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Luggage Transfer Correos

first-timer packing list starting April 11

2020 Camino Guides
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
forgive me in advance if i am not posting this to the right place! i am wrapping up my packing list and wonder if anyone sees any glaring omissions or errors. the list attached includes everything - including what i'll be wearing- so the 16lbs would be minus whatever that is on any given day. any help appreciated. i feel pretty good about this so far. thanks very much!
 

Attachments

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Hey - good list .. I see that you have chosen quality gear ....
thoughts?
I like your little pocket knife ... but you would be amazed how often you are holding a bottle of wine and there is no corkscrew, apparently for miles) so for me I need a corkscrew so carry a Swiss Army knife (also has scissors, toothpick, tweezers, etc.
You have a pair of trousers and a pair of shorts .. if you are going weight conscious you could get some zip-offs then you would have trousers and shorts combined?
You seem to have five pairs of socks .. as you can only wear one pair at a time why not take just two pairs .. one on, one off? - it is a good rule of thumb; wear one, pack one ... wash that day when you change and if not dry in the morning you can use your safety pins to pin clothes to your pack - of which, don't take ordinary safety pins, take nappy pins (diaper pins) as they are stronger and lock shut.
Soo .. hang on! Is this a backpack list with you already dressed for Camino? If so drop one of everything!! Or rather, complete your list and then take out of it what you need to wear!
Wear one - pack one. .. except for cold weather back ups.
Neat on taking extra hiking pole tips!! get more!!
Ear plugs - if possible try to keep the spare ones separate, then when you lose yours you will have a secreted back up.
You already have a torch on your phone so you could lose the headlamp.
Do you need to carry a month's supply of laundry discs (whatever they are, I am English) .. you could take just a few and buy/share the odd container when out there when needed.
Personal thing here, but, chapstick .. my experience, observing many people, is that the moment you start to use a lip balm the body stops producing lubricant and you need more and more .. for me - I never use it.
The hand sanitiser is for what?
Duct tape? Fab - it is like the force; it has a dark side, a light side, and it holds the universe together.
Used up toiler paper centre roll, cut to size, makes a good wrap around holder for gaffer tape (sorry, duct tape).
Don't forget to take a needle and some thread - can go in your first aid kit - you never know when a seam will come apart or a button becomes loose. I usually carry a small tube of superglue as well - once I glued my backpack back together, and also my hiking sandals. (and, yes, once my fingers).

You may want to carry some tissues in a waterproof sandwich bag - handy as tissues, handy as toilet paper.
Take some over the counter painkillers.

You use Imperial measures - ok, I am a Brit and think both ... the French were pretty smart when they introduced the metric system - a litre of water weighs a kilo, exactly - a kilo is 2.2 pounds (UK).
Food? will depend on how you want to provide for yourself .... you may simply buy a large bocadillo in a village shop in the morning to keep for lunch, or buy ingredients and make your own - so glad you are taking a spork - how else does one eat yoghurt!! ... same with cooking in the evenings .... were you to always carry cheese and sausage and a little pasta you can make a meal any evening. I tend to carry sea salt, black pepper, olive oil .... helps, every time!

Oh - take a universal sink plug!! You can use it in the shower to fill the shower tray enough to soak your feet whilst you shower, and you will be surprised at how many refugio sinks do not have plugs!!

You could photograph all your documents, travel ins, passport, etc then you will have them on your phone (and backed up online) in case of need - also .. think about how you will be caqrrying cash. The Camino is mainly a cash economy and the safest way is to carry a few days supply in a go-to place and your main stash elsewhere, such as a flat body belt.

Looking forward to reading other responses - I like the way you are working on this.

Buen Camino - oh, was out there last April and I was really cold all the time .. then got ill ... other years it is warm, so do check the forecasts before you go - Accuweather is pretty good - https://www.accuweather.com/

p.s. I would like to meet you out there .. sit you down, pour some Rioja into you ... and then casually ask why Skyedogstudio ;)
 
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Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
Ditch the Scrubba and use your Sea to Summit dry bag instead (provided it's big enough)
I use a 12 liter Osprey dry sack (only 1.2 ounces) to wash my clothes in, using pretty much the same method as using a Scrubba.
thanks so much- yep i will ditch the scrubba and some socks. still deliberating on taking the quilt or not but my apex jacket is of the same material and am thinking with the wool base layer should be ok but will watch the temps. as for skyedogstudio my daughter named my art studio after our dog skye- named after one of my favorite places on the planet! whoops! i told you and didn't even get any wine for it!!! :)))
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
thanks so much- yep i will ditch the scrubba and some socks. still deliberating on taking the quilt or not but my apex jacket is of the same material and am thinking with the wool base layer should be ok but will watch the temps. as for skyedogstudio my daughter named my art studio after our dog skye- named after one of my favorite places on the planet! whoops! i told you and didn't even get any wine for it!!! :)))
I like to bring three pair of socks, that way I can change out of sweaty socks midday if necessary, and I have a backup pair in case one goes missing off the clothesline.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
I like to bring three pair of socks, that way I can change out of sweaty socks midday if necessary, and I have a backup pair in case one goes missing off the clothesline.
good point!!! I have lost things off the clothes line before now - good point!! (note to self ..... )
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
Hey - good list .. I see that you have chosen quality gear ....
thoughts?
I like your little pocket knife ... but you would be amazed how often you are holding a bottle of wine and there is no corkscrew, apparently for miles) so for me I need a corkscrew so carry a Swiss Army knife (also has scissors, toothpick, tweezers, etc.
You have a pair of trousers and a pair of shorts .. if you are going weight conscious you could get some zip-offs then you would have trousers and shorts combined?
You seem to have five pairs of socks .. as you can only wear one pair at a time why not take just two pairs .. one on, one off? - it is a good rule of thumb; wear one, pack one ... wash that day when you change and if not dry in the morning you can use your safety pins to pin clothes to your pack - of which, don't take ordinary safety pins, take nappy pins (diaper pins) as they are stronger and lock shut.
Soo .. hang on! Is this a backpack list with you already dressed for Camino? If so drop one of everything!! Or rather, complete your list and then take out of it what you need to wear!
Wear one - pack one. .. except for cold weather back ups.
Neat on taking extra hiking pole tips!! get more!!
Ear plugs - if possible try to keep the spare ones separate, then when you lose yours you will have a secreted back up.
You already have a torch on your phone so you could lose the headlamp.
Do you need to carry a month's supply of laundry discs (whatever they are, I am English) .. you could take just a few and buy/share the odd container when out there when needed.
Personal thing here, but, chapstick .. my experience, observing many people, is that the moment you start to use a lip balm the body stops producing lubricant and you need more and more .. for me - I never use it.
The hand sanitiser is for what?
Duct tape? Fab - it is like the force; it has a dark side, a light side, and it holds the universe together.
Used up toiler paper centre roll, cut to size, makes a good wrap around holder for gaffer tape (sorry, duct tape).
Don't forget to take a needle and some thread - can go in your first aid kit - you never know when a seam will come apart or a button becomes loose. I usually carry a small tube of superglue as well - once I glued my backpack back together, and also my hiking sandals.
You may want to carry some tissues in a waterproof sandwich bag - handy as tissues, handy as toilet paper.
Take some over the counter painkillers.

You use Imperial measures - ok, I am a Brit and think both ... the French were pretty smart when they introduced the metric system - a litre of water weighs a kilo, exactly - a kilo is 2.2 pounds (UK).
Food? will depend on how you want to provide for yourself .... you may simply buy a large bocadillo in a village shop in the morning to keep for lunch, or buy ingredients and make your own - so glad you are taking a spork - how else does one eat yoghurt!! ... same with cooking in the evenings .... were you to always carry cheese and sausage and a little pasta you can make a meal any evening. I tend to carry sea salt, black pepper, olive oil .... helps, every time!

Oh - take a universal sink plug!! You can use it in the shower to fill the shower tray enough to soak your feet whilst you shower, and you will be surprised at how many refugio sinks do not have plugs!!

You could photograph all your documents, travel ins, passport, etc then you will have them on your phone (and backed up online) in case of need - also .. think about how you will be caqrrying cash. The Camino is mainly a cash economy and the safest way is to carry a few days supply in a go-to place and your main stash elsewhere, such as a flat body belt.

Looking forward to reading other responses - I like the way you are working on this.

Buen Camino - oh, was out there last April and I was really cold all the time .. then got ill ... other years it is warm, so do check the forecasts before you go - Accuweather is pretty good - https://www.accuweather.com/

p.s. I would like to meet you out there .. sit you down, pour some Rioja into you ... and then casually ask why Skyedogstudio ;)
oh i didn't answer- this list is everything i will have including what i'm wearing. i like all of your suggestions. where do you weigh in on taking a camera and stashing the phone? I have a little canon g7x i love and really hate carrying the phone, but it seems like such a pain to carry both. as for the laundry, the sheets are from amazon "tru earth eco-strips laundry detergent (fragrance free) and yes i thought i'd share them. on the passport- do i keep that in my everyday bag with daily cash to show to alberges or will a copy of the passport suffice? anyway- i don't want to overthink this and the whole point is to go with the flow but some things are nice to know! i appreciate it :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
oh i didn't answer- this list is everything i will have including what i'm wearing. i like all of your suggestions. where do you weigh in on taking a camera and stashing the phone? I have a little canon g7x i love and really hate carrying the phone, but it seems like such a pain to carry both. as for the laundry, the sheets are from amazon "tru earth eco-strips laundry detergent (fragrance free) and yes i thought i'd share them. on the passport- do i keep that in my everyday bag with daily cash to show to alberges or will a copy of the passport suffice? anyway- i don't want to overthink this and the whole point is to go with the flow but some things are nice to know! i appreciate it :)
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
good point!!! I have lost things off the clothes line before now - good point!!
I lost a sock off of my backpack one year, and was left with just 1.5 pair - three socks to finish my Camino.
as for the laundry, the sheets are from amazon "tru earth eco-strips laundry detergent (
I use a similar product, and use half a sheet each time I was my clothes. I bring enough to use a half a sheet every day, and they only weigh about 1.5 ounces total
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
The camera/phone thing is easy isn't it? you need a phone (switched off and only used for emergencies!) but a camera? Those really into photography tend to take cameras and it is a solid plus for them ... snappers just take their phone .. but it means it needs to be switched on, draining battery. Though, doesn't an iphone have a Fab camera installed? (I don't know these things).
Love the laundry 'sheets' - will look them up ... I have the feeling that you are a competent adult and one who already knows how to pack for travelling - so - my top tip? in the end, do what you think is right!
Spanish (and EU) law says that foreigners need to carry their passports at all times - I have never ever been asked to produce mine by the police ... hotels you have to produce ... refugios was just the pilgrim passport but Spain recently introduced new security laws for refugios so keep it with your pilgrim passport.
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Something that I really like about the detergent strips that I use is that they get my clothes clean without making a lot of suds, so it's easy to rinse them out. I let my clothes soak in the dry bag while I shower and dress. Then I agitate the bag a bit by shaking it before rinsing everything in the laundry sink.
My clothes get cleaner with this method than when I just washed in the laundry sink. I think that the soaking time really helps.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
The Gossamer Gear Gorilla is a great choice, but I am wondering how much hiking you have done, with the poncho-stuff in place of the sit-pad back pad it comes with? Or the newer airflow mesh sit-pad?

For consistency, do not count as backpack weight things that you are not actually in your backpack while walking. For example, your trekking poles. Also. . how clothes are carried on the body is quite different than how weight in a backpack is carried.

Raincoat AND poncho? I'd choose one or the other. I know that you are thinking of using the poncho as the GG Gorilla back pad, but for ease of use, and quick deployment to take on and off for sprinkles and rain, I'd keep it in a side pocket.

The guide book: what I did was use the Maps only Brierley version, after cutting out anything that WASN'T a map, so I could jot notes on it referencing stuff I wanted to recall at locations I was at. I used a phone app for anything information based. . .I found the Wisely app to be useful.

The EE quilt, at that weight, is probably rated (depending on the model) in the 20 to 30F range. EE rates their temps based on someone who sleeps nekkid in the quilt, outside, and without a tent. For me, that is too warm for that time of year on Camino.

I only take two, long sleeved shirts - one to wear (which is my baselayer) and one in the backpack as a second layer and as my clean shirt to change into after a day's hike. Long sleeves can be rolled up if I want bare skin, but for sun and heat protection, or chill, they stay down.

I would think of combining functions and choose either the Sea to Summit pack (which is what I carry) and the GG fanny pack. Choose to take only one.

The dry bags are heavier than an equivalent - and equally effective - silnylon stuff sack.

Two Buffs?

The mid-weight baselayers are too heavy for that time of year. I would switch to the lightweight versions and save the weight. Keep in mind that it is the thinner layers of two long-sleeved shirts that provide a much better thermo-regulation over a broad temperature range.

If you are taking a long-sleeved button down shirt, ditch one of the other long sleeved shirts.

I have not encountered a situation on Camino where I regretted NOT carrying eating utensils.

Headlamp. . . IF you are going to do walking in the black of night, maybe. But I bet it will never be used. Next to snoring - which can't be helped, using a headlamp in an albergue is exceedingly aggravating to others - which can be helped. :)

After arriving on Camino, purchase a travel-sized bottle of hand sanitizer in liquid form and skip the spray.

The towel. . . . wow. A bit too big and heavy, and I wonder how effective it will be as a one-sided dorm-bed barrier :)

HikeGoo can be decanted into a ziplock bag to make it more packable and to save some weight.

Duct tape, wrapped around a trekking pole shaft will have usability, but I would also include something that sticks better to synthetics, like Tenacious Tape.

I do not dangle stuff outside the pack, so the Freshette might be better served stored in the outside mesh pocket of the Gorilla backpack. Just a thought.
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
thanks so much i sm taking all into consideration!!! btw i have used the gorilla 40 a lot but just thought the sit pad might be a waste and to replace it with items to store. - havent gone out with it like that yet it was just an idea- i am going to rethink the midweight baselayer but was thinking of sleeping in that with the liner instead of bringing the quilt, but your idea on s couple thinner shirts is good too. plenty of time to test all! thanks a million :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
thanks so much i sm taking all into consideration!!! btw i have used the gorilla 40 a lot but just thought the sit pad might be a waste and to replace it with items to store. - havent gone out with it like that yet it was just an idea- i am going to rethink the midweight baselayer but was thinking of sleeping in that with the liner instead of bringing the quilt, but your idea on s couple thinner shirts is good too. plenty of time to test all! thanks a million :)
also i like two buffs one for a wrist sweat-wipe the other for neck, head whatever...
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
The Gossamer Gear Gorilla is a great choice, but I am wondering how much hiking you have done, with the poncho-stuff in place of the sit-pad back pad it comes with? Or the newer airflow mesh sit-pad?

For consistency, do not count as backpack weight things that you are not actually in your backpack while walking. For example, your trekking poles. Also. . how clothes are carried on the body is quite different than how weight in a backpack is carried.

Raincoat AND poncho? I'd choose one or the other. I know that you are thinking of using the poncho as the GG Gorilla back pad, but for ease of use, and quick deployment to take on and off for sprinkles and rain, I'd keep it in a side pocket.

The guide book: what I did was use the Maps only Brierley version, after cutting out anything that WASN'T a map, so I could jot notes on it referencing stuff I wanted to recall at locations I was at. I used a phone app for anything information based. . .I found the Wisely app to be useful.

The EE quilt, at that weight, is probably rated (depending on the model) in the 20 to 30F range. EE rates their temps based on someone who sleeps nekkid in the quilt, outside, and without a tent. For me, that is too warm for that time of year on Camino.

I only take two, long sleeved shirts - one to wear (which is my baselayer) and one in the backpack as a second layer and as my clean shirt to change into after a day's hike. Long sleeves can be rolled up if I want bare skin, but for sun and heat protection, or chill, they stay down.

I would think of combining functions and choose either the Sea to Summit pack (which is what I carry) and the GG fanny pack. Choose to take only one.

The dry bags are heavier than an equivalent - and equally effective - silnylon stuff sack.

Two Buffs?

The mid-weight baselayers are too heavy for that time of year. I would switch to the lightweight versions and save the weight. Keep in mind that it is the thinner layers of two long-sleeved shirts that provide a much better thermo-regulation over a broad temperature range.

If you are taking a long-sleeved button down shirt, ditch one of the other long sleeved shirts.

I have not encountered a situation on Camino where I regretted NOT carrying eating utensils.

Headlamp. . . IF you are going to do walking in the black of night, maybe. But I bet it will never be used. Next to snoring - which can't be helped, using a headlamp in an albergue is exceedingly aggravating to others - which can be helped. :)

After arriving on Camino, purchase a travel-sized bottle of hand sanitizer in liquid form and skip the spray.

The towel. . . . wow. A bit too big and heavy, and I wonder how effective it will be as a one-sided dorm-bed barrier :)

HikeGoo can be decanted into a ziplock bag to make it more packable and to save some weight.

Duct tape, wrapped around a trekking pole shaft will have usability, but I would also include something that sticks better to synthetics, like Tenacious Tape.

I do not dangle stuff outside the pack, so the Freshette might be better served stored in the outside mesh pocket of the Gorilla backpack. Just a thought.
btw i am bringing poncho snd rain skirt not raincoat. the skirt has a bunch of other uses. otherwise i have the synthetic EE apex jacket for warmth for sleeping w/o the quilt. anyway i am considering all your comments 😆
 
Camino(s) past & future
2 Camino Frances, next: April 2020 Primitivo
Three socks ok. I have a tradition: every time I loose one pair of socks on the first day of camino. One pair left in Madrid hostel bed, another in train... So, with three socks I'll still have two pairs left. That's enough. Otherwise, if you can carry it, take what you need. I'll have a pink hairdryer, so can't give much of advice 😉
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
Three socks ok. I have a tradition: every time I loose one pair of socks on the first day of camino. One pair left in Madrid hostel bed, another in train... So, with three socks I'll still have two pairs left. That's enough. Otherwise, if you can carry it, take what you need. I'll have a pink hairdryer, so can't give much of advice 😉
lol!!!
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
thanks so much i sm taking all into consideration!!! btw i have used the gorilla 40 a lot but just thought the sit pad might be a waste and to replace it with items to store. - havent gone out with it like that yet it was just an idea- i am going to rethink the midweight baselayer but was thinking of sleeping in that with the liner instead of bringing the quilt, but your idea on s couple thinner shirts is good too. plenty of time to test all! thanks a million :)
The newer air mesh sitpad is definitely a benefit, and it does add some additional support to the main bag. When I was gear testing the Mariposa for Gossamer Gear, my final report strongly advocated for a pad to increase circulation. I think a lot of consumers also gave a similar feedback. So I was thrilled that GG sent me a production prodotype of the airflow pad, and I really like how it works with all of my larger GG backpacks.

Also, it does work well as an actual pad for sitting on, too. :)

If I can be of any help, feel free to send me a PM.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
btw i am bringing poncho snd rain skirt not raincoat. the skirt has a bunch of other uses. otherwise i have the synthetic EE apex jacket for warmth for sleeping w/o the quilt. anyway i am considering all your comments 😆
I use a rain kilt, too. :) it's a ULA rain kilt. I only backpack and walk in running shorts, and most of the time my legs stay dry. If they get wet, no biggie, they dry just fine :) But if the weather is cool and the rain cold, I'll sometimes pull the rain kilt out of the side pocket that I also keep the poncho in.
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
I use a rain kilt, too. :) it's a ULA rain kilt. I only backpack and walk in running shorts, and most of the time my legs stay dry. If they get wet, no biggie, they dry just fine :) But if the weather is cool and the rain cold, I'll sometimes pull the rain kilt out of the side pocket that I also keep the poncho in.
The newer air mesh sitpad is definitely a benefit, and it does add some additional support to the main bag. When I was gear testing the Mariposa for Gossamer Gear, my final report strongly advocated for a pad to increase circulation. I think a lot of consumers also gave a similar feedback. So I was thrilled that GG sent me a production prodotype of the airflow pad, and I really like how it works with all of my larger GG backpacks.

Also, it does work well as an actual pad for sitting on, too. :)

If I can be of any help, feel free to send me a PM.
thanks! i don't know how to PM on here!! - i have asked GG to please let me know when a small size new pad is available as my pack is a small. sometimes i fold up a thermarest pad and stick that in the sit pad slot on my gorilla - which i love - but i understand we don't need to bring a sleeping pad on the camino, right? i only think i hope i don't end up having to sleep outside!!
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
thanks! i don't know how to PM on here!! - ...
Put the cursor over the user name of the person you want to send a PM, a pop-up window will appear, click "start conversation" and there you are ;-)
BC SY
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
Hey - good list .. I see that you have chosen quality gear ....
thoughts?
I like your little pocket knife ... but you would be amazed how often you are holding a bottle of wine and there is no corkscrew, apparently for miles) so for me I need a corkscrew so carry a Swiss Army knife (also has scissors, toothpick, tweezers, etc.
You have a pair of trousers and a pair of shorts .. if you are going weight conscious you could get some zip-offs then you would have trousers and shorts combined?
You seem to have five pairs of socks .. as you can only wear one pair at a time why not take just two pairs .. one on, one off? - it is a good rule of thumb; wear one, pack one ... wash that day when you change and if not dry in the morning you can use your safety pins to pin clothes to your pack - of which, don't take ordinary safety pins, take nappy pins (diaper pins) as they are stronger and lock shut.
Soo .. hang on! Is this a backpack list with you already dressed for Camino? If so drop one of everything!! Or rather, complete your list and then take out of it what you need to wear!
Wear one - pack one. .. except for cold weather back ups.
Neat on taking extra hiking pole tips!! get more!!
Ear plugs - if possible try to keep the spare ones separate, then when you lose yours you will have a secreted back up.
You already have a torch on your phone so you could lose the headlamp.
Do you need to carry a month's supply of laundry discs (whatever they are, I am English) .. you could take just a few and buy/share the odd container when out there when needed.
Personal thing here, but, chapstick .. my experience, observing many people, is that the moment you start to use a lip balm the body stops producing lubricant and you need more and more .. for me - I never use it.
The hand sanitiser is for what?
Duct tape? Fab - it is like the force; it has a dark side, a light side, and it holds the universe together.
Used up toiler paper centre roll, cut to size, makes a good wrap around holder for gaffer tape (sorry, duct tape).
Don't forget to take a needle and some thread - can go in your first aid kit - you never know when a seam will come apart or a button becomes loose. I usually carry a small tube of superglue as well - once I glued my backpack back together, and also my hiking sandals. (and, yes, once my fingers).

You may want to carry some tissues in a waterproof sandwich bag - handy as tissues, handy as toilet paper.
Take some over the counter painkillers.

You use Imperial measures - ok, I am a Brit and think both ... the French were pretty smart when they introduced the metric system - a litre of water weighs a kilo, exactly - a kilo is 2.2 pounds (UK).
Food? will depend on how you want to provide for yourself .... you may simply buy a large bocadillo in a village shop in the morning to keep for lunch, or buy ingredients and make your own - so glad you are taking a spork - how else does one eat yoghurt!! ... same with cooking in the evenings .... were you to always carry cheese and sausage and a little pasta you can make a meal any evening. I tend to carry sea salt, black pepper, olive oil .... helps, every time!

Oh - take a universal sink plug!! You can use it in the shower to fill the shower tray enough to soak your feet whilst you shower, and you will be surprised at how many refugio sinks do not have plugs!!

You could photograph all your documents, travel ins, passport, etc then you will have them on your phone (and backed up online) in case of need - also .. think about how you will be caqrrying cash. The Camino is mainly a cash economy and the safest way is to carry a few days supply in a go-to place and your main stash elsewhere, such as a flat body belt.

Looking forward to reading other responses - I like the way you are working on this.

Buen Camino - oh, was out there last April and I was really cold all the time .. then got ill ... other years it is warm, so do check the forecasts before you go - Accuweather is pretty good - https://www.accuweather.com/

p.s. I would like to meet you out there .. sit you down, pour some Rioja into you ... and then casually ask why Skyedogstudio ;)
One little mention about your mention about the 5 pairs of socks. You may be right about the socks that she wears under the socks that she wears. I mean maybe they are socks too but with so many of her items I have no idea what the brands are, and whether they are good or not, or worth bringing. I take 3 pairs of socks with me. I know I could get by with 2 but I always somehow manage to lose a sock or two on every camino. I was advised by the owner of the running store in the town that I used to live in to buy as he put it, "your grandmothers synthetic socks that are really thin and will absorb sweat and help prevent blisters from walking" He is also the man, along with his 3 employees who all pointed to Cascadia Trail Runners after I went in and told them I had been wearing some Merrill shoes and was getting bad blisters blisters training for the Camino. I took his advice based on the fact that my friend who brought me in the store back in 2012 told me that the owner was at the time the #2 Ultra Marathoner in the world and that Ashland, Oregon which was my home was a top training area for these people. I had no idea what an Ultra Marathoner was at the time. But he sure knew his stuff and I listened to all his foot advice and I have only had 4 blisters in 5 Caminos and I walk full caminos all the time. I would love to hear a foot conversation between this guy and Señor @davebugg I bet it would be an interesting conversation for all us camino addicts. I would recommend those grandma socks to everyone to check out. I have no idea what they are called but you can find them in REI (or at least you could a few years ago). I also love the Wigwam socks. They are a little cheaper (I think) then the Smartwool socks. Don't smell too bad when I don't wash them too well. They never itch my feet as am a delicate lad with delicate skin, and I think they last a really long time and dry pretty darn quick too.
 

J Byrd

Artist, Filmmaker, and walking Nomad
Camino(s) past & future
France 2018 Fall
Portugal 2020 Spring
oh i didn't answer- this list is everything i will have including what i'm wearing. i like all of your suggestions. where do you weigh in on taking a camera and stashing the phone? I have a little canon g7x i love and really hate carrying the phone, but it seems like such a pain to carry both. as for the laundry, the sheets are from amazon "tru earth eco-strips laundry detergent (fragrance free) and yes i thought i'd share them. on the passport- do i keep that in my everyday bag with daily cash to show to alberges or will a copy of the passport suffice? anyway- i don't want to overthink this and the whole point is to go with the flow but some things are nice to know! i appreciate it :)

I’m a professional photographer and i took a dslr camera last time - and regretted it. Too much weight vs real use and how I wanted to spend my time. That’s just me... ☺
 

JamesVT

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2019
forgive me in advance if i am not posting this to the right place! i am wrapping up my packing list and wonder if anyone sees any glaring omissions or errors. the list attached includes everything - including what i'll be wearing- so the 16lbs would be minus whatever that is on any given day. any help appreciated. i feel pretty good about this so far. thanks very much!
In read your post with envy— I walked the Camino last year, starting in SJPP in April and the walk was a wonderful and transformative experience. The Camino forum was a great, encouraging help. Your packing list is well organized and thought out. I skimmed your list and have a few random thoughts. First, many pilgrims I encountered seemed to be carrying way more weight than they needed. The general advice to carry no more than 10% of your body weight seems to me to be excessive and perhaps to encourage people to carry too much “stuff” (just in case), often duplicates. You can get by with two pairs of socks, but three is better so that you can rotate them and always have a dry pair to put on when you want to change. I wore toe sock liners covered by Darn Tough Marino wool socks. I didn’t notice if you had a foot care kit of stuff to use to prevent or attend to blisters— you’ll definitely want/need that. You should ask for advice on what to include and use. Dave Bugg is one expert many. BTW— trail runners proved to be a good choice for foot ware for me— you will see pairs of heavy hiking boots abandoned all along the Camino.

I used and needed a down quilt at many points along the Camino. Many albergues have blankets, but if they don’t, you will be glad to have your own way to stay warm. For rain gear I used a Packa cover which was okay but difficult to get on properly without help. I took a rain kilt but never it. As to water, I saw many pilgrims who seemed to be carrying way too much drinking water— in only a few places are hikers unable to get safe drinking water.

Washing clothes, I usually just used any kind of soap or shampoo and had five feet of parachute cord and five conventional clothes pins, which worked far better for me than safety pins.

Finally, I’d advise again against over packing. Less is best. In every albergue you will see clothing and other stuff that pilgrims dumped because they didn’t need it and didn’t want to carry it. That said, you’ve done a good job of thinking through your needs. You will be fine, and I wish you a joyous Camino!
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but will I be fit enough for 2020?
I lost a sock off of my backpack one year, and was left with just 1.5 pair - three socks to finish my Camino.

I use a similar product, and use half a sheet each time I was my clothes. I bring enough to use a half a sheet every day, and they only weigh about 1.5 ounces total
Three socks is still three pairs 🧦🧦🧦 . . . Let's call them Sock A, Sock B and Sock C:

Sock A + Sock B = pair 1
Sock A + Sock C = pair 2
Sock C + Sock B = pair 3

No?

;)
 

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
forgive me in advance if i am not posting this to the right place! i am wrapping up my packing list and wonder if anyone sees any glaring omissions or errors. the list attached includes everything - including what i'll be wearing- so the 16lbs would be minus whatever that is on any given day. any help appreciated. i feel pretty good about this so far. thanks very much!
Great list! We never carry guide book or maps - there are super aps and websites which you can download on your phone. That cuts out a bit of weight. I also don’t carry much food. Most days there is plenty available along the way. Finally, I would consider taking water-resistant shoes. It can rain lots and I mean LOTS especially once you are in Galicia.

Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Walked CF September/October 2015
One thing I noticed is that I don’t see any sort of shower shoes on your list. To protect your feet, you will definitely want some sort of very lightweight flip-flop or something similar to wear in the shower. Some people like Crocs.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
One thing I noticed is that I don’t see any sort of shower shoes on your list. To protect your feet, you will definitely want some sort of very lightweight flip-flop or something similar to wear in the shower. Some people like Crocs.
I have always gone barefoot in the shower and haven't had an issue.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but will I be fit enough for 2020?
Hahahaha - sure, if you want to eat it all in one go and also don't mind sucking aluminium into your body (everyone with Altzheimers has high aluminium content in their brains!).
It's sadly true that, if you're unfortunate enough to have Altzheimers you're likely retain more aluminium but there's no proof that using aluminium in cooking will cause or exacerbate Altzheimers so, on the odd occasion I'm sans cuillère . . . .
 

Luther

Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
April 20, 2016 to May 20, '16 SJPdP to Santiago d C.
Love this gear post. It looks like you're following thru hikers great lightweight gear lists. I also did SJPdP to SDC April 20 - May 20, 2016. I took only a sleeping bag liner (permethrin treated), but froze several nights in the first half. I'd bring a 40 degree bag or quilt, as light and compact as I can find. Along the way I discarded shower sandals, 2/3rds of my first aid, extra socks (kept 2 injinji's and 3 smartwool and alternated), a second long sleeved shirt, paper return flight info, paper medication prescriptions, sink stopper, and a few other things I can't remember. I eliminated a headlight and Brierly guidebook before the start, but missed the great history in it. My app wasn't as good, but a lot lighter. Are you bringing a journal?Also, since I didn't want to check my bag, I bought an Opinel folding pocket knife in SJPdP. It's my only (but prized) souvenir. Someday one of my sons will get it. Buen Camino, peregrina! -LAI
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
About 35 years ago I did a 9 day walk with Outward Bound (originally a British organisation but now spread across the Commonwealth). Our walk leader briefed us on sock and foot maintenance. He said that he always wore two pairs of socks - a thin liner pair and a thicker outer pair. The thickness of the outers depended upon the terrain and walking conditions. I have followed this practice and have significantly reduced my blisters and other foot problems. For the past 10 years I have worn the Inija "toe sock" liner socks. Being a bloke I am not overly weight conscious so I carry two pairs of liners and three pairs of outers. The tip about changing socks or at least taking the outers off during stops is one I endorse. I did in 2017 and I feel it improved the foot condition. Thanks for sharing your list.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May-June 2020)
One thing I noticed is that I don’t see any sort of shower shoes on your list. To protect your feet, you will definitely want some sort of very lightweight flip-flop or something similar to wear in the shower. Some people like Crocs.
I have always gone barefoot in the shower and haven't had an issue.
Forgive me for responding for @skyedogstudio - but since we both seem to be fans of the waterproof EVA Birkenstocks she included on her list, I can say that they work perfectly as Croc-like flip-flop equivalents for shower use or walking in the rain or mud. (I especially value them for the former, as unlike @trecile I seem to have caught more than my fair share of athlete's foot and other unpleasantries from various gym and sauna environments over the years.)

And to @skyedogstudio: Bravo (brava?) or a detailed and comprehensive packing list! I'll be setting off on my first Camino a few weeks after you and have likewise compiled my own list using the online tool at LighterPack.com, which allows for categorizing items by use and comparing base pack vs. total weights. I'll share my complete profile/list once I'm a little closer to my departure date or when I get below 7 kg total, whichever comes first (I'm currently hovering around 7.3kg/16 lb total, which I don't think is a bad start!)
 
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J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
thanks so much- yep i will ditch the scrubba and some socks. still deliberating on taking the quilt or not but my apex jacket is of the same material and am thinking with the wool base layer should be ok but will watch the temps. as for skyedogstudio my daughter named my art studio after our dog skye- named after one of my favorite places on the planet! whoops! i told you and didn't even get any wine for it!!! :)))
You will need the quilt or a sleeping bag as the albergues don't always have sufficient heat and personally I do not like using the blankets provided, some do not provide blankets. I use a 40 degree bag.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Well this is a pleasant thread, started off by a great packing list .... bedding .. is a problem isn't it .. quilts and bags tend to be bulky unless expensive and there is always the chance they will never be used, so the temptation to leave them behind - but I was walking in April last year for a short while (first aiding) and it was cold, bright mostly but a really cold wind and I needed my bag at night ... Spring can have any weather, from early summer feeling to late winter feeling ... I would take a bag ...

this mine - made by Snugpak who supply our military (UK) and also sell the same items to the public, though sometimes in different colours rather than khaki.
This their "jungle bag" - 950gms - 34 ozs, comfort 7C - 45F, low rating 2C - 36F, left or right zip, rectangular, and unzips all the way round so can be used as a throw or blanket, has a built-in mosquito net at the head end (no bed bugs!!), has draw cord loops internally to attach a liner, compresses down to the size of a pineapple, and only costs about £44 (57 USD?).

Although it is listed as a 'jungle' bag I have found it pretty good at low temperatures, right down to that 2C. Though the temperature range is male set and females may not find it warm enough when really cold.

SNUGPAK-JUNGLE-OK-SITE.jpg

Alternatively ... I wonder if anyone has ever taken an adult onesie and sleeping socks??????????????

:D:D:eek:;)

blog180824-6.jpg
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
A Costco down quilt weighs 15 ounces. I cut them in half, making a quilt which is just big enough to tuck inside the sleeping back liner. I add ties to the half quilt, and loops inside the liner to tie it to. Saves a ton of weight.
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
You will need the quilt or a sleeping bag as the albergues don't always have sufficient heat and personally I do not like using the blankets provided, some do not provide blankets. I use a 40 degree bag.
yes now thinking will probably end up tsking the quilt- can always send ahead if unnecessary. appreciate your help and the other suggestions-
A Costco down quilt weighs 15 ounces. I cut them in half, making a quilt which is just big enough to tuck inside the sleeping back liner. I add ties to the half quilt, and loops inside the liner to tie it to. Saves a ton of weight.
thanks - i really like that idea. will look into it but i don't belong to costco. i don't want the bulk of a full size quilt or bag but agree the added warmth of some sort of inside-the-liner blanket would be good.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but will I be fit enough for 2020?
ok i see you have one of those travel bowls that folds-worth it too? (doesn't weigh much)
The Orikaso ones like these?:

1580487088510.jpeg

Have used them on picnics and camping trips (one set lives in my camper/RV, the other in my car) but have never taken them on a Camino though would in future - the plate on the left doubles as a preparation/chopping board and I'd take the bowl on the right in preference to the fold up mug which is just junk. they each weigh about 40gms.

They fold completely flat and would slip down into the water bladder pocket on my favourite rucksack. The plate is useful when preparing a wayside lunch and acts as a "third hand" - one for the bread, one for the filling and one for the knife . . . Durable, resistant to cuts and easy to wash.

Orikaso are no longer in business but there's an American company called FOZZILS which make an almost identical product called Snapfold - although a friend of mine uses a fold flat water bowl intended for dogs (because it's cheaper).

They also make for a conversation starter as people watch you making your plates and bowls before you start making your lunch!
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
The Orikaso ones like these?:

View attachment 69178

Have used them on picnics and camping trips (one set lives in my camper/RV, the other in my car) but have never taken them on a Camino though would in future - the plate on the left doubles as a preparation/chopping board and I'd take the bowl on the right in preference to the fold up mug which is just junk. they each weigh about 40gms.

They fold completely flat and would slip down into the water bladder pocket on my favourite rucksack. The plate is useful when preparing a wayside lunch and acts as a "third hand" - one for the bread, one for the filling and one for the knife . . . Durable, resistant to cuts and easy to wash.

Orikaso are no longer in business but there's an American company called FOZZILS which make an almost identical product called Snapfold - although a friend of mine uses a fold flat water bowl intended for dogs (because it's cheaper).

They also make for a conversation starter as people watch you making your plates and bowls before you start making your lunch!

nice piece of kit - but just a thought ... have you thought of taking a Frisbee instead? Doubles as bowl and plate but also fun as a Frisbee!!!
 

Tandem Graham

Every new day an adventure
Camino(s) past & future
Bike: Mont St Michel-SdC. Budapest-Vezelay. Alicante-Burgos
Walk: Le Puy-SJPdP. Dax-(CF)-SdC.
Nice kit list. Notwithstanding any comments already made, you've done some good research and good prep and if you set off with what's on this list you'll do fine. Of course each of us would change something here and there, that's partly because we're all different!
I'm with you on the socks. I take a pair of injinji liners, two regular pairs of hiking socks and a pair of injinji thick hiking socks and I rotate and combine them according to how hot it is (whether my feet have swollen) and how wet it is (change to dry socks at lunchtime).
You've made me think about sleeping bags/quilts. I walked the Le Puy route in April 2018 and managed with just a silk liner - using albergue blankets where needed. I walked the Camino Frances in September 19 and found the liner was sometimes too warm on its own. I'm setting of on Camino del Norte from Bayonne in late March. Now in two minds whether I ought to take a two season sleeping bag or start with just the silk liner again and buy a bag in San Sebastian if I need it. Any thoughts, experienced caminantes?
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
thank you. btw i am opting for a "costco down quilt" in addition to the "friendly swede" liner. the costco quilt can be obtained from Amazon under the title "double black diamond packable down quilt" that, plus the liner ought to cover the colder nights in the mountains, and this particular quilt comes highly recommended by experienced pilgrims you'll see on the forums here. buen camino- i bet it will be so incredibly peaceful and beautiful in March on the Norte!
 

Rick Davidson

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis, April/May (2019)
Last year we walked from mid April. For weeks it seemed the morning temperatures averaged 4C. Some days it never warmed much and while we only had one day of real rain we had wind pretty regularly. Because of the temperature and wind my shell, an OR Helium, was critical for comfort on many days. I wore it almost every morning. On many mornings I also started out with maximum (all I had) layering, short sleeve T, long sleeve wool T, then a lightweight fleece hoody followed by the shell. The lightweight shell was great and I saw no application for a poncho. I ditched the headlamp and guidebook. My phone could provide everything I needed. I also carried an EE quilt but our group quickly decided that we were hotel/pension guys rather then alberque guys so my quilt got minimal use. We carried no food other than maybe some Digestive biscuits for a snack. I carried 1L of water but other walking with me only carried 0.5L and had no problem. I agree with others...wear 1...wash one. Washing a T shirt and shorts in a sink every other day is easy. That reminds me...we wore hiking shorts every day...if upper body is warm shorts are great. A fleece hat and gloves are also essential. On many mornings you can use the buff rather then the fleece hat. For foot care I can do no better than carry some leukotape and fixomull. No spork, no cup, no camera.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
.....has a built-in mosquito net at the head end (no bed bugs!!),
Love this. I pull my silk sleeping bag liner up over my head and cinch it shut with an elastic cord, breathing through the silk. But a mosquito net would be even better. Now considering sewing one in.

PS for warmth I put a Costco down throw inside my sleeping bag liner. Great tip given by? @trecile? Cant remember but one of our genius members.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
PS for warmth I put a Costco down throw inside my sleeping bag liner. Great tip given by? @trecile? Cant remember but one of our genius members.
I settled on putting my down blanket inside when it kept slipping off when it was outside. 😊
I had sewn small snaps onto it and my silk liner, but apparently I should have tested it out at home, because they didn't hold well.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but will I be fit enough for 2020?
nice piece of kit - but just a thought ... have you thought of taking a Frisbee instead? Doubles as bowl and plate but also fun as a Frisbee!!!
But much bulkier than a flat sheet of plastic! Oddly enough my daughter was down for the weekend and fancied a seaside picnic (it was sunny and we were mourning no longer being Europeans so we sat atop the White Cliffs of Dover gazing at France) - guess who didn't have a single plate in the car? Baguette crumbs all over the place!
 

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