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Buying a Hamlet in Galicia

0 Euro Camino Bank Note

TMcA

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona to Santiago (2013)
Le Puy to Pamplona in segments (2013 - 2016)
Pamplona to León
I believe all who have posted so far are from the U.S. Maybe we are all thinking, and I am one of them, that right now we'd be better off living elsewhere.;)

Anyway, I don't think purchase of a home in Spain brings with it any kind of temporary residence visa. There is still the Schengen visa requirement (for U.S. citizens and many/most non-Schengen countries.) Then there is healthcare if this is a retirement home. The Brit who bought the village and is developing it will probably "luck out" and find that the BREXIT negotiations provide some form of reciprocal coverage for UK citizens to at least partially replicate what they have previously enjoyed. Meaning visiting a doctor or having a procedure in Spain will be partially covered by some post-BREXIT reciprocity. Maybe... this has yet to be decided. Brits buying places in his village will join the earlier emigration of Brits who have moved to southern France and southern Spain.

My newsfeed has had a recent stream of breezy articles about retiring in desirable and cheaper countries...Italy was the last such place. Don't know for sure, but I would guess the same impediments exist for those outside of the Schengen Area - residency authorizations and healthcare.

But dream on, U.S, citizens.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
...
Anyway, I don't think purchase of a home in Spain brings with it any kind of temporary residence visa. There is still the Schengen visa requirement (for U.S. citizens and many/most non-Schengen countries.) Then there is healthcare if this is a retirement home. The Brit who bought the village and is developing it will probably "luck out" and find that the BREXIT ...
Three different things here.

1) If you own an apartment or a house in EU you are eligible for long term visa no big problem,
2) You can arrange your health care security quite easily in country of residence but of course you would either have to pay for it through taxes (from your salary) or pay for it independently,
3) Brexit and possible glitches re "rights" is completely something else.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
But dream on, U.S, citizens.
Residency in the EU for Americans could probably be handled by alternating 90 day periods in Spain and Ireland (or Poland under a special visa). Having medical coverage could be handled too if, like in @rappahannock_rev's dreams, you win a lottery.
 
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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Residency in the EU for Americans could probably be handled by alternating 90 day periods in Spain and Ireland (or Poland under a special visa). Having medical coverage could be handled too if, like in @rappahannock_rev's dreams, you win a lottery.
Wrong and wrong.

Read my post above. Owners of a property are eligible for residential visa! And members of their close family too.

I don't really have to move a muscle to have minimum pension and basic health insurance in Slovenia if I pay 370€ per month. Don't know for Spain but we are (at least from the OP perspective) talking about retirement. So I guess you would already have these things covered. And you definitely don't need to win a lottery although ... ;)
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
I dream about buying a village often as I'm walking a Camino. But then reality sets in and the wise words of one of our most valued members......... "There is a reason many of those hamlets are empty" ;)
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Someone once said...There are those who "make things happen", those who "watch things happen", and those who "don't know anything is happening at all". Probably for many who make things happen...it often starts out with a pipe dream.
 
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Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
I think that the place in Vilalba is closer to Norte than Primitivo.
The group of friends are from Madrid.
I am sure that they like the place because the landscape is green and beautiful but I hope that previously had checked how would it be the life in winter by renting a house in the area.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
The Brit who bought the village and is developing it will probably "luck out" and find that the BREXIT negotiations provide some form of reciprocal coverage for UK citizens to at least partially replicate what they have previously enjoyed.
See previous message: the village was bought by a group of Spanish people. They are retired, just watch the video ... the British man mentioned in the article has nothing to do with this village. He runs an agency that sells real estate and he has renovated an old house himself. He has married a Galician and has lived in Galicia for over 40 years. So none of them have to cope with additional issues like moving to a foreign country they know only from a few visits and the conditions for qualifying for residency.
 
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Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo, Norte, Francés, Volunteer Hospitalero.
"There is a reason many of those hamlets are empty"
The main reason is that people have to work and take care of their family.

If you have children, would you like to raise them away from other children?

For most people, finding work in such isolated places is really difficult. I knew a painter, from Slovakia, I think, who moved to live in an amazing house in Grajal de Campos (next to Sahagún) ... but this guy had the advantage of having a liberal profession ... I hope I can make him a visit on my next Camino!

By the way, the Albergue in Grajal de Campos ... just amazing !! Unfortunately it has no hospitalero, but the building is amazing! I really enjoyed exploring the building, the tunnels, ...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Wrong and wrong.

Read my post above. Owners of a property are eligible for residential visa! And members of their close family too.
Kinky, first let me say that my post was being written when yours was sent so, although my reply came after yours I hadn't a chance to read yours first.

I'll stand corrected on the facts but let me quibble about the practicality. I knew that Portugal had a Golden Visa program but hadn't heard about Spain's. Spain too has one but €500,000 for a house is a bit much for me.
I don't really have to move a muscle to have minimum pension and basic health insurance in Slovenia if I pay 370€ per month. Don't know for Spain but we are (at least from the OP perspective) talking about retirement. So I guess you would already have these things covered. And you definitely don't need to win a lottery although ... ;)
American retirees's government health care, Medicare, doesn't pay anything for care outside of the States. And the government's "pension" plan for the masses, Social Security, has a minimum payment of $0.00. That's not a typo.
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés, '14 '17 Finisterre, '14 '17 '18 Primitivo, '15 '18 Portuguese, '17, '18 San Salvador, '18
Wow, I never expected my post to create such a maelstrom of practicalities. Yes, it was a utopian dream only. Unless an entire community was created of retirees, living in an isolated fashion as would be required, in a foreign culture would be difficult at best. Cheers to the dream!
 

Evvie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
I believe all who have posted so far are from the U.S. Maybe we are all thinking, and I am one of them, that right now we'd be better off living elsewhere.;)

Anyway, I don't think purchase of a home in Spain brings with it any kind of temporary residence visa. There is still the Schengen visa requirement (for U.S. citizens and many/most non-Schengen countries.) Then there is healthcare if this is a retirement home. The Brit who bought the village and is developing it will probably "luck out" and find that the BREXIT negotiations provide some form of reciprocal coverage for UK citizens to at least partially replicate what they have previously enjoyed. Meaning visiting a doctor or having a procedure in Spain will be partially covered by some post-BREXIT reciprocity. Maybe... this has yet to be decided. Brits buying places in his village will join the earlier emigration of Brits who have moved to southern France and southern Spain.

My newsfeed has had a recent stream of breezy articles about retiring in desirable and cheaper countries...Italy was the last such place. Don't know for sure, but I would guess the same impediments exist for those outside of the Schengen Area - residency authorizations and healthcare.

But dream on, U.S, citizens.
Yes, I think many in the US are contemplating becoming expats. I've thought about Spain for a long time and buying a hamlet in Galicia sounds perfect but for the Schengen requirements and, of course, healthcare.
 

lindam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Via de La Plata, Portuguese, Camino Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan and Aragones, Norte
Having retired to Spain (from Canada), I am quite familiar with the requirements for residency. Owning a property here does not guarantee residency unless you are prepared to spend 500,000.00 euros. However, there are other ways to acquire residency (e.g., on a non-lucrative visa). Private heath care in Spain (at least here in Barcelona) is top notch and very affordable. As an added bonus, it offers easy to access many Camino routes! I might also add that living here began as a pipe dream (see Camino Chrissy's post above) following our first Camino.
 
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Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Wow, I never expected my post to create such a maelstrom of practicalities. Yes, it was a utopian dream only. Unless an entire community was created of retirees, living in an isolated fashion as would be required, in a foreign culture would be difficult at best. Cheers to the dream!
For the people from Madrid, rural Galicia is also a very different culture (and weather). Of course, they will be able to comunícate with locals in Spanish but are going to hear at bar and shops conversations in Galego that they don't understand. Also their own conversations with locals in Spanish will be difficult because they don't know anything about agriculture, forests and cows and the locals nothing about urban issues.
 

ortemio

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances,14,
Frances,15
Madrid,15
Salvador,15
VdlP,Sanabres
Porto,16
Levante,17
Mozarabe,18
I saved this the other day for future reference, maybe it can help answer some of the questions ...

 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
Wow, I never expected my post to create such a maelstrom of practicalities. Yes, it was a utopian dream only. Unless an entire community was created of retirees, living in an isolated fashion as would be required, in a foreign culture would be difficult at best. Cheers to the dream!
A previous thread ;) It led to me talking to a couple of members living in Spain, on the Camino......
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Hahaha.
Yesterday I watched a TV program about fortune tellers in Spain and to my surprise most of them told that they were autonomous workers and pay taxes. So, the papeleo must not be so hard now. :)
 

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