• PLEASE NOTE: Please think twice before you travel to Spain now. More here.

Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement

COVID Governmental guidelines albergues

Status
Not open for further replies.

LTfit

Veteran Member
The Spanish government has released safety and hygiene guidelines governing all accommodations. There is a special document for each type - hotel, casa rural, albergue (all, not specifically those on the Camino), etc.

It is in Spanish but considering the length I'm not going to translate.

There is no mention of how long these regulations will stay in place nor as of when they need to be implemented.

This is quite a blow for all involved, both pilgrims and hospitaleros.

https://www.mincotur.gob.es/es-es/COVID-19/Paginas/Guias-sector-turistico.aspx
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
For the section on hostels/alburgues, the main thing I was looking for was any reference to required partitioning between beds within multiple occupancy / dorm-style rooms. There was no mention of hard partitions as a requirement, nor did it seem there is a prohibition against bunk beds. There was mention of following established spacing requirements between beds.

There were a lot of smaller details about sleeping areas regarding things like providing storage outside of rooms for shoes and luggage, types of waste baskets, and stuff like that. It didn't seem to me that there was anything in the way of remodeling or reconfiguring the designs of hostel sleeping areas, other than the potential of a decrease in the number of available beds in order to keep things properly distanced.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
A summary:

2 metre distancing between people at all times - if not possible in some circumstances masks must be worn.
In shared rooms, except groups or families, if a bottom bunk is used, the top bunk opposite should be used on if 2 metre requirement can be met.
Strict cleaning regime
Kitchens must only be used once then everything must be cleaned - rules out communal kitchens
Meals - 2 metre distance to be observed at all times
Payment only by card is recommended.
Check in - distancing achieved e g by screens, masks and gloves
Also shoes and packs need to be sanitized before entering and if possible placed in plastic bags.
Plus no folders, books etc unless clean hands before and after use.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo, Norte, Francés, Volunteer Hospitalero.
I didn't see any dramatic regulation. I would say that maintaining the albergues at 50% capacity and an extreme cleanliness would meet most of the requirements.

I think 50% capacity is something that will just happen ... I don't think there are so many pilgrims at the beginning to exceed 50% capacity of the open albergues. And at the very begining, probably a 10% of the capacity will be more than enough (even considering that many albergues will remain closed).


In any case, a certain discipline on the part of the pilgrims will be necessary.
 

Shaun-Castaneda-Rio

Shaun@Feebird-Castaneda
Camino(s) past & future
Francais 2014
The Spanish government has released safety and hygiene guidelines governing all accommodations. There is a special document for each type - hotel, casa rural, albergue (all, not specifically those on the Camino), etc.

It is in Spanish but considering the length I'm not going to translate.

There is no mention of how long these regulations will stay in place nor as of when they need to be implemented.

This is quite a blow for all involved, both pilgrims and hospitaleros.

https://www.mincotur.gob.es/es-es/COVID-19/Paginas/Guias-sector-turistico.aspx
One question that comes to mind following the various posts and requests for help !!
how will the already struggling Donativos mange to accomodate these requirements, the investment ?
Payment by card at donativos I have never heard of has anyone else ?
 
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
Payment by card at donativos I have never heard of has anyone else ?
Payment by card is not an obligation for albergues, it's a recommendation. "Albergues" as mentioned in the government guidelines are all sorts of albergues, including pilgrim albergues but not only those. Besides, there are pilgrim albergues on the Camino Frances for example who do have the option of payment by card; use of cards is encouraged.

Every shop that sent me an email today to inform me that they are open again (I am not in Spain) also informed me that they prefer payment by card or even only allow payment by card from now on.

In fact, for a similar reason, a few days ago I asked my bank to send me a card that allows contactless payment as my quite old card does not yet have this option.

And in addition, the recommendation is a reminder to be careful when handling and touching cash.
 
Last edited:

LTfit

Veteran Member
One question that comes to mind following the various posts and requests for help !!
how will the already struggling Donativos mange to accomodate these requirements, the investment ?

That's a good question, not only for Donativos. If you can only receive 6 pilgrims at €5, can not offer a communal dinner or breakfast but will need to spend funds to follow these rules? And I haven't even mentioned the hours needed to clean throughout the day.
 

IngridF

Intrepid Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
2012, 2015 ,2017, 2019
Having been hospitalera in a few different albergues, all donativos, the cleaning alone will be a herculean task. They are already struggling to cover basic daily costs, the need for extra protective materials etc, makes this a nightmare. In addition the policing of pilgrims re behaviour etc will be overwhelming. For most of us who volunteer is the human to human relationship that makes the hard long hours well worth it. We need a miracle.
 

natefaith

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2009)
León-Ponferrada (2014)
Camino Inglés (2017)
The Spanish government has released safety and hygiene guidelines governing all accommodations. There is a special document for each type - hotel, casa rural, albergue (all, not specifically those on the Camino), etc.

It is in Spanish but considering the length I'm not going to translate.

There is no mention of how long these regulations will stay in place nor as of when they need to be implemented.

This is quite a blow for all involved, both pilgrims and hospitaleros.

https://www.mincotur.gob.es/es-es/COVID-19/Paginas/Guias-sector-turistico.aspx

Thanks for posting, Lee. We hadn't seen these yet - very helpful information.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Thanks for posting, Lee. We hadn't seen these yet - very helpful information.

You're welcome. I assume the Pilgrim House will also have their "norms". You'll need to look into what category you fall under but for sure the social distancing regulations and cleaning will be the same. We Albergues can't give out information folders or the likes. I'd be interested to see what will apply to you.

Good luck! We'll get through this.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
Madre mía... I am afraid this is never going to work... Keep pilgrims 2 metres apart at all time? I even haven't seen that discipline in the Spanish supermarkets yet. With strangers, not Camino friends. Will be impossible to cross each other in hallways and hardly anyone is going to sit down for a conversation at 2 metres distance. Bunk beds at 2 metres? That means leaving half of them empty. But I agree that the cleaning will be the hardest part.

I guess this means either a violation of the rules or closed albergues.... And forget about the ones without hospitaleros...
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
Until it is safe, I appreciate, the need for distancing.... however, given we are in an age group where pilgrims are more at risk, there is no way, I would make any camino until there is a safe theraputic medication and/or a safe and proven vaccine. I Think also that future travel health policies may put a rider not covering COVID 19 for a number of years? So while these new accommodation restrictions may be sensible for pilgrims who are in a less vulnerable group and whose health plan will cover them...I can not see, for my family, a future camino anytime soon. :(:(:(:( If your circumstances allow you to go...Buen Camino!
 
Last edited:

LTfit

Veteran Member
There is going to be a period of great adjustment, for all of us.

How will I be able to offer a communal dinner and breakfast whilst still following the regulations?

Pilgrims will need to wash clothes, shower etc one at a time. It looks like I will need to disinfect after each visit rather than once a day.

The list goes on...I am trying to visualize this out of the box and in a positive manner but it's really hard.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
The list goes on...
Hang in there, Lee. 💖
It must feel overwhelming, having to figure out how to adjust absolutely everything. Including how to maintain a pilgrim culture in the face of regulations whose intention is to keep people apart. I honestly can't imagine pilgrims keeping that kind of distance except perhaps in dormitories.

Whatever physical things you end up doing, the most important thing will be the heart behind it. And you have that in abundance!

Pilgrims will need to wash clothes, shower etc one at a time. It looks like I will need to disinfect after each visit rather than once a day.
Is there anything that prevents you from delegating the disinfection duties to pilgrims themselves? Of course quality control is the issue here...but...how could you manage to do that?
How will I be able to offer a communal dinner and breakfast whilst still following the regulations?
A buffet, that you serve, eaten sitting in a properly distanced circle in the courtyard?
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Hang in there, Lee. 💖
It must feel overwhelming, having to figure out how to adjust absolutely everything. Including how to maintain a pilgrim culture in the face of regulations whose intention is to keep people apart. I honestly can't imagine pilgrims keeping that kind of distance except perhaps in dormitories.

Whatever physical things you end up doing, the most important thing will be the heart behind it. And you have that in abundance!


Is there anything that prevents you from delegating the disinfection duties to pilgrims themselves? Of course quality control is the issue here...but...how could you manage to do that?
A buffet, that you serve, eaten sitting in a properly distanced circle in the courtyard?

According to the regulations one should avoid a buffet but my idea is to do just that, outside in the courtyard. Not everyone leaves at the same time so that may be doable.

Dinners? Luckily I have several tables to separate people. It won't be the same as sitting side by side but what other solution is there? People are suggesting the use of physical barriers (glass, plexiglass etc) but that doesn't sit well with me. And if it rains or is too cold? Then we have a problem.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
People are suggesting the use of physical barriers (glass, plexiglass etc) but that doesn't sit well with me.
Gaak. Me neither. I was thinking it could be a little like a potluck where people don't sit at a table, but balance their plates in their laps - so you could separate chairs at the necessary distance. And then people would just have talk loudly enough to maintain a flow of conversation.
 

CarolamS

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese 2018
Camino Ingles, Caminos Muxia and Finisterre 2019
You know people do get used to socially distancing. We had a street party to celebrate the 75th anniversary of VE Day. Just my neighbours; we brought chairs to the pavement outside our houses and provided our own refreshments. Someone had appropriate music playing. We were outdoors and could walk to within 2m of others which is certainly close enough to talk. I find as I walk to and from my Mother's house (I have to care for her) it is easy enough to keep an eye open for other people and always give them a wide berth as we pass....everyone is doing it now.

I don't know about the cleaning but there will be a solution. Maybe pilgrims need to clean a shower/sink before and after each use. It is in all our interests to heed whatever rules are in place. I feel it is better to not compare with how things were but to isolation and not being able to do things at all!

May we all stay safe and well and find a heartful way to overcome the challenges. And thank you to all those now trying to find a way to make this new future safe.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
A new day does wonders. Yesterday I was in a bit of a shock, worried and sad at the same time. This morning I woke and thought "I'll do my best and will figure this out although it is not what I had hoped for or planned".

It may be difficult, but I personally hope to provide a feeling of togetherness and community for those who need it. And as @Kiwi-family said, the introverts will do just fine although they too (I can speak as one) appreciate contact from time to time with others.

On a different note, a film crew from Santiago just stopped by to look inside. They have been filming a show for Xacobeo but due to COVID had to stop. They are now scouting out new locations when they start up again in June. Let let me know if they want to use my albergue in the show.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
You know people do get used to socially distancing.
I think this is true. Perhaps this can be viewed as another step toward larger "personal space" as we go about our business. Handshaking can disappear and be replaced by a namaste greeting - we can already see this starting to happen.

Increasing this personal space (i.e. physical distancing) and increased socializing outside will not eliminate the virus, but they will reduce the risks without undue sacrifices. (I don't actually feel a huge need to shake hands or hug people anyway, so it is no big loss to me.)
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
@LTfit, it is totally off topic, but I now realise you own an albergue in the same village as Christine, who was followed in the Belgian tv-show Eviva España. I was mostly surprised about the stories she told about the village you live in. I mean, the people who live there and how they (don't) get along.

I am happy to read that you found your spirit back! I really hope something of the pilgrims season can be saved.
 
Last edited:

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
This morning’s walk revealed another positive to me: if numbers are halved, the amount of work will be decreased (however that also reduces income which is problematic)
@LTfit if I ever get to stop at your albergue I hope to relieve you of cooking duties and dishes for one night ! If that’s allowed.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
You’re looking for positives? It could end up great for introverts and other solo walkers!!
@Kiwi-family
I am an introvert and my window on the street is right next to the main entrance of my apartment building. It took me a few days to figure out why people were standing outside my window and shouting at one another. To be in an albergue where all the pilgrims were doing this (day and night, as necessary) strikes me as hell for introverts.
 
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
it is totally off topic, but I now realise you own an albergue in the same village as Christine, who was followed in the Belgian tv-show Eviva España.
Thanks for mentioning this, I didn't know that. A few weeks ago, they did a 45 minutes show about the people they had visited during the earlier shows, it is called Eviva España, Spain during the times of Corona 2020. It's in the form of interviews and videoclips with the help of laptops and mobile phones, what else.

There are some views of the village where Christine now lives, apparently some 100 km from Villares de Obrigo. She sounds happy.

I managed to watch it but there are some (geolocation related) hurdles for viewers. They have put the whole series on their website for free viewing, the series is available from April to August 2020. I also watched episode 2 that features Christine and the albergue (which is now @LTfit's albergue) for the first time.
 
Last edited:

LTfit

Veteran Member
@LTfit, it is totally off topic, but I now realise you own an albergue in the same village as Christine, who was followed in the Belgian tv-show Eviva España. I was mostly surprised about the stories she told about the village you live in. I mean, the people who live there and how they (don't) get along.

I am happy to read that you found your spirit back! I really hope something of the pilgrims season can be saved.

@Luka as @Kathar1na mentions at the end of her post, I'm in the same village because I bought Christine's albergue on March 13th (and had to close 2 days later).

I saw the original Eviva España when still in The Netherlands. Personally I thought it of poor quality, nothing like the Dutch KRO program which also had a segment about the albergue.

I actually spoke to the woman who runs the Eviva show in March. She called wanting to talk to Christine not realizing that she had gone. The woman was interested in my story and how I was dealing with the COVID situation then asked if I would be willing to be on the follow-up TV program but that she first had to clear the change with her producer. In the end they interviewed Christine in her new home. I tried to watch the follow-up show on my laptop but I can't get it to work.
 

SabineP

Camino = Gratitude + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
Indeed @LTfit , sorry to say about our national Belgian TV but Eviva España , and especially the lady who runs the show does nothing to lift it up to the level of the excellent Dutch KRO show that ran years ago.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
I managed to watch it but there are some (geolocation related) hurdles for viewers. They have put the whole series on their website for free viewing, the series is available from April to August 2020. I also watched episode 2 that features Christine and the albergue (which is now @LTfit's albergue) for the first time.
I couldn't (because of the geolocation). Only saw the original tv-show, because it is online now for a couple of months. Watched it because I know the couple in Asturias and then happily surprised there was a hospitalera in it as well.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
@Luka as @Kathar1na mentions at the end of her post, I'm in the same village because I bought Christine's albergue on March 13th (and had to close 2 days later).

I saw the original Eviva España when still in The Netherlands. Personally I thought it of poor quality, nothing like the Dutch KRO program which also had a segment about the albergue.

I actually spoke to the woman who runs the Eviva show in March. She called wanting to talk to Christine not realizing that she had gone. The woman was interested in my story and how I was dealing with the COVID situation then asked if I would be willing to be on the follow-up TV program but that she first had to clear the change with her producer. In the end they interviewed Christine in her new home. I tried to watch the follow-up show on my laptop but I can't get it to work.
So that's it! She left and you took over. Do you know where she went and why?

Madre mía... 2 days after you took over... That is really sad...

I am not sure which KRO show you are talking about, but I guess that was all about pilgrims? While the Belgian show was about emigrants of all kinds.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
So that's it! She left and you took over. Do you know where she went and why?

Madre mía... 2 days after you took over... That is really sad...

I am not sure which KRO show you are talking about, but I guess that was all about pilgrims? While the Belgian show was about emigrants of all kinds.

She retired and decided to stop (long story). She is now in Voznuevo near Boñar.

I forget the name of the program @SabineP could you help me out here?

If you have Facebook it is on the Facebook page of the albergue. It was on several years ago and is the best TV program that I have yet to see on the Camino. The real thing, not a reality show.
 
Last edited:

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
Thanks! I will have a look!
Edit: found it! Kruispunt of course.
 

SabineP

Camino = Gratitude + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
She retired and decided to stop (long story). She is now in Voznuevo near Bomar.

I forget the name of the program @SabineP could you help me out here?

If you have Facebook it is on the Facebook page of the albergue. It was on several years ago and is the best TV program that I have yet to see on the Camino. The real thing, not a reality show.


Here you go @LTfit . The TV program is called Kruispunt. I now see that in different years they covered different Camino routes.

 
Last edited:

witsendwv

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2015)
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
In the latest newsletter from Boletin Hospitaleros, I read the following - well, I put the original into deepl.com and checked it slightly. It is a sign of hoepfulness and solidarity, although it does not wave any magic wand. Forgive me if this has been posted elsewhere.

Volunteer hospitality. The Covid. The albergues. The relationships among us.

It was a disappointment; it shouldn't have been because you only have to follow the news every day to know that the pandemic is not letting go. When on Sunday 10 May in the afternoon, the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Industry, Trade and Tourism made public the measures to reduce the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, everything began to be clearer: the measures to be implemented are extremely difficult to put into practice in the shelters that Hospitaleros voluntarios serve. It was already foreseen; it is structurally impossible to maintain an optimal social distance -among other things-.

We all know (or should know) that, when legislating, one does not go down to every possible case: one should not tear one's clothes off because the Way of Saint James is not discussed in the Council of Ministers, we are not the centre of the world. That is why the rule that is for all types of hostel has not taken into account the particular idiosyncrasies of the Way and does not contemplate what the traditional welcome in the Way of Saint James is like, which advocates the resolution of the difficulties that each pilgrim presents and not to not be interested in those who do not meet the health standards at all times. The importance of what is happening on a global level does not allow us to treat this issue lightly if we want to be an active part of the fight against Covid19 , so that for now, it does not seem easy that we can be part of the Way without guarantees.

These days we are beginning to receive the impressions of the owners of the hostels we serve; none are optimistic. They range from "this year we will not open" to "it is very difficult for us and we do not know what to do". Less than a week has passed since the publication of the measures, there is still a lot to internalize but the worst scenarios are lording it over the landscape; "we'll leave it until 2021" is also a phrase that has been taken up.

The Federation's volunteer albergue workers will attend to the shelters that decide to open once they have adopted what the Ministry of Health requires. They will be healthy hospitaleros, who are not in risk groups and who, once we are clear that the safety of the volunteers is guaranteed by the hostel, have faithfully assimilated the information and preparation that the people attending the hostels must have. I honestly don't see it as easy. But, above all, what we intend to do is to accompany our friends of so many years -the owners of the hostels- who have loyally allowed us to be on the Camino for years and for and by the pilgrims. We want to be by their side in case they need our loyal advice and opinion in these times of uncertainty for the Way.

Also in the uncertainty is everything related to the formation of new hospitaleros. This year, almost all the courses that had been scheduled all over the world were suspended. When in 2021 - God and the apostle permit it - we convene new courses, we will have had to change some of the things that are explained by reality. We always advocate for a welcome where physical contact, while practising listening, is fundamental...the pandemic has robbed us, for the moment, of this way of doing that is not only for the well-being of the pilgrims welcomed but also to comfort the spirit of the hospitaleros themselves.

Perhaps it is better to get used to the idea that this will be an almost empty year. And I say almost because we are learning something from all this and we should not fall into despair. Those of us who receive the mail from the hospitaleros from all over the world, the questions from pilgrims we do not know or from future pilgrims and hospitaleros, can only say that - out there - the interest in the Way and its hospitality is not waning. All we need is patience and trust.

Finally, I would like to send a special affection and remembrance to all the hospitaleros who are in the front line in the fight against the Covid19. To the people who clean in hospitals or nursing homes, health centres, to those who do it in the streets; to the bus, taxi and truck drivers, to those who work in shops or supermarkets, to the doctors and nurses, to the dentists, to the psychologists, to the military and to the police. Because Hospitaleros is so universal that it has professionals from all these branches among them. As they say on TV "I don't want to forget anyone" if I did, please excuse me and know that you are also in this special love for you. To those of you who have suffered from the illness in yourselves or from the closeness of sick or perhaps deceased relatives and friends, all of us raise a prayer.

Keep the memory of the Way and the traditional welcome alive in your hearts, they will again be needed at some point and we must be strong and ready... as ever was.



Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

There is also the following information. a training session for hospitaleros to learn songs that can be sung with pilgrims. Send an email to the contact below and he will send an email with zoom access info, two hours before each session.
Curso de canto para hospitaleros
Para mantener el Camino en nuestras vidas, Angelo Pastura y yo, vamos a empezar un curso de canto. Los sábados a partir del 9 de mayo, de 4 a 6 pm (en España e Italia) cantaremos canciones en diferentes idiomas.
Cualquier hospitalero de cualquier parte del mundo está invitado. Si quieres participar, solo tienes que enviarme un correo electrónico a tomfriesen@hotmail.com
Te enviaré la conexión Zoom dos horas antes del curso cada semana.
Los objetivos son aprender y cantar canciones que los hospitaleros pueden cantar con los peregrinos. También queremos disfrutar del tiempo juntos hasta el momento en que estamos cara a cara juntos de nuevo. Si tú tienes una canción en cualquier idioma, por favor envíala y vamos a aprenderla.
Tom Friesen, hospitalero veterano y canadiense
 
Last edited:

David Pettee

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
GPM '86; Soviet/Amer. Walk '88; Death Valley to Mt. Whitney '89; CF '18; Coast to Coast '19; CP '20?
Ah, perhaps not a miracle, but maybe the joyful expectation that pilgrims will be of service, rather than expect to be served.
 

Undermanager

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Madrid (x2)
VDLP
Salvador
Primitivo
Finisterra / Muxia
Lana
My 2p ......

"Would camping not work?"
"Camping where?"

There's an opportunity here to give the Camino 'scene' a much needed boost, as it is probably going to take a C19 hit for a while; camping can reduce the numbers staying in hostels and ease one pressure, but still bring in much needed income for those providing services like food, restaurants, maybe showers and so on. I appreciate that it's not for everyone, but there are many of us walking Caminos who like camping and especially wild camping and would love the opportunity to do this without having to look over our shoulders and feeling naughty if we put up a tent late, or get our head down under a bivvy, and are gone in the morning, leaving no sign we were there.

Perhaps it's time that the Government looked at how it can accommodate Camino walkers who want to carry a tent, perhaps look at relaxing wild camping rules, drawing a up a code of conduct for campers e.g. no fires, bury waste, leave no trace, no more than one night allowed, only allowed between 7pm and 7am, not allowed within 500m of any dwelling, perhaps allowing camping in certain areas for a fee etc etc. Thinking back to the walks I've done (mostly the less travelled ones, admittedly), the option to camp would have been awesome and I could have camped without interfering with anyone. Many countries already allow this and function just fine e.g. Scotland.

It clearly needs to be thought through, but in these strange times, perhaps the old ways do need to be revisited with fresh eyes and for people to think through new ideas.
 
Last edited:

LTfit

Veteran Member
My 2p ......

"Would camping not work?"
"Camping where?"

There's an opportunity here to give the Camino 'scene' a much needed boost, as it is probably going to take a C19 hit for a while; camping can reduce the numbers staying in hostels and ease one pressure, but still bring in much needed income for those providing services like food, restaurants, maybe showers and so on. I appreciate that it's not for everyone, but there are many of us walking Caminos who like camping and especially wild camping and would love the opportunity to do this without having to look over our shoulders and feeling naughty if we put up a tent late, or get our head down under a bivvy, and are gone in the morning, leaving no sign we were there.

Perhaps it's time that the Government looked at how it can accommodate Camino walkers who want to carry a tent, perhaps look at relaxing wild camping rules, drawing a up a code of conduct for campers e.g. no fires, bury waste, leave no trace, no more than one night allowed, only allowed between 7pm and 7am, not allowed within 500m of any dwelling, perhaps allowing camping in certain areas for a fee etc etc. Thinking back to the walks I've done (mostly the less travelled ones, admittedly), the option to camp would have been awesome and I could have camped without interfering with anyone. Many countries already allow this and function just fine e.g. Scotland.

It clearly needs to be thought through, but in these strange times, perhaps the old ways do need to be revisited with fresh eyes and for people to think through new ideas.

I don't think that improving the camping situation, creating a new code of conduct or relaxing existing rules regarding wild camping are a priority for Spain as a whole or for local municipalities along the Camino at this point. Many businesses are just trying to keep afloat and don't have the resources to start something new. Keep in mind that they have been closed for two months and don't even know if they will be able to open this year. They could use the income when and if they open.

Those albergues with land may decide to allow camping (if they don't already do so) but I see that being allowed on the more remote and solitary routes, not so much on the Francés.
 

anthikes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 SJPdP > SdC
2018 Porto > SdC
2019 Sevilla > SdC
Albergues that cram rooms full of bunk beds and have them next to each other might be a thing of the past.

This must be a good thing for the pilgrims!

Maybe less available beds on the Frances will push people towards lesser known routes.
 

WalkingJane

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
Gaak. Me neither. I was thinking it could be a little like a potluck where people don't sit at a table, but balance their plates in their laps - so you could separate chairs at the necessary distance. And then people would just have talk loudly enough to maintain a flow of conversation.
Having a mental image of a group "properly spaced" shouting at each other....,
 

mary_mh

Buen Camino
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept (2019)
@Luka as @Kathar1na mentions at the end of her post, I'm in the same village because I bought Christine's albergue on March 13th (and had to close 2 days later).

I saw the original Eviva España when still in The Netherlands. Personally I thought it of poor quality, nothing like the Dutch KRO program which also had a segment about the albergue.

I actually spoke to the woman who runs the Eviva show in March. She called wanting to talk to Christine not realizing that she had gone. The woman was interested in my story and how I was dealing with the COVID situation then asked if I would be willing to be on the follow-up TV program but that she first had to clear the change with her producer. In the end they interviewed Christine in her new home. I tried to watch the follow-up show on my laptop but I can't get it to work.
Lee, where is your albergue please?
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021" ... (GOD WILLING!)
Would camping not work?
There is another thread going on right now about 'camping' with plenty of discussion on the topic (and apparently not the 1st time camping has been discussed on the Forum)

Without starting any further discussion here all I can say is that - what I am taking away from THAT discussion is that camping along the Camino (esp. CF) is pretty much illegal. IMHO - that should end it
And I agree with @LTfit - this is not going to help any albergoes, nor is it pertinent to the fact of any future guidelines.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances x 2 , Norte x 2 , Le Puy x 3 , Portuguese x 2,
Mont St Michel , Primitivo .
There were a lot of smaller details about sleeping areas regarding things like providing storage outside of rooms for shoes and luggage,

As per GR 65 Dave.
Many gites and alberques from Le Puy in France have implemented this , it will become the norm i believe ..........it will decrease in size the numbers allowed in each abode, maybe a good think.
Keep safe.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
Without starting any further discussion here all I can say is that - what I am taking away from THAT discussion is that camping along the Camino (esp. CF) is pretty much illegal.

It's ... complicated.

But it's pretty much illegal anywhere in the confines of a Municipality (except a "camping ground") or any private property, except with permission from that Municipality or the owner. It is also basically illegal anywhere that there is a fire risk, i.e. most of the Francès for much of the time.

But ... Spanish Law defines "camping" as setting up a "camp" with a cooking/etc fire, soooo ....

Just throwing yourself down in the open air in a sleeping bag and taking some cold dinner from your pack is less illegal than "camping".

But Spanish Municipalities and Parishes very often have room indoors somewhere where it's OK to put your sleeping bag down on a floor, rather than in the open air -- now, that's really only valid for people walking solo or in 2s or 3s, as they would start to break the Law if they started offering such possibilities to larger groups, or to multiple individuals or groups. So you can't count on it, and certainly pilgrims in general on the more well traveled routes shouldn't.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I ran across this news story regarding an alburgue project in Canfranc on Camino Aragones.

Work begins to create a new pilgrim hostel in Canfranc (Huesca)
01.05.2020 - 10: 39H


The City Council of Canfranc plans to open in the summer of 2021 the new pilgrim hostel on the Camino de Santiago, located in the old town and whose works have started this Wednesday in a building on Albareda street in this nucleus, at the foot of the Jacobean path. .

This has been indicated to Europa Press by the mayor, Fernando Sánchez, who explained that the budget amounts to 600,000 euros, of which the European Commission contributes approximately 50 percent and the rest to the City Council. It is part of the 'Arles Aragón' project to promote the Camino de Santiago.

The building has three floors and the first will be used as a terrace, bar, restaurant and bedroom for people with reduced mobility, while on the second floor there will be other rooms, for a total of 19 beds for pilgrims, and the third will serve to wash the clothes and rest.

The works will last eight months and then the City Council will equip the installation, making it available to the public in the summer of next year. It will be a public facility, with regulated prices, but privately managed.

Sánchez has pointed out that the COVID-19 pandemic has obliged to modify the work safety plan to establish preventive measures, mainly the mandatory use of masks and respect for social distances by the workers who carry out the work. .
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I ran across this news story regarding an alburgue project in Canfranc on Camino Aragones.

Work begins to create a new pilgrim hostel in Canfranc (Huesca)

I've seen outside photos of the building where they're putting this, and it looks sweet.

AFAIK there's still a project to create another albergue at Canfranc Estacion, though whether that may be in disarray from other plans to potentially reopen the railway line to France I do not know.
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
Is there anything that prevents you from delegating the disinfection duties to pilgrims themselves? Of course quality control is the issue here...but...how could you manage to do that?
I’ve been disinfecting while travelling for decades. On Caminos I travel with WC and Dettol/Clorox wipes, disinfecting every toilet in every bar and every hotel room, not to mention airplanes. Under the current circumstances the judicious placement of cleaning products with reminders would go far to help the situation.
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
"Would camping not work?"
"Camping where?"
What about pitching a tent on the grounds of an albergue? They could still charge a fee for the use of showers, kitchen, clothes washing (which is usually outside anyway), while pilgrims can maintain social distancing.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017-18)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Gaak. Me neither. I was thinking it could be a little like a potluck where people don't sit at a table, but balance their plates in their laps - so you could separate chairs at the necessary distance. And then people would just have talk loudly enough to maintain a flow of conversation.
Sorry, was going to say something and changed my mind, can't figure out how to cancel replying.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017-18)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Ah I found what I remembered...https://quillette.com/2020/04/23/covid-19-superspreader-events-in-28-countries-critical-patterns-and-lessons/
The writer comes to the conclusion that intense conversations, such as shouting over the loud music or serious long business meetings and funerals, seem to be an issue. I take it to mean that talking loudly over your separated plates is more an issue than passing in the hallways.
I found some of the stuff quoted about folders confusing, does it refer to an info sheet that lives on the desk and is passed from hand to hand all afternoon?
Re showers sanitation, um, the ever present shower area mop bucket could have some chlorine solution in the reservoir and it would also stink less that way...
But it is early days yet and many things are still to come clear. I will wait and try to be patient.
The Camino doesn't belong to us. And we will all, if we are willing to hear, be guided to where we need to be.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Sorry, was going to say something and changed my mind, can't figure out how to cancel replying.
It's easy, Texas Walker. Down on the lower left side of your post are three little dots. If you click them, a pull-down menu comes up and one option says 'delete.'

I take it to mean that talking loudly over your separated plates is more an issue than passing in the hallways.
Inside spaces seem particularly fraught. Outside is better. And yes...breathing each other's air right now is dangerous.
 
Last edited:

nathanael

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Plata,
There is going to be a period of great adjustment, for all of us.

How will I be able to offer a communal dinner and breakfast whilst still following the regulations?

Pilgrims will need to wash clothes, shower etc one at a time. It looks like I will need to disinfect after each visit rather than once a day.

The list goes on...I am trying to visualize this out of the box and in a positive manner but it's really hard.
best to stay at home and forget the Camino for a few years.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
What about pitching a tent on the grounds of an albergue? They could still charge a fee for the use of showers, kitchen, clothes washing (which is usually outside anyway), while pilgrims can maintain social distancing.

Only some albergues allowed that, but this might change after the epidemic maybe ?
 

Fromista

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015, 2017)
Would camping not work?
I also think it might worth camping more, than using the albergues. I would really appreciate if they could have more outdoor showers, and toilets, like in campsites, too.

In case we go to albergues I think this is clever regulation: "Individual lingerie. In shared rooms, the hostel will provide bagged or packed sheets and blankets. It will be the pilgrim himself who must make his own bed and instruct him to avoid touching beds or bunk beds of other clients".

All together do you think the new regulations about the distanced beds and more hygiene (=more cleaning) mean that it would cost more to walk the Camino? That the cost of the accomodation will rise? I know how hard it was for some hospitaleros to keep the cost / night around 10 EUROS / night.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - May 2015; Camino del Norte/Primitivo - July/August 2016; Camino Portugues - Sept 2017
A summary:
No more bunk beds, for sure.


2 metre distancing between people at all times - if not possible in some circumstances masks must be worn.
In shared rooms, except groups or families, if a bottom bunk is used, the top bunk opposite should be used on if 2 metre requirement can be met.
Strict cleaning regime
Kitchens must only be used once then everything must be cleaned - rules out communal kitchens
Meals - 2 metre distance to be observed at all times
Payment only by card is recommended.
Check in - distancing achieved e g by screens, masks and gloves
Also shoes and packs need to be sanitized before entering and if possible placed in plastic bags.
Plus no folders, books etc unless clean hands before and after use.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member

Nowhere in the guidelines is it stated that bunk-beds are prohibited. If I have a room with 2 bunk-beds (which I do) and a unit of 4 is walking together (family for example) there is no reason not to be able to sleep in the bunk-beds. If on the other hand they are not together than the 2 meter requirement holds.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Sorry, was going to say something and changed my mind, can't figure out how to cancel replying.

Same thing has happened to me. I just go ahead and hit the 'reply', and then immediately go to the 'Delete' option next to the button for 'Edit'. Hit the 'delete', and a box appears asking for a reason for the deletion. You do not have to enter a reason, just click on 'Delete'. with
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
In case we go to albergues I think this is clever regulation: "Individual lingerie. In shared rooms, the hostel will provide bagged or packed sheets and blankets. It will be the pilgrim himself who must make his own bed and instruct him to avoid touching beds or bunk beds of other clients".

Given the nature of alburgues, and the fact that pilgrims are used to carrying sleeping gear of some kind (liners, bags, quilts, etc), a solution is for alburgues to forgo providing sheets, blankets, and pillows, period. That way, a bare mattress with some sort of waterproof covering (as is seen in many places now), is simply and quickly disinfected during housekeeping. Pilgrims take their bedding with them.

All together do you think the new regulations about the distanced beds and more hygiene (=more cleaning) mean that it would cost more to walk the Camino? That the cost of the accomodation will rise? I know how hard it was for some hospitaleros to keep the cost / night around 10 EUROS / night.

Yes. And it should.

Even the 'donativo' model may need to reevaluate how they recoup operating costs. . . perhaps something along the line of having a base fee of 5 Euro. So that if one ordinarily gives 10 Euro per person per night, it now becomes a reasonable 15 Euro price that is 'donated'.

Of course, the nature of a donativo in providing bed space for those who cannot afford to pay can still remain as it always has.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
These governmental guidelines put some of us on edge, controlling our lives in ways that are uncomfortable, even if we know that they are intended to keep us alive. I finally realized, while reading this thread, that I cannot imagine being willing to stay in an albergue under the new restrictions. And the comments, on this and other threads, on regulations against wild camping, seemed to be designed to leave me no place to stay on camino: no albergue, no campsite, however simple. Finally, I realized that it was time to start thinking about the big picture.
No, I don't want to download the app that will show the authorities in Alberta where I am at all times, and whom I meet. The thought horrifies me. But I listened to a young scientist yesterday maintain that such an app is an important way to help find the persons with COVID-19 and save their lives, and the lives of those around them. He thought that it should be obligatory. As an introvert, my mind is shouting, "Get out of my space." This is the world that we are living in right now. I have never lived in wartime. so I am unfamiliar with the limitations and regulations that are imposed in such a time. And I think that it is important, even now, to listen to the voices of those of us who value our privacy. The possibilities of electronic surveillance are such than some of us need to resist it, hopefully for the good of all in the long term. But my simple task, with reference to going on camino at this time is to answer two questions for myself: "Do I feel safe to go?" and "Would I enjoy my camino under the new conditions?" My answers are" "I don't feel safe at present" and "If I don't get sick, I think I could enjoy it, by paying for private accommodation."
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
Many rude and personal attack posts have been deleted in this thread. Several posts attacking pilgrims from a specific country have also been deleted.
Warning points have been awarded.

Further violations of the forum rules in regard to civil discourse and/or political posts will result in potential banning from the forum.

Thanks for a little assistance in keeping the forum polite and a calm place to visit.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Many rude and personal attack posts have been deleted in this thread. Several posts attacking pilgrims from a specific country have also been deleted.
Warning points have been awarded.

Further violations of the forum rules in regard to civil discourse and/or political posts will result in potential banning from the forum.

Thanks for a little assistance in keeping the forum polite and a calm place to visit.

Thank you @grayland. I'm glad I missed those threads. We are here to help each other and hopefully provide information on the current situation in Spain and with regards to albergues so that pilgrims can make decisions regarding a future Camino.
We are all in this together.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I woke up to see how this had disintegrated into name calling, insults, and totally off-topic rants. Thanks to the mods who had to slog through it all.

But here is what I am wondering — looking back at all of the deleted posts, I see that in fact many of the people involved are both well aware of the rules and in fact report to us when they see the same violations in others. But for whatever reason that doesn’t stop them from continuing to go at it on the thread itself, well aware of what they are doing presumably. Why is that?

When you report something to the moderators, you are letting us know that you believe that the post violates some rule (usually politics or rudeness as it turns out, with the occasional bullfighting thrown in for good measure). At that point, I think most people would react by turning off their reply button rather than encouraging the slug fest by responding in kind.

Moderators are not on the forum at all times of day and night, so you do have to be a bit patient. But I just cannot understand why anyone who reports a post thinks it‘s ok to respond to the post with the same kind of vitriol he or she just reported.

And apologies to poor @LTfit as she tries to wade through the confusing world of albergue regulations. She surely didn’t deserve to have this thread end up like this!
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
@LTfit , you said it perfectly when you said we are all in this together. Humanity is faced with a crisis that asks us to hang together rather than to fall apart. Unfortunately, in some places we are failing miserably.

So the question remains - how to go about doing what you need to do to keep pilgrims safe?
The CDC in the States has just put this on their website; scroll to the end for the Practical information. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/reopen-guidance.html

Before you get overwhelmed, remember one step at a time. You can do this.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
Moderators are not on the forum at all times of day and night, so you do have to be a bit patient.
I would also like to add that when moderators delete posts, it is done in the interests of keeping the forum free of rancor and rudeness, and focused on the Camino. The Rules were based on experience, of what topics lead to pointless discord. Moderators may or may not agree with any of the opinions expressed, but we try hard not to let that influence the moderation decisions.
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
No, I don't want to download the app that will show the authorities in Alberta where I am at all times, and whom I meet. The thought horrifies me.
Agreed. But there are different kinds of apps that work in one of two ways, decentralised and centralised. It’s the centralised apps that worry me. The one that they’re trialing where I live is a decentralised one, so after some consideration I decided to sign up, as it will let me know if I’ve been in contact with an infected person.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
Agreed. But there are different kinds of apps that work in one of two ways, decentralised and centralised. It’s the centralised apps that worry me. The one that they’re trialing where I live is a decentralised one, so after some consideration I decided to sign up, as it will let me know if I’ve been in contact with an infected person.
@gerip
I have heard a very good description on CBC of a decentralized app which is under development for use in warning people when they have come in contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19. However, the authorities of the Government of Alberta have chosen to offer a centralized app to their citizens, and this is what is available to download here for my information to be available to the network that will handle the information. I prefer not to sign up. But I am an old-fashioned paranoid citizen; I even keep the location function on my iphone turned off most of the time.
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
@gerip
I have heard a very good description on CBC of a decentralized app which is under development for use in warning people when they have come in contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19. However, the authorities of the Government of Alberta have chosen to offer a centralized app to their citizens, and this is what is available to download here for my information to be available to the network that will handle the information. I prefer not to sign up. But I am an old-fashioned paranoid citizen; I even keep the location function on my iphone turned off most of the time.
And when people are reluctant to sign up the government will realise that they need to take another route for tracking the virus. As someone who is old enough to admit to using the old punch cards when at university, to say I’m not comfortable with the level of intrusiveness of today’s computer technology would be an understatement.
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
The Correos site has this information in English

Thanks for this. But a lot of emphasis seems to be placed on cleanliness of objects, surfaces, etc. when the greater threat is with contact between people. As Correos says in one of the comments, reopening of the Camino is planned for the autumn, so maybe the kinks will be worked out by then.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
But a lot of emphasis seems to be placed on cleanliness of objects, surfaces, etc. when the greater threat is with contact between people
I agree. I keep reading about places doing "deep cleaning", but it doesn't matter how clean a place is if infected people come in and recontaminate it right away. Just like bedbugs in albergues. An albergue can be as clean as possible, but a pilgrim with bedbugs in their backpack can come in and start a new infestation.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Thanks for this. But a lot of emphasis seems to be placed on cleanliness of objects, surfaces, etc. when the greater threat is with contact between people. As Correos says in one of the comments, reopening of the Camino is planned for the autumn, so maybe the kinks will be worked out by then.

Actually there is no word when albergues are allowed to open. I am assuming already in July for Spanish pilgrims when the deescalation phases are finished and travel between regions allowed but this is not official.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
Actually there is no word when albergues are allowed to open. I am assuming already in July for Spanish pilgrims when the deescalation phases are finished and travel between regions allowed but this is not official.

Could still turn out to be June ... but basically, yes, you clearly have the gist of it !!
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
For most of us in Castilla y León or Madrid and Barcelona June does not seem likely as we are still in Fase 0. We hope to move to Fase 1 on Monday where small retailers may open and terrasses outside at 50% occupation rate. There are still 3 more Fases after that!
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Actually there is no word when albergues are allowed to open. I am assuming already in July for Spanish pilgrims when the deescalation phases are finished and travel between regions allowed but this is not official.
Such a lot of uncertainty...
It must be incredibly frustrating.
But at least there are consistent guidelines and an actual plan for opening that is uniform across the country, even if the different phases come into play at different times. May you have the patience and support that make waiting bearable, @LTfit !
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Since 2012: CF, CdN, CP, Salvador, Aragones, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakobsweg NRW, Jakibspaad.
Not sure if this fits into this thread (but the term camino has an international meaning for me) but I just read some guide lines for albergues (Herbergen) on the Via Regia (Germany). I can not quite work out whether the Herbergen are open now, or will open soon. In any case, some will not open because the people running them (often (church) volunteers) do belong to a vulnerable group themselves.

Of course the albergue system is different in Germany, but is in interesting to read which rules apply:
- one person per room (except for families)
- take a mouth mask with you (and use a fresh one in each Herberg) - no details are given whether one should wear a mouth mask all the time
- leave contact details after you leave the Herberg (in case they do have to a tracing when an infection breaks out).

For those interested, here is some more background (in German):

In Switzerland some pilgrim albergues will open in the comings month as well. There seem to be extensive guidelines and regulations. I may translate them into English, if there is interest. Meanwhile, here's your chance to practice your German language skills


I am not posting this because I particularly am in favor or against these guidelines, I just want to provide the information. [Note to mods: If you consider this post should move to a separate thread, as it is not about Spain, please let me know].
 
Last edited:

natefaith

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2009)
León-Ponferrada (2014)
Camino Inglés (2017)
We will be meeting as a team tomorrow, in person for the first time since the lockdown began, to start going through the regulations to see what we need to do to even think about opening! I'm reading through multiple documents right now and feeling overwhelmed. Thankfully we still have time before any influx of pilgrims starts to arrive. And we are a relatively small operation...it seems albergue owners will have plenty more to think about as well in incorporating the new norms. Ánimo, @LTfit ! You can do it!
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
We will be meeting as a team tomorrow, in person for the first time since the lockdown began, to start going through the regulations to see what we need to do to even think about opening! I'm reading through multiple documents right now and feeling overwhelmed. Thankfully we still have time before any influx of pilgrims starts to arrive. And we are a relatively small operation...it seems albergue owners will have plenty more to think about as well in incorporating the new norms. Ánimo, @LTfit ! You can do it!

Just in case you are not aware....Faith and her husband Nate run the Pilgrim House in Santiago.

The Pilgrim House is an oasis for pilgrims arriving in Santiago after their adventure.
It is a welcoming place to sit and rest..chat with other pilgrims...enjoy a cup of coffee or tea..or just relax.
They do have a few services such as clothes cleaning, pack holding, etc. A great place to visit on arrival in Santiago.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
We will be meeting as a team tomorrow, in person for the first time since the lockdown began, to start going through the regulations to see what we need to do to even think about opening! I'm reading through multiple documents right now and feeling overwhelmed. Thankfully we still have time before any influx of pilgrims starts to arrive. And we are a relatively small operation...it seems albergue owners will have plenty more to think about as well in incorporating the new norms. Ánimo, @LTfit ! You can do it!

Thank you Faith! Good luck to you. Nate and your team too :)
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
My 2p ......

"Would camping not work?"
"Camping where?"

There's an opportunity here to give the Camino 'scene' a much needed boost, as it is probably going to take a C19 hit for a while; camping can reduce the numbers staying in hostels and ease one pressure, but still bring in much needed income for those providing services like food, restaurants, maybe showers and so on. I appreciate that it's not for everyone, but there are many of us walking Caminos who like camping and especially wild camping and would love the opportunity to do this without having to look over our shoulders and feeling naughty if we put up a tent late, or get our head down under a bivvy, and are gone in the morning, leaving no sign we were there.

Perhaps it's time that the Government looked at how it can accommodate Camino walkers who want to carry a tent, perhaps look at relaxing wild camping rules, drawing a up a code of conduct for campers e.g. no fires, bury waste, leave no trace, no more than one night allowed, only allowed between 7pm and 7am, not allowed within 500m of any dwelling, perhaps allowing camping in certain areas for a fee etc etc. Thinking back to the walks I've done (mostly the less travelled ones, admittedly), the option to camp would have been awesome and I could have camped without interfering with anyone. Many countries already allow this and function just fine e.g. Scotland.

It clearly needs to be thought through, but in these strange times, perhaps the old ways do need to be revisited with fresh eyes and for people to think through new ideas.
I think that new camping sites are not very likely. what would be more likely, however, is that those albergues who have gardens, could arrange for maybe one or two tent spaces (suitably apart) with the use of albergue facilities (bathroom, washing machine etc.). I would pay the same price as for the bed in the dorm for such a safe place to sleep.

with this in mind, I updated my list of albergues on the francés with the official camping grounds and albergues who have been known to let pilgrims pitch a tent (with the number of places and prices, where I could find them). I have also indicated albergues with gardens which can be asked for a tent place.

the situation is actually not as lacking in tent spaces as I thought. there may be the odd day that would have to be a bit long but otherwise I think it would be quite possible to camp legally on the camino, provided all the establishents will open and will be accepting tents.

if someone has more info, please do share.
 

Attachments

  • accommodation FRANCES 2020.pdf
    2.3 MB · Views: 8
Last edited:

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
I think that new camping sites are not very likely. what would be more likely, however, is that those albergues who have gardens, could arrange for maybe one or two tent spaces (suitably apart) with the use of albergue facilities (bathroom, washing machine etc.). I would pay the same price as for the bed in the dorm for such a safe place to sleep.

with this in mind, I updated my list of albergues on the francés with the official camping grounds and albergues who have been known to let pilgrims pitch a tent (with the number of places and prices, where I could find them). I have also indicated albergues with gardens which can be asked for a tent place.

the situation is actually not as lacking in tent spaces as I thought. there may be the odd day that would have to be a bit long but otherwise I think it would be quite possible to camp legally on the camino, provided all the establishents will open and will be accepting tents.

if someone has more info, please do share.
Thanks for this. Looks like there is some opportunity to pitch a tent at least within a days walk of each stopping point, for the most part.
 

flickchic98

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 18,2015 - June 23,2015 El Camino Frances
May 25, 2017 - June 30th, 2017 Le Puy to Moissac
wow they have to clean the bathrooms at least 6 times a day! I imagine the number of volunteers will decline
:(
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
In those parts of Spain that will enter phase 2 on Monday, the "public areas" in hostelry will be allowed to reopen -- so the question of when the albergues may reopen, at least in Galicia (inter-regional travel is still disallowed, even though for instance all of the Camino del Norte will starting on Monday be located in phase 2 areas), is starting to be a bit more live and current.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
In those parts of Spain that will enter phase 2 on Monday, the "public areas" in hostelry will be allowed to reopen -- so the question of when the albergues may reopen, at least in Galicia (inter-regional travel is still disallowed, even though for instance all of the Camino del Norte will starting on Monday be located in phase 2 areas), is starting to be a bit more live and current.

For some Spanish, yes. If your are in Fase 1 you may not travel outside your area.
 

natefaith

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2009)
León-Ponferrada (2014)
Camino Inglés (2017)
In Galicia, due to enter Phase 2, we still won't be able to travel between provinces (i.e. La Coruña to Lugo), much less leave Galicia (the autonomous region).

So as @JabbaPapa says, even if all the localities along the Camino del Norte are in Phase 2, you still won't be allowed to walk from one province to the other, much less go from one autonomous region to another, say Asturias into Galicia. So it still will be difficult to walk a "normal" Camino with the restrictions upon movement right now.

The Pilgrim's Office and the Cathedral are still closed to the public for now, too.

It will be interesting to see how things unfold.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Advertisement

Booking.com

Similar threads

Camino Conversations

Camino Conversations

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 57 4.3%
  • April

    Votes: 202 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 330 24.8%
  • June

    Votes: 96 7.2%
  • July

    Votes: 25 1.9%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.0%
  • September

    Votes: 386 29.0%
  • October

    Votes: 160 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top