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Camino in April with two 8 yr olds

2020 Camino Guides

Workers3233

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
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We have two weeks Easter holidays in 2020 and my two kids are now capable of walking 4-6 hours daily

Ideally want to do the first half of the camino and come back another time to do the second half.

Any advice? Am I mad doing it alone with two kids?
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
Well I dragged along eight kids and an octogenarian grandpa (with hubby).... then went back on my own with the four youngest kids (three times) so perhaps I’m not the best to certify your sanity!
Actually, taking two kids is easier than one, I think.
Not having pressure to finish at a particular place will be useful too because you can play each day by ear.
A pack of cards, tennis ball and journals are the luxuries I would take with kids - let them use them after they have showered, done their hand washing and cooked some food! (Of course you may prefer to eat out and use washing machines and give them a device to while away their free hours - your call!!)
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
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What do you consider as “the first half of the Camino“? My guess is that you and your young ones might walk 250-300km during your two week break, so you might look for a starting point about 500km from Santiago?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
We have two weeks Easter holidays in 2020 and my two kids are now capable of walking 4-6 hours daily

Ideally want to do the first half of the camino and come back another time to do the second half.

Any advice? Am I mad doing it alone with two kids?
My advice if you are walking during Semana Santa and plan on booking any lodging is to DO IT NOW. I'm finding lodgings in the cities already filling up.
 

Workers3233

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Not yet
Well I dragged along eight kids and an octogenarian grandpa (with hubby).... then went back on my own with the four youngest kids (three times) so perhaps I’m not the best to certify your sanity!
Actually, taking two kids is easier than one, I think.
Not having pressure to finish at a particular place will be useful too because you can play each day by ear.
A pack of cards, tennis ball and journals are the luxuries I would take with kids - let them use them after they have showered, done their hand washing and cooked some food! (Of course you may prefer to eat out and use washing machines and give them a device to while away their free hours - your call!!)
That was really helpful (and inspiring)! One question in response- how do you know places have space for you if you are playing each day by ear? I am a planner by nature so winging it doesn't come naturally!!!
 

Workers3233

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Not yet
What do you consider as “the first half of the Camino“? My guess is that you and your young ones might walk 250-300km during your two week break, so you might look for a starting point about 500km from Santiago?
I had thought the total camino was approx 28 days of walking. Therefore finish on day 14 and come back and do days 15 to 28 another time?
 

jefferyonthecamino

http://www.barrerabooks.com/ - Guidebooks
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (1994) & (2013 - 2019)
Camino Portugués (2015 - 2019)
Camino de Madrid (2019)
We have two weeks Easter holidays in 2020 and my two kids are now capable of walking 4-6 hours daily

Ideally want to do the first half of the camino and come back another time to do the second half.

Any advice? Am I mad doing it alone with two kids?
i guess it depends on how many kms you/they can cover in 4-6 hours daily, and even more important, would you/they be enjoying yourself/themselves walking that distance daily for a fortnight.
 

Roland49

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2019 July
<PMFJI>

As far as I remember the walking with my son of this age you will be happy to make 15-20km in 5-6hrs.
Maybe less. If they are well trained or do sports in a club or team you can walk up to 25km in 5-6hrs.

I did my CdS in 27 days, but I was in a quite good shape and do walk a lot on my job and my free time.

Start in Pamplona (or Roncesvalles) and walk to Burgos. That's a third of the CF and should be ok for such young kids.

Just my 2cts. ;)

Best regards and Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
I had thought the total camino was approx 28 days of walking. Therefore finish on day 14 and come back and do days 15 to 28 another time?
From personal experience those dates are a trifle optomistic - yes someone is going to tell me (and you) that they did St Jean to Santiago in 25 days). But if you look at the good guide books you will see that they are talking about 20-25-28 even 30 km days. Even with just simple lightweight backpacks 8 yearolds are not going to manage these distances for 14 days straight.
My 10 Euro cents - start somewhere around Pamplona and aim for 12-15 km per day (maybe 10 km for the first 3-5 days whilst you all become what I call "camino fit" - use to the track; the food; the beds; etc.
Northern Spain (from Roncesvalles to Leon ) has over 2000 years of "modern history" (and even goes back to 450,000 years - at Atapuerca) so maybe try to make it a friendly yet educational experience with a book on the history of the Camino. Maybe even start them learning some basic Spanish. Cheers
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
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The "standard" duration for the Camino Frances (St. Jean Pied de Port to Santiago) is 33 days, plus or minus. This is what the seminal guide by John Brierely proposes. Most ADULT pilgrims aim for this. Remember, your legs as a grown up are much, much longer than any eight-year old.

Each time I have done the Frances, and solo, it has taken between 36 - 38 days. This provided needed rest days at Burgos, Leon and Astorga. I usually tell adults to allow 40 days or so, relax and enjoy the journey. Taking rest days every week or so helps as well.

My other advice is that if you cannot devote enough time to do it fully, enjoying each day and not rushing, break it up into stages or segments. Many, many people do this and take several years to complete the entire route.

If you are time-limited, my recommendation would be to start at Ponferrada. There are good bus and train connections to here from Madrid and elsewhere in Spain.

This is nominally about 220 km east of Santiago and would take 10 days for an adult. For an eight-year old, possibly several days longer. There is a VERY cool Knights Templar castle there that you will want to make time to visit, perhaps the day before you start.

However, the advice above about booking early is spot on. Reserve early, confirm, then confirm again. If you must change your plans ALWAYS notify the property that you are arriving late or not at all.

When you do you reservation planning, consider that, if you can comfortably walk - say 24 km in 6 hours - the kids MIGHT be able to cover no more than perhaps 18 km in the same time...provided you can regain their attention and focus, and they do not throw a tantrum and refuse to walk further... There are enough cafes at regular intervals that they can be plied with snacks, etc.

You should plan accommodation reservations accordingly. Also, along this stretch, backpack and luggage transport services are commonly available from town to town. So the kids need only carry a school backpack with things they might need during the day. Things like toiletries and extra clothing can go ahead in the mochila transport vehicle. Search above for mochila transport Camino Frances.

Walking in April on the Frances, you WILL encounter light but wet snow at elevations over 700 metres ASL. So, the kids need to have a layerable fleece, a shell parka, a poncho, a warm beanie and gloves. I recommend microfleece or microfiber for everything but the poncho. You must keep them warm, even if they get wet. On the Frances, snow is possible through the end of May. Hypothermia is a risk if one becomes both cold and wet. Wet and warm is okay. You will dry out.

To answer one of your original questions, no, you are not mad, and this would be a most excellent adventure for the children. You just need to thing and plan ahead accordingly.

Perhaps others, here in the forum who have traveled with younger children (pre-teens) in the spring, could offer additional commentary and advice. Not having done so, I am extrapolating based on my experience and direct observations.

Hope this helps.
 

c0484

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
We have two weeks Easter holidays in 2020 and my two kids are now capable of walking 4-6 hours daily

Ideally want to do the first half of the camino and come back another time to do the second half.

Any advice? Am I mad doing it alone with two kids?
I always walk the Camino during April and May. I've seen a lot of kids. They will do fine if you let them set the pace (within reason). Buen Camino
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Frances (2018}
We have two weeks Easter holidays in 2020 and my two kids are now capable of walking 4-6 hours daily

Ideally want to do the first half of the camino and come back another time to do the second half.

Any advice? Am I mad doing it alone with two kids?
I would not take them over the Pyrenees in April. The weather can be atrocious at times. If by any chance Napolean is opened when you get there, bear in mind that there will still be places with snow on the ground and deep mud where the snow has melted. In 2018, I set off in mid April in glorious sunshine, stopped the night in Orisson and made it to Roncesvalles next day in a fierce blizzard. I had hoped to go back next year and start walking on April 1st but even if Napolean is opened, I am going Valcarlos. Back in 2013, an American lady took her two girls, one who was 8, and although the 'girls on the way', as they called themselves, were experienced hill walkers, the youngest found it tough doing the Valcarlos route. Personally, with two kids, I would think about starting in either Roncesvalles or Pamplona
 

Jim

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006- Camino Portuguese
2008- Camino Frances
2009- Sanabres extension of the VDLP
2010- Camino Frances
2011- Camino Potuguese
2014- Camino Frances
2017- Camino Finisterre
I had thought the total camino was approx 28 days of walking. Therefore finish on day 14 and come back and do days 15 to 28 another time?
I will be doing the camino from SJPDP with grandkids who will be 8 and 10 by the time we undertake it, and will use 45 to 50 days. Doing half the camino in two weeks would be intense and rushed for two kids that age-- they would not have the opportunity to take in much of the culture aside from, say, the food. And that would be letting alone the spiritual side of the camino. ...just saying, and this is strictly my opinion. Others might have very different opinions and experiences.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
I would start wherever you choose (Roncesvalles, Pamplona??) and just see how far you get in the time you have available. Transport connections to your airport will be available from most places (you can check on www.rome2rio.com)
If you need to come back three times to finish, that’s a bonus! And I wonder which route you will choose for your fourth visit;-)
One of the beauties of the Camino - especially for planners - is the ease with which you can safely relax and let the days unfold. Even when we walked as a group of eleven we did not have trouble finding accommodation (partly because we walked short stages and arrived in time to be the queue in front of an albergue - this is a technique you could employ to put your mind at ease)
 

Workers3233

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Not yet
I would not take them over the Pyrenees in April. The weather can be atrocious at times. If by any chance Napolean is opened when you get there, bear in mind that there will still be places with snow on the ground and deep mud where the snow has melted. In 2018, I set off in mid April in glorious sunshine, stopped the night in Orisson and made it to Roncesvalles next day in a fierce blizzard. I had hoped to go back next year and start walking on April 1st but even if Napolean is opened, I am going Valcarlos. Back in 2013, an American lady took her two girls, one who was 8, and although the 'girls on the way', as they called themselves, were experienced hill walkers, the youngest found it tough doing the Valcarlos route. Personally, with two kids, I would think about starting in either Roncesvalles or Pamplona
This is v helpful advice. I.have been meaning.toask for advice about.where to start and whether the pyrenees would be safe in April but you've answered my question already. If we start midway then how does that affect the decision on whether we walked the whole camino? Sorry for my ignorance I just wasnr sure about the rules of starting and finishing etc.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
You walk YOUR camino, wherever you desire in whatever order you desire. No one can tell you what is or is not a proper Camino. As regards qualifying for a Compostela, it is only required that a pilgrim walk AT LEAST the FINAL 100 km on any recognized route into Santiago.

You can walk as many or as few km before that, but it does not affect your eligibility for a Compostela. On the Camino Frances, this starting point is Sarria.

This location has good rail and bus connections. If you started anywhere before Sarria, you will pass through this large town / small city one day. Many people choose to start at Sarria as it represents the last place that is easy to get to and is at least 100 km from Santiago de Compostela.

All of this established, and in an effort to be transparent, you should know that the Cathedral Administration, arbiters of all things Compostela related, will not generally issue a Compostela to a young child. This coming year will mark my seventh consecutive year working as a volunteer at the Pilgrim Office, where Cathedral employees and volunteers interview arriving pilgrims and issue Compostelas. I mention this to establish that I know the hules, both published (like in a credencial booklet) and enforced as policies.

The usual cutoff age is GENERALLY 10 years old, UNLESS the child is Catholic and has had their First Holy Communion. The rationale is that the Church considers it important that each pilgrim undertake their pilgrimage understanding who Saint James is and why a pilgrimage is undertaken, as well as the significance of the effort. Any Catholic young person or convert who has gone through the "indoctrination" leading up to their First Holy Communion will have accomplished this. I know I certainly did...

I do not know what the rule is for other Christian youngsters, or if there even is one. Absent the Communion age threshold, age 10 is commonly used as a placeholder for understanding right from wrong, and the seriousness of undertaking a pilgrimage.

I am not trying to start an argument or turn this into a religious tome. I KNOW that is against the Forum rules. I am merely trying to explain the facts of life as regards seeking a Compostela.

NOW. having said all this, there ARE alternative documents available for children who they MIGHT not wish to issue a Compostela to. There are Certificates of Welcome that look a lot like the actual Compostela, but connote that the person came to Santiago de Compostela and visited the Cathedral and Tomb of the Apostle Saint. You will likely do that regardless of religious affiliation or none at all. The inside of an 800 year old Cathedral is VERY interesting, especially to young people.

Also, there is an optional Certificate of Distance that marks the starting and ending places, the route followed, and the distance (in kilometers) walked. This is an impressive looking document. It costs €3,00 per certificate, and can be issued to a family group... "La Familia Smith-Jones" accomplished this feat. This option is popular with budget conscious families who want this information commemorated but do not want to shell our €3,00 for each family member.

I hope all this helps.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
Hola @Workers3233 Where you start and where you finish is entirely up to you and your companions(involve them in the decision making process). If a compostella is your goal then you need to complete the last 100 km into Santiago (so roughly Saria). If you start further east (Pamplona; Burgos or Leon) and after your 14 days decide to go home you can return and resume from any point - you just need to complete that last 100 km.
If you were to start in Ponferrada as was suggested then you can walk from there to Santiago (its well more than 100km) and you and your companions will all receive the compostellas (just remember that each of you will need a pilgrim passport and you will need to collect two stamps per day from Saria onwards.) This stamp collection is not onerous, virtually all churches; bars; as well as accommodation places have pilgrim stamps.

(Note the age qualifications as mentioned by @ t2andreo above).

Buen Camino.
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
If we start midway then how does that affect the decision on whether we walked the whole camino?
Wherever you start, you'll be starting at the start. When you finish you'll have walked the whole Camino from start to finish. Don't fall into the trap of thinking that starting in SJPP or Le Puy or wherever makes someone's Camino more valid or whole than someone else's.
 

Workers3233

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Not yet
Wherever you start, you'll be starting at the start. When you finish you'll have walked the whole Camino from start to finish. Don't fall into the trap of thinking that starting in SJPP or Le Puy or wherever makes someone's Camino more valid or whole than someone else's.
Thanks @Raggy much appreciated. I am less worried about a certificate and finishing than enjoying our first camino. Where would you recommend we start bearing in mind I'm coming from London Gatwick in early April and I think should avoid the pyrenees area given how young the kids are. Thoughts welcome!
 

Workers3233

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Not yet
Hola @Workers3233 Where you start and where you finish is entirely up to you and your companions(involve them in the decision making process). If a compostella is your goal then you need to complete the last 100 km into Santiago (so roughly Saria). If you start further east (Pamplona; Burgos or Leon) and after your 14 days decide to go home you can return and resume from any point - you just need to complete that last 100 km.
If you were to start in Ponferrada as was suggested then you can walk from there to Santiago (its well more than 100km) and you and your companions will all receive the compostellas (just remember that each of you will need a pilgrim passport and you will need to collect two stamps per day from Saria onwards.) This stamp collection is not onerous, virtually all churches; bars; as well as accommodation places have pilgrim stamps.

(Note the age qualifications as mentioned by @ t2andreo above).

Buen Camino.
@saint Mike hola to you! Thanks for this too. I anticipate coming back another time to finish in Santiago so would welcome suggestions on a suitable start for the three of us bearing in mind the kids' ages and that it's just me (female) with them! We fly from gatwick and I'd like to avoid snowy passes.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I had thought the total camino was approx 28 days of walking. Therefore finish on day 14 and come back and do days 15 to 28 another time?
That depends on where you start and how far you walk each day. When I walked with my son in 2016 we took 37 days from Roncesvalles to Santiago de Compostela (and 4 more days to Finisterre). That was with 2 rest days. He found that walking 25 km or more day after day really brought on the blisters and they were much more manageable when we cut the daily distance down a bit.

But the theory, walk as far as you do in two weeks and continue another time, is valid. Just recognize that it may take more than two trips. And save your credencials. Come back to where you got your credencial last stamped and get your first stamp on the returning trip there.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
This is v helpful advice. I.have been meaning.toask for advice about.where to start and whether the pyrenees would be safe in April but you've answered my question already. If we start midway then how does that affect the decision on whether we walked the whole camino? Sorry for my ignorance I just wasnr sure about the rules of starting and finishing etc.
The topic of a "whole camino" can be fraught here on these forums. :)

The farther you walk, the more you will see, the more of Spain's (and/or France's and/or Portugal's, depending on which Camino route you take) many cultures and landscapes you will experience. That creates value for starting earlier and returning. On the other hand, now that you know you don't have to start in the Pyrenees, maybe you want to end in Santiago this trip and start in Astorga or Ponferrada. That would mean missing the Pyrenees and Basque region, the vineyards of La Rioja, the cities and cathedrals of Burgos and Leon, the wide open spaces and wheat fields of the Meseta, etc. But you could complete the Camino in one trip and not leave it hanging, unfinished.

Or you can walk from Astorga or Ponferrada this trip and see how much you like it. If you do, you can always return and do another Camino, either in one go or in stages. If not, you will have completed a Camino.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
I recommend starting with the total time (whole days) available from departure and returning (door-to-door), then:
  • subtract travel days to your starting point, and from Santiago to get home. Count partial days as full days. Travel plans never go according to plan...
  • build in two-nights at Santiago de Compostela, it is very engaging for younger people.
  • with the time left, determine how far your children can walk, up and down hills (not mountain climbing mind-you - just steepish hills), while being rained on, walking in mud, and in a moderate wind ' stiff breeze. Assume they will get cranky and moody at times. NO ONE can remain in a sunny disposition whilst being cold and wet...
This will give you the nominal daily distance that can be covered, be it 10 or 20 km. Take the number of remaining walking days after the first two considerations, divide by the mid-point of the kids range of capability (15 km using the above 10-20 model) and VOILA! you have your total effective distance that can be converted in the time available. From that number, use a good guide book to:
  • determine the optimal starting point for your great adventure,
  • make accommodation reservations at the effective daily distance points, and to
  • come up with a Plan B for accommodations in case one or both of the kids just cannot go the distance planned for that day. You need to remain flexible, above all else.
You can take a taxi / bus to cover the remaining distance to your lodgings, OUTSIDE the 100 km threshold. I have done so frequently in the past, when I was too worn out, in pain, or too cold and / or wet to continue on foot. Of course, you can do it anywhere at anytime, but recall the requirement to walk the entire final 100 km to be eligible for the Compostela... just sayin...

Hope this helps.
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
Where would you recommend we start bearing in mind I'm coming from London Gatwick in early April
I don't know much about the CF - and I definitely think that the CF is best suited to your needs. You'll get better advice about the CF from the others here.
Purely based on distance, I guess Ponferrada to Santiago is good / do-able in two weeks. You might feel fine about not reaching Santiago - but perhaps the children would get a kick out of arriving in Santiago at the end of the two-week adventure?
If your party can walk about 20km per day, starting from Ponferrada allows you to throw in a rest day somewhere or a couple of short days and still have a day for tourism in Santiago at the end. If it turns out that the optimal daily distance is a little shorter, the CF has enough accommodation options that you can adjust to, say, 15km days and still make it in two weeks.
Screen Shot 2019-11-21 at 01.23.33.png
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
The OP has said finishing in Santiago is NOT a need.....a very easy starting point would be Pamplona. The route from there is very scenic and not too demanding. They would pass the iconic statues at Alto de Perdón which I suspect the children will like.
If they only manage less than 10km a day they’ll be able to get to their airport from Logrono. If they can do 20km they might get as far as Burgos. (My 8yo did Pamplona to Burgos in two weeks)
In fact, if it were me, I’d be inclined to book flights into Pamplona and out of Burgos (and if they didn’t quite make it to Burgos in time they could catch a bus or taxi to get them there)
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Frances (2018}
This is v helpful advice. I.have been meaning.toask for advice about.where to start and whether the pyrenees would be safe in April but you've answered my question already. If we start midway then how does that affect the decision on whether we walked the whole camino? Sorry for my ignorance I just wasnr sure about the rules of starting and finishing etc.
You can start anywhere you want. To get a compostela you need to start 100km from Santiago and have the sellos to prove it. Other than that, there are no rules. I have started from both St Jean and Pamplona and no, I did not break any rules because, apart from the 100km rule, there arent any rules. Just go do it and enjoy your time with your kids. In fact, I just created a new rule. You must enjoy your kids growing up and treasure every moment with them
 

Jay Es

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017 the del Norte, home via the Portuguse to Vigo, Planning a Via de la Plata for October 2018.
Whilst I have not walked the Camino with youngsters. I hiked the West Highland Way with my children when they were 6 and 8. Also travelling in Spain when they were little too. If yours are adaptable and you are flexible I see no problem. You may want to stay in other places that there is more privacy than albegues. Spanish people adore children, and often we found a willingness to make a snack for them, as Spanish late meals times were often an issue for ours.
Spanish kids of all ages are often our playing in the streets still at midnight in small towns. When parents are finished eating their main meal of the day.
The Pyrennes in spring would be iffy, can be snow until June. Maybe start on the Spanish side. Would you walk in the English Lakes at Easter with them up some of the snowy fells like Gable or Hellvellyn? Walking on the South Downs and Surrey hills is definitely great training for them, make sure to get out in wet weather as April can still have plenty of rain in Northren Spain and SE England s much, much drier than Gallicia.
Have you thought of doing a Pilgrimage along the Way o Canterbury as a starter event... plenty of time between now and then to B and B for a few days from Tunbridge.
I hope you enjoy your Camino.
 

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