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American pilgrims may be interested in this page...

  • Thread starter Deleted member 43780
  • Start date
2020 Camino Guides
Camino(s) past & future
2015 entire CF, Porto and CF again in Feb 2020
They will mail you a pilgrim passport (free of charge) before you go.
 
D

Deleted member 43780

Guest
FYI: REI stores have classes on walking and what to pack for the Camino.
Friend of mine told me there is a class in REI Jacksonville, Florida, this month.

Check their page for info.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
FYI: REI stores have classes on walking and what to pack for the Camino.
Friend of mine told me there is a class in REI Jacksonville, Florida, this month.

Check their page for info.
I'm a chapter coordinator for American Pilgrims on the Camino in Southern Oregon, and we give presentations at REI several times per year.
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
A great organization that also sponsors the development of the Caminos and training of Hospitalero.
They also give financial grants to needy causes related to the Camino, such as albergue upgrades, etc. Check the APOC website to see some of the grants that have been made.
 

Geodoc

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2018 (across Pyrenees, then Sarria to SdC), CF 2019 (SJPdP to Finisterra & Muxia), CI 2019
Great organization. Got my credencial from them and they list my cookbook on their website. Our payback - my wife will become a hospitalero (I may, too. This is to be seen).
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I'm a chapter coordinator for American Pilgrims on the Camino in Southern Oregon, and we give presentations at REI several times per year.
Do the APOC credencials still take sellos on both sides? The paper was excellent, but since I frame and hang my credencials, hiding half the sellos isn't viable.
 

The Kolbist

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
past: Frances, inland Portuguese, Fatima
future: Del Norte, coastal Porugues, Englis
FYI: REI stores have classes on walking and what to pack for the Camino.
Friend of mine told me there is a class in REI Jacksonville, Florida, this month.

Check their page for info.
In our neck-of-the-woods REI, I always talk to the REI folks and ask them if they have heard of Camino. Most of the answers are either NO or vaguely. The vaguely answers always recommend a trail running shows because in their opinion it's just walking. I always tell them that most of the time I see mid-cut shoes in the camino to protect their ankles and the few low cut trail running shoes that we've seen doesnt usually last until Santiago. There's gonna be a lot of debates on this but my point is not about the shoes at all but rather, how these folks would be were pretty sure of their recommendations when they have vaguely or half of them never heard of the Camino much less never been to Camino. They are experts on PCT or AT but more or less never heard of the Camino. This might have change since the last time i visted an REI which is last year but in my experience, REI folks dont know much about the Camino. just my 2 cents...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino francés, Camino portugués (Tui), Pilgrims Welcome Office, hospitalero 8 times
American Pilgrims does indeed provide credentials but they are not "free". They are by donation. Hopefully we all approach staying in a "free" albergue the same way. The organization will indeed mail to other countries but, again, a donation covering the not insignificant cost of production and mailing will be cheerfully accepted. American Pilgrims' credentials have cells for 56 sellos - both sides are useable. Actually *every* credential I've ever seen is two-sided. Not very efficient to produce a credential with one side not being used but I understand your situation.

Grant program: The annual awards to the Camino infrastructure have been running between $35,000 and $50,000 total.

American Pilgrims holds hospitalero training sessions perhaps three times a year in various places around the country. (There are also sessions in Canada provided by Canadian Hospitaleros: http://canadianhospitaleros.blogspot.com)

I'm one of the coordinators for the Colorado Front Range Chapter. This late winter we're doing six Intro to the Camino presentations at REI stores - four to go at the moment. We have a minimum of two events of one kind or another every month.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
Do the APOC credencials still take sellos on both sides? The paper was excellent, but since I frame and hang my credencials, hiding half the sellos isn't viable.
I framed both of my Compostelas, and confronted the same problem as you with respect to the Credencias, so what I did was place each in a red open envelope with red ribbon, and affixed each to the backs of the framed Compostelas. When someone expresses interest in the Camino journey, I can easily remove them from their envelope homes and share all my Sellos.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
American Pilgrims' credentials have cells for 56 sellos - both sides are useable. Actually *every* credential I've ever seen is two-sided. Not very efficient to produce a credential with one side not being used but I understand your situation.
I'm looking at my wall with credencials from four different caminos. They all have sellos on one side and maps, etc. on the back side. For instance, look at those issued by the Cathedral (currently and in the past). It may be less efficient, but it is certainly accommodating of a pilgrim's desire to display the entirety of the journey. I recall other threads on this exact topic throughout the forums.

BTW, I first attended on of your info sessions with my oldest son at the REI flagship store in Denver back in late 2012/early 2013. Very informative and nicely done. Edit: Also, my son and I met you and your wife on the approach to O Cebriero in June 2013, on the eve of the feast of the birth of St. John the Baptist.
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
For those concerned about visible sellos on the credentials only being on one side, credentials along the Frances route are inexpensive. Just get two or three sets and when one side gets filled up, stat using a second set, or a third etc. You can obtain credentials in Saint Jean at the pilgrim's office as well as the tourist office, and you can obtain them in Pamplona as well at the Jesus y Maria albergue.
Spending a couple of euro on or using more than one set of credentials not that big of a deal. I am surprised that anyone would expect a free set of credentials, lol.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Agreed, except inside the 100 km mark, where they aren't easily found, although you can get "extensions" that can be taped onto the end. My only point was that the APOC (the one I started with on my first camino) only has four panes available on the one side, which barely got me to Estella before I needed another. Nice to have six or seven panes for sellos before having to get another. Not the end of the world, but nice to have.

What's wrong with free credencials? The benefit of an APOC credencial isn't that it's free, it's that you support the good work they do. With limits on how much a credencial can be sold for, a donativo system probably raises more money even with freeloaders.
 
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Rex

Pilgrim Trekker
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago (2013)
Lisboa to Santiago (2018)
In our neck-of-the-woods REI, I always talk to the REI folks and ask them if they have heard of Camino. Most of the answers are either NO or vaguely. The vaguely answers always recommend a trail running shows because in their opinion it's just walking. I always tell them that most of the time I see mid-cut shoes in the camino to protect their ankles and the few low cut trail running shoes that we've seen doesnt usually last until Santiago. There's gonna be a lot of debates on this but my point is not about the shoes at all but rather, how these folks would be were pretty sure of their recommendations when they have vaguely or half of them never heard of the Camino much less never been to Camino. They are experts on PCT or AT but more or less never heard of the Camino. This might have change since the last time i visted an REI which is last year but in my experience, REI folks dont know much about the Camino. just my 2 cents...
All depends on where you live. I first heard of the Camino Frances through a friend who works at Seattle's REI Headquarters. They have more than 15 workers at the flagship store in Seattle who have done the CF and many other camino routes and can talk with great expertise about what to do and not to do to have a successful camino experience. Note: REI has begun promoting a Camino tour as one of their group hiking options, but just my personal opinion - it's nothing like walking your own camino and finding your own path.

For the money, I've walked over 600 miles in a pair of Salomon Xa Pro 3D trail runners and another 350 miles in a pair of Salomon Speed Cross and never had a blister in either one. They are comfortable and durable. I did not get the shoe recommendation from REI, but from a reputable ultra-marathoner who owns a trail running shoe store in Seattle.
Buen Camino.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Agreed, except inside the 100 km mark, where they aren't easily found, although you can get "extensions" that can be taped onto the end. My only point was that the APOC (the one I started with on my first camino) only has four panes available on the one side, which barely got me to Estella before I needed another. Nice to have six or seven panes for sellos before having to get another. Not the end of the world, but nice to have.

What's wrong with free credencials? The benefit of an APOC credencial isn't that it's free, it's that you support the good work they do. With limits on how much a credencial can be sold for, a donativo system probably raises more money even with freeloaders.
I just find it amusing that anyone would spend hundreds, if not thousands of euros on airfare, equipment, transportation etc to go and walk the Camino, not to mention taking off from a job and then to become a cheap charlie about spending 2-3 euros on the credentials (or to be a cheap charlie at the donativo albergues).
Mind you, I am not referring to those actually on a extremely limited budget to walk the Camino. One where they are literally counting their euros everyday when they walk and a few euro difference here and there can mean not eating lunch because you need the money for the albergue. I am only guessing here, and I may be wrong, but I doubt many regular members and contributors to this forum fall under that category, lol.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Ditto on having Camino-experienced and knowledgeable staff at every REI I've entered in the Denver area. Ditto on the use of trail runners (Brooks and ON) lasting well past 500 miles. I've seen similar everywhere on every trail so far. They are NOT the exception.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I just find it amusing that anyone would spend hundreds, if not thousands of euros on airfare, equipment, transportation etc to go and walk the Camino, not to mention taking off from a job and then to become a cheap charlie about spending 2-3 euros on the credentials (or to be a cheap charlie at the donativo albergues).
Thankfully your view of motivation ("cheap charlie") is probably not the core motivation of most people getting a [donation optional] credencial from APOC. They do good work, and if their approach to "free" credencials proves a liability to their work, I'm sure they'll change it.

Now, if they could just change the empty pages for sellos all to one side . . . :cool:
 

Saranger

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Samos-Santiago 2015 & 2016
Porto-Santiago 2017
Kumano Kodo March 2018
Ferrol-Santiago May 2019
American Pilgrims on the Camino will hold their Annual Gathering of Pilgrims March 12-15, 2020 at Zephyr Point Conference Center in Zephyr Cove, NV (Lake Tahoe). For more information, to see the program and to register for this fantastic weekend go to https://americanpilgrims.org/annual-gathering/ but do so soon. Registration closes on February 26 and spaces are limited. Full program with lots of interest to first-time and veteran pilgrims alike.

A hospitalero training course will be held March 10-12 just before the Gathering. There are still a few places left. If you want to be trained to serve as a hospitalero along the Camino this summer, go to https://americanpilgrims.org/hospitalero-training/ for more information.
 

Beeks

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2019) only 2 weeks available! St. Jean PDP - Pamplona, then Sarria - SDC with the family,
I just find it amusing that anyone would spend hundreds, if not thousands of euros on airfare, equipment, transportation etc to go and walk the Camino, not to mention taking off from a job and then to become a cheap charlie about spending 2-3 euros on the credentials (or to be a cheap charlie at the donativo albergues).
Mind you, I am not referring to those actually on a extremely limited budget to walk the Camino. One where they are literally counting their euros everyday when they walk and a few euro difference here and there can mean not eating lunch because you need the money for the albergue. I am only guessing here, and I may be wrong, but I doubt many regular members and contributors to this forum fall under that category, lol.
The key to becoming a multi-millionaire is NOT paying for credentials. 🤣
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés five times, Madrid two days, Ingles once.
RJM said: I just find it amusing that anyone would spend hundreds, if not thousands of euros on airfare, equipment, transportation etc to go and walk the Camino, not to mention taking off from a job and then to become a cheap charlie about spending 2-3 euros on the credentials (or to be a cheap charlie at the donativo albergues).
Mind you, I am not referring to those actually on a extremely limited budget to walk the Camino. One where they are literally counting their euros everyday when they walk and a few euro difference here and there can mean not eating lunch because you need the money for the albergue. I am only guessing here, and I may be wrong, but I doubt many regular members and contributors to this forum fall under that category, lol.
The key to becoming a multi-millionaire is NOT paying for credentials. 🤣
Frankly, I think both of these remarks are rude.
 

Carmen L. Padron

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2016
Do the APOC credencials still take sellos on both sides? The paper was excellent, but since I frame and hang my credencials, hiding half the sellos isn't viable.
What about framing them between 2 pieces of glass or see thru plastic? This way you can show/see both sides.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances/SJPP '15,'16,'18,'19,('20)
Way of St. Francis, Italy 2017
Portuguese/Finisterre 2018, 2019
In our neck-of-the-woods REI, I always talk to the REI folks and ask them if they have heard of Camino. Most of the answers are either NO or vaguely. The vaguely answers always recommend a trail running shows because in their opinion it's just walking. I always tell them that most of the time I see mid-cut shoes in the camino to protect their ankles and the few low cut trail running shoes that we've seen doesnt usually last until Santiago. There's gonna be a lot of debates on this but my point is not about the shoes at all but rather, how these folks would be were pretty sure of their recommendations when they have vaguely or half of them never heard of the Camino much less never been to Camino. They are experts on PCT or AT but more or less never heard of the Camino. This might have change since the last time i visted an REI which is last year but in my experience, REI folks dont know much about the Camino. just my 2 cents...
I am one of the Jacksonville coordinators for American Pikgrims on the Camino and will be giving the comprehensive presentation on walking the Camino. I will be walking my eight Camino this summer. While I have had your same experience when buying gear, most presentations (all of ours) are given by seasoned pilgrims. Our upcoming presentation will be on Saturday, Feb 29 from 2:00-4:00
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
It is normal for people raised in a world where everything has a price-tag to be amazed at something that's free. This is one reason the Camino is such a wonder to North Americans. Generosity without a price... that's what camino hospitality is about. If you are in need, there is someplace for you to rest even if you cannot to pay for it. People share their food and bandages and wisdom and wine with you, gratis! It's amazing!
People with resources share them, and pay their way, to keep the whole system going. People without can keep walking, and sharing what they have. It is what makes this trail unique. It's glorious. It is what Grace is.
 

ctay122

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020 Camino Frances
FYI: REI stores have classes on walking and what to pack for the Camino.
Friend of mine told me there is a class in REI Jacksonville, Florida, this month.

Check their page for info.
I took a class at REI 2 weeks ago. One of the staff did the Frances, the other did the Portuguese. Alot of good information was given out, I highly recommend checking it out if you have an REI close by.
 

NJohn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept/Oct 2020
I'm one of the coordinators for the Colorado Front Range Chapter. This late winter we're doing six Intro to the Camino presentations at REI stores - four to go at the moment. We have a minimum of two events of one kind or another every month.
My husband and I appreciate the resources the Colorado chapter has provided and continues to provide. We’re looking forward to the shell ceremony next Saturday. Thanks for all you do! And while I’m at it, thank you to all the many volunteers, the Hospitalero’s and Ivar and this great community on the forum. We have learned so much!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino francés, Camino portugués (Tui), Pilgrims Welcome Office, hospitalero 8 times
This may have been said somewhere in this long thread but American Pilgrims' credentials are not "free" - they are by donation. Just like that donativo albergue you stayed in! // And re the kind remark about the Colorado Front Range Chapter- next week we have three intro to the Camino talks at local REI stores and the eighth annual formal Shell Ceremony. // There are presently 52 local chapters. If you live in the U.S., there's likely one near you! // The American Pilgrims grant program every year awards somewhere between $35,000 and $50,000 to support the Camino infrastructure. Total to date is about $400,000. The primary source of this money is memberships.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
What about framing them between 2 pieces of glass or see thru plastic? This way you can show/see both sides.
Easier just to use the Cathedral credencial where all the sellos are on one side and can be traditionally framed and left on the wall. To almost everyone who sees them, the framed credencial with all the sellos is far more impressive and captivating than the compostella certificate.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I'm a chapter coordinator for American Pilgrims on the Camino in Southern Oregon, and we give presentations at REI several times per year.
You do? Where are you in Southern Oregon?
I'm in Dallas, Oregon.
I'd love to help with a presentation sometime if you find you need anyone.
 

jbear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to SdC march-may 2015
I’m an Atlanta Chapter coordinator. The REI’s here do camino classes and both of the presenters (Tom or Fred, depending on the store) have walked multiple caminos. Our chapter also does a class that is intended to be a follow up to theirs. If you in the Atlanta metro feel free to join us at our events. We usually have two per month (hikes, lunches, coffee, happy hour, etc).
 

Anthony Rocco

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Ignaciano, Aragones, Arle, Tolosana, Salvador, Primitivo, Madrid, Olvidado/Invierno (2020)
Ou
may be of help to American Pilgrims
Outstanding group whose numbers have swelled to nationwide to over 10,000. Our Mid-Atlantic Chapter (The DC area, including northern Virginia and southern Maryland) alone has over 500 members. We do monthly hikes and hold a practice camino later in April each year at Prince William National Forest. Two-days of hikes, overnight in bunkhouses, communal meals, gear demonstration...everything one needs to learn and practice by doing. Next week we have our shell ceremony for new walkers, 25 in total. Those of us who are veterans do our best to pass on our knowledge.
 

Keyes

Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2016
Francesco 2017
Francigena 2017
Portuguese 2018
Norte 2019
(2020 la Plata)
In our neck-of-the-woods REI, I always talk to the REI folks and ask them if they have heard of Camino. Most of the answers are either NO or vaguely. The vaguely answers always recommend a trail running shows because in their opinion it's just walking. I always tell them that most of the time I see mid-cut shoes in the camino to protect their ankles and the few low cut trail running shoes that we've seen doesnt usually last until Santiago. There's gonna be a lot of debates on this but my point is not about the shoes at all but rather, how these folks would be were pretty sure of their recommendations when they have vaguely or half of them never heard of the Camino much less never been to Camino. They are experts on PCT or AT but more or less never heard of the Camino. This might have change since the last time i visted an REI which is last year but in my experience, REI folks dont know much about the Camino. just my 2 cents...
Where are you in Texas? REI in San Antonio has several Camino classes yearly. Staff have all heard of the Camino, although they have more AT / PCT / camping experience. They are very helpful advising equipment choices without pushing based on any particular personal experience. There were many pilgrims - including myself - wearing low cut trail runners on the Norte last summer. Our shoes all made it to Santiago with plenty of miles left in them.
 

The Kolbist

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
past: Frances, inland Portuguese, Fatima
future: Del Norte, coastal Porugues, Englis
Where are you in Texas? REI in San Antonio has several Camino classes yearly. Staff have all heard of the Camino, although they have more AT / PCT / camping experience. They are very helpful advising equipment choices without pushing based on any particular personal experience. There were many pilgrims - including myself - wearing low cut trail runners on the Norte last summer. Our shoes all made it to Santiago with plenty of miles left in them.
Hi,

No, I havent attended any camino class in the North Texas area but by then we have been to camino 3 times already so I might know a thing or two about the camino. We usually would just engage them in conversation about the camino and maybe the ones that we talked to haven't been to Camino, know very little about the Camino and to one or two, I have to introduce the camino. Again, it was not about the shoes. Anyway, we have never walked during summer it's always on the shoulder months (early May, late Sept up to Nov) and we have lots and lots of rain (even weeks at end) and for those who wore low cut trail shoes, we saw that mud and rain did some effect on them while we who were using boots were dry and mud was easily handled but then again, to each his own and it was not even the point. Because I heard that some walked barefoot in the past.
 

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