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Cordoba to Cerro Muriano

TravellingMan22

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Portuguese/Frances 2020/Norte 2021
Hello all.

Currently in Cordoba for a while and looking to do some walking and keep seeing signs for the Camino Mozarabe. So I thought I may take a day to do a stage. Did a search and it looks like a nice stage, albeit uphill a fair bit which is fine. I have seen it mentioned that it is quite rocky, which doesn’t worry me though a bad character trait I have is that I tend to be quite ‘gung ho’ about things! I don’t have any walking boots with me but it’s only 17 km so distance not an issue but just wanted to check if my ‘trainers’ will do the job!! How rocky is it I guess? Quite a bit of rain predicted next few days after a dry spell!
 
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Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
I have done the Mozárabe, and always walk caminos in trail runners. I don’t think you’ll have a problem in trainers (which I take to refer to typical running shoes, but I may be wrong). There is an ascent towards the end, but it isn’t a sharp steep one except for a few places. I always walk with hiking poles, which are a great comfort when the trail is rocky and it’s raining. I think the trail will drain well, though, so if you aren’t walking in the middle of a downpour, I think you’ll be fine. Let us know how it goes!
 
I did that leg many years ago and from memory, it was an easy walk out of Cordoba. I wouldn’t worry about rocks and such and the climb isn’t a big deal. It’s 400m, but over a fairly long distance.

It would be interesting to hear if you see any other walkers when you do it. I didn’t see any between Granada and Merida (except one group doing a day walk).
 
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I'm interested in walking from Almería or Málaga, starting mid February. Will there be much in the way of spring flowers by then? I'm comparing to the same her in northern France where there won't be much pushing through. Also, do the southern routes have the same "closed" season as several of the northern albergues do in winter?
 
My wife, son in law and I walked from Almeria to Granada starting last March 5. Some but not many plants flowering then, until we were walking though MANY almond orchards nearer Granada. The Association albergues were open, by calling for a door code. Go to the website for the Associacion Jacobea de Almeria-Granada Camino Mozarabe. You will find a lot of great information and when you start in Almeria you must meet Nely Pascual of the Association who will give you a lot more information. The association albergues are great and so is the waymarking along the Way.

It's a lonely path that time of year, we only met 7 other pilgrims in two weeks. But the local Andalusians are very friendly. I will be walking Malaga to Cordoba starting February 15. Maybe I will see you before or after Baena. Buen Camino
 
I'm interested in walking from Almería or Málaga, starting mid February. Will there be much in the way of spring flowers by then? I'm comparing to the same her in northern France where there won't be much pushing through. Also, do the southern routes have the same "closed" season as several of the northern albergues do in winter?
I think the most spectacular wildflower display I have ever seen on a camino was what we were treated to in April-May 2018 on the Mozárabe. It had rained all winter, we were told, and it magically stopped a few days before the bunch of forum members met up in Almería. I think it was on April 12 or 13.

I don’t know about February, but maybe it’s a bit too early for flowers. Almond trees may be in bloom then — when we walked there was a second round of almond tree flowering because the first round had been killed by frost (I think I’m remembering this right).

The drought in Spain may also have an impact, if it’s still raging next spring. This recent article paints a not so rosy picture. Even if you don’t read Spanish, the map tells you all you need to know. This year on the Lana, though we had tried to time a departure to coincide with the spring flowers that we had seen from others’ pictures in earlier years, there was a lot of crop failure and few flowers till we got north of Cuenca.

I am probably going to start another camino in the south this spring, knowing that though there may not be flowers, there will be plenty of other bits of beauty.

The Almería Association is in charge of all of the albergues from Almería to Granada, and they are open all year. After Granada, there are few albergues, but I don’t think you’ll have any problem with accommodation.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I have done the Mozárabe, and always walk caminos in trail runners. I don’t think you’ll have a problem in trainers (which I take to refer to typical running shoes, but I may be wrong). There is an ascent towards the end, but it isn’t a sharp steep one except for a few places. I always walk with hiking poles, which are a great comfort when the trail is rocky and it’s raining. I think the trail will drain well, though, so if you aren’t walking in the middle of a downpour, I think you’ll be fine. Let us know how it goes!
Ah that’s great. Thank you for taking the time to reply. Yes, you are right re your interpretation of trainers!! I will do it in next few days and report back!!
 
I did that leg many years ago and from memory, it was an easy walk out of Cordoba. I wouldn’t worry about rocks and such and the climb isn’t a big deal. It’s 400m, but over a fairly long distance.

It would be interesting to hear if you see any other walkers when you do it. I didn’t see any between Granada and Merida (except one group doing a day walk).
Thank you! Sounds ideal for a day walk. Have been in Cordoba for a few weeks and yet to see any folks who look like they are walking and I am in the town by the route most days! Seen more signs than walkers!
 

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My wife, son in law and I walked from Almeria to Granada starting last March 5. Some but not many plants flowering then, until we were walking though MANY almond orchards nearer Granada. The Association albergues were open, by calling for a door code. Go to the website for the Associacion Jacobea de Almeria-Granada Camino Mozarabe. You will find a lot of great information and when you start in Almeria you must meet Nely Pascual of the Association who will give you a lot more information. The association albergues are great and so is the waymarking along the Way.

It's a lonely path that time of year, we only met 7 other pilgrims in two weeks. But the local Andalusians are very friendly. I will be walking Malaga to Cordoba starting February 15. Maybe I will see you before or after Baena. Buen Camino
Thank you. I may also be starting in Malaga depending on time constraints, so may catch up somewhere. Buen camino.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
In addition to the Guia on the Associacion --- de Almeria website, the Confraternity of Saint James now has guidebooks available for each of the Caminos starting from Almeria and another from Malaga. Buen Camino
 
I have seen it mentioned that it is quite rocky, which doesn’t worry me though a bad character trait I have is that I tend to be quite ‘gung ho’ about things! I don’t have any walking boots with me
It is a nice walk - just take the usual care not to slip on those rocky patches, especially if it is wet. Here is a photo of that section.

Yes, the wildflowers were beautiful along the Mozarabe in April-May.
 

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It is a nice walk - just take the usual care not to slip on those rocky patches, especially if it is wet. Here is a photo of that section.

Yes, the wildflowers were beautiful along the Mozarabe in April-May.
Thank you so much! Appetite whetted!!!
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-

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