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Camino de Madrid April/May 2019

Rhomer

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2017)
Portugues (2017)
Podiensis (2018)
Norte (2018)
Hello all

Feeling rather underprepared, but setting off from Madrid on Wednesday! It's been wonderful reading the threads and I've been poring over all the info on Gronze. I think I can complete it in 10/11 days before meeting friends on the CF before heading off again on the San Salvador & Primitivo. However, I've still got a load of questions and would love any advice you can give!
  1. It looks pretty warm in the general area from next week but how cold can it get up in the mountains and what clothes equipment might be needed?
  2. What guidebook/app/map would you recommend?
  3. Where are Ray and Rosa? I keep seeing their names cropping up but seem to have missed where they are!
  4. I read something about bulls on the path that got me a little nervous but couldn't find any solutions! Any tips I might have missed?
It would be great to hear from anyone who's done the path and can answer the above or advise on unmissable stopping places or offer any other tips.
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
Madrid (April '19)
1. A couple of weeks ago I walked the pass with three layers (a shirt and two Decathlon hiking sweaters/jumpers) and light gloves. But that was during a cold snap with sub-zero temperatures, so I don’t think you need to go overboard if the forecast looks good. Check the forecast for Cercedillas and that will give you a decent idea.

2. Johnnie Walker / CSJ is the only guidebook that I’m aware of. I had some issues with it but overall it was OK and did the job. I got the kindle version for my phone.

3. Manzanares el Real. The end of Day 2 if you follow standard stages.

4. Didn’t see any at all.

¡Buen Camino!
 

Doogman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many more in the future (hopefully)
I have just returned to Madrid this morning after walking Madrid to Segovia. The first few days were brilliant weatherwise, with temperatures during the day of 20-21 degrees and sunshine. The last couple of days in the Segovia area were chilly with drizzle - maybe about 10-11 degrees or so. I was fine walking in a tee shirt each day, even up the mountain, but in the evenings I wore a combination of tee shirt, long sleeved shirt, vest and rain jacket. It looks like it is getting warmer again, but I would be prepared for cool nights. People are walking around in their winter jackets, and the cafes have the heaters going.
 

Doogman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many more in the future (hopefully)
I also had the CSJ guide on my phone, but I did not refer to it very much. I had the GPS track laid down on MAPS.ME, so I used that as a guide to check if I was still on the right route.

If you want a rest day, Segovia is wonderful, but beware of crowds. It was crazy busy on Thursday and Friday. The crowds were a shock.
 

rayyrosa

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Madrid, Camino Primitivo, Camino del Norte, Camino Francés, Camino de San Salvador
The weather is good now although it is raining in Manzanares el Real. Now it's 11 degrees so I think you will not find snow in the mountains anymore.
We recommend our guide with map and positioning in each stage:
Camino de Madrid
You can also download our tracks for any app that uses gpx files:
Tracks
We are in Manzanares el Real. At the end of the 2nd stage: Colmenar Viejo-Manzanares el Real. You can call us at +34 645 908 079 and we will pick you up at the beginning of the town
There are only bulls from Colmenar Viejo to Segovia, but they are on closed farms. No problem
Buen Camino.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Hello all

Feeling rather underprepared, but setting off from Madrid on Wednesday! It's been wonderful reading the threads and I've been poring over all the info on Gronze. I think I can complete it in 10/11 days before meeting friends on the CF before heading off again on the San Salvador & Primitivo. However, I've still got a load of questions and would love any advice you can give!
  1. It looks pretty warm in the general area from next week but how cold can it get up in the mountains and what clothes equipment might be needed?
  2. What guidebook/app/map would you recommend?
  3. Where are Ray and Rosa? I keep seeing their names cropping up but seem to have missed where they are!
  4. I read something about bulls on the path that got me a little nervous but couldn't find any solutions! Any tips I might have missed?
It would be great to hear from anyone who's done the path and can answer the above or advise on unmissable stopping places or offer any other tips.
Hi. I walked in May June last year and it was great.
Just printed off the Gronze Maps and that was great. Accommodation was easy.
No bulls on the path.
Excellent sign posting.
Ray Rosa have a website. They are in Manzanares el Real. www.rayrosa.com
Lovely place and people.
 

Doogman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many more in the future (hopefully)
Just to confirm what has been written above, I have just completed the Madrid to Segovia sections and did not encounter any bulls on the trail.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Just to confirm what has been written above, I have just completed the Madrid to Segovia sections and did not encounter any bulls on the trail.
We have had several informative threads about bulls, toros bravos, vacas bravas, and just plain cows and steers. As someone who always plasters myself against a tree or a fence when the herds saunter by, I have absolutely none of the nonchalance with which others just forge ahead. BUT... I do know for a fact that there will never be a toro bravo loose and walking around. For one thing, they are way too valuable to leave out wandering.

Just last year, on the new route into Galisteo on the Vdlp, hundreds of cows and steers started coming up towards me. I waited for at least a half hour over next to a fence, and true to form, as the guy in charge rode up at the end on a little scooter, he looked at me pitifully and said “no hacen nada.” (They won’t do anything). Well, that’s the same thing the dog owners tell me but I still just stand and wait till someone comes and takes the barking menace out of my way. :).

A few posts to set your mind to rest if you are anxious.


 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
We have had several informative threads about bulls, toros bravos, vacas bravas, and just plain cows and steers. As someone who always plasters myself against a tree or a fence when the herds saunter by, I have absolutely none of the nonchalance with which others just forge ahead. BUT... I do know for a fact that there will never be a toro bravo loose and walking around. For one thing, they are way too valuable to leave out wandering.

Just last year, on the new route into Galisteo on the Vdlp, hundreds of cows and steers started coming up towards me. I waited for at least a half hour over next to a fence, and true to form, as the guy in charge rode up at the end on a little scooter, he looked at me pitifully and said “no hacen nada.” (They won’t do anything). Well, that’s the same thing the dog owners tell me but I still just stand and wait till someone comes and takes the barking menace out of my way. :).

A few posts to set your mind to rest if you are anxious.


This is my favourite thread about meeting a bull on the Madrid:
 

marjude

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
4/2011 VdlP,
4/2014 Rota Vincentina, Portugues.
4/2016 Aragones, Frances.
4/2019 Madrid, Frances
Hello all

Feeling rather underprepared, but setting off from Madrid on Wednesday! It's been wonderful reading the threads and I've been poring over all the info on Gronze. I think I can complete it in 10/11 days before meeting friends on the CF before heading off again on the San Salvador & Primitivo. However, I've still got a load of questions and would love any advice you can give!
  1. It looks pretty warm in the general area from next week but how cold can it get up in the mountains and what clothes equipment might be needed?
  2. What guidebook/app/map would you recommend?
  3. Where are Ray and Rosa? I keep seeing their names cropping up but seem to have missed where they are!
  4. I read something about bulls on the path that got me a little nervous but couldn't find any solutions! Any tips I might have missed?
It would be great to hear from anyone who's done the path and can answer the above or advise on unmissable stopping places or offer any other tips.
I’ve just finished the Madrid route. I won’t snswer all your questions as others have answered.

I found the Buen Camino app to be very good.

All the animals I saw were in fenced off paddocks and just happily grazing.
Buen Camino, enjoy your walk. Judy.
 

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'Portuguese,Frances,Norte,Salvador/primitivo,Le puy, Inglés, CDM, Invierno, Fin/Mux, VDLP spring19
We have had several informative threads about bulls, toros bravos, vacas bravas, and just plain cows and steers. As someone who always plasters myself against a tree or a fence when the herds saunter by, I have absolutely none of the nonchalance with which others just forge ahead. BUT... I do know for a fact that there will never be a toro bravo loose and walking around. For one thing, they are way too valuable to leave out wandering.

Just last year, on the new route into Galisteo on the Vdlp, hundreds of cows and steers started coming up towards me. I waited for at least a half hour over next to a fence, and true to form, as the guy in charge rode up at the end on a little scooter, he looked at me pitifully and said “no hacen nada.” (They won’t do anything). Well, that’s the same thing the dog owners tell me but I still just stand and wait till someone comes and takes the barking menace out of my way. :).

A few posts to set your mind to rest if you are anxious.


I’m surprised at you Laurie.
Cows (I think )are in awe of us. Nothing to worry about any more than you would a sheep.
The dogs are all Pussy cats. They just want a hug.
Today on the Vdlp (Carcoboso to Hostal Asturias) so many animals / mostly behind fences but the huge dog in photo was bounding back and forth from me to the pilgrim in front.. was bounding happily.
Annie
 

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CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
I'm not surprised at her answer!

We have cattle on our property, and every two years the herd changes. Let me just say that on occasion, our animals are gentle and docile. Then along comes a jerk.

We try to shuffle out the aggressive animals fairly quickly, but they do exist. I usually give cattle (including bulls, cows, steers, heifers, etc.) a fairly wide berth. Even when they do the summer frolic--jumping, bucking, and kicking out their back hooves--they can be dangerous, albeit inadvertently.

Recently, my husband had a bad accident and ended up in urgent care. The hallways were hung with photos of people who had survived serious injuries. In one, a woman was photographed looking out at the herd of cattle her family raised. She had been seriously gored and tossed by a bull. Her words, upon the helicopter arriving to life flight her to the trauma hospital were, "Make sure my husband puts that one down."

I'm not sharing any of this to scare you all, but we're farmers, and know better than to make the claim that cattle are just docile animals. It's not true. Give them a wide berth.
 

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