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"normal" daily routine

MNMama

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
April 2024
I prefer to hike early, and plan to arrive at a destination for the night by 1400 or 1500. What do people do once you find an albergue for the night? When do you find other pilgrims eating evening meals? At home, I'd prefer to eat early and crash for the night, but look forward to conversations with others.
 
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While some places you arrive to will really be a one-mule-hitch town, I think it is nonetheless valuable to try to find out something about where you are. Chat with the bar-tender if they are not busy... go look at that little chapel, or at the village church... Go look at that plaque on the wall of the collapsed building that was the birthplace of a poet laureate... take your camera for a stroll, ask about interesting things coming up in the next days... (many towns have museums or archeological sites or galleries -- depending where you are). Ask if there's a local cheese! Ask if there's a local food!
Don't forget that you are travelling... that you are in the unique position of privilege to encounter people where they live, at ground level, at the pace at which they live. Embrace the siesta!
Pick up some new phrases... eat a dish you've never encountered before!
And have a buen camino...
 
Kind of depends on the route a bit.
More popular routes will have places catering mainly for Pilgrims with earlier evening meal times.
Less popular routes you will eat 'local' time maybe having your main meal at lunch time and just a snack later.

A common routine it to do laundry on arrival (to give maximum drying time), then look around a bit or rest.
 
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Less popular routes you will eat 'local' time maybe having your main meal at lunch time and just a snack later.
Away from the main Camino routes like the Frances and Portugues you are likely to find meal times are much later than at home. Lunch from about 1pm to 3pm or even 4pm. Where dinner is available it probably will not be served until 9pm at the earliest. Often there is little available at night on the quieter routes as lunch is generally the main Spanish meal. The much-decried menu peregrino on the popular Camino routes is a compromise for us foreigners with strange eating habits - a limited range of dishes available at earlier hours.
 
I prefer to hike early, and plan to arrive at a destination for the night by 1400 or 1500. What do people do once you find an albergue for the night? When do you find other pilgrims eating evening meals? At home, I'd prefer to eat early and crash for the night, but look forward to conversations with others.
What has been said above: Wash clothes and straighten up your gear; be ready for the next day. Then enjoy the rest of your afternoon:

My personal advice would be:

I understand it that you are intending to walk the CF: My favorite. Lots of opportunities for new friends (only if you want to) aka "Camino family", with whom you can make an early supper; most albergues (except in Galicia) have kitchens with utensils to use. You can go alone (or with newfound friends) to a local grocery store and buy ingredients for a joint dinner: This will be cheap and can make a bonding friendship, as well as you can decide on feeding time.

Or have a "Menu del dia" at a local cafe, thus supporting local community. 2 courses/bread/wine for 10-15€

I quite often prepare supper for myself, and offer it to others if I make too much, which I often do, unintentionally :cool: . It may be a soup with tuna/choriso/other or an omelette: something easy (but protein-rich). And always with bread & wine. I normally get away with 5-6 €. If more pilgrims are doing it together, maybe 4-5 €/person.

Read beforehand (paper guide/app) about the place you plan to stay the next day to see points of your interest, and seek them up. There are many (most) places on CF that are worthy to visit... History is everywhere, centuries/milleniums before the "white man" even knew about the existence of any America. Submerging into the culture of Spain may add another dimension to your journey.

Learn a little Spanish (Thank you, please, excuse me, left, right, straight on) to start with. It will portray you as polite (important in Spain), and you can ask for directions. The Spanish are very polite, and will expect the same from visitors. You may end up with Spanish friends...

Edit: And never forget: Spain is a civilzed "1st world" democratic country: It is also a historic and cultural landscape unlike most other countries in the world, and you can also buy anything you need, for less than at home and usually of better quality.

You are in for a treat,

Buen Camino!
 
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I try to keep a foot in both camps. I am ‘on Camino’ but I’m also in Spain; so ..

You’ll be arriving pretty much at Spanish lunchtime - so seek out somewhere where that’s happening. Thereafter attend to your Camino-self, sort out gear and laundry (which needn’t be a protracted event) chill out and plan tomorrow, meet others and after a necessarily ‘snack based’ dinner, get an early night.

If you try for Spanish dinner time, you’ll be missing some essential sleep.
 
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I prefer to hike early, and plan to arrive at a destination for the night by 1400 or 1500. What do people do once you find an albergue for the night? When do you find other pilgrims eating evening meals? At home, I'd prefer to eat early and crash for the night, but look forward to conversations with others.
Do almost the same, walk early (I only can walk in summer), stop early. After making my bed, showering and chatting, I prefer to stroll through city, town or hamlet, just sightseeing and relaxing. After that is done I prepare for dinner. Sometime alone, but most of the time with fellow pilgrims I met on the way.

I didn't walk the Caminos with scarce infrastructure, but I could prepare a healthy and cheap dinner on my own, if kitchen is provided.
 
I prefer to hike early, and plan to arrive at a destination for the night by 1400 or 1500. What do people do once you find an albergue for the night? When do you find other pilgrims eating evening meals? At home, I'd prefer to eat early and crash for the night, but look forward to conversations with others.
I generally try to arrive by 1400 at the latest, generally earlier (a habit set when walking in the summer). General post-check-in routines often involve a shower and laundry. Possibly a nap and some shopping and visiting places of interest in the town or village. Some attend mass if one is offered in the vicinity. Some go out for drinks and/or snacks. Generally pilgrims eat earlier than the Spanish, but that isn't saying much. The evening meal for pilgrims is generally somewhere in the vicinity of 7 (the typical Spanish evening meal starts around 10, about the same time that many albergues lock their doors). It could be a communal meal in the albergue, or a meal cooked in the albergue by a group of pilgrims, or a menu peregrino at a local restaurant or bar. Some pilgrims will eat very lightly in the evening and have their main meal in mid-afternoon when many Spanish do, often a menu del dia in a Spanish bar or restaurant or in the albergue if one is provided there. They will then fit that into their afternoon activities. Many pilgrims will take the time before bed to set things up in their backpack for a speedy and quiet departure the next morning.
 
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I book in, get a shower, wash clothes, take a nap. Maybe go to church if available. Then eat at 8 pm then go to bed. Lots of time in the afternoon to look around, talk to others over coffee, beer or wine in the afternoon. There's plenty to do. Journal, send an email home. Read a book. You are on a Camino. Slow down and live in the moment.
 
If you try for Spanish dinner time, you’ll be missing some essential sleep.
True enough, but worth trying the Spanish late evening dining a socializing experience on rest days if you are in private accommodations, and also… it’s a terrible look for pilgrims to sit about moaning that the Spanish are not fetching supper for the hard working pilgrims to eat by 6pm. I have heard that ugly complaint so often on Camino that I just want to tell such people to go home and walk joylessly around their back 40 until 5pm, tuck into their sensible dinners at 6… and to leave the world and its joys for those prepared to accept them as they appear in their own settings.
 
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it’s a terrible look for pilgrims to sit about moaning that the Spanish are not fetching supper for the hard working pilgrims to eat by 6pm.
My first Camino predated both the menu peregrino and the 10pm curfew. I tried to have my main meal at lunchtime when possible, a short postprandial snooze under a tree, then walk on until 5 or 6pm before stopping for the night. Many refugios wouldn't open their doors before 3pm or 4pm anyway. On the few occasions when I could keep my eyes open for long enough to eat an evening meal rather than just a bocadillo the very late dinners could be a real joy. Especially when being something of a novelty as a pilgrim occasionally meant being invited to join a family or group of friends at their table rather than eat alone.
 
I prefer to hike early, and plan to arrive at a destination for the night by 1400 or 1500. What do people do once you find an albergue for the night? When do you find other pilgrims eating evening meals? At home, I'd prefer to eat early and crash for the night, but look forward to conversations with others.
There's really no "normal" on the Camino, except to an extent if you're walking in a very solitary manner for this or that reason.

You'll work this out on your own and with the others that you will meet along the Way.
 
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With so many albergues nowadays having a 10pm curfew you risk being locked out if you try for a regular Spanish restaurant dinner!
Yeah, if you're aiming for dinner out of the Albergue, make sure to get to your table at the earliest point of kitchen opening time, and scoff it down double quick !!
 
True enough, but worth trying the Spanish late evening dining a socializing experience on rest days if you are in private accommodations, and also… it’s a terrible look for pilgrims to sit about moaning that the Spanish are not fetching supper for the hard working pilgrims to eat by 6pm. I have heard that ugly complaint so often on Camino that I just want to tell such people to go home and walk joylessly around their back 40 until 5pm, tuck into their sensible dinners at 6… and to leave the world and its joys for those prepared to accept them as they appear in their own settings.
I think the early meal thing is hard because pilgrims are actually hungry long before 8, 9, or 10. They may not have had the big afternoon Menu del Dia. Grocery stores are always closed for siesta so by the time the store opens again, I am personally starving at 5 pm. Children in Spain often have Merienda about this time (afternoon snack) so I count myself in that age group at age 61. Still I usually wait until 8 pm if dining out due to restaurant hours.

When working as a hospitalera, I try to adhere to the 8 pm rule, especially if there is Mass before and the priest may be coming to eat with us. Sometimes if there is no priest expected, I will ask the hungry pilgrims who've been hanging around waiting for the dinner bell if they mind eating earlier. The Spanish pilgrims are usually pretty indifferent, but all the other nationalities are usually ready to dig in. There no better compliment than the quiet sound of eating around the table at the cena communitaria. Second only to the request for second or third helpings with little or nothing left over.
 
Hi,

Your priority when you arrive at the albergue is to have a shower then wash your laundry and dry it before sunset (quite a challenge in October). Then up to you : chat, cerveza, visit of the surroundings, phone call to next accommodation, etc. and finally dinner when available.
 
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Away from the main Camino routes like the Frances and Portugues you are likely to find meal times are much later than at home. Lunch from about 1pm to 3pm or even 4pm. Where dinner is available it probably will not be served until 9pm at the earliest.

This is kind of what I expected from past experience but I found it not to be the case on my most recent Camino(s) this fall. I walked the Norte, Vadiniense, San Salvador and Primitivo and had dinner most nights either at 7:30 or 8. There were a few places, maybe 3 or 4 where 8:30 was the norm but for the most part dinner was at surprisingly Camino convenient times.
 
There's really no "normal" on the Camino, except to an extent if you're walking in a very solitary manner for this or that reason.

You'll work this out on your own and with the others that you will meet along the Way.
Perhaps the only 'normal' is that we are practically all walking west (apart from those brave sous who retrace their steps after arriving in SdC. Apart from that, we are all individuals with our own itineraries and purposes. It'a a wonderful place to be.
 
I always start early and walk until I don't want to anymore. More often than not I will join in the communal meals, sit for a while and pilgrim watch.. shop for tomorrows snacks, shower , wash clothes. Check guidebook for next days route, places etc. Chat with pilgrims ... and repeat

for me... that's my normal. After my first Camino I did make an effort to note down where I stayed and who was there, maybe a photo or 2. Most days i walked or met different people due to the distances I was walking.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
It has worked well for my husband and me to eat a hearty lunch around 2 or 3 and then skip dinner or have a light snack or maybe some tapas. Lunch is typically served late in Spain so that is perfect for stopping around 2 or 3. And I believe lunch is typically the biggest meal of the day for the Spanish people as well.
 
This is kind of what I expected from past experience but I found it not to be the case on my most recent Camino(s) this fall. I walked the Norte, Vadiniense, San Salvador and Primitivo and had dinner most nights either at 7:30 or 8. There were a few places, maybe 3 or 4 where 8:30 was the norm but for the most part dinner was at surprisingly Camino convenient times.
Did you go into Leon,or go to LA Robla directly?
 
My first Camino predated both the menu peregrino and the 10pm curfew. I tried to have my main meal at lunchtime when possible, a short postprandial snooze under a tree, then walk on until 5 or 6pm before stopping for the night. Many refugios wouldn't open their doors before 3pm or 4pm anyway. On the few occasions when I could keep my eyes open for long enough to eat an evening meal rather than just a bocadillo the very late dinners could be a real joy. Especially when being something of a novelty as a pilgrim occasionally meant being invited to join a family or group of friends at their table rather than eat alone.
I have found that on some routes, this is still a very good method... eat the large almuerza, move on... then the smaller cena later in the evening... or skip it if you remember to keep a small snack in your pocket for later in the evening and have had that generous and calorific mid-day meal. I've found parts of the Primitivo very well suited to this method, the Salvador as well, and the Portuguese in the shoulder seasons...
I also understand that people are accustomed to eating when they eat (circadian rhythm almost) -- but it can usually be varied without harm, and certainly without rudeness. It's the demanding rudeness of thinking that Spain, or any destination, should change for the sake of the transient visitor that concerns me. It is embarrassing to me to be thought perhaps to be with *that table* that arrives saying "Well! It's about time!!" etc, etc.
Just as we adjust our waking and sleeping schedules to accommodate long days of hiking; just as the body's other "timed habits" adjust to the jet lag (if one is changing zones)... so can we adjust our meal times, barring a significant health reason not to do so.
 
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I prefer to hike early, and plan to arrive at a destination for the night by 1400 or 1500. What do people do once you find an albergue for the night? When do you find other pilgrims eating evening meals? At home, I'd prefer to eat early and crash for the night, but look forward to conversations with others.
Experience from 2 Caminos: You'll use your time to shower, do laundry and get it in the sun to dry, review/edit your photos, write your daily journal (eg. Whatsapp, Facebook, personal blog), do foot care, look around town, visit local church, pick up snacks for the next day, read (books on your phone, local history), etc. The evening meal is usually not available before 19:00. By the time you eat and visit with other pilgrims you'll be ready to sleep! 😃 Buen Camino!
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-

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