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How to be more like koilife in the kitchen

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
No, I am not planning to carry a sharp knife or a pepper grinder, but I have to say koilife's thread on the mobile kitchen got me thinking. I realized that on many occasions, I have benefited from pilgrims like koilife, who take it upon themselves to spearhead a communal dinner. These are invariably wonderful events, lots of interaction and enjoyment. I am one of the ones who is always quick to offer to help out, but never one of the ones who organizes the meal. If there is no organizer, I'll go eat in a restaurant.

I am not an inspired chef, and though I cook for small groups a fair amount, it's always in my own kitchen, with a cookbook, lots of time and planning, etc. And that's not what life is like in an albergue, obviously.

So will those of you for whom this comes naturally throw out some ideas on how to put together a plan for a meal for an albergue group? I realize that for many of you it's easy, just go to the market and see what's fresh. But what about for those of us who aren't so inspired? I can do lentils, but I get so many good lentils on the camino that it seems kind of silly.

Thanks, everyone, buen camino, Laurie
 

Travellingman

Active Member
Well Laurie, as with you, I love the spontaneous communal meal - unfortunately doesn't happen often enough. However, all you really need is pasta (of course), tomatoes/onions/garlic/courgettes/beans/whatever, plus olive oil and salt - hopefully enough of this left by the previous cook-up merchant, and some minced meat if liked. Easy spag bol, in fact. However, the coming together of interested parties, a good cook and sufficient cooking facilities,pots,pans,crockery and cutlery is somewhat problematical. I do love cooking, and if the facilities are there, will gladly whip up a feast for all. (In fact have just whipped up a feast for Mother's Day here in the UK).
So, for me, bring it on. I'm a qualified, (expert;)) cook, just waiting to throw a gourmet meal together for around 5 euros each, including vino - where are all you customers??
If you're on camino in May, then I'll be there.:)
 
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mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Travellingman,

As you said "facilities, pots, pans, crockery and cutlery is somewhat problematical".
This is especially so in the albergues administered by the Xunta de Galicia. The kitchen stove may be sleek and new but generally there is nothing to cook in, serve on or eat with. Nada. Be prepared!

Margaret Meredith
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I have a fully equipped kitchen, so if any of you inspired chefs pass through Moratinos, feel free to stop and cook for us!
Hi, Reb, you are a perfect illustration of my general lack of initiative. I remember that when I was blessed with a wonderful meal at the Peaceable, my contribution was limited to something like peeling a few carrots. I need to change my ways. Next time I'm through, I will be a better pilgrim! Laurie
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
Laurie --- Never underestimate the value of a kitchen assistant or line chef . . . peeling carrots and potatoes makes a huge difference to the person leading the cooking effort. Many hands do indeed make for light work. There was one meal, quite impromptu, where these two ladies asked if they could help by making the salad. I of course gratefully accepted, and the next thing I knew, there was a stunning salad sitting on the table.
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
But come on people, give me some ideas of how you glide through the market gathering fresh food and put together a yummy meal. I aspire to rise above my status as chopper, at least when there is not a chef in the albergue. ;) So far, I see how the pasta idea could work -- I gave up on red sauce pasta years ago because I couldn't find a tomato sauce that made a base I liked, but Travellingman is suggesting no tomato sauce, just lots of fresh veggies sauteed sounds good.


If you're on camino in May, then I'll be there.:)
I realize that all of this may be academic for me for this year, since I will be walking on the Camino Olvidado and the Invierno and I expect that Susanna is the only other pilgrim I'll see. And we know that Susanna cooks all her meals with the electric coil. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata 2010, Camino de Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo 2013, Olvidado, Invierno 2014
But come on people, give me some ideas of how you glide through the market gathering fresh food and put together a yummy meal. I aspire to rise above my status as chopper, at least when there is not a chef in the albergue. ;) So far, I see how the pasta idea could work -- I gave up on red sauce pasta years ago because I couldn't find a tomato sauce that made a base I liked, but Travellingman is suggesting no tomato sauce, just lots of fresh veggies sauteed sounds good.




I realize that all of this may be academic for me for this year, since I will be walking on the Camino Olvidado and the Invierno and I expect that Susanna is the only other pilgrim I'll see. And we know that Susanna cooks all her meals with the electric coil. :)
:D!!!
Actually I suspect the only kitchen you will see on our camino will be the electric coil and a mug. Unless there is somewhere to cook in the casa rural we will pass. That would be fun.
I remember there was a great kitchen in the casa rural in Pajares, I saw it on Gunnars film. But there was nowhere to buy food. So they could not cook anyway.
I guess the first thing if you want to cook is that a kitchen and food must be available at the same place. :)
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Susanna,

Since I walk in late autumn/winter I always carry basic rations since the only shop or bar in town may NOT be open! There is NO reason it should be open especially out of season! For me each camino is not only a walk of personal thanksgiving, but also a test of tenacity and endurance. To pass any test one needs to BE PREPARED.

Food basics include tea bags, packets which make a cup of soup (even including croutons), firm cheese, small sausage, simple cookies and some chocolate. Nothing heavy but enough to exist for 24 hours if need be. On past caminos especially during storms when I stopped in small and remote albergues far from any supply source novice pilgrims have staggered in wet, cold and hungry. They may have had the best gear but often carried no food.

Of course I shared; hot soup (heated with my invaluable electric coil), a chunk of cheese and wedge of sausage can be ambrosia in such a setting. A smile returned by a new friend over such a simple meal is one of the camino's many joys. Next morning after the tea, cookies and chocolate for our common breakfast we would set out together. At the first open shop I would re-stock those basics and usually the other pilgrim would buy provisions and at last be truly prepared.

Margaret Meredith
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
The simplest of all meals is spaghetti carbonara and it can be done in one pot. After you boil a fist full of spaghetti, set it aside and then sauté bits of pork, preferable 200g of lardon fume with an onion and olive oil, once they are thoroughly cooked return the spaghetti to the pan and add 4 to 6 eggs and several cups of grated parmesan cheese and toss until done. You can adjust the quantities of the ingredients by the number of people you are cooking for, the above recipe will serve 2 to 4 people. A little bit of red pepper flakes and/or nutmeg will add to the flavor.
 
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Travellingman

Active Member
But come on people, give me some ideas of how you glide through the market gathering fresh food and put together a yummy meal. I aspire to rise above my status as chopper, at least when there is not a chef in the albergue. ;) So far, I see how the pasta idea could work -- I gave up on red sauce pasta years ago because I couldn't find a tomato sauce that made a base I liked, but Travellingman is suggesting no tomato sauce, just lots of fresh veggies sauteed sounds good. :)
Laurie: Basic fresh vegetable sauce to go with pasta. Serves 4 (more or less)
1 large onion, peeled and chopped
Several cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed
2 or 3 large ripe tomatoes, roughly chopped
Red or green pepper(capsicum) chopped
1 courgette, sliced
A few mushrooms, chopped.
Some green beans, sliced
Or some tinned plum tomatoes and tomato puree if liked.
Pepper and salt.
Depending on what's available, throw in any of the above, but include the onion tomatoes and garlic, at least.
Fry everything up in plenty of olive oil in a large pan for about 10 minutes,stirring well, until all vegetables are softened. If using minced beef for Bolognaise sauce, fry this up separately for 20 mins or so, until well cooked, then add to the veg. Add some boiling water plus a couple of stock cubes to give a creamy consistency to the sauce.
Meantime cook your pasta in a large pan of salted water at a rolling boil for 12
minutes. Allow about 75 grms each person - most packets contain 500grms, so estimate accordingly.
Important note. The cook must be kept supplied with vino tinto during the preparation of this meal, and of course copious quantities are needed to accompany this feast.
As already said, the main problem is gathering together the utensils - if lucky, there may be salt,pepper and oil left from a previous cook-up.
Hope this helps :)
The best place I've cooked at, for facilities and utensils is Seminario Menor in Santiago, and they have a shop with basic supplies, including wine....
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
But come on people, give me some ideas of how you glide through the market gathering fresh food and put together a yummy meal. I aspire to rise above my status as chopper, at least when there is not a chef in the albergue. ;)
Laurie --- In one sense, this is like asking someone how they think. We can help each other develop our thinking ability, including the patterns and rules of logical thought, but it's a whole lot more difficult to directly answer how we think.

Given, and speaking only for myself, I look for things that are relatively quick and easy to prepare, but that also look and taste appealing. I don't consider myself to be even an amateur chef, and I have no formal training, just years of experience and experimentation. Mostly, I just love to entertain others. Therefore, take my comments with a grain of salt (or a grind of salt, if you're willing to carry the extra weight).

A couple principles:
  • One-pot and two-pot meals are best given the limited cookware selection at many albergues. Also, you often have to share the stove with other pilgrims.
  • Saute/stir-fry/simmer and soup/sauce are your most common options. I would avoid frying. I saw relatively few steamers, although I would tend to use them whenever possible.
  • Baking might be possible (almost no competition for the oven), such as for a casserole or some kind of roast meat, but make sure you have the proper cookware and the oven actually works (experience talking here).
  • Focus on one or two courses of fresh dishes such as fruit salads, vegetable salads, possibly with seared or cooked meat (beef, chicken, seafood). Also, dress up a baguette with dipping oil (infuse with some roasted garlic and basil, etc.) and balsamic vinegar.
In my opinion, the trick with cooking from scratch, based on whatever is available at the store, is that experience is more important than creativity. If you experiment at home with different variations on a handful of basic recipes, that experience will be hugely useful when you walk into a supermercado and have to pick from their narrow selection. Start with a basic recipe, understand its basic elements and approach, and then start to experiment with different ingredients. By way of several examples:
  • Risotto makes a great one-pan core meal with almost infinitely possible variations. There are tons of online recipes; once you get the hang of it, it's quite straightforward.
  • A light and fresh option to the heavier sauces is a "margarita" approach --- fresh-diced tomatoes, garlic, and basil sauteed in olive oil forms the core, but onions, squash, diced peppers (or tinned pequillos), or paprika (or smoked paprika) make a nice addition. You can add some chile piquin or cayenne to give a little heat, or some fresh squeeze lemon juice. Shrimp, chicken, or chorizo all go with it. You can also saute any number of other vegetables if you want. Use it over pasta or rice, or place it on a toasted baguette that has been sliced in half, then grate some cheese (or thin cut slices) onto it and then put it in the oven to melt and toast the cheese.
  • There are a number of light pestos and pesto-like sauces that can be used with pasta, vegetables, chicken, or bread.
Also, when you experiment, try to see what flavors go well together. For instance, Iberian ham typically goes very well with chicken. Diced, it also goes well in tomato dishes (sauces and sautes). Wrap it around brussel sprouts and saute, or diced with green beans. Fresh squeezed lemon and fresh thyme go great together with steamed or sauteed green vegetables. If you spend time looking at various recipe books, ignore the recipes and look for common ingredient pairings that help form the core taste of a thing. Look also for ingredients that appear to be "background" flavors that don't dominate but do add texture, depth, and complexity. Once you know how other people use things together, you have a basis for your own experimentation, which leads to experience and judgement.

As part of your experimentation, think of what is likely to be available along your route. In the US, we have pretty much everything all year round, but I suspect its far more seasonal and regional in most rural areas of Spain. Obviously, chorizo, cured ham, sometimes chicken and sometimes beef. I remember green beans, lettuce, spinach, tomatoes, onions, carrots, potatoes, squash, peppers (rarely hot), sometimes more exotics like broccoli and cauliflower and brussel sprouts. Garlic is a mainstay. Citrus, especially oranges and lemons, were common. Take every ingredient that you are likely to find, and Google search recipes that include that ingredient --> "recipe green beans". Typically, your hits will feature recipes built around that ingredient as the core ingredient, and that will help you learn how that ingredient is commonly used.

Note that above there is really no "creativity" being used, just experience and judgement informed by experimentation.

Here's a link to a Camino recipe booklet. Some workable ideas inside.
 
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koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
Another possibility would be to look at Greek recipes for ideas suited to Mediterranean cuisine and ingredients.

Cheese plates would be quick and easy, and a small jar of jelly or chutney would provide a nice topping for the cheese.
 

bokormen91

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Via Podensis, Baztan, Coastal Portugese, sections on others...
Like others have said, cooking equipment tends to vary... In addition to stews/soups/one pot meals/pasta, I've cooked the following a couple of times when there's not been to many of us

Chorizo with green beans and toasted pine nuts.
Toast the nuts, slice the chorizo and fry it in some olive oil (I like the spicy version). Then add your green beans, a little bit of water, stir until veg are cooked/water evaporated, add the nuts.
I normally add small amounts of water as I prefer it when it's evaporated and the veg are coated in the lovey oil/fat from the chorizo. You can use almonds instead of pine nuts. Peas, sugar snaps, broccoli etc etc instead of green beans - whatever is available. You can have bread next to it, add pasta - whatever you like/find. Leftovers are nice for lunch the next day.

I often feel vegetable deprived (not counting chips/fries as a veg here...)

Whatever vegetables they have in the market that look good - served with a hollandaise sauce (lemon, butter and eggs seem to be available most places). I love hollandaise, and as it's calorifically good, the Camino is a good place to indulge :p
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks for the help, koilife, you're right it's given me a window into the thought processes of a cook. I will just have to try to do this at home, unchain myself from my cookbooks, then it won't be so daunting on the camino! Thanks, Laurie
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
Whatever vegetables they have in the market that look good - served with a hollandaise sauce (lemon, butter and eggs seem to be available most places). I love hollandaise, and as it's calorifically good, the Camino is a good place to indulge :p
I really like the hollandaise idea. A touch of fresh dill or fresh chives in it can be a nice touch.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
Ratatouille (sauteed or simmered versions more than the casserole versions) are also a viable option using local vegetables. I also think there are actually common Basque and Castillian versions of it. I tend to think ratatouille is more of a pattern for making dishes, rather than a dish in its own right.

I've put fried eggs (over easy with runny yolks are my preference) on it (although I'm no good at frying eggs on anything but teflon or well-seasoned cast iron). Fried chorizo or Iberian ham or seared chicken would go well with it.
 
Last edited:

OTH86

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés five times, Madrid two days, Ingles once.
Methinks all these tips and recipes and suggestions should become a part of a comprehensive Camino Cookbook (nod to Laurie) as a pdf to carry on the device of choice... :)
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
I'm searching for suggestions for cooking along the Camino and I came across the following threads on this forum. Inside are some suggestions of one sort or another related to Laurie's OP.

Another link from @Anniesantiago that might prove useful:
I also found reference by Johnnie Walker to 1080 Recipes (available in English on Amazon). It is filled with Spanish recipes, and as such should be a good source of recipes that favors locally available ingredients. After I get it, I'll probably provide a review.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
Spain Sept 11 Ponferrada (40).JPG
This is typical of what we concocted....pasta, chickpeas, olive oil, chorizo, cheese, olives, tomatoes, spinach (or whatever veges we could find), pepper....sometimes with eggs or tomato sauce with onion and garlic
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
View attachment 9011
This is typical of what we concocted....pasta, chickpeas, olive oil, chorizo, cheese, olives, tomatoes, spinach (or whatever veges we could find), pepper....sometimes with eggs or tomato sauce with onion and garlic
Looks quite yummy, and nicely presented. What is the sauce in there? At first glance, I would assume it is a combination of pepper juice, olive oil, and possibly some of the chorizo fat. Also, there is some kind of spice which I assume is black pepper.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
@Peregrina-- others will likely come along with their favourite recipes, but I always preferred to skin and then chop finely a few ripe or over-ripe tomatoes into a handful of garlic and vegetables, sizzled in a bit of oil, then left to simmer, then served up on the pasta. This works as well if not better than the best of tinned tomato sauce, and is much less acidic. In terms of gliding through the market, it is easily done and, when the vendors see that you are actually buying something, they are usually very helpful and when they learn you are a pilgrim, embarrassingly generous. What I found most difficult was resisting the temptation of a tray of figs for as much as I would pay for a single one in Ottawa.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
Looks quite yummy, and nicely presented. What is the sauce in there? At first glance, I would assume it is a combination of pepper juice, olive oil, and possibly some of the chorizo fat. Also, there is some kind of spice which I assume is black pepper.
Correct on all counts - plus add some garlic and maybe even a tin of tomatoes and some juice from the chickpea can!
BTW, the spinach is raw.
 

Bajaracer

Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
If the opportunity to cook a meal and there is a decently equipped kitchen, look around and ask what has been left behind from previous pilgrims such as salt, pepper, oil, an onion, etc. before you go grocery shopping.
Even if you don't know how or have any cooking skills, anybody can help wash pots and pans, dishes, and clean up the dining room.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 was Camino #14
Laurie --- In one sense, this is like asking someone how they think. We can help each other develop our thinking ability, including the patterns and rules of logical thought, but it's a whole lot more difficult to directly answer how we think.

Given, and speaking only for myself, I look for things that are relatively quick and easy to prepare, but that also look and taste appealing. I don't consider myself to be even an amateur chef, and I have no formal training, just years of experience and experimentation. Mostly, I just love to entertain others. Therefore, take my comments with a grain of salt (or a grind of salt, if you're willing to carry the extra weight).

A couple principles:
  • One-pot and two-pot meals are best given the limited cookware selection at many albergues. Also, you often have to share the stove with other pilgrims.
  • Saute/stir-fry/simmer and soup/sauce are your most common options. I would avoid frying. I saw relatively few steamers, although I would tend to use them whenever possible.
  • Baking might be possible (almost no competition for the oven), such as for a casserole or some kind of roast meat, but make sure you have the proper cookware and the oven actually works (experience talking here).
  • Focus on one or two courses of fresh dishes such as fruit salads, vegetable salads, possibly with seared or cooked meat (beef, chicken, seafood). Also, dress up a baguette with dipping oil (infuse with some roasted garlic and basil, etc.) and balsamic vinegar.
In my opinion, the trick with cooking from scratch, based on whatever is available at the store, is that experience is more important than creativity. If you experiment at home with different variations on a handful of basic recipes, that experience will be hugely useful when you walk into a supermercado and have to pick from their narrow selection. Start with a basic recipe, understand its basic elements and approach, and then start to experiment with different ingredients. By way of several examples:
  • Risotto makes a great one-pan core meal with almost infinitely possible variations. There are tons of online recipes; once you get the hang of it, it's quite straightforward.
  • A light and fresh option to the heavier sauces is a "margarita" approach --- fresh-diced tomatoes, garlic, and basil sauteed in olive oil forms the core, but onions, squash, diced peppers (or tinned pequillos), or paprika (or smoked paprika) make a nice addition. You can add some chile piquin or cayenne to give a little heat, or some fresh squeeze lemon juice. Shrimp, chicken, or chorizo all go with it. You can also saute any number of other vegetables if you want. Use it over pasta or rice, or place it on a toasted baguette that has been sliced in half, then grate some cheese (or thin cut slices) onto it and then put it in the oven to melt and toast the cheese.
  • There are a number of light pestos and pesto-like sauces that can be used with pasta, vegetables, chicken, or bread.
Also, when you experiment, try to see what flavors go well together. For instance, Iberian ham typically goes very well with chicken. Diced, it also goes well in tomato dishes (sauces and sautes). Wrap it around brussel sprouts and saute, or diced with green beans. Fresh squeezed lemon and fresh thyme go great together with steamed or sauteed green vegetables. If you spend time looking at various recipe books, ignore the recipes and look for common ingredient pairings that help form the core taste of a thing. Look also for ingredients that appear to be "background" flavors that don't dominate but do add texture, depth, and complexity. Once you know how other people use things together, you have a basis for your own experimentation, which leads to experience and judgement.

As part of your experimentation, think of what is likely to be available along your route. In the US, we have pretty much everything all year round, but I suspect its far more seasonal and regional in most rural areas of Spain. Obviously, chorizo, cured ham, sometimes chicken and sometimes beef. I remember green beans, lettuce, spinach, tomatoes, onions, carrots, potatoes, squash, peppers (rarely hot), sometimes more exotics like broccoli and cauliflower and brussel sprouts. Garlic is a mainstay. Citrus, especially oranges and lemons, were common. Take every ingredient that you are likely to find, and Google search recipes that include that ingredient --> "recipe green beans". Typically, your hits will feature recipes built around that ingredient as the core ingredient, and that will help you learn how that ingredient is commonly used.

Note that above there is really no "creativity" being used, just experience and judgement informed by experimentation.

Here's a link to a Camino recipe booklet. Some workable ideas inside.
The Camino recipe booklet link is broken. Does anyone have a good link?
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Easy, one-caserole fish soup dish:

Buy a bag of vegetable soup and follow instructions
Add a tin of tuna in oil
Add a tin of scallops in spicy oil
Add chick peas/whatever green stuff
Salt/pepper/Tabasco to your taste.

1 caserole, 15 minutes, lots of protein. Drink sufficient tinto during waiting time.

Serve with bread and (much) vino tinto

-------------------------------------------------------------

Omelete, one-frying-pan:

Eggs
Fine-chopped onion(s)
Fine-chopped choriso
Other fine-chopped vegetables to your taste
Shredded cheese
Salt/pepper/Tabasco to your taste.

Whip and then fry in the pan. If thick omelete, do not turn: Just fold in two, and let stiffen off the oven. If many people, fry several rations. Drink sufficient tinto during each frying session.

Serve with bread and (much) vino tinto
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo
Laurie, I'll send you a PM. Maggie
 

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