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Camino Ingles or Norte?

AnnaWalks123

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues, May 2018
Hello all!

After hearing about my Camino experience last May, my mom has decided she would like to walk the Camino with me. We are planning for early May 2019. I loved the Camino Portuguese, but would like to experience another route. She only wants to do the last 100 km. That being said, would other pilgrims recommend we do the Ingles or do the last 100 of the Norte? I'm open to other route suggestions as well!

Something of note: she is 71 and she's got bad knees, so I am trying to take into consideration a route that is not TOO challenging. I think she'll find she can do more than she thinks once we start and I have told her that most of my pilgrim buddies last year were closer in age to her than me, but she's still skeptical. Thanks very much!
 

Phil71

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (2014,2016),Primitivo (2015), San Salvador (2017), Norte (2018), Ingles (2018)
When I started reading your post my first thought was the Ingles. It's a great first Camino. First couple of days are only about 15km or so. But I don't like the route changes from last year, bit too much road walking now. And there are some steep bits. The norte/French option would be busy. Some people love that some don't. I'm afraid I don't. I'd say it depends on your mum's knees. If you're worried about them I would actually recommend going back.to the Portuguese (sorry). Purely because it's flatter and more off road. If you want to push her a bit then the Ingles. Because it's quieter and you get to do a "full" route.
 

andycohn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2012,13,15); Finisterre / Muxia (15); Portugeuse (17); Primitivo (17); Norte (18); Ingles (18)
The last 100 k of the Norte, starting in Baamonde, is quite serene, and not at all demanding. The route has changed so that you now avoid linking up with the Frances until the very last day — either at O Rua / Pedrouzo or near the Santiago airport. For complete information about the new route, see this resource: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/resources/new-official-alternative-route-to-join-camino-frances-at-lavacolla-and-avoid-the-hordes-at-arzúa.681/
The new and original routes are also both described in the Wise Pilgrim app.

i agree with Phil71 above. There is now a lot more road-walking on the Ingles, often on relatively busy roads. While much of this last section of the Norte is on pavement, it is usually on more tranquil roads.

Note that if you do choose the Norte, it will not be a social experience, like the Frances or Portuguese. You’ll meet people in the evenings, but few while walking. However, if you find it too isolated, you can always follow the original routing, and link up with the Frances at Arzua.
 
Last edited:

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
The last 100 k of the Norte, starting in Baamonde, is quite serene, and not at all demanding. The route has changed so that you now avoid linking up with the Frances until the very last day — either at O Rua / Pedrouzo or near the Santiago airport. For complete information about the new route, see this resource: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/resources/new-official-alternative-route-to-join-camino-frances-at-lavacolla-and-avoid-the-hordes-at-arzúa.681/
The new and original routes are also both described in the Wise Pilgrim app.

i agree with Phil71 above. There is now a lot more road-walking on the Ingles, often on relatively busy roads. While much of this last section of the Norte is on pavement, it is usually on more tranquil roads.

Note that if you do choose the Norte, it will not be a social experience, like the Frances or Portuguese. You’ll meet people in the evenings, but few while walking. However, if you find it too isolated, you can always follow the original routing, and link up with the Frances at Arzua.

Davebugg’s posts are usually very informative, but he is confusing here. He is talking about the Primitivo, another route altogether, which branches off from the Norte many hundreds of miles previously. The Norte itself (such as I am describing) continues past the intersection with the Primitivo.
Thanks for clearing that up, Andy, I appreciate it. :) I had always associated using the Primitivo with the Norte when I have thought of doing the Norte, and just spaced out the real route. <shaking head> I'm going to edit my post to remove the incorrect information.
 

peb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Ingles March 2018
One thing against the Ingles, whilst it is quiet, and you walk a whole Camino, is that it does not have the infrastructure of busier Caminos. By infrastructure, I mean it can be up to 2 hours walk until you reach the next shop, cafe, restaurant or bar, and there are few water fountains. You therefore need to carry provisions with you to make you last the day. Something to bear in mind if your mother is 71, has bad knees, and needs to stop at more regular intervals.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances,Via Francegena,di Francesco,Portugues,Finisterre,,Norte(Partial), Ingles,La Plata(19)
Hello all!

After hearing about my Camino experience last May, my mom has decided she would like to walk the Camino with me. We are planning for early May 2019. I loved the Camino Portuguese, but would like to experience another route. She only wants to do the last 100 km. That being said, would other pilgrims recommend we do the Ingles or do the last 100 of the Norte? I'm open to other route suggestions as well!

Something of note: she is 71 and she's got bad knees, so I am trying to take into consideration a route that is not TOO challenging. I think she'll find she can do more than she thinks once we start and I have told her that most of my pilgrim buddies last year were closer in age to her than me, but she's still skeptical. Thanks very much!
Ingles to start from Ferrol
 

Silencio Por Favor

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ingles 2018
An option could be to start from the nice town of Betanzos and walk for 3 days to SdC, If your Mum was feeling fine and wanted to walk further you could carry on to the Finisterre? This would mean two short walks, one ending at the Cathedral and the other at the seaside. Ignore this suggestion if receiving the Compostela is important?
 

Eleonore

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugal
Hello all!

After hearing about my Camino experience last May, my mom has decided she would like to walk the Camino with me. We are planning for early May 2019. I loved the Camino Portuguese, but would like to experience another route. She only wants to do the last 100 km. That being said, would other pilgrims recommend we do the Ingles or do the last 100 of the Norte? I'm open to other route suggestions as well!

Something of note: she is 71 and she's got bad knees, so I am trying to take into consideration a route that is not TOO challenging. I think she'll find she can do more than she thinks once we start and I have told her that most of my pilgrim buddies last year were closer in age to her than me, but she's still skeptical. Thanks very much!
My husband - 79 and I - 76 - walked the Ingles last May. It was a very easy walk for us. We walked the new route - a bit disappointing because of much road walking. We did the Portuguese from Tui the year before and enjoyed this Camino so much more. However a bit more challenging in the hot September climate. Bon Camino!
 

Maggie Y

Maggie
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte Sept 2013
Camino del Norte Sept 2014
Camino del Norte 2015,16,17,18
Surely it must be possible to revert to less road version of the Ingles? It seems a shame this new route appears to have changed it for the worst
 
Camino(s) past & future
Cycling the camino de Santiago "2013"
Hello all!

After hearing about my Camino experience last May, my mom has decided she would like to walk the Camino with me. We are planning for early May 2019. I loved the Camino Portuguese, but would like to experience another route. She only wants to do the last 100 km. That being said, would other pilgrims recommend we do the Ingles or do the last 100 of the Norte? I'm open to other route suggestions as well!

Something of note: she is 71 and she's got bad knees, so I am trying to take into consideration a route that is not TOO challenging. I think she'll find she can do more than she thinks once we start and I have told her that most of my pilgrim buddies last year were closer in age to her than me, but she's still skeptical. Thanks very much!
Whichever route you decide you will both have a brilliant time together, even if you catch the bus occasionally. Indeed, that can be as much fun too.

I have bad knees (arthritis) and prefer to cycle. But that's just me. My own suggestion would be for your mum to check out with her doctor, the local sports centre, a physiotherapist, or even the internet for exercises which would alleviate her knee pain. I used to have a horrendous problem even cycling with my knees but as long as I keep up the exercises I keep the pain at bay. I'm also 71 and hope to ride the Del Norte this year with my husband of 78. We rode the Camino de Santiago back in 2013 (our website shows that it can be done! www.cyclingsofties.blog) and I've heard that the Norte is more challenging!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
I would really like to hear from someone who has walked the Ingles recently. If there is a lot of road walking, and if there are a lot of hills: is the last 100km of the Norte easier than the new Ingles for an old woman of 71 (!) who has dodgy knees? Yes, I am a chicken. in terms of preferring to be able to do it than take a taxi...
 

peb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Ingles March 2018
Ingles is about 50% walking on tarmac, but the majority of this is walking on country lanes where you walk down the middle of the road and can see and hear the traffic as and when it comes.

There are two quite large hills, out of Pontedeume and Betanzos, each taking about 30 minutes to climb up, but they come at the very start of a stage, when you are hopefully slept, breakfasted and refreshed. Other than that, the last 100 km of the Norte runs through Galicia, and therefore the terrain, in terms of flatness should be similar.

I have written earlier, that where the Ingles is tougher than other Caminos is the infrastructure, in terms of frequency of albergues, hotels, bars, restaurants, water fountains. If you are prepared, then this should not be an issue, but if you do not plan, this can cause problems.

Where the Ingles has an advantage is that if you only have a week or so, you walk the whole of a Camino from start to finish. Somehow, this gives you a different feeling when you queue up at the pilgrim's office in Santiago for your compostela, than if you had walked the last 100km of a longer camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
Ingles is about 50% walking on tarmac, but the majority of this is walking on country lanes where you walk down the middle of the road and can see and hear the traffic as and when it comes.

There are two quite large hills, out of Pontedeume and Betanzos, each taking about 30 minutes to climb up, but they come at the very start of a stage, when you are hopefully slept, breakfasted and refreshed. Other than that, the last 100 km of the Norte runs through Galicia, and therefore the terrain, in terms of flatness should be similar.

I have written earlier, that where the Ingles is tougher than other Caminos is the infrastructure, in terms of frequency of albergues, hotels, bars, restaurants, water fountains. If you are prepared, then this should not be an issue, but if you do not plan, this can cause problems.

Where the Ingles has an advantage is that if you only have a week or so, you walk the whole of a Camino from start to finish. Somehow, this gives you a different feeling when you queue up at the pilgrim's office in Santiago for your compostela, than if you had walked the last 100km of a longer camino.
Thanks so much. I had not taken the 'whole' into account. I appreciate the time you took to reply.
 

RumAndChupacabras

Do unto other's as you would have them do unto you
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Sept 2019 Ingles/Norte~Apr. 2018 Oviedo, Santo Toribio, Covadonga~May/June 2016 Portuguese
The last 100 k of the Norte, starting in Baamonde, is quite serene, and not at all demanding. The route has changed so that you now avoid linking up with the Frances until the very last day — either at O Rua / Pedrouzo or near the Santiago airport. For complete information about the new route, see this resource..
Interesting information that just changed our thoughts from Camino on the Inglés to Camino de Norte. Thank you.
 

m00nman

Neil and Craig in Pontedueme - 2012
Camino(s) past & future
Ingles (2012), Norte (Hendaya - Gernika, (2013), Sanabres from Ourense, (2014), Portugues Oct (2017)
I would recommend the Ingles, it was my first back in 2012 and am heading back to repeat it in October. Cannot wait although a little concerned about the comments made on here about some of the route changes. I'm sure it will be fine though.
I have walked the first five stages of the Norte and am also going to repeat that in May (lucky me) but cannot comment on the last stages, hopefully I will be able to one day in the future.
There are hills of course to navigate on the Ingles but I'm sure you will both be fine, just slow down and enjoy the surroundings...Buen Camino!!!
 

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