back. We saw lots of nicer rigs that other people were using, especially those hikers from Italy and Brazil.
Have you tried to repack you backpack? If the bacpack is loaded correctly it should stand upright as you put it on the ground. If not something is wrong and that could also be harmfull for your spine, back muscles etc.!
 

Sal Miller

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances
Have you tried to repack you backpack? If the bacpack is loaded correctly it should stand upright as you put it on the ground. If not something is wrong and that could also be harmfull for your spine, back muscles etc.!
We packed and repacked every day during the Camino and on weekend hikes in the Superstitions since then. Trying different ways, loading was always the worst, no flexibility at all. We have been backpacking since the '80s, the Camino we travelled light, and we decided to try the Ospreys. For the relatively light load, there was no freedom of movement, kind of like having a monkey strapped to our backs.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
We packed and repacked every day during the Camino and on weekend hikes in the Superstitions since then. Trying different ways, loading was always the worst, no flexibility at all. We have been backpacking since the '80s, the Camino we travelled light, and we decided to try the Ospreys. For the relatively light load, there was no freedom of movement, kind of like having a monkey strapped to our backs.
I don't understand what you mean by "flexibility"... It's just a backpack. You throw things in it and that's it.

But if you feel like you have "monkey strapped" to your back then dump the damn thing :D
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
But keep the ideas coming and I'll pitch them to Mike for a real Camino pack!
I totally love my Aura 50, even though it is a tad too big - so for me the ideal pack wouldn't be much different.
My ONLY gripes about the pack are
1. The mingy little zip compartments on the hip belt. Not only are they too small, but they are too far back to be easily accessible.
2. The hip belt could use more padding over the hip bones.
3. The mesh water bottle holder is too small to be much use.

And this pack should be fully featured but on the small side: 36-48
I vote for the 48, with options to access both from the front and the top - but NO sleeping bag compartment.
Like my Aura.
😊

And if it is to be a camino pack? Of course it must be blue, with a yellow scallop on the lid. (And maybe make the scallop reflective.)

Jill, since they donate packs overseas, do you know if you can turn in packs for donation when you 'upgrade'?
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
Just had a thought - is it possible to make the mesh for the pockets out of reflective material? That way a large area of the pack would light up if a car came up behind an early morning pilgrim by the side of the road, whether the pilgrim had a wet poncho in the mesh kangaroo pocket or not.

Oh and yes, the Exos type packs really won't stand up, they keep falling over.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Yah, well, thanks for the advertisement. My wife and I both took Ospreys on our Camino in October 2018. Based on recommendations from REI. I found that my Osprey was difficult to deal with, especially when loading, as it wanted to tip backwards. Felt like I was wrestling a football, if you know what I mean. Hers had the center of gravity sticking way out from her back. We saw lots of nicer rigs that other people were using, especially those hikers from Italy and Brazil.
Which packs do you have? Some of the lighter weight packs won't stand up until you have some things loaded in them. Standing up independently while being loaded is not a priority feature for most customers, I would guess. And the ventilated mesh pad on some packs does make the pack stand out from the back but it doesn't bother most people. I love that feature that allows ventilation on my back! Of course how you load the weight in your pack makes a huge difference, too. I hope you find packs that work for you. Let us know what you end up with!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011), Camino Frances (2015), Camino Ingles (2017), Camino Muxia (2017), LePuy(2019)
The Tempest is the women's version of the Talon. Size isn't the only difference; they are shaped differently for narrower shoulders, hip shape and torso length. Try to find somebody in your local shop that can fit you with the appropriate pack.
As I stated I chose the Talon in 2015 because it fit me better than the Tempest, even though I am female. Although packs are designed for women or men, that doesn't mean that only women should use womens packs and men mens packs. You must choose what fits your body best. Definitely going to a good outdoor store and being fitted helps. I did and that is why I ended up with the Talon. I am looking at new backpack models and perhaps the Tempest has changed enough to be reconsidered. Of course, I maybe I should just wait until you have convinced Osprey to produce Ultreia and Suseia!!!
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
As I stated I chose the Talon in 2015 because it fit me better than the Tempest, even though I am female. Although packs are designed for women or men, that doesn't mean that only women should use womens packs and men mens packs. You must choose what fits your body best. Definitely going to a good outdoor store and being fitted helps. I did and that is why I ended up with the Talon. I am looking at new backpack models and perhaps the Tempest has changed enough to be reconsidered. Of course, I maybe I should just wait until you have convinced Osprey to produce Ultreia and Suseia!!!
As we speak, I am wearing men's cargo shorts, a men's tee shirt and - come to think of it - men's shoes (size wide). So I'm not going to argue!
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
If the bacpack is loaded correctly it should stand upright as you put it on the ground.
I'm not so sure about this. My Talon 33 does not balance very well and when I look at the shape, I am not surprised. I just accept that as a minor disadvantage. Otherwise it is great.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I have a 2 year old Osprey Sirrus 36L and love it. My super tiny daughter-in-law used the lightweight Osprey Exo 48L and loved it. She didn't need all that room so left the top piece at home to meet airline regulations. My son has the 20L Atmos and an an Atmos 85L...Go Osprey!
He has a lightweight ULA which he has used on his last two Caminos and enjoys it as an ultra lite option.
 
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JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
I'm not so sure about this. My Talon 33 does not balance very well and when I look at the shape, I am not surprised. I just accept that as a minor disadvantage. Otherwise it is great.
The shape of the pack is designed for carrying weight on your back properly. Sitting independently while being loaded is probably not a big priority.
 

susanawee

susanawee
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances-(2013/14/18
Camino Salvado Perth -(2015)
West Highland Way (2016)
Lyon France 2017
I Love and would never part with my first Osprey which has accompanied me on many trips now. I also have four different Osprey Day Packs which have also been on many walks with me. I really cannot recommend them highly enough.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
The main attraction of the Exos is the ultra light weight and the foam padding on shoulder straps and hip belt.
The suggestions to add pockets and zippers and other bits will bring the empty weight right back up to other models. The only way to reduce weight is to reduce material and zippers. It is a trade off.

I love pockets and "stuff" but I will stick to the light weight of the empty Exos pack. The same would apply, of course, to the ladies model.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Now Kestrel fullfill my needs: 48ltrs for the caminos and 28 ltrs for walking for my joball yearound ...
Talon 18 for my wife...
When I worked in a backpacking store, I used to tell women who hiked with husbands or boyfriends to get a smaller pack. That way, on packing day, they could say, "I don't have room for the stove (tent poles, food, etc.), so you'll have to carry that." I was mostly kidding, of course.

The dilemma for me is that I prefer to walk alone, so I don't have anybody I can pawn off the heavy stuff to.
 

WayWalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2016
Wow! Thanks so much for sharing such and interesting backstory! I've only owned Osprey and Colorado is my home for almost 40 years. Thanks for the info on the newer lightweight packs too!
 

andrienettefourie

New Member
Hi! The Osprey Exos (48) is by far my favourite pack (it has everything, imo!) and only weighs 1.1 kg. It is big enough to carry camping gear etc and served me well on many Caminos and all the way to Jerusalem. The smaller version (38) would be more than enough I’m sure for a ‘normal’ Camino...
Still, I bought the Lumina (45) last Spring because I HAD TO go as light as possible....
This Summer was my second camino with it and I can recommend it if ‘lightest’ is your issue, whilst retaining all the comfort features.... It was expensive when I bought it and - in the UK - could only be bought online. Pm me if you need more details 🙂
Thank you for this advice. Will be in Birmingham and Wales in October this year so will make sure to order it online the day we arrive for it to reach me before we leave again. Please please send me more details of the Exos 48, Exos 38 and Lumina 45 so I could compare. Weight is a big issue as I had a huge neck operation and now have an artificial disk in my neck so I need to be beware of too heavy. Rather pay more and get the right thing. If you say buy online through Osprey itself in UK or which co? Any chance I'll find the Ospreys at the Outdoor shops in Wales perhaps Bets-y-Coed? Thank you for the info so far - it has given me a lot to think about. I am also looking for the Oboz boots - ever seen or heard of them in the UK? Suppliers? Tried a friend's and they are magnificent but she bought them in NZ.
 

andrienettefourie

New Member
I showed Mike my system for shoulder strap water bottles, which works great. He just laughed. I think he likes the reservoir system better, but I don't think that's for everybody. I prefer water bottles that are accessible.
I agree the water bottles are easier to clean out and I am sure must more hygienic. The bladders takes up too much space in my bag when full.
 

TMinAlaska

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF segments -2014 and 2016
CN/CP - 2018
Pict of bag. Not full and zipped open for access. Bag at top of rucksack is effectively upside down as the zip in on the floor without disconnecting it (on this model anyway.) Contents fall out. Be better if zip was on top (or front).
Heard others comment too, my Kyte the bag cannot be disconnected. But heyho everything still falls out!
Cheers
View attachment 62391
I stow sunglasses and other quick grab stuff so I can reach in while walking (over my head) - perhaps that is why the zipper is on the 'front' of the bag. Works for me....
 

alhartman

346 joyful days in Spain and France since 2005
Camino(s) past & future
Hope so!
Osprey has been my goto manufacturer for the last decade after the GoLite went fashion. I love the features of my Aarn, but it is overkill for the Frances--and the Altus poncho does not fit well over the front pouches.
Talon 33 is my Camino pack and the only features I would add is a larger capacity waist belt and small front pockets. And I would note that less durable and lighter weight materials could be used since durability on the Camino is not as important as light weight. The design really is for comfort at a 15-30# load.
I would also like a mesh bag on top of the top lid for quick deployment of my Altus and a neat way to repackage while wet. My rotator cuffs do not allow me to retreive from the Kangaroo pocket. I also cut off excess strapping including the Ice Axe loops--redundant with the walking pole attachment. For my bad shoulders, water bottles in the side pockets are not accessible but I do use for the footgear to change into at end of day or long breaks.
My 'style' is that I like everything needed during the day accessible while I am wearing the pack--hence my love for Aarn front pouches and large capacity hip belt pockets.

FWIW, I loved Patagonia in the Chouinard days and care little since they became Patagucci. I started in the 60s as a fan of Frostline. Seems to me that history of great small manufacturers is that they do not survive the big expansion--NorthFace and SierraDesigns do not have the design quality they once did. I attribute a lot to the fact that, to sell more gear, they let of fashionists control the designers. All that said, I think Osprey is doing a great job--my only issue is the proliferation of models. I certainly like what Mike and Diane have done!!
 

ctay122

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020 Camino Frances
I spent last week up in Dolores, Colorado, staying with my friends, Mike and Diane. Mike and I have now been friends for 50 years (!) since we hiked and camped together as young teenagers. He owns, and founded, Osprey Backpacks. I used to tease him because he liked to sew. I said that there were two kinds of people who backpacked; those who use the gear to get out into the wilderness and those who go out into the wilderness in order to play with their gear. Mike was the gear-fiddler. I worried back then about him ever holding down a real job, because he was such a dreamer.

He has a workshop on his property (with marmots tunneling under it and bears wandering around outside some nights), and there is a big new headquarters in Cortez, Colorado. He showed me all the new space-age materials he is working with, and how he's experimenting with mesh pads of various densities with a 3D press. I had no idea there was something that could do this. We toured the new building - complete with a ping pong room, a beer tap in the kitchen, full showers and lockers for those riding their bikes to work, and a kennel for the dogs who come to work, too. There's a show room with practically every Osprey pack that's ever been made right next to the Customer Service department. When people call with questions about their packs, the reps can look at the actual pack while they talk to the customers, even if the pack is no longer made.

Another, older building in Cortez houses their earlier factory, now devoted to repair and storage of parts (after moving from Santa Cruz, California, Osprey opened their first Colorado operation in Dolores). A few Navajo workers in the older Cortez building have been with the company for 25 years. One guy there who does repair work in the shop collects used backpacks to distribute to disadvantaged folks in SE Asia, Africa and elsewhere in the world who can really use them. Two rooms full of backpacks were ready to be delivered.

Most fascinating to me was the large warehouse full of parts; shelves and shelves with box drawers of thousands of different kinds of buckles, straps and other parts, labeled with the name and year of the packs they belonged to. Osprey has a lifetime warranty, so they need to keep all those things in stock. I'm telling you; don't hesitate to send your pack back to them for repairs or call them for help.

You may know that Osprey has a very lightweight pack (I saw a lot of them on the Camino) called the Exos for men and the Eja for women. It's a very good balance between durability, comfort and weight-savings. Now they make a superlight pack called the Lumina for women and Levity for men. They're about a pound and a half in weight.

Oh, and I recommended a name for a new pack, the Ultreia. I like the idea of an embroidered scallop shell on the pack flap. I don't know about the shell advice, but he did really like the name idea, so we will see...
That sounds awesome! I love your idea. BTW I have only hiked with Ospreys and got my 3rd one for my Camino next April, a Tempest 40L
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly

VAtoNC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
305 miles of the Frances, 2019. Planning another Frances 4/20 and will go the distance this time!
I would ask Domigee about the Lumina. I haven't tried it myself. I carry the Sirrus and plan to get an Eja next. It's a much lighter weight pack than mine, but not as light as the Lumina. I'm sure Osprey has a dealer in South Africa. I'd recommend going into a shop and trying them on (and other brands too, of course).
I tried the Sirrus 36 but found my older Talon 44 to be lighter and more comfortable
 

GingerHaddad

Member
Camino(s) past & future
September (2018)
I spent last week up in Dolores, Colorado, staying with my friends, Mike and Diane. Mike and I have now been friends for 50 years (!) since we hiked and camped together as young teenagers. He owns, and founded, Osprey Backpacks. I used to tease him because he liked to sew. I said that there were two kinds of people who backpacked; those who use the gear to get out into the wilderness and those who go out into the wilderness in order to play with their gear. Mike was the gear-fiddler. I worried back then about him ever holding down a real job, because he was such a dreamer.

He has a workshop on his property (with marmots tunneling under it and bears wandering around outside some nights), and there is a big new headquarters in Cortez, Colorado. He showed me all the new space-age materials he is working with, and how he's experimenting with mesh pads of various densities with a 3D press. I had no idea there was something that could do this. We toured the new building - complete with a ping pong room, a beer tap in the kitchen, full showers and lockers for those riding their bikes to work, and a kennel for the dogs who come to work, too. There's a show room with practically every Osprey pack that's ever been made right next to the Customer Service department. When people call with questions about their packs, the reps can look at the actual pack while they talk to the customers, even if the pack is no longer made.

Another, older building in Cortez houses their earlier factory, now devoted to repair and storage of parts (after moving from Santa Cruz, California, Osprey opened their first Colorado operation in Dolores). A few Navajo workers in the older Cortez building have been with the company for 25 years. One guy there who does repair work in the shop collects used backpacks to distribute to disadvantaged folks in SE Asia, Africa and elsewhere in the world who can really use them. Two rooms full of backpacks were ready to be delivered.

Most fascinating to me was the large warehouse full of parts; shelves and shelves with box drawers of thousands of different kinds of buckles, straps and other parts, labeled with the name and year of the packs they belonged to. Osprey has a lifetime warranty, so they need to keep all those things in stock. I'm telling you; don't hesitate to send your pack back to them for repairs or call them for help.

You may know that Osprey has a very lightweight pack (I saw a lot of them on the Camino) called the Exos for men and the Eja for women. It's a very good balance between durability, comfort and weight-savings. Now they make a superlight pack called the Lumina for women and Levity for men. They're about a pound and a half in weight.

Oh, and I recommended a name for a new pack, the Ultreia. I like the idea of an embroidered scallop shell on the pack flap. I don't know about the shell advice, but he did really like the name idea, so we will see...
You just made me really glad both my packs are Osprey. Great to see a US company that is so responsible and responsive !
 

Rod Murray

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2016) Portuguese Coastal (Sept 2019)
I spent last week up in Dolores, Colorado, staying with my friends, Mike and Diane. Mike and I have now been friends for 50 years (!) since we hiked and camped together as young teenagers. He owns, and founded, Osprey Backpacks....
Great insight into a great company. It’s true isn’t it that really good companies always have extraordinary people at the helm? Will see how my new Gregory pack performs over my small Deuter from my Camino Frances in 2016 and compared to my very small Osprey!
 

Swift3

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP, Porto to SdC, May/June 2016
I LOVE this thread. I am on my third Osprey rucksack and loved them all. Their customer service is among the best I’ve seen anywhere in any industry.

I also really like the idea of crowd-sourcing the ideal Camino rucksack. We already have a starting point, using the Exos as a foundation or platform. IMHO, I would include:

- A neon safety color option, like lime yellow.
- Reflective patches front, rear and sides, perhaps embroidered Conchas...
- “Stow-and-go” pole management system.
- Large (5” x 7”), gusseted, mesh, waist pockets, with zips.
- Top lid pockets, I preferred two, like on my old Kestrel 48-liter. You could make the top lid removable (like the Exos) for those who desire to save weight.
- Water bladder capable
- Stretch, gusseted, mesh pockets (expandable to 4” x 8”) on the shoulder straps for small items you want quick to hand. Ideally, they should accept .5 liter water bottles or mobile phones, etc.
- optional plastic snap clips to hold an umbrella shaft on the shoulder strap. The best system now on the market anchors the handle using the wrist strap at the waist belt to pull down to stabilize the very long shaft umbrella.
- click fastener attachment points for a chest pack option on each shoulder strap.

This chest pack would be color matched to the main rucksack, or could be ordered in a different color, as the buyer chose. It would have a large 4-5 liter main compartment, two bottle holders, bungee cords to tie down things like a poncho, gloves or a light jacket. The best one I’ve seen also had a horizontal, top sleeve that would hold a 1.5 liter bottle for this long, Meseta or de la Plata days.

I use a chest pack, sometimes worn lower, at gut, or waist level, but suspended from my shoulder straps.

I know this sounds very busy. But I have been using aftermarket products to achieve this level of utility. I would rather my rucksack have these features built-in instead of cobbled together and added on.

Also, I encourage using lightweight rips top fabric, possible sip-nylon or something like cubes fiber. Yes I know it will be expensive, but ultimately, I feel it would be worth it.

Hope this helps the dialog.
- click fastener attachment points for a chest pack option on each shoulder strap.

Agree!
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
click fastener attachment points for a chest pack option on each shoulder strap.
Me too. One of my elastic thingys on the shoulder straps broke this year, but that's the only thing to attach the click fasteners to.
 

Bogong

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
First, March 2014
There is a counterpoint. A friend walked the Camino around two years ago jusing an Osprey pack. I forget the model. She was in agony as she found the strapping like a cheese grater( her words) and she still suffers from the scarring and the pain. I have heard of at least one similar case but I think they threw the pack away early on. I trust they have had some feedback and addressed this problem. Given the lifetime guarantee I'm going to tell my friend to return her pack, ask them for her money back and also that they pay for postage presuming she hasn't consigned it to the tip. Otherwise I would seriously recommend that anyone contemplating a new pack, including some of the mega expensive ones, try to "test drive" it first rather than rely on what seems to have been a concerted advertising campaign on this site.

De Colores

Bogong
 

ObeeOne

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning stage for 2020
Oh, and I recommended a name for a new pack, the Ultreia. I like the idea of an embroidered scallop shell on the pack flap. I don't know about the shell advice, but he did really like the name idea, so we will see...
[/QUOTE]

I used to live in the four corners in Mancos. My husband worked in Cortez. There sure was not much of anything in Dolores in those days!

Will watch for the Lumina and Ultrea!
 

Tony Bobcat

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017
I spent last week up in Dolores, Colorado, staying with my friends, Mike and Diane. Mike and I have now been friends for 50 years (!) since we hiked and camped together as young teenagers. He owns, and founded, Osprey Backpacks. I used to tease him because he liked to sew. I said that there were two kinds of people who backpacked; those who use the gear to get out into the wilderness and those who go out into the wilderness in order to play with their gear. Mike was the gear-fiddler. I worried back then about him ever holding down a real job, because he was such a dreamer.

He has a workshop on his property (with marmots tunneling under it and bears wandering around outside some nights), and there is a big new headquarters in Cortez, Colorado. He showed me all the new space-age materials he is working with, and how he's experimenting with mesh pads of various densities with a 3D press. I had no idea there was something that could do this. We toured the new building - complete with a ping pong room, a beer tap in the kitchen, full showers and lockers for those riding their bikes to work, and a kennel for the dogs who come to work, too. There's a show room with practically every Osprey pack that's ever been made right next to the Customer Service department. When people call with questions about their packs, the reps can look at the actual pack while they talk to the customers, even if the pack is no longer made.

Another, older building in Cortez houses their earlier factory, now devoted to repair and storage of parts (after moving from Santa Cruz, California, Osprey opened their first Colorado operation in Dolores). A few Navajo workers in the older Cortez building have been with the company for 25 years. One guy there who does repair work in the shop collects used backpacks to distribute to disadvantaged folks in SE Asia, Africa and elsewhere in the world who can really use them. Two rooms full of backpacks were ready to be delivered.

Most fascinating to me was the large warehouse full of parts; shelves and shelves with box drawers of thousands of different kinds of buckles, straps and other parts, labeled with the name and year of the packs they belonged to. Osprey has a lifetime warranty, so they need to keep all those things in stock. I'm telling you; don't hesitate to send your pack back to them for repairs or call them for help.

You may know that Osprey has a very lightweight pack (I saw a lot of them on the Camino) called the Exos for men and the Eja for women. It's a very good balance between durability, comfort and weight-savings. Now they make a superlight pack called the Lumina for women and Levity for men. They're about a pound and a half in weight.

Oh, and I recommended a name for a new pack, the Ultreia. I like the idea of an embroidered scallop shell on the pack flap. I don't know about the shell advice, but he did really like the name idea, so we will see...
I would love to send my Osprey Back pack back and have the waist strap pockets made larger, they are made too small.
 

KariC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho portugûes (2016)
Thanks for this - love Ospreys, have several, and hiked the Camino with an Exos.
 

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