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Daily Mass

pam

New Member
Another question from this newcomer: Is it possible to go to Daily Mass each day along the walk..i'm brand new to this but it seems as if the refuges are w/in little villages/big cities/regular size cities...it will be a priority for this walker...thanks for any feedback...pam
 
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pam

New Member
archicompostela: john

john: THANK YOU! i checked out the website and it is awesome!
just kicked things up a big notch. printed out lots of the information and will read in quiet. now the dream shifted from dream to reality.
 

bjorgts

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
What happens in Easter?

Thank you very much from me too! :D :D :D The Mass is importent for me when I am on the Camino, but I have found out that I can not always end up in a town where there is a Mass in the evening. In the small towns there are usually not Mass daily, and when there is no Mass the churches are closed too. But this list will help me next spring.

What about Easter? I am planning to walk the Camino around Easter next spring, and have wandered if I could find some information (not now but perhaps in February?) on what is going on in the different cityes during this week. When and where Mass? When and where processions? Things like that. :?:

This forum is a good place to ask. There are often someone somewhere who have an answere.

Hopefully, Bjørg
 
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sillydoll

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Daily Mass - Catholic and Protestant

A couple of years ago I asked a Catholic priest about communion for Prostestants on the Camino. Here is his reply:

QUESTION:
“I am not a Catholic. Can I go to Holy Communion when I attend a Pilgrims’ Mass along the Camino or when I arrive in Santiago?”

ANSWER:
This is a question that is often asked by pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela. There is a desire to go to Communion and to be part of the liturgical celebration while at the same time wanting to respect the practice of the host church. What is the position?

The general rule in the Catholic Church regarding sacramental sharing is that it is only permissible for those with whom we share full ecclesial communion. There are two exceptions to this rule, namely, in danger of death or for “some other grave or pressing need”. In the case of grave or pressing need, the following conditions are to be met:
(a) the person must seek it of his or her own initiative,
(b) must be unable to receive the sacrament from a minister of his or her own Church
(c) must manifest Catholic faith in the sacrament
(d) must have proper disposition for the fruitful reception of it.

How these norms are interpreted varies from place to place and I think that one can normally assume a broad interpretation. For example, here in Cape Town, the policy has this to say regarding the criterion that the person should “manifest Catholic faith in the sacrament”:
- the person concerned should “acknowledge that the sacrament is the Body and Blood of Christ given under the form of bread and wine. This faith is manifest by responding ‘Amen’ to the minister who presents the sacred bread and saving cup.”

The short answer? By all means go to communion if you are a regular communicant in your own church and can say ‘yes’ to this being the Body and Blood of Christ. After all, when you are walking the Camino, you are probably a long way off from receiving the sacrament from your own church! And surely everyone on pilgrimage has the proper disposition!

One last thing. You will notice that most Catholic churches give Communion to the congregation under the form of bread only. This is really a matter of convenience. We believe that Christ is entirely present under either of the species. For symbolic value, of course, receiving Communion under both kinds is more complete.

And one more last thing. When Communion is administered to someone on their death-bed it is referred to as ‘viaticum’ which means ‘food for the journey’. But in a real way, every time we receive communion, it is viaticum, food for the pilgrimage of life!
Fr. Frank de Gouveia
Fr Frank de Gouveia is the Spiritual Advisor at the St Francis Xavier Seminary in Cape Town. He has walked both the Camino Frances and Portuguese Caminho
 

papajohn

Member
Good answer Sil.
When i read your post, I was struck by your use of the word form. ie bread and wine. It caused my mind to stray a little to the distant past.
It is interesting that the Cathollic theology of Eucharist is bound up in the metaphysics of Aristotle, whose writings we know of only because of the interchange of the Islamic world with the west. ForAristotle, and subsequently St. Thomas Aquinas, all reality is composed of Essence and Existence, and Essence is composed of Substance and Form. For Catholics the substance is changed,(trans substantiation), but not the form. I remember a Jesuit illustrating this by bringing an ordinary water glass to class. He held up the glass and asked the class, what is this? The answer was a water glass. He then placed a flower in the glass and asked " What is it now?" The answer was, a vase. The substace had changed but not the form. What has all this to do with the camino?
The historical pilgrimage was deeply rooted in Christianity's first response to the Muslim world's advance into the western world. One of the intentions of my upcoming camino walk is to reflect on what is and should be the christian response to the Muslim world today? Maybe if the response had been different a thousand years ago? I look forward to joining all of your at the table of the Lord along the camino. John
 

bjorgts

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
Going to Mass

On the Caminos I have tryed to carry with me this saying: "Don't ask so much what the Camino can give to you as you ask what you can give to the Camino". A friend of mine said: "The Camino is what all the people walking it, make it. I want to give my little share by walking there as a Christian going to Mass." I think that's my filosofy too.

The only thing I really missed on Via de la Plata this year, was the churches with Mass in the evening, and the feeling of walking together with other people seeking the same aim. That feeling was stronger on the french route - but it depends on the people walking ...

I'm a protestant going to Mass on the Camino. I never ask anybody. The only time I have turned aroud and returned to the albergue, was when this notice was on the door: "Catholics only." I don't want to offend anybody. I hope the Camino will continue to be a place where different believes meet! Bjørg
 

M.A. Northmore

New Member
Mass Times

Another thank you to John. I have located the details, and shall make notes of the times I require during my 35 day pilgrimage (with a group)setting out from Roncesvalles on 29/09/06. Margaret
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
I asked the Queen's Chaplain if he would be taking communion at the Pilgrim's Mass, and he replied, "Oh no. The Catholic Church does not permit that."
 
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The 2022 Camino guides will be coming out little by little, most of them by the end of 2021. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.

MichaelB10398

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
For those who are not Catholic, but still seek to participate in the Mass, know that you are welcome. It is rare indeed to see a sign stating "Only for Catholics"; if you do see such feel free to return and commune with nature. At the vast majority of other Catholic cathedrals and churches, walk in, be respectful, and enjoy the liturgy of the Catholic Church.

During the Eucharist, if you wish to participate, walk with with your arms crossed and hands on chest. The priest will then offer a blessing on you.

The Church is home for all those who seek and know Jesus Christ.
 

sulu

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
a few since 2010
slightly off at a tangent but in answer to Bjorg
What about Easter?
The Province of Castilla and Leon has some of the most imprtant processions to be seen in Spain. (Andalucia obviously comes top!) Leon, Astorga and Ponferrada are all worth seeing. Astorga has a webpage with information now.
http://www.semanasanta-astorga.com/procesiones
Two things to think about in advance: 1) The processions are usually at night, sometimes all night, and the albergues usually close their doors at 22.30.
2) Hotels in these cities become booked up well in advance, so if you are serious don't leave it to the last minute to make plans.
However when I was in Astorga for Maundy Thursday the albergue stayed open until midnight, due to popular demand, but that was the kindness of the Hospitalero.
The Easter sunday procession is during the day!
Sue
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
The Queen's Chaplain attended the Pilgrim Mass, and participated without taking communion. He thought it one of the most moving ceremonies of his life. However, as an authority in protocol and from his weekly meetings with the Queen of England, he was sensitive to what the Catholic Church offered, and did not offer. It was his official view that it would be inappropriate for him to take communion under the rules of the Catholic Church. It might have been out of an official respect between institutions that does agree with the ken of laymen, but it was his well-qualified opinion. As a non-Catholic, I read the English part in the Los Arcos church mass, so I know that all are welcome to attend and participate in the masses. I would never have imagined it appropriate to take communion.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
Falcon, this sadly is true in England and maybe the USA, but is not in our experience the 'norm' in Europe as a whole.
 

MichaelB10398

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
Tia Valeria said:
Falcon, this sadly is true in England and maybe the USA, but is not in our experience the 'norm' in Europe as a whole.


I agree with you. The Eucharist is a closed communion and is really best for Catholics and not the rest of us. That is the reason that one may ask for a blessing at the time of communion and not partake of the Eucharist.
 
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JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
MichaelB10398 said:
During the Eucharist, if you wish to participate, walk with with your arms crossed and hands on chest. The priest will then offer a blessing on you.

Do that in Spain and I bet 99 times out of 100 the priest has no clue what to do. An alternative is to bless yourself if you want a blessing.
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
Re: What happens in Easter?

bjorgts said:
What about Easter? I am planning to walk the Camino around Easter next spring, and have wandered if I could find some information (not now but perhaps in February?) on what is going on in the different cityes during this week. When and where Mass? When and where processions? Things like that. :?:

Hi bjorgts,
Re Easter services: We attended the Maundy Thursday evening liturgy and adoration at the Cathedral in Pamplona- the later was candlelit with very small attendance and exquisite a cappella singing. Very very early on Easter Sunday in Estella (Lizarra) there was a sort of religious serenade by a group of 4 or 5 musicians who paused, at what appeared to be designated places, sang to the locals who were waiting for them on their balconies, and then moved on to the next spot. It was quite sombre but very beautiful. We just made it to Los Arcos for the end of the Easter Sunday procession and mass. Despite being rather grubby we were made to feel very welcome by the congregation. This was a lovely joyous local service
Masses in general: Without ever staying overnight just to 'catch one' (when I walk the CF again thats something I may change) we went to as many masses as we could and were quite frankly opportunistic about attendance. If we couldn't get full mass then we took whatever service was on offer including a wedding in Leon Cathedral (we held back from receiving communion that day though) gatecrashing a baptism in Sarria and 'tailgating' a priest saying his evening office outside Najera :oops: .
I found that, in addition to the prayer service held by the sisters in Carrion, the pilgrim masses in Roncevalles, San Juan de Ortega and Triacastela (communion under both kinds at the latter) had particular resonance.
On non catholics receiving: I'm not saying we were religious press gangers but whenever we went to church we'd generally 'bring' along some other pilgrim(s). As pilgrims without access to their own service I thought whether they felt called to receive or not was personal matter. As I walk along various Jakobswegs en route to SDC I'm receiving, and will continue to receive, communion at both Protestant and Catholic churches. Such actions don't feel sacrilegious to me and, as a person who for a period of time attended mass and received without belief, I'm familiar with that hollow feeling.

Nell
 

capecorps

Member
I attended mass this evening in my parish church. The church was practically empty. Thinking of her legions of lapsed Catholics (myself included), I drank a bottle of wine and wrote:

She Waits

She waits at the church gates
longing for her lost babes
Hers the hand that anointed
their infant brow with holy waters
their youth with chrism oils
Hers the heart that loves them
and forgives them all their sins
Where are they now
Gone, all gone
Leaves blown in the four strong winds

Her bells call unheeded
All over the land
the demons cavort
and gleefully gloat
They all ours now
two thousand years it took us
and you never getting them back

The long years come and go
the cold bitter snows of Winter
follow the hot burning suns of Summer
Her walls crumble and fall
Saints and martyrs lie in the dust
amidst the stained glass and faded vestments
The Holy Cross hangs by a thread

And yet she waits at the church gates
Forsaken forgotten
Her tears fall in the snow
Her Sacred Heart breaking
She gazes down the long lonely overgrown path

But no one comes…….
 

MichaelB10398

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
capecorps said:
I attended mass this evening in my parish church. The church was practically empty. Thinking of her legions of lapsed Catholics (myself included), I drank a bottle of wine and wrote: ........

And yet she waits at the church gates
Forsaken forgotten
Her tears fall in the snow
Her Sacred Heart breaking
She gazes down the long lonely overgrown path

But no one comes…….

Friend Cape,

We do have a melancholy moments. This poem is so full of deep emotion and regret. There is also redeeming Grace in that she always stands waiting; waiting on each to return into her arms outstretched. Thank you for going to Mass, please go again, invite a friend to go with you. Before long, the pew will be full. Not long after that two pews will fill. There is joy to share with others and She stands with arms outstretched for each of them.
 
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