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LIVE from the Camino Carrion de los Condes

Camino(s) past & future
First 2016
Latest Camino Frances Jul-Aug 2020
Only a British person of a certain age is likely to realise why I find this the funniest place name on the Camino and was disappointed on arrival three hours ago to find there was no statue of one Sid James esq. I apologise for my lack of reverence but it is irresistible.

It has taken three stages to get here from Burgos. The first, 40km, to Castrojeriz was my first really long stage of this Camino. Leaving Burgos took longer than I expected but the walk to Tardajos was uneventful. I had coffee in Hotel de la Casa de Beli where I caught up with two fellow pilgrims. They were the only people staying there the previous night.

We walked on to Hornillos where places seemed to be open but we only stopped for a soft drink at the bar opposite the church. A small but very pretty place to walk through. We had planned to overnight in Hontanas and eventually found it hiding in an unexpected valley. The only albergue open was the Municipale which two of us didn’t like the look of. The third decided to stay only to be told later when he decided to check in that it was completo!

There then followed one of those unexpected Camino treats. The walk down the valley to the San Anton ruins was perfectly idyllic and although the albergue was closed there was a friendly little drink stop on the other side of the road. We walked on to Castrojeriz enjoying the stunning view of the castle as we approached. We stayed in albergue Ultreia for 12 Euros which was fine. Most people stayed at Casa Nostra for seven Euros and there were other places open. We were the only people in Ultreia. Supermarket dinner again.

We left at 7am and climbed the steep hill onto the plateau and I was pleased to find my legs took me up comfortably after two weeks of walking, but I had paid a price in blisters for the previous day’s exertions. The view back and then the one before the descent were both stunning. I wonder if the plateau was put there to give pilgrims a view of what is in store. The greenery as we crossed the Rio Pisuerga was a beautiful surprise and we had a well earned coffee in Itero.

I walked with headphones and music for the first time to Boadillo del Camino which made time pass quickly. The only obviously open accommodation was the Hotel Rural En El Camino. The church was open which has been a rarity so far. Drinks breaks brought quite a lot of people together and we walked in twos and threes along the canal in the shade. An unexpected relief from the sun. In Fromista everyone I knew stayed in the municipal albergue which was full to its limited capacity. Lots of bars open and at least two peregrinas stayed in a pension. Lomo y huevos for lunch and bocadillo in the albergue garden for dinner.

Today was a 6 am start and for anyone familiar with the 19km along the road to Carrion will know what it was like Luckily I still thrill to the sight of distant mountains and topping a rise to see a church towering over a village. Bar stops in Poblacio de Campos and by the church in Villalcazar de Sirga. The latter name has a faintly romantic hint of moorish influence in a sea of Castilian. I have my Camino tastebuds and have swapped Kas Limon For Coke on the way and Cola Cao for coffee in the evenings.

We are staying in the Albergue Parroquial on Plaza Santa Maria in Carrion for ten Euros.

A couple of observations to update people on what is happening. There has been a marked uptick of people on the way since Burgos. The newcomers are mainly Spanish with a sprinkling of other nationalities. For the first time two people were turned away from the Municipale in Fromista. More places are open. Apparently all of the accommodation bar the Municipale in Honatanas have the same owner, hence the blanket closure.

Take this with a pinch of salt as it is one pilgrim’s view but my sense is that albergue accommodation before Burgos was on average two euros higher than indicated in guidebooks, whereas after Burgos it seems more like four Euros. This is an observation not a complaint as fixed costs remain the same and need to be covered by a smaller number of pilgrims.

As on any Camino the memories of earlier days are merging into each other and will only sort themselves into some sort of order when I have finished. Did I see the first vulture before Los Arcos or Punta La Reina? and where was that particular bar? All I know is that it is currently a joy to be walking and to see what each new day will bring.
 

robou

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2018: Camino Primitivo (Oviedo)
2019: Camino Portugues (Lisbon)
2020: Camino Frances (SJPDP)
Interesting to know that the municipal albergue in Fromista and the parochial albergue in Carrion are both open. I was under the impression that they were shut. This would be helpful, particularly in Carrion, as there appears to be no other albergues open, only pensions which were in danger of ruining my budget!

Thank you for the information, and buen camino!
 
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thejoker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
many
This is a really fascinating report. I salute you for your tenacity.
To me, you sound like a pioneer (well done on going for it!) but it it also confirms I made the right choice to 'stick' for this year (not like I could have walked anyway, being an inhabitant of an Asian country). Too many places closed and not the Frances I want to walk, personally.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2017 2018
Only a British person of a certain age is likely to realise why I find this the funniest place name on the Camino and was disappointed on arrival three hours ago to find there was no statue of one Sid James esq. I apologise for my lack of reverence but it is irresistible.

It has taken three stages to get here from Burgos. The first, 40km, to Castrojeriz was my first really long stage of this Camino. Leaving Burgos took longer than I expected but the walk to Tardajos was uneventful. I had coffee in Hotel de la Casa de Beli where I caught up with two fellow pilgrims. They were the only people staying there the previous night.

We walked on to Hornillos where places seemed to be open but we only stopped for a soft drink at the bar opposite the church. A small but very pretty place to walk through. We had planned to overnight in Hontanas and eventually found it hiding in an unexpected valley. The only albergue open was the Municipale which two of us didn’t like the look of. The third decided to stay only to be told later when he decided to check in that it was completo!

There then followed one of those unexpected Camino treats. The walk down the valley to the San Anton ruins was perfectly idyllic and although the albergue was closed there was a friendly little drink stop on the other side of the road. We walked on to Castrojeriz enjoying the stunning view of the castle as we approached. We stayed in albergue Ultreia for 12 Euros which was fine. Most people stayed at Casa Nostra for seven Euros and there were other places open. We were the only people in Ultreia. Supermarket dinner again.

We left at 7am and climbed the steep hill onto the plateau and I was pleased to find my legs took me up comfortably after two weeks of walking, but I had paid a price in blisters for the previous day’s exertions. The view back and then the one before the descent were both stunning. I wonder if the plateau was put there to give pilgrims a view of what is in store. The greenery as we crossed the Rio Pisuerga was a beautiful surprise and we had a well earned coffee in Itero.

I walked with headphones and music for the first time to Boadillo del Camino which made time pass quickly. The only obviously open accommodation was the Hotel Rural En El Camino. The church was open which has been a rarity so far. Drinks breaks brought quite a lot of people together and we walked in twos and threes along the canal in the shade. An unexpected relief from the sun. In Fromista everyone I knew stayed in the municipal albergue which was full to its limited capacity. Lots of bars open and at least two peregrinas stayed in a pension. Lomo y huevos for lunch and bocadillo in the albergue garden for dinner.

Today was a 6 am start and for anyone familiar with the 19km along the road to Carrion will know what it was like Luckily I still thrill to the sight of distant mountains and topping a rise to see a church towering over a village. Bar stops in Poblacio de Campos and by the church in Villalcazar de Sirga. The latter name has a faintly romantic hint of moorish influence in a sea of Castilian. I have my Camino tastebuds and have swapped Kas Limon For Coke on the way and Cola Cao for coffee in the evenings.

We are staying in the Albergue Parroquial on Plaza Santa Maria in Carrion for ten Euros.

A couple of observations to update people on what is happening. There has been a marked uptick of people on the way since Burgos. The newcomers are mainly Spanish with a sprinkling of other nationalities. For the first time two people were turned away from the Municipale in Fromista. More places are open. Apparently all of the accommodation bar the Municipale in Honatanas have the same owner, hence the blanket closure.

Take this with a pinch of salt as it is one pilgrim’s view but my sense is that albergue accommodation before Burgos was on average two euros higher than indicated in guidebooks, whereas after Burgos it seems more like four Euros. This is an observation not a complaint as fixed costs remain the same and need to be covered by a smaller number of pilgrims.

As on any Camino the memories of earlier days are merging into each other and will only sort themselves into some sort of order when I have finished. Did I see the first vulture before Los Arcos or Punta La Reina? and where was that particular bar? All I know is that it is currently a joy to be walking and to see what each new day will bring.
Following your progress with great interest and will be particularly to read your valued reports from O Cebrieo onwards as I aim to resume my Camino from there september 16th. Buen camino.
 

NualaOC

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few and hopefully lots more. See signature.
Only a British person of a certain age is likely to realise why I find this the funniest place name on the Camino and was disappointed on arrival three hours ago to find there was no statue of one Sid James esq. I apologise for my lack of reverence but it is irresistible.
There’s a Kenneth Williams one on the Le Puy Route, outside a Crepe Suzette cafe 😊

Seriously though, thanks for the detailed update. Great that everything is going well for you. Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
First 2016
Latest Camino Frances Jul-Aug 2020
Just as a matter of interest, is there any socially distancing? For instance having a meal or sleeping in albergues?
Communal areas are closed so any socialising is outside. In general capacity has been reduced by at least 50% and until Burgos even that was rarely filled. People are generally considerate but there is no escaping the fact that we are sleeping in dormitories. The wild card is people coming into a group that has been together for some time. At Carrion there were A lot of cyclists who I presume were breaking Burgos to Leon into two. This meant the proportion of new Peregrinos was particularly high. The hospitalera checked everyone’s temperature on check in. As for the locals, social distancing and mask wearing is much more apparent in the cities.
 

julia-t

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2015-17
Kumano Kodo March 2018
Camino Portuguese Valenca-SdC April 2018
Fromista to Carrion de los Condes is another stage where the river route is so much nicer than the trudge along the senda beside the main road. The turn off to it is in Poblacion de los Campos, and while it may be a couple of km further, it is a beautiful walk alongside the river.
1596723938873.png
 

MarkyD

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
Fromista to Carrion de los Condes is another stage where the river route is so much nicer than the trudge along the senda beside the main road. The turn off to it is in Poblacion de los Campos, and while it may be a couple of km further, it is a beautiful walk alongside the river.
View attachment 80262
Wow, can you walk the rest of the way along river route to Carrión de los Condes? That would definitely be one to try next time.
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
Fromista to Carrion de los Condes is another stage where the river route is so much nicer than the trudge along the senda beside the main road. The turn off to it is in Poblacion de Campos, and while it may be a couple of km further, it is a beautiful walk alongside the river.
Wow, can you walk the rest of the way along river route to Carrión de los Condes? That would definitely be one to try next time.
From street level images dated 2014 there is a very large sign showing the alternative.

It is not far from the "official" route for the first 10 km or so then swings away north.

And my handy calculator suggest the river route to Villalcazar de Sirga is well under 1 km shorter than the straight line road route.

The aerial imagery suggests there is shade to walk beside / under for about half that time and that, like the image posted by @julia-t, suggest the river, at this stretch at least, is quite sluggish.
 

Ian L

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances summer 2017 (SJPP to Fromista)
Camino Frances summer 2019 (Fromista to Santiago)
There was even a little snack bar in the park when leaving Villovieco on the river route. I don't think we saw another pilgrim on this route last summer. It seemed more interesting than walking beside the main road.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese Coastal {Feb-March 2020}
Camino Frances {March 2019 & 2020}
Thanks. The detail is very helpful. Sounds much safer than my trip to the grocery store.
Social distance and/or wearing a mask is such a simple courtesy.
Look forward to updates - to help to plan an escape.
 
Camino(s) past & future
frances 1998, 2000, 2013
Only a British person of a certain age is likely to realise why I find this the funniest place name on the Camino and was disappointed on arrival three hours ago to find there was no statue of one Sid James esq. I apologise for my lack of reverence but it is irresistible.

It has taken three stages to get here from Burgos. The first, 40km, to Castrojeriz was my first really long stage of this Camino. Leaving Burgos took longer than I expected but the walk to Tardajos was uneventful. I had coffee in Hotel de la Casa de Beli where I caught up with two fellow pilgrims. They were the only people staying there the previous night.

We walked on to Hornillos where places seemed to be open but we only stopped for a soft drink at the bar opposite the church. A small but very pretty place to walk through. We had planned to overnight in Hontanas and eventually found it hiding in an unexpected valley. The only albergue open was the Municipale which two of us didn’t like the look of. The third decided to stay only to be told later when he decided to check in that it was completo!

There then followed one of those unexpected Camino treats. The walk down the valley to the San Anton ruins was perfectly idyllic and although the albergue was closed there was a friendly little drink stop on the other side of the road. We walked on to Castrojeriz enjoying the stunning view of the castle as we approached. We stayed in albergue Ultreia for 12 Euros which was fine. Most people stayed at Casa Nostra for seven Euros and there were other places open. We were the only people in Ultreia. Supermarket dinner again.

We left at 7am and climbed the steep hill onto the plateau and I was pleased to find my legs took me up comfortably after two weeks of walking, but I had paid a price in blisters for the previous day’s exertions. The view back and then the one before the descent were both stunning. I wonder if the plateau was put there to give pilgrims a view of what is in store. The greenery as we crossed the Rio Pisuerga was a beautiful surprise and we had a well earned coffee in Itero.

I walked with headphones and music for the first time to Boadillo del Camino which made time pass quickly. The only obviously open accommodation was the Hotel Rural En El Camino. The church was open which has been a rarity so far. Drinks breaks brought quite a lot of people together and we walked in twos and threes along the canal in the shade. An unexpected relief from the sun. In Fromista everyone I knew stayed in the municipal albergue which was full to its limited capacity. Lots of bars open and at least two peregrinas stayed in a pension. Lomo y huevos for lunch and bocadillo in the albergue garden for dinner.

Today was a 6 am start and for anyone familiar with the 19km along the road to Carrion will know what it was like Luckily I still thrill to the sight of distant mountains and topping a rise to see a church towering over a village. Bar stops in Poblacio de Campos and by the church in Villalcazar de Sirga. The latter name has a faintly romantic hint of moorish influence in a sea of Castilian. I have my Camino tastebuds and have swapped Kas Limon For Coke on the way and Cola Cao for coffee in the evenings.

We are staying in the Albergue Parroquial on Plaza Santa Maria in Carrion for ten Euros.

A couple of observations to update people on what is happening. There has been a marked uptick of people on the way since Burgos. The newcomers are mainly Spanish with a sprinkling of other nationalities. For the first time two people were turned away from the Municipale in Fromista. More places are open. Apparently all of the accommodation bar the Municipale in Honatanas have the same owner, hence the blanket closure.

Take this with a pinch of salt as it is one pilgrim’s view but my sense is that albergue accommodation before Burgos was on average two euros higher than indicated in guidebooks, whereas after Burgos it seems more like four Euros. This is an observation not a complaint as fixed costs remain the same and need to be covered by a smaller number of pilgrims.

As on any Camino the memories of earlier days are merging into each other and will only sort themselves into some sort of order when I have finished. Did I see the first vulture before Los Arcos or Punta La Reina? and where was that particular bar? All I know is that it is currently a joy to be walking and to see what each new day will bring.


In Fromista, not only is the municipal albergue open, we, Luz de Frómista, and some other albergue are also open.
What happens is that the other two albergues, the municipal one and another, think that it is not worth opening for a few pilgrims, and they reached an agreement to open one and close the other. They asked us to join that agreement, and to avoid more problems than we have had since we opened our albergue in Frómista, two years ago, we agree to close when they open, and they close when we open.

Our opinion is that in a free market, the freedom to open or close, to work, even if it is little, belongs to each person.
We also think that on the Camino de Santiago we must work with a sense of offering the best for pilgrims, and that they can choose from the existing possibilities. We love to open up and work with pilgrims, even if there is only one!
Personally too, we are scared to see how the Camino is so closed, we know that there are stages that have almost disappeared, with almost all the albergues closed that force pilgrims to walk many more kilometers, as happens between Burgos and Castrojeriz ... and at the same time the owners of the closed albergues complain that there are no pilgrims ... They are thrown off the Camino with their albergues closed !!!
We would like to be open every day, so that the pilgrims do not have to go to much more expensive hotels or to the next town, and also, of course, we need every euro that we can get, we are not a municipal hostel owned by the city council that receives provincial aid, we are not an old shelter that does not have mortgages or large expenses, nor are we a donation shelter, totally free of taxes.
We feel sad for a certain too practical and commercial environment that has clouded the Camino de Santiago in recent months, as we have seen and as some pilgrims who have passed through our hostel have told us.


And of course we apologize for not being open.
 

tigermike

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: April/May 2018. CF Aug/Sep 2018. CF May/June 2019.
CF: Aug/Sep 2019, CF: Aug/Sep 2020
Thank you GMAG for your kind message and all that you are doing to stay open at this difficult time.
Has the government informed you what will happen after the 'phased lockdown' begins on September 18 ?
 

tigermike

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: April/May 2018. CF Aug/Sep 2018. CF May/June 2019.
CF: Aug/Sep 2019, CF: Aug/Sep 2020
That is most kind, thank you.
The reality is that the situation changes so quickly and all that politicians can do, hopefully, is to formulate plans in advance so that they are ready to act quickly when (and if) things deteriorate.
My reason for concern is because I plan to start my camino from St Jean Pied du Port on Saturday, August 15th and finish in SdC about a month later.
Along 'The Way' it is possible that there might be regional lockdowns.
Because it is only now that the stark economic reality of Nationwide lockdowns are now being fully understood by so many countries in Europe, it seems unlikely that governments will re-impose such drastic measures again unless absolutely necessary.
Here in the UK we are now officially in recession, with GDP having shrunk this year by over 20%.
A MASSIVE number that will cause huge economic and social upheaval for many years to come.
With this hindsight in mind politicians must weigh carefully the "pandemic second wave' risk against the known risk to social and economic stability, employment, education, mental health and so on....
A most difficult and unenviable balancing act to be sure.

Despite this, each of us is ultimately in charge of our own destiny and mine tells me to walk.
Some might say that I am irresponsible, that I may carry the virus from one area of Spain to another.
And that might be true, despite all the sanitary precautions I have learnt to take in my daily life here in England.
Others may say that the (albeit minor) contribution I will make to the local economies are guaranteed, and welcome - whereas the infection risk is just that, a risk and not a fact.
In addition there is the enrichment, the simple joy that pilgrims both bring and receive along The Way.

And it is hard to put a price on that.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
And it is hard to put a price on that.
It's a price that others may end up paying, not us - for example, if some elderly person living in a village along the way gets sick and dies as a result. It's a delicate edge we walk if we decide to go.

I'n not categorically saying don't go - but just that it will need extra care. So definitely buen camino! And please remember when you come into a village to put on a mask and be very aware of social distancing. Here's an on-the-ground plea for that from this thread:
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...-masks-in-all-public-areas.68252/#post-866389
A little more about Vilacha. There are 30 people here. As you enter Vilacha, a walled garden on the right, has a tap, which brings drinking water from a natural spring into Vilacha. We all take our drinking water from there. It is on the Camino so we pass pilgrims, going to collect our drinking water. Our homes have wells and we use this water for everything else. Also on the left side of the Camino is a metal gate. This is the entrance to the chicken yard of my elderly neighbours (both over 80), who tend to the chickens several times a day - taking them food, collecting eggs, letting them out to forage, and locking them up at night. A little further along is the home of my nearest neighbour. For 8 months she has had chemotherapy and radiotherapy for advanced breast cancer. She is immuno suppressed. Juan, approaching 80, takes the cows out to graze along the Camino each day. I am telling you these things to try to get pilgrims to understand on a more personal level, why they should put on masks when they enter our village. It is a sign of respect to care enough to want to protect us. In a sense you are invading our private world, by walking through our village. To you though, it is public space, and the law says that masks are compulsory in all public spaces - outdoors and indoors.

I hope by reading this, some pilgrims change their attitude and behaviour, in order to protect the local people who just lead a simple life, but for whom the Corona virus has made life complicated. Thank you for reading this.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Folk's this is getting way off topic. And there are lots of coded political messages. Please don't or we will close the thread.

I have removed a number of posts.
 
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JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Only a British person of a certain age is likely to realise why I find this the funniest place name on the Camino and was disappointed on arrival three hours ago to find there was no statue of one Sid James esq. I apologise for my lack of reverence but it is irresistible.

It has taken three stages to get here from Burgos. The first, 40km, to Castrojeriz was my first really long stage of this Camino. Leaving Burgos took longer than I expected but the walk to Tardajos was uneventful. I had coffee in Hotel de la Casa de Beli where I caught up with two fellow pilgrims. They were the only people staying there the previous night.

We walked on to Hornillos where places seemed to be open but we only stopped for a soft drink at the bar opposite the church. A small but very pretty place to walk through. We had planned to overnight in Hontanas and eventually found it hiding in an unexpected valley. The only albergue open was the Municipale which two of us didn’t like the look of. The third decided to stay only to be told later when he decided to check in that it was completo!

There then followed one of those unexpected Camino treats. The walk down the valley to the San Anton ruins was perfectly idyllic and although the albergue was closed there was a friendly little drink stop on the other side of the road. We walked on to Castrojeriz enjoying the stunning view of the castle as we approached. We stayed in albergue Ultreia for 12 Euros which was fine. Most people stayed at Casa Nostra for seven Euros and there were other places open. We were the only people in Ultreia. Supermarket dinner again.

We left at 7am and climbed the steep hill onto the plateau and I was pleased to find my legs took me up comfortably after two weeks of walking, but I had paid a price in blisters for the previous day’s exertions. The view back and then the one before the descent were both stunning. I wonder if the plateau was put there to give pilgrims a view of what is in store. The greenery as we crossed the Rio Pisuerga was a beautiful surprise and we had a well earned coffee in Itero.

I walked with headphones and music for the first time to Boadillo del Camino which made time pass quickly. The only obviously open accommodation was the Hotel Rural En El Camino. The church was open which has been a rarity so far. Drinks breaks brought quite a lot of people together and we walked in twos and threes along the canal in the shade. An unexpected relief from the sun. In Fromista everyone I knew stayed in the municipal albergue which was full to its limited capacity. Lots of bars open and at least two peregrinas stayed in a pension. Lomo y huevos for lunch and bocadillo in the albergue garden for dinner.

Today was a 6 am start and for anyone familiar with the 19km along the road to Carrion will know what it was like Luckily I still thrill to the sight of distant mountains and topping a rise to see a church towering over a village. Bar stops in Poblacio de Campos and by the church in Villalcazar de Sirga. The latter name has a faintly romantic hint of moorish influence in a sea of Castilian. I have my Camino tastebuds and have swapped Kas Limon For Coke on the way and Cola Cao for coffee in the evenings.

We are staying in the Albergue Parroquial on Plaza Santa Maria in Carrion for ten Euros.

A couple of observations to update people on what is happening. There has been a marked uptick of people on the way since Burgos. The newcomers are mainly Spanish with a sprinkling of other nationalities. For the first time two people were turned away from the Municipale in Fromista. More places are open. Apparently all of the accommodation bar the Municipale in Honatanas have the same owner, hence the blanket closure.

Take this with a pinch of salt as it is one pilgrim’s view but my sense is that albergue accommodation before Burgos was on average two euros higher than indicated in guidebooks, whereas after Burgos it seems more like four Euros. This is an observation not a complaint as fixed costs remain the same and need to be covered by a smaller number of pilgrims.

As on any Camino the memories of earlier days are merging into each other and will only sort themselves into some sort of order when I have finished. Did I see the first vulture before Los Arcos or Punta La Reina? and where was that particular bar? All I know is that it is currently a joy to be walking and to see what each new day will bring.
So the wonderful En El Camino albergue (with the art statues, etc. in the grassy courtyard, run by Eduardo) wasn't open... just the hotel next door? Curious about Albergue Ultreia in Castrojerez. The owner is just a fun guy... he and his wife serve dinner and then he gives a tour of the ancient tunnels underground. Was that still going on? I hope he and his wife are still there!!! I loved that place.
 

wes

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2006) VdlP to Plasencia (2010) Frances (2013) Portugues (2016) Meseta Feb/March 2020
when you come through moratinos tomorrow you will find everything open!
I should have posted this before, but anyway ... Anyone who reads this, whatever you do, don’t miss Moratinos, it’s my personal numero uno on the Camino. In late February this year my partner and I were walking from Calzadilla to Sahagun. It was sleeting ice, brutally cold. We were desperate to stop in Poblacion to warm-up and regroup, but the entire town was closed, nothing, as in nada, was open. We struggled on, hoping Moratinos would be open. It was; and it was warm, welcoming, and wonderful. Great coffee, great bocadillo, great people. The sleet eased, reinvigorated, we headed off to Sahagun, no hay problema! Moratinos is a top Camino experience, don’t miss it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
First 2016
Latest Camino Frances Jul-Aug 2020
So the wonderful En El Camino albergue (with the art statues, etc. in the grassy courtyard, run by Eduardo) wasn't open... just the hotel next door? Curious about Albergue Ultreia in Castrojerez. The owner is just a fun guy... he and his wife serve dinner and then he gives a tour of the ancient tunnels underground. Was that still going on? I hope he and his wife are still there!!! I loved that place.
He offered the tour but I had just walked 40km so declined
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Okay, whew, I'm glad Albergue Ultreia in Castrojerez is still open! I love those guys.

As for Moratinos, I didn't stop there because I was on a roll, but I won't forget the little plaza with all the trees wearing hand-knitted sweaters.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
Okay, whew, I'm glad Albergue Ultreia in Castrojerez is still open! I love those guys.

As for Moratinos, I didn't stop there because I was on a roll, but I won't forget the little plaza with all the trees wearing hand-knitted sweaters.
Next time I would stay there, I'd love to met the people who made these
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Aug/Sept 2018
planning 2023/24
Only a British person of a certain age is likely to realise why I find this the funniest place name on the Camino and was disappointed on arrival three hours ago to find there was no statue of one Sid James esq. I apologise for my lack of reverence but it is irresistible.

It has taken three stages to get here from Burgos. The first, 40km, to Castrojeriz was my first really long stage of this Camino. Leaving Burgos took longer than I expected but the walk to Tardajos was uneventful. I had coffee in Hotel de la Casa de Beli where I caught up with two fellow pilgrims. They were the only people staying there the previous night.

We walked on to Hornillos where places seemed to be open but we only stopped for a soft drink at the bar opposite the church. A small but very pretty place to walk through. We had planned to overnight in Hontanas and eventually found it hiding in an unexpected valley. The only albergue open was the Municipale which two of us didn’t like the look of. The third decided to stay only to be told later when he decided to check in that it was completo!

There then followed one of those unexpected Camino treats. The walk down the valley to the San Anton ruins was perfectly idyllic and although the albergue was closed there was a friendly little drink stop on the other side of the road. We walked on to Castrojeriz enjoying the stunning view of the castle as we approached. We stayed in albergue Ultreia for 12 Euros which was fine. Most people stayed at Casa Nostra for seven Euros and there were other places open. We were the only people in Ultreia. Supermarket dinner again.

We left at 7am and climbed the steep hill onto the plateau and I was pleased to find my legs took me up comfortably after two weeks of walking, but I had paid a price in blisters for the previous day’s exertions. The view back and then the one before the descent were both stunning. I wonder if the plateau was put there to give pilgrims a view of what is in store. The greenery as we crossed the Rio Pisuerga was a beautiful surprise and we had a well earned coffee in Itero.

I walked with headphones and music for the first time to Boadillo del Camino which made time pass quickly. The only obviously open accommodation was the Hotel Rural En El Camino. The church was open which has been a rarity so far. Drinks breaks brought quite a lot of people together and we walked in twos and threes along the canal in the shade. An unexpected relief from the sun. In Fromista everyone I knew stayed in the municipal albergue which was full to its limited capacity. Lots of bars open and at least two peregrinas stayed in a pension. Lomo y huevos for lunch and bocadillo in the albergue garden for dinner.

Today was a 6 am start and for anyone familiar with the 19km along the road to Carrion will know what it was like Luckily I still thrill to the sight of distant mountains and topping a rise to see a church towering over a village. Bar stops in Poblacio de Campos and by the church in Villalcazar de Sirga. The latter name has a faintly romantic hint of moorish influence in a sea of Castilian. I have my Camino tastebuds and have swapped Kas Limon For Coke on the way and Cola Cao for coffee in the evenings.

We are staying in the Albergue Parroquial on Plaza Santa Maria in Carrion for ten Euros.

A couple of observations to update people on what is happening. There has been a marked uptick of people on the way since Burgos. The newcomers are mainly Spanish with a sprinkling of other nationalities. For the first time two people were turned away from the Municipale in Fromista. More places are open. Apparently all of the accommodation bar the Municipale in Honatanas have the same owner, hence the blanket closure.

Take this with a pinch of salt as it is one pilgrim’s view but my sense is that albergue accommodation before Burgos was on average two euros higher than indicated in guidebooks, whereas after Burgos it seems more like four Euros. This is an observation not a complaint as fixed costs remain the same and need to be covered by a smaller number of pilgrims.

As on any Camino the memories of earlier days are merging into each other and will only sort themselves into some sort of order when I have finished. Did I see the first vulture before Los Arcos or Punta La Reina? and where was that particular bar? All I know is that it is currently a joy to be walking and to see what each new day will bring.
thanks for a lovely update. I'm planning to come back in 2023/24.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
Fromista to Carrion de los Condes is another stage where the river route is so much nicer than the trudge along the senda beside the main road. The turn off to it is in Poblacion de los Campos, and while it may be a couple of km further, it is a beautiful walk alongside the river.
View attachment 80262
Thank you for this feedback....next time, I will take this alternative...looks delightful.
 

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