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Injuries, Fatalities Since May

Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances
SJPP to SdC, 2023
CF, 2024
One death attributed to a heart attack last week.
Two pelegrinos gored, one seriously.
One broken leg and many ending in Pamplona due to knee and leg and ankle injuries.
Is it possible to confirm these "facts" independently Ivar? Been quite the start, if true!
Moderators and more experienced Pelegrinos, is there any way to determine the number who drop off after registering at SJPP? I know that wouldn't account for all those that begin, but it would get us "in the ballpark"! Thank you!
Finally, the why. I would like to be able to lift those injured or killed in prayer, and be able to remind those coming that this is NOT a "Sunday stroll" for most!
Thanks!
 
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Stories of deaths and serious injuries of pilgrims are often repeated by several reputable local news websites and on the social media accounts of the bomberos, Guardia Civil and other official agencies. I do not know how much more independent confirmation you would need of these "facts".

You could compare the number who register at the SJPDP pilgrim office with the number who receive Compostelas who named SJPDP as their starting point. In 2023 around 57,000 registered in SJPDP and 31,000 Compostelas were given to those who started in SJPDP. A relatively small number will have registered in SJPDP but started walking further back in France or elsewhere. There are very detailed Compostela statistics on the Santiago pilgrim office website. The SJPDP figures are simple monthly totals available from their Facebook page.
 
Actually the examples you point to just the tip of the iceberg. As pointed out by @Bradypus, the Spanish Media frequently have reports on these incidents, when the emergency services have been involved. Which to me would strongly suggest that it was 'verified'.

I don't recall a recent broken leg incident report on the forum (other than the overly sensational heading of one incident);
Oh, and the excellent 'tibial fracture' thread - but the incident itself actually dates from 2017.
However I wouldn't be at all surprised if somebody has.

There have been several ankle incidents - twisted or broken, my own included, and multiple reports of Falls causing at the very least bruises & grazing. The latter of course generally involved delays rather than abandoning the camino altogether.

One thing we seldom see reported on the forum but is actually often reported elsewhere is the number of Pilgrim injuries by vehicle. Generally, simply crossing the road.

Remember we here on the forum are such a tiny, tiny percentage of the individuals walking the camino at any point in time that it is hardly surprising that we miss the multiple reports of injuries, even fatalities, especially as many of us do not read the Spanish news reports....
 
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This accident was reported in the Zubiri area about 3 weeks ago. Fairly sure there have been others recently.

Yes, but I specifically said 'on the forum'.
Mind you, you have just provided that so I guess there is now!

This is my point actually. With the exception of your good self few people actually bring these incidents to our attention. Personally I have looked for statistics of deaths on camino and they are very hard to find for somebody that does not speak Spanish. And yet as we all know people die on camino every year.
It's the law of statistical averages.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
In 2023 around 57,000 registered in SJPDP and 31,000 Compostelas were given to those who started in SJPDP.
I find this to be a particularly interesting statistic. When you consider that some of the 31K Compostelas were awarded to individuals who did the CF in segments over several visits to the Camino, the percentage of pilgrims both starting in SJPP and finishing in 2023 is even lower. I guess I’m just surprised. I would have thought that the completion rate for a single season would have been higher. Of course, not everyone is interested in the Compostela if they have walked the CF before. Anyway, doesn’t this strike you as a low completion rate?
 
Anyway, doesn’t this strike you as a low completion rate?
It does surprise me. Those walking in sections over several years should not make a big difference in the long term - those starting on their first stage walking should be roughly balanced by those arriving on their final stage. The figures are only a rough guide: some will walk the Frances without registering in SJPDP and others will not ask for a Compostela on completion of their journey. But I don't think that alone would account for such a large difference.
 
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Ivar reported an increase of 23% of those who arrive in SdC in total. Coming from all Camino's, not only the Camino Francés but coming from all directions. Walking/biking/on a horse. Making 100 kms or 2500 kms.
If you narrow this year's arrivals to the Camino Frances alone the increase to date is currently 13%. That is for any length of journey including the final 100km on the Frances. For all the Caminos combined it is now 19%.
 
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If doing a Camino was a health problem, the insurers would be all over it and asking for a premium. Don't recall having been asked about this by my insurers. They were though quite concerned (at a price) about our doing dog sledding.

Would be an interesting way to complete one though.
 
One death attributed to a heart attack last week.
Two pelegrinos gored, one seriously.
One broken leg and many ending in Pamplona due to knee and leg and ankle injuries.
Is it possible to confirm these "facts" independently Ivar? Been quite the start, if true!
Moderators and more experienced Pelegrinos, is there any way to determine the number who drop off after registering at SJPP? I know that wouldn't account for all those that begin, but it would get us "in the ballpark"! Thank you!
Finally, the why. I would like to be able to lift those injured or killed in prayer, and be able to remind those coming that this is NOT a "Sunday stroll" for most!
Thanks!
How about just a general prayer for the safety of all pilgrims instead of engaging in fear mongering? We all know to take necessary precautions with our feet and legs without hearing the specifics of others’ misfortunes.
 
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As tough as the trail can be, and as out-of-shape and un-suited to the job as some of the pilgrims appear, I am forever amazed that so FEW people die each year on the Way.
It has its dodgy sections (the Frances) but overall it is a safe trail with infrastructure so close. Not austere at all. Pre existing medical conditions aside I figure one has to work really hard to get killed on it.
 
Having just completed my first, and possibly last, CF I was amazed at the number of pilgrims I saw with a death/injury wish from texting while walking down rocky slopes to wandering up the middle of a road, I'm not sure if this was due to exhaustion or stupidity but I did wonder.. The other ever present danger was the lunitics in lycra on their bikes who approach unseen from behind then scream past. I do however hold in the highest respect those pilgrims who day in day out stumble on to the end....may God be with you
 
It has its dodgy sections (the Frances) but overall it is a safe trail with infrastructure so close. Not austere at all. Pre existing medical conditions aside I figure one has to work really hard to get killed on it.
I agree completely, but actually it's those pre-existing medical conditions that make me surprised that we don't have more deaths.

An example: cardiovascular disease is the number one Killer worldwide. The CDC statistics (2021) show that the number one cause of death in the USA is heart disease, at 210 people per 100,000. Spain's was 250. The statistics are relevant because Spaniards alone make up roughly 50% of the total number of pilgrims. Therefore it would not be unreasonable to expect over 900 deaths from heart disease alone (450,000 recorded pilgrims last year).

I appreciate that this is far too simplistic, because many people are aware that they are simply too sick to walk.

One might assume that most people on camino are at least moderately healthy, but as Rebekah said:

As tough as the trail can be, and as out-of-shape and un-suited to the job as some of the pilgrims appear, I am forever amazed that so FEW people die each year on the Way.
Basically, when you throw in the statistics above, I can't help but agree!
 
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We have a very heterogeneous group present on the camino. Great variation in ages, nationalities, distance and time covered, physical fitness... In an attempt to standardize an analysis, I would choose to have statistics on the Spanish people, as they are frequent midfielders and of a social standard that I think represents well on average the pilgrims in general. Based on age, I would take an average of 50 to 65 years old as a general representation, as they are around what we see most frequently on the camino.

With these premises, we would have an average mortality rate of around 570 deaths for every 100,000 people per year. As these pilgrims stay for a short time on the route (I will assume a chance of error of around 2 weeks), the rate would be 1/24 of this total.

Mortality would then be 23.75 deaths for every 100,000 pilgrims. With a total audience of 400,000 pilgrims per year, around 95 deaths per year from natural causes would be expected.

We do not see this number because there is a likely selection of an audience with better physical fitness than the general population, in addition to other factors. I think that from these numbers, we see that the path is not a relevant risk factor. The deaths we noticed are probably mainly associated with causes not of the path but of people's individual issues.

Therefore, instructing people to have a check up and physically prepare themselves for the journey would be more than necessary. I don't see the need for any greater fuss about the risks of the pilgrimage. Muscle injuries. bones, these do deserve attention but we already have this type of guidance quite widespread on the forum.
 
I agree completely, but actually it's those pre-existing medical conditions that make me surprised that we don't have more deaths.

An example: cardiovascular disease is the number one Killer worldwide. The CDC statistics (2021) show that the number one cause of death in the USA is heart disease, at 210 people per 100,000. Spain's was 250. The statistics are relevant because Spaniards alone make up roughly 50% of the total number of pilgrims. Therefore it would not be unreasonable to expect over 900 deaths from heart disease alone (450,000 recorded pilgrims last year).

I appreciate that this is far too simplistic, because many people are aware that they are simply too sick to walk.

One might assume that most people on camino are at least moderately healthy, but as Rebekah said:


Basically, when you throw in the statistics above, I can't help but agree!
I was probably writing my post below while you were posting yours, so my statistics became a little redundant. You said it all. I think the same as you!
 
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No se puede comparar la tasa de mortalidad general de un país (en España rondaría las 9,5 muertes por cada 1.000 personas al año, donde están incluidas muertes por accidentes de tráfico, consumo de drogas, personas de más de 80 años y por supuesto muchísimos enfermos crónicos), con la tasa de mortalidad de peregrinos durante la ruta a Compostela: se supone que la inmensa mayoría de peregrinos que se ponen a caminar están en suficiente buena forma física y gozan de una salud razonablemente aceptable; de lo contrario, ya ni se plantearían realizar el Camino.
No entiendo el sentido de comparar estadísticas tan diferentes, salvo que la intención sea vender seguros de vida (perdón, en realidad deberían denominarse "seguros de muerte").
Estoy de acuerdo con Rebekah en que sorprendentemente fallecen MUY POCOS peregrinos. Y con Duncan que aquellos que les preocupe este tema, mejor que su destino fuese LOURDES ;)

Computer translation:
It is not possible to compare the general mortality rate of a country (in Spain it would be around 9.5 deaths per 1,000 people per year, which includes deaths from traffic accidents, drug use, people over 80 years of age and of course many chronically ill people), with the mortality rate of pilgrims during the route to Compostela: It is assumed that the vast majority of pilgrims who set out on foot are in sufficiently good physical shape and in reasonably acceptable health; otherwise, they would not even consider doing the Camino.
I don't understand the point of comparing such different statistics, unless the intention is to sell life insurance (sorry, they should actually be called "death insurance").
I agree with Rebekah that surprisingly FEW pilgrims die. And with Duncan that those who care about this issue, it would be better that their destination would be LOURDES ;)
 
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I was probably writing my post below while you were posting yours, so my statistics became a little redundant. You said it all. I think the same as you!
Thanks, but I like your analysis - it never occurred to me to factor in the number of weeks! An obvious omission, dramatically lowering the numbers - although the physical exertion and other stressors would of course increase the risks and likelihood of fatal consequences.

It is assumed that the vast majority of pilgrims who set out on foot are in sufficiently good physical shape and in reasonably acceptable health
You are probably correct in your assumptions.
I think Rebekah's point - and certainly mine - is that a significant number of people are not. And bearing that in mind, we are pleasantly surprised that there are not more deaths considering the physical challenges to those individuals.

Throw in motor vehicle accidents (too many) and believe it or not, the odd drowning. (Although the former is not surprising really, because this happens anywhere you are).

Plus so many are woefully unprepared in other ways. No idea as to their own limitations, walking the Napoleon route in bad weather with inadequate clothing, carrying insufficient water on a hot day - the list goes on.... .
 
OK, so, my assorted health tribulations are previously stated on this forum (the curious can search tincatinker/occlusion). In Napoli it is 70 steps up to my cold-water flat. The motorcyclists on the Via San Gregorio Armeno neither swerve or brake for anyone. Even their granny. The sneaky sub-teens on their electric fat-bikes will have whatever they can grab and be gone before you can fart.

My Fitbit tells me I’m averaging 15 miles a day around Pompei, Herculaneum and the rest while my blood oxygen monitor tells me I’m already dead. At MAN today I looked at some of the body casts.

The risks of death or worse on the Camino? The daily infant mortality rate in this city kicks that into a cocked hat.
 
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One death attributed to a heart attack last week.
Two pelegrinos gored, one seriously.
One broken leg and many ending in Pamplona due to knee and leg and ankle injuries.
Is it possible to confirm these "facts" independently Ivar? Been quite the start, if true!
Moderators and more experienced Pelegrinos, is there any way to determine the number who drop off after registering at SJPP? I know that wouldn't account for all those that begin, but it would get us "in the ballpark"! Thank you!
Finally, the why. I would like to be able to lift those injured or killed in prayer, and be able to remind those coming that this is NOT a "Sunday stroll" for most!
Thanks!
I think most don’t get reported thru here. One of my Camino family came across a woman who had fallen & broken her leg on the way to Molineseco about April 16th, emergency services were already with her but he warned us to be careful for that section.
 
I wouldn’t assume that any pilgrim starting in SJPDP registers in the pilgrims office. I didn’t because I already had a credencial pre-ordered. So that numbers cannot be reliable. Anyways I don’t get why is it important to get such numbers at all. If you wanna pray then do it, for what’s sake is it important to have a number?!

And in terms of people getting injured or way more sadly dying: As I (and probably just me!) experienced that lots of people really underestimate the walk and do not listen to their bodies when it is telling you „stop!“ - this won’t help anybody who fell or slipped, this can happen to anybody. But afaik from the group I started with many pilgrims had to quit because of underestimation of the trip. In my case it was the CF and yes it is a walk with lots of opportunities to get medical treatment or even transport, but that still doesn’t mean that it is a walk in the park. Myself underestimated the first stages to Pamplona and paid with a break week in Burgos after that but I listened to my body. I finished in Santiago and continued to Fisterra BECAUSE I stopped. I think lots of pilgrims have a false pride, I met ppl 60+ mourning in pain and they didn’t stop. They ended on crutches and did not walk into Santiago at all which is sad.

Sorry for the off topic but I think besides people who fell or even worse die most of the injuries are caused by the underestimation of the trip and the overestimation of their capabilities.
 
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No se puede comparar la tasa de mortalidad general de un país (en España rondaría las 9,5 muertes por cada 1.000 personas al año, donde están incluidas muertes por accidentes de tráfico, consumo de drogas, personas de más de 80 años y por supuesto muchísimos enfermos crónicos), con la tasa de mortalidad de peregrinos durante la ruta a Compostela: se supone que la inmensa mayoría de peregrinos que se ponen a caminar están en suficiente buena forma física y gozan de una salud razonablemente aceptable; de lo contrario, ya ni se plantearían realizar el Camino.
No entiendo el sentido de comparar estadísticas tan diferentes, salvo que la intención sea vender seguros de vida (perdón, en realidad deberían denominarse "seguros de muerte").
Estoy de acuerdo con Rebekah en que sorprendentemente fallecen MUY POCOS peregrinos. Y con Duncan que aquellos que les preocupe este tema, mejor que su destino fuese LOURDES ;)

Computer translation:
It is not possible to compare the general mortality rate of a country (in Spain it would be around 9.5 deaths per 1,000 people per year, which includes deaths from traffic accidents, drug use, people over 80 years of age and of course many chronically ill people), with the mortality rate of pilgrims during the route to Compostela: It is assumed that the vast majority of pilgrims who set out on foot are in sufficiently good physical shape and in reasonably acceptable health; otherwise, they would not even consider doing the Camino.
I don't understand the point of comparing such different statistics, unless the intention is to sell life insurance (sorry, they should actually be called "death insurance").
I agree with Rebekah that surprisingly FEW pilgrims die. And with Duncan that those who care about this issue, it would be better that their destination would be LOURDES ;)

Estimado Charles, la tasa de mortalidad que utilicé no fue la tasa general del país. Lo restringí a los españoles de 50 a 65 años precisamente porque se acercan más a lo que tenemos con las estadísticas de quienes hacen el Camino de Santiago y lo restringí a los españoles porque son la nacionalidad más común. y pese a ello, reconozco que el margen de error en mi análisis es relevante. Sin embargo, hay que reconocer que la diferencia de números es muy relevante. No existe un análisis ideal, pero que yo sepa, describí las conclusiones anteriores que creo que son relevantes. Gracias por tu reseña.

Dear Charles, the death rate I used was not the overall rate for the country. I restricted it to Spaniards aged 50 to 65 precisely because they are closer to what we have with the statistics of those who do the Camino de Santiago and I restricted it to Spaniards because they are the most common nationality. And despite this, I recognize that the margin of error in my analysis is relevant. However, it must be recognized that the difference in numbers is very relevant. There is no ideal analysis, but as far as I know, I described the conclusions above that I think are relevant. Thanks for your review.
 
While many people may push on when they shouldn’t, one of the differences of the Camino from other through-hikes is the abundance of places to take a few rest days, to seek medical attention, etc., and then continue on, or to take a bus a few stages ahead, or to have your bag transported. I think this itself might account for why fewer than expected completely end their Caminos due to serious injury or worse.
 
One death attributed to a heart attack last week.
Two pelegrinos gored, one seriously.
One broken leg and many ending in Pamplona due to knee and leg and ankle injuries.
Is it possible to confirm these "facts" independently Ivar? Been quite the start, if true!
Moderators and more experienced Pelegrinos, is there any way to determine the number who drop off after registering at SJPP? I know that wouldn't account for all those that begin, but it would get us "in the ballpark"! Thank you!
Finally, the why. I would like to be able to lift those injured or killed in prayer, and be able to remind those coming that this is NOT a "Sunday stroll" for most!
Thanks!
I was in Roncesvalles last Tuesday 21st after crossing the Pyrenees and a saw several ambulances and police cars even a medical helicopter landed next to the albergue. They all went to the road behind the little church next to La Posada de Roncesvalles After a while, they all left but the police. We all figured they were waiting for the coroner. During mass that day, the priest confirmed 2 fatalities. One from hypothermia and one from a hearth attack. The hypothermia victim might has been the one who got lost days before.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
More news from the Burguete bomberos today. Two injured peregrinas rescued near Roncesvalles. It seems the bomberos were responding to a call from a peregrina with a sprained ankle when they came across another woman with fractures of tibia and fibula.

 
How about just a general prayer for the safety of all pilgrims instead of engaging in fear mongering? We all know to take necessary precautions with our feet and legs without hearing the specifics of others’ misfortunes.
I like to know what's possible. Telling people what has happened is not the same as "fear mongering." If I need to be careful around bovines, I'd want someone to tell me. I mean, I already know that, but not everyone does, as we have seen with tourists who approach bison at Yellowstone in the US.
 
I like to know what's possible. Telling people what has happened is not the same as "fear mongering." If I need to be careful around bovines, I'd want someone to tell me. I mean, I already know that, but not everyone does, as we have seen with tourists who approach bison at Yellowstone in the US.
Most of the things that are "possible" never happen. There seems to be an emphasis on highlighting the salacious details of every single mishap that one hears about on the trail. It's not necessary and is the definition of fear mongering.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
It’s no different than the 3 peaks walk where I live in the Yorkshire Dales . If you’re going to do an outdoor activity then there is always a small risk factor. No different than all those people who have accidents in their own home and sadly many people drop dead at home . I had a cycle accident on my second day on the Camino. Plasters and antiseptic cream and back on the bike . There was no way I was going to let a small injury stop me . Safe travels.
 

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Actually the examples you point to just the tip of the iceberg. As pointed out by @Bradypus, the Spanish Media frequently have reports on these incidents, when the emergency services have been involved. Which to me would strongly suggest that it was 'verified'.

I don't recall a recent broken leg incident report on the forum (other than the overly sensational heading of one incident);
Oh, and the excellent 'tibial fracture' thread - but the incident itself actually dates from 2017.
However I wouldn't be at all surprised if somebody has.

There have been several ankle incidents - twisted or broken, my own included, and multiple reports of Falls causing at the very least bruises & grazing. The latter of course generally involved delays rather than abandoning the camino altogether.

One thing we seldom see reported on the forum but is actually often reported elsewhere is the number of Pilgrim injuries by vehicle. Generally, simply crossing the road.

Remember we here on the forum are such a tiny, tiny percentage of the individuals walking the camino at any point in time that it is hardly surprising that we miss the multiple reports of injuries, even fatalities, especially as many of us do not read the Spanish news reports....
The trail into Zubiri is just like much of the Appalachian trail in the US. Only AT hikers are much better prepared than some of the Camino hikers. Also the AT has regional groups who work to improve the trail or move it over a few meters. Is this not possible on the Camino?
 
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Transport luggage-passengers.
From airports to SJPP
Luggage from SJPP to Roncevalles
No se puede comparar la tasa de mortalidad general de un país (en España rondaría las 9,5 muertes por cada 1.000 personas al año, donde están incluidas muertes por accidentes de tráfico, consumo de drogas, personas de más de 80 años y por supuesto muchísimos enfermos crónicos), con la tasa de mortalidad de peregrinos durante la ruta a Compostela: se supone que la inmensa mayoría de peregrinos que se ponen a caminar están en suficiente buena forma física y gozan de una salud razonablemente aceptable; de lo contrario, ya ni se plantearían realizar el Camino.
No entiendo el sentido de comparar estadísticas tan diferentes, salvo que la intención sea vender seguros de vida (perdón, en realidad deberían denominarse "seguros de muerte").
Estoy de acuerdo con Rebekah en que sorprendentemente fallecen MUY POCOS peregrinos. Y con Duncan que aquellos que les preocupe este tema, mejor que su destino fuese LOURDES ;)

Computer translation:
It is not possible to compare the general mortality rate of a country (in Spain it would be around 9.5 deaths per 1,000 people per year, which includes deaths from traffic accidents, drug use, people over 80 years of age and of course many chronically ill people), with the mortality rate of pilgrims during the route to Compostela: It is assumed that the vast majority of pilgrims who set out on foot are in sufficiently good physical shape and in reasonably acceptable health; otherwise, they would not even consider doing the Camino.
I don't understand the point of comparing such different statistics, unless the intention is to sell life insurance (sorry, they should actually be called "death insurance").
I agree with Rebekah that surprisingly FEW pilgrims die. And with Duncan that those who care about this issue, it would be better that their destination would be LOURDES ;)
My take away from this is positive. According to all the statistics quoted in this thread doing the Camino is Good for you! You are much less likely to die on the Camino than off it. The numbers speak for themselves.
Why? Fresh air, simple food, daily exercise, mental peace? And it is the Camino Santiago after all. Maybe he is watching?

Buen Camino!
 
An article appeared overnight on a Navarra news website. Behind a paywall but the introductory paragraph provided some numbers: "Of the 15,063 pilgrims who have passed through Roncesvalles this year, 4,461 were between 60 and 90 years old. In May, two died in 24 hours and the Burguete firefighters have carried out 18 interventions this month". We do seem to be keeping the bomberos busy this year.
 
An article appeared overnight on a Navarra news website. Behind a paywall but the introductory paragraph provided some numbers
It is a pity that the article is behind a paywall. One can buy it for € 0,99 but they don't even make that easy.

The article is not so much about numbers but about what the title says: Pilgrims at their limit: how the Camino walkers arrive at the Lepoeder pass.

The Roncesvalles albergue manager and a local person had recently driven up to the pass to see. They did not only witness heaps of basura - trash - near the WiFi station on the Lepoeder pass and the Ibañeta emergency shelter shortly before the pass, they also witnessed in what state pilgrims arrive at the pass after having walked from SJPP and in what state they arrive at the Roncesvalles albergue.

Quote:

In fact, according to the latest data from Roncesvalles, of the 15.063 pilgrims who have passed through Roncesvalles during the period from 1 January - 20 May of this year, 4.461 were between 60 and 90 years old and three were close to 100. ‘And in these conditions, at this age, without appropriate clothing, without meteorological knowledge, in fact with limited information in general, pilgrims do not hesitate to put themselves to the limit of their possibilities,’ they lamented. ‘On top of that, at the Information Point in Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port they recommend to pilgrims to go over the mountain instead of taking the road through Valcarlos. And this complicates everything even more’.

The choice to put the text about "limited information in general" is the author's choice and not mine.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
As someone who is now firmly in the "between 60 and 90 years old" bracket I was struck yet again by the great change in the age profile of pilgrims. When I walked my first Camino there were very few pilgrims over the age of 60 and even at 28 I was probably in the upper half of the age range at the time. The huge increase in numbers and an older and potentially less fit collection of pilgrims does seem like a recipe for greater need for the rescue services.
 
in fact with limited information in general,
Hard to know what to do about that. There has never been a time when information about the Caminos in particular, walking more generally, weather conditions, physical fitness, navigation or any other relevant topic has been so easily and so freely accessible to all. Some people will always have an unjustified high opinion of their own abilities and will disregard well-meaning attempts to persuade them of the difficulties they might face.
 
Hard to know what to do about that. There has never been a time when information about the Caminos in particular, walking more generally, weather conditions, physical fitness, navigation or any other relevant topic has been so easily and so freely accessible to all. Some people will always have an unjustified high opinion of their own abilities and will disregard well-meaning attempts to persuade them of the difficulties they might face.
But the flip side of that (and the subject of another thread) is the reassurance that “the Camino provides” … whatever you need when you need it so don’t worry about preparing too much. Not to mention the advice to count every single gram in your pack, which no doubt results in people deciding against bringing the fleece jacket, the heavier leggings, etc. Plus, of course, the constant refrain that “anyone” can “do” the Camino, even with no preparation (hello Martin Sheen).
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-

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