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The big map o the Caminos de Santiago

more on backpacks size vs weight

Pieces

Veteran Member
#1
Hi,

I am really og seven minds. I have 2 backpacks, one large and one small. The small weighs 600 grams less than the larger one. All my stuff fits in both but in the small one there is not much extra room so I would maybe have to cut my baquette in 2 in order to fit it.
Which would you choose and why ?
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#6
The main reason to lower your pack weight is to make it more comfortable to carry. If the larger pack is equally comfortable then I don't see a reason not to take it. That said there's no way that I could have fit a full baguette into my 32 liter backpack, but it wasn't something I worried about.
Does the small pack have side pockets that could hold the baguette?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#9
Hi,

I am really og seven minds. I have 2 backpacks, one large and one small. The small weighs 600 grams less than the larger one. All my stuff fits in both but in the small one there is not much extra room so I would maybe have to cut my baquette in 2 in order to fit it.
Which would you choose and why ?
What is the volume of each in liters?
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#12
Is that kg with all your gear? If so, either is very light.
I agree with trecile; at those weights, there is not going to be much of a noticeable difference when you are carrying a pack. If you were trying to cut weight from a 7 kg load, then I would be more conscious of saving 600 gm of weight as a part of trying to reduce my overall load weight.
 

Pieces

Veteran Member
#13
I do realise that I am very light weight as it is, but I also have a scould I am afraid will give me problems. ON the other hand I am thinking as I am already low maybe just go with the big one and that I am being too extreme (can one be too extreme when aiming for ultra light?) :D
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#16
I do realise that I am very light weight as it is, but I also have a scould I am afraid will give me problems. ON the other hand I am thinking as I am already low maybe just go with the big one and that I am being too extreme (can one be too extreme when aiming for ultra light?) :D
If by "too extreme" you mean leaving behind common sense as a weight reduction strategy, then, yes. :)
 
#18
Hi,

I am really og seven minds. I have 2 backpacks, one large and one small. The small weighs 600 grams less than the larger one. All my stuff fits in both but in the small one there is not much extra room so I would maybe have to cut my baquette in 2 in order to fit it.
Which would you choose and why ?
Bring the small backpack and gaffa tape this on the side for the baguette.
Problem solved!
paprør-med-låg-ø50-x-20-x-350-mm-3.jpg
 
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twh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from SJPdP May/June, 2018
#20
Size vs Weight may be most important when it applies to carry-on vs check-in baggage size requirements.
I'm guessing both of your bags do not exceed the size requirement for carry-on but this might be an important consideration for others to consider.
 

twh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from SJPdP May/June, 2018
#21
A place to carry food while walking.
I used one of those noisy, crinkly plastic bags from the local shops to hold a few pieces of fruit and a sandwich. I tied the handles of the bag to my chest strap and it worked OK. It was easy to remove what I wanted and eat it while walking. A baguette cut in half would fit easily. The downside: the bag swings with each step and anything soft (basically any fruit) gets beat up over time due to the gentle bumps it receives over several thousand steps. A baguette cut in half does not have the mass and liquid interior like the fruit so I think it would ride in that bag without issue. The swinging of the bag while walking and the noise it made (if any) did not bother me other than the fruit being bruised and leaking which made handling it while eating a bit messier. The constant bumping with each step could easily be defeated with some light weight shock cord or a bungie cord strategically located and attached low on your shoulder straps, pinning the lower portion of the bag against your chest/stomach area.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#23
32 & 44 bringing both puff and sleepingbag. Weight is app 4,2 & 4,7
I’d definitely go with the smaller one. 32 liters ought to be plenty, and if it’s not, you’re taking too much stuff.

By the way, I’m assuming those weights are of the packs empty. Frankly, even if they are fully loaded weights, I’d still go with the smaller pack. I’d rather my pack be packed tightly rather than loosely. That way things don’t shift around when I’m walking.

As far as noticing 600 grams, when I got to Burgos I added a second fleece for warmth. It probably weighed about 300 - 400 grams. My total pack weight loaded, with water and camera, was 10 kg. I definitely noticed the added weight of that fleece and gave it away as soon as I was clear of the colder weather.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#25
they are equally comfortable but one is heavier

yes, theres side pockets but I was planning on using them for water :D

maybe I can hold the water till i have eaten the baquette....
For your water, these are great! Got the idea from @David .
https://www.hipsta.com.au/
Never going back to bladders or bottles in side pockets.

We use them like this... (drinking tube below)


This is the drinking tube. other similar ones available I think.
https://www.amazon.com/Blue-Desert-SmarTube-Hydration-System/dp/B000GM6LWS
(But we use a different bite valve to those supplied)

We could have chopped the tube off short, but instead pass it over the shoulders to the opposite side, where the bite valve hangs down at a handy spot. Reason? If we want to put a very large bottle in the pack or side pocket, the tube will still reach.
It wasn't going to save much weigh cutting the tube short! And I reckon flexibility/options in how you use your gear is always a good thing.
When empty, easy to swap the bottles whilst still walking.
And almost any size local bottle works.

And I'd go with the smaller pack ;)
I use a 32L and Pat a 24L :eek:

Oh and for carrying lunch.........
I sometimes put lunch in a small drysac (about 40gms) and just hang it on the front straps of my pack with a tiny carabiner. Again, easy to reach whilst walking!
 
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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#26
...
As far as noticing 600 grams, when I got to Burgos I added a second fleece for warmth. It probably weighed about 300 - 400 grams. My total pack weight loaded, with water and camera, was 10 kg. I definitely noticed the added weight of that fleece and gave it away as soon as I was clear of the colder weather.
Really? Huh. I almost didn't notice 3 litres of water on Levante and I know that I was carrying over 10kg at that time (with 2kg DSLR in front pack). I even carried few beer cans... Being 45 y/o, 180cm and 90kg. A lot to carry my own weight already ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#27
Really? Huh. I almost didn't notice 3 litres of water on Levante and I know that I was carrying over 10kg at that time (with 2kg DSLR in front pack). I even carried few beer cans... Being 45 y/o, 180cm and 90kg. A lot to carry my own weight already ;)
Crazy, yes, but I noticed the added weight. Perhaps it was all in my head, but so be it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#28
Crazy, yes, but I noticed the added weight. Perhaps it was all in my head, but so be it.
Yep, I notice every bit of extra weight. an extra litre of water for me is very noticeable on my feet, ankles, knees...... Wish it wasn't so :oops:
 
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Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#29
Really? Huh. I almost didn't notice 3 litres of water on Levante and I know that I was carrying over 10kg at that time (with 2kg DSLR in front pack). I even carried few beer cans... Being 45 y/o, 180cm and 90kg. A lot to carry my own weight already ;)
You are younger and have a much better height to weight ratio than many of us ;)
i.e. I am almost 20 years older, shorter, heavier and not in best of health :(
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#30
You are younger and have a much better height to weight ratio than many of us ;)
i.e. I am almost 20 years older, shorter, heavier and not in best of health :(
Yes, maybe true. Also being a former rock climber. But a smoker and a drinker doesn't help much I'd say ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
in fall 2017
#31
I took a 16 liter osprey. No sleeping bag. A sleep sheet sack and used my polar fleece and rain ponchos during day if read and then at night for sleeping. The small size pack made sure I didn't add extra. I had a nylon shopping bag for food that I picked up as needed. It fit inside a closed womans fist. I could tie it to pack for easy access. Or slip it over shoulder if distance was short. My pack was about 12 pounds with water. It felt heavy after awhile. That extra 600 grams will be noticeable.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
#32
Bring the small backpack at gaffa tape this on the side for the baguette.
Problem solved!
View attachment 46219
Then it will weigh the same as the bigger one;-)
BTW, I'm amazed at how many people seem to eat whilst walking. I love walking, but I also love to sit down with my baguette and spread some cheese on it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#33
All things being equal, save the empty pack weight, I recommend taking the smaller, lighter pack. For 'extra stuff' you should have a taffeta weight shopping bag or sling bag that you can deploy as needed. COnsider this one...

http://seatosummitusa.com/collectio...cts/ultra-sil-sling-bag?variant=7896122458140

It is available on Amazon as well, and in varied colors. It compresses to the size of a Kiwi fruit and rides in my right rucksack hip pocket. For six Caminos, it has worked like a charm, and for a multitude of uses....

"Stuff is stifling..." The more empty volume you are toting around, regardless of the weight, the more likely it will attract items that will increase carried weight. Nature abhors a vacuum. Empty space inte rucksack is like a vacuum. It sucks up unnecessary stuff...at least in my experience.

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
#34
All things being equal, save the empty pack weight, I recommend taking the smaller, lighter pack. For 'extra stuff' you should have a taffeta weight shopping bag or sling bag that you can deploy as needed. COnsider this one...

http://seatosummitusa.com/collectio...cts/ultra-sil-sling-bag?variant=7896122458140

It is available on Amazon as well, and in varied colors. It compresses to the size of a Kiwi fruit and rides in my right rucksack hip pocket. For six Caminos, it has worked like a charm, and for a multitude of uses....

"Stuff is stifling..." The more empty volume you are toting around, regardless of the weight, the more likely it will attract items that will increase carried weight. Nature abhors a vacuum. Empty space inte rucksack is like a vacuum. It sucks up unnecessary stuff...at least in my experience.

Hope this helps.
Oh, so true! Empty space is dangerous. I have a Sea to Summit bag that is same material as yours, and same wadded-up size, but is a backpack. Can make it a frontpack so lunch is handy. I use it here at home too. Fits into a pocket and I've also fastened it to a hiking pole with a rubber band. I have balance issues so use one or both hiking poles here at home whenever I venture out. Am living "car-free" in Tacoma, WA where there is public transit that is not as good as NYC, but can get me nearly everywhere I want to go on the bus.
 

Pieces

Veteran Member
#35
I’d definitely go with the smaller one. 32 liters ought to be plenty, and if it’s not, you’re taking too much stuff.

By the way, I’m assuming those weights are of the packs empty. Frankly, even if they are fully loaded weights, I’d still go with the smaller pack. I’d rather my pack be packed tightly rather than loosely. That way things don’t shift around when I’m walking.

As far as noticing 600 grams, when I got to Burgos I added a second fleece for warmth. It probably weighed about 300 - 400 grams. My total pack weight loaded, with water and camera, was 10 kg. I definitely noticed the added weight of that fleece and gave it away as soon as I was clear of the colder weather.

well, with a sleeping bag and the warm puff jacket the 32 liter is almost full, I can hardly take any less than I have :D

The weight is og the pack full (see how little I am bringing *looks pleased*) and I agree 600 grams is enough to notice. Also, doing the primitivo & salvador I think that with all the ups and rather long stages it will be nice to have less...
 

Pieces

Veteran Member
#36
Then it will weigh the same as the bigger one;-)
BTW, I'm amazed at how many people seem to eat whilst walking. I love walking, but I also love to sit down with my baguette and spread some cheese on it.
I do plan on sitting and eating but I will also have to bring food in quite a fes places it being one of the smaller caminos with less infrastructure :)
 

Pieces

Veteran Member
#37
All things being equal, save the empty pack weight, I recommend taking the smaller, lighter pack. For 'extra stuff' you should have a taffeta weight shopping bag or sling bag that you can deploy as needed. COnsider this one...

Hope this helps.
Yes, I had a small extra bag on my first camino, I may do this again or hang my raingear on the outside which will also free some space up....
 

Pieces

Veteran Member
#38
Thank you guys. I think I will go with the smaller one as that seems to be the preferred. I was thinking the larger one when I posted, but it does seem stupid sorta.

I will get an extra smaller drybag or somesuch for extra stuff, also I previously bright an extra bag & just carried stuff in one hand but I figured on the harder walking sections this would just get really annoying. Maybe I will just eat my baguette before it ets annoying if that is the case :D
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#39
Thank you guys. I think I will go with the smaller one as that seems to be the preferred. I was thinking the larger one when I posted, but it does seem stupid sorta.

I will get an extra smaller drybag or somesuch for extra stuff, also I previously bright an extra bag & just carried stuff in one hand but I figured on the harder walking sections this would just get really annoying. Maybe I will just eat my baguette before it ets annoying if that is the case :D
If your pack has side pouches, those are great for holding baguettes . I carry a water bottle in one pouch and a baguette in the other.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#40
Whichever pack you choose it should be large enough to include everything being able to fit INSIDE of the bag. No dangling stuff outside of the pack because there isn't enough room. Dangly bits hanging from a pack, like extra shoes, bags of groceries, etc, can make the pack shift around more, catch branches and bushes, throw off the center of gravity, and make the pack less comfortable.

Temporary placement of drying garments are understandable; some gear that is lashed to the pack, like a sleeping bag or pad, has been designed into some packs ... these are not what I am referring to. :) However, if what should normally be inside of the pack needs to be clumped onto the outside because the pack is too small, then there is no purpose and rationale for having a smaller pack.

As has been said before, gather all of the items for your Camino ... all of them down to the teeniest item. Put anything you plan on inserting into stuff sacks actually into those stuff sacks. Include all ancillary items, like a bag of pretend snacks, water bottles, guides, maps, electronics, etc.

Now, after you are sure you have EVERYTHING, fit it into the pack. I never have a pack so full that I have to jam everything into the bag with force, or have anything bulging up out of the top of the pack so that I have to really pull on the straps fastening down the lid of the pack. All zippers should be easy to pull open and shut.

Can't do that? I then prefer a bigger volume of pack. Keep in mind that the usability of the pack isn't only how it carries, but how easy it is to get to things inside and to unpack and re-pack. After all, you will need to get into your 'house' several times every day, at least. And you will need to re pack everything again. Day after day for a few weeks. I want to be able to get into my 'house' fairly easy. And I also know that the longer one lives out of a pack, the smaller it seems to get as you spend less time wanting to organize the heck out of stuff just to make it fit.

There can be a real concern that the inexperienced will not have the wisdom or experience to understand that extra space is not a challenge to add more stuff. That's why encouraging beginners to work from a packing list is important advice ---- nothing goes into the pack that isn't on the list. In other words, train to pack to the list, not to the space available in a pack. :)

My pack is about 65 liters with its extension collar up. For Camino, my gear and clothing takes up about half that volume. I don't look at that empty space and say to myself, "Oh, goody, now I have room for my crock pot". :) But that's because of my experience, which is why it is important for the 'veterans' to pass on wisdom of the packing list and contents to the Camino newbies :)

Now, I can hear someone think, "Why doesn't he take a 35 or 40 liter pack and save more weight, instead of that 65 liter?" Three reasons:
1. My Gossamer Gear pack is lighter at just under two pounds, than most other smaller packs. My Osprey 32 liter pack that I use for my day hikes is nearly a pound and a half heavier.

2. My pack is well fitted to me and comfortable.

3. It meets all the dimension requirements for carry-on luggage for both domestic and international flights. I can pack it to carry 13 pounds of my gear used for month's long wilderness thru-hikes, or 8 pounds of gear for a Camino and I don't have to check it as baggage and risk losing it or waiting for its return. After having had my backpack and gear for a backpacking trip irrecoverably lost by an airline after arriving at my trail head destination, I will not check my back pack in again.

Plus as a carry on, I can get out of the airport quicker, or to a connecting flight faster. :)
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
#41
Hi,

I am really og seven minds. I have 2 backpacks, one large and one small. The small weighs 600 grams less than the larger one. All my stuff fits in both but in the small one there is not much extra room so I would maybe have to cut my baquette in 2 in order to fit it.
Which would you choose and why ?
The tendency with a larger pack is taking more stuff. My larger pack 56 liters can carry comfortably up to 35 lbs. of stuff. I usually limit my stuff to a maximum of 8lbs. excluding food and water so my total weight up to 14lbs. That pack weighs 4.2 lbs. I can carry the same amount of stuff in my 1lb.5oz. pack 36 liters which comfortably carries 18lbs. and fill it up. My issue is I shop for other stuff usually at the end of the walk in Santiago for souvenirs and such. With my large pack I can continue to fill it for the trip home up to about 35lbs. With my small pack which is already full I have to get a check box for the souvenirs so I have one more item to carry on the plane. I prefer the large pack and carry it on.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#42
Whichever pack you choose it should be large enough to include everything being able to fit INSIDE of the bag. No dangling stuff outside of the pack because there isn't enough room. Dangly bits hanging from a pack, like extra shoes, bags of groceries, etc, can make the pack shift around more, catch branches and bushes, throw off the center of gravity, and make the pack less comfortable.

Temporary placement of drying garments are understandable; some gear that is lashed to the pack, like a sleeping bag or pad, has been designed into some packs ... these are not what I am referring to. :) However, if what should normally be inside of the pack needs to be clumped onto the outside because the pack is too small, then there is no purpose and rationale for having a smaller pack.
I totally agree. I like to use my backpack compression straps to cinch my pack down as much as possible to keep the weight close to my back. Even though I have all the same things in my pack, sometimes it just doesn't fill right, so I readjust what's inside and tighten it up. I can imagine that having stuff hanging off would make my backpack feel off balance.
 

Helen1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
London to Santiago (2014)
Narbonne to Oloron (2015)
Camino Portugues (2016)
Sentier Cathar (2017)
#43
Whichever pack you choose it should be large enough to include everything being able to fit INSIDE of the bag. No dangling stuff outside of the pack because there isn't enough room. Dangly bits hanging from a pack, like extra shoes, bags of groceries, etc, can make the pack shift around more, catch branches and bushes, throw off the center of gravity, and make the pack less comfortable.
:) totally agree with this! I tied some fruit to my rucksack and found it had disappeared and I had an empty plastic bag attached to my rucksack when I came to eat it :(. There are loads of people walking the camino with should bags, handbags, shopping bags, some even have carrier bags in each hand... Each to their own but personally I like my stuff inside my rucksack and enough space to shovel stuff in if I am feeling lazy in the morning rather than having to carefully pack to make stuff fit every day.
 
#44
If you take the smaller pack with just enough room then the possibility of someone slipping rocks into it at the start of the day is reduced.

Not that anyone would even think of that of course.
This is for Peg ...
I can’t help thinking that you must be rather special, Peg .. :cool:
Does the excellently wicked sense of humour render you powerless to resist?
Is it more fun to join him than beat him? (that would be a pointless waste of effort)
Must be good for the tummy muscles, though ...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#45
This is for Peg ...
I can’t help thinking that you must be rather special, Peg .. :cool:
Does the excellently wicked sense of humour render you powerless to resist?
Is it more fun to join him than beat him? (that would be a pointless waste of effort)
Must be good for the tummy muscles, though ...
Rick has a nice sense of humor. That's one reason I married him. He sometimes teases me like I am his little sister. It's all in fun.
 
#46
Rick has a nice sense of humor. That's one reason I married him. He sometimes teases me like I am his little sister. It's all in fun.
As was my post!!
Your husband has a brilliantly perceptive sense of humour, widely acknowledged on here ...

And my beloved’s sense of humour is one of the reasons I married him.
Nearing 45 years together and we still surprise each other!
 

Lance Chambers

Lance Chambers
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria (2015) SJPdP (2016) Burgos (2017) SJPdP (2018)
#47
yes, that is what I am thinking, but then I really want to save the 600 grams :-|
Looking at your profile pic can l suggest you may save more than 600 if you cut your hair?

What you may do is buy a very small pack that yoj carty with you for stuff you need to take while walking during the day and have you medium or small pack taken forward every day. The price varies from 5 - 6 Euros and can help a lot in making the walks much easier and more comfortable.

I have a 890 litre pack which goes forward if l'm feeling the strain at all - mostly causes by too high temperature and l always have my tiny 'front' (l call it my front pack because that's where it goes when l carry my large pack) which has my tablet, water, a bit of food, etc. in it.
 

bobbogram

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Norte San Sebastián to Santiago; Portuguese Lisbon to Porto; next Porto to Santiago; next Geneva
#48
Pack your stuff, unpack, then repack with half of it. I completed the Portuguese in 90F this summer, Porto to Santiago, before starting the French Camino out of Geneva. En route I discarded some clothes, knee supports, redundant elec adapters. If clothes don’t dry out hanging overnight, they are an albatross.
The water bottles tied to the front straps with tie wires is a great idea - the side pouches are almost inaccessible while hiking.
The top of my backpack detaches as a fanny pack of sorts. I’ve used it in front for easy access, but placed behind, below my backpack as a ledge of sorts, is better. It provides a second waist strap to share the weight of my pack. Getting the weight off your shoulders onto your hips is an improvement.
The fanny pack is also convenient for flying to Europe holding my essentials so I can check the backpack for the flight.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#49
Looking at your profile pic can l suggest you may save more than 600 if you cut your hair?

What you may do is buy a very small pack that yoj carty with you for stuff you need to take while walking during the day and have you medium or small pack taken forward every day. The price varies from 5 - 6 Euros and can help a lot in making the walks much easier and more comfortable.

I have a 890 litre pack which goes forward if l'm feeling the strain at all - mostly causes by too high temperature and l always have my tiny 'front' (l call it my front pack because that's where it goes when l carry my large pack) which has my tablet, water, a bit of food, etc. in it.
@Pieces already has a very light pack. She said that the larger one, fully packed weighs just 4.7 kg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
#50
Hi Pieces - the difference in the packs is about half a litre of water (well, ok, 600ml). In 13 years I have only once drank all the water I was carrying before being able to refill.
My answer? The smaller pack .. I would dry-bag the sleeping bag and/or puffer and stow that on the lid I think, then there would be lots of room.
Then again ... if you have put everything inside the smaller one ... well .. where does that bottle of wine for later on go??
Nah - both have the same comfort and you aren't walking into winter? take the 36 litres - plenty of pack ..
 

Pieces

Veteran Member
#51
thanks all, I can't really take out anything, as I really am down to a bare minimum...

I have decided to go with the larger one. Hard pressed the smaller one is only is more comfortable when it is not so stuffed. Also, as there are about 2 days without stores It would be nice to be able to fit a few choclate bars and a pack of biscuits :p
 
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Camino(s) past & future
may-june (2016)
#52
Same as kayaking: If you have a big kayak os a small one or if the route is shoprt or one week,
the kayak is FULL. Hence: take the smaller one. The bigger
is heavier and will be fully loaded.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#54
I do realise that I am very light weight as it is, but I also have a scould I am afraid will give me problems. ON the other hand I am thinking as I am already low maybe just go with the big one and that I am being too extreme (can one be too extreme when aiming for ultra light?) :D
No!
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#55
thanks all, I can't really take out anything, as I really am down to a bare minimum...

I have decided to go with the larger one. Hard pressed the smaller one is only is more comfortable when it is not so stuffed. Also, as there are about 2 days without stores It would be nice to be able to fit a few choclate bars and a pack of biscuits :p
I was going to say just that, take the larger one. It is easier in the end. Worth the 600g+ (but like you I ooooh and ahhhhhh e-ve-ry time :D).
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#57
yes, it is not an easy one all these decisions. I spend 2 month deciding should i take the shoe size I had last time or ½ a size bigger :D
How do you decide what to eat for lunch whilst walking ! :eek: ;);)
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Frances, 2017 Frances, (2019 ???)
#60
I do realise that I am very light weight as it is, but I also have a scould I am afraid will give me problems. ON the other hand I am thinking as I am already low maybe just go with the big one and that I am being too extreme (can one be too extreme when aiming for ultra light?) :D
The feedback is saying 'comfort'.

Comfort is saying...

AHHH...

600g

???

AHH wouldn't worry


Peace be with you.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Haven't walked the Camino yet. But I've hiked all over this beautiful planet and hope to walk the Camino in the near future.
#61
I’m curious, what brand are the two backpacks by the way? You said 32L & 44L. I only ask cause sometimes sizes can be odd. For instance, i have an Osprey Stratos 50L that is a lot shorter height wise than my osprey Talon 44 or even my Exos 38. It’s weird. I’ve never had a problem getting any of them on as carry on. Being nice to the ticket counter person always goes a long way too.

After reading your post and the responses, I’d go with the 44. If you say the smaller pack is stuffed to the max with all your essentials, and you can’t fit a baggett or food or gifts in it...then it makes sense to be safe & give yourself the extra 12L. You can always cinch the extra space down with the compression straps.

And when you stop in a town & buy that food or bottle of wine(heh heh) you know you’ll have room for it.

Whichever you decide...Bien Camino!
 

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