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Live - Camino Mozarabe No mob—just me — on the Mozárabe

peregrina2000

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#1
I left Granada alone today. Percy went home from Guadix, the Austrian couple didn’t stop yesterday in Granada, and Alun succumbed to the appeal of poolside sunning with friends in Malaga. And as far as I can tell, I am the only peregrina tonight in Moclin.

I had hoped to find a shorter alternative to Moclin through Abolote but failed. So I wound up in Pinos Puente. Those first 19 kms are not brutal but not beautiful either. Pretty typical city exit with lots of asphalt, warehouses, sone dumps, unfinished subdivisions, abandoned factories. But then things changed for the better.

Ten km or so of untraveled but asphalt road through nothing but olive groves. There is a point at which the arrows take you off road but the paved road will stay low and take you into Olivares. I went off road and went up through olives and then back down to Olivares. The bar on the other side of the river was open but I was not particularly welcome, it seems. After that there are 3+ kms straight up to Moclin. Beautiful views all the way. So I am here in the Casa rural. 25€ for pilgrims. There is s small grocery store and bar/restaurante. The castle is stunning, I was glad to be here on a weekend when it is open, but even if it is not open you can get inside the first ring of walls. Views all the way back to Sierra Nevada are just incredible.
Tomorrow I just have 24 km but I imagine it has a killer descent from Moclín.
 

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Camino Chris

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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#2
I left Granada alone today. Percy went home from Guadix, the Austrian couple didn’t stop yesterday in Granada, and Alun succumbed to the appeal of poolside sunning with friends in Malaga. And as far as I can tell, I am the only peregrina tonight in Moclin.

I had hoped to find a shorter alternative to Moclin through Abolote but failed. So I wound up in Pinos Puente. Those first 19 kms are not brutal but not beautiful either. Pretty typical city exit with lots of asphalt, warehouses, sone dumps, unfinished subdivisions, abandoned factories. But then things changed for the better.

Ten km or so of untraveled but asphalt road through nothing but olive groves. There is a point at which the arrows take you off road but the paved road will stay low and take you into Olivares. I went off road and went up through olives and then back down to Olivares. The bar on the other side of the river was open but I was not particularly welcome, it seems. After that there are 3+ kms straight up to Moclin. Beautiful views all the way. So I am here in the Casa rural. 25€ for pilgrims. There is s small grocery store and bar/restaurante. The castle is stunning, I was glad to be here on a weekend when it is open, but even if it is not open you can get inside the first ring of walls. Views all the way back to Sierra Nevada are just incredible.
Tomorrow I just have 24 km but I imagine it has a killer descent from Moclín.
Great pictures, Laurie! I've been following you on F. P. and have saved it as a permanent bookmark on my phone. Also am following Maggie's blog, too...You must have "zoomed" past the whole group. Hope you find another walking partner soon!
 
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amancio

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Lebaniego-Vadiniense, Invierno (2018)
#3
Moclin is a lovely, quaint little whitewashed village perched on a mountain with stunning views to Sierra Nevada and to Alcalá la Real, it is a strategic location in the Moors' castle and watch tower chain between the border of the former Moor border and the capital of Granada. Sad to hear about the bar in Olivares, they are not the friendliest of people, I am aware, but there is not much of a choice otherwise. Buen camino, valiente peregrina!!! I wish they would mark the nicer route between Granada and Pinos Puente by River Genil... furious!!!!
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
#4
Moclín (the escudo de Granada) and its views are great. If you fancy a rest day soon, I really recommend taking the bus from Alcaudete (Peter Nickson's albergue there is very welcoming) to Baeza via Jaén. Baeza is a pretty renaissance town with a couple of rare Andalusian Romanesque churches. It's also the place where the teenage Lorca (born not far from Pinos Puente) met Machado, and decided that his future lay in writing rather than music, changing literary history.
 

pelerine

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Camino(s) past & future
Norte, Primitivo, Plata, Salvador Torres
#5
So pleased to hear from you again! And thank you for the photos!

Do you mind being on your own on this camino? and what is the probability of coming across others doing this camino? I have the Mozarabe on my planning list for 2020 - do not mind being on my own but like to come acroos others occasionally as I did not during three weks on the Camino de Torres.

Buen camino anyway!
Ina
PS I copy your posts into my Mozarabe planning files as I have done with your Olvidado posts
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Frances 15,Portuguese 16,Finisterre Muxia 16,Ingles16,,starting Almeria mar18
#6
Hi,,,have just got to Merida after walking up from Almeria,,,,bit of culture shock ,,,,,albergue completo !!!!!
 

peregrina2000

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#7
Even though I slept in and left after 8, by noon I was in alcala looking for hostal Zacatin. 27€ single room. There is a 3*** hotel on the way into town. Just checked for fun and it was 41€ (special pilgrim price). There is also another hotel near the pension, Rio de Oro, but it only had a double room for 45€.

The walk was very nice. My GPS registered 22 I think. No services at all but I had fruit and water. I saw several atalayas in the distance that must have been part of Moclín’s defense system. There were several off road parts through olive groves, agricultural areas and a few villages. I got a lesson from an elderly man on the work of picking asparagus—short version is that it is backbreaking and pays next to nothing (2€ for the bunch he is holding in the picture). I also talked with a young cyclist while we both rested. Lots of politics, which fortunately is only prohibited on the forum and not on the camino;)

Alcala has a massive fortress open this afternoon. So for the time being I will enjoy my good lunch and my good fortune for being able to enjoy this wonderful camino.

Still alone I think. Four were here last night and two have called so far for tomorrow. And then comes the forum mob!

And just to say @alansykes that The Romanesque detour is tempting but I am going to continue in. If I only had more time....
 

VNwalking

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Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#9
Thank you, Laurie, for letting us join you from our desks!!
Your pics are gorgeous, and it sounds like you are having a grad walk. You sound like you are in the gap between waves, which is not a bad thing. If you want company, you can just wait a bit...or not, if you don't. Alan's suggestion of a visit to Baiza would definitely be tempting...
Buen camino, peregrina liebre! (From one who is more of a tortuga...)
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#10
Good to hear from you Laurie!
Oh how I remember the climb up to Moclín! I too slept in Pinos Puente but continued on to Alcalá after resting a bit in the square in front if the ayuntamiento in Moclín (where I got a stamp). I guess you were luckier than I was - I got terribly lost in the olive groves. I ended up having to backtrack to the road. I was exhausted when I finally reached Alcalá.

As you know, I too was alone (all the way from Granada to Mérida). At least you have the choice to rejoin the group should you choose.

Ultreia dear peregrina!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#11
So pleased to hear from you again! And thank you for the photos!

Do you mind being on your own on this camino? and what is the probability of coming across others doing this camino? I have the Mozarabe on my planning list for 2020 - do not mind being on my own but like to come acroos others occasionally as I did not during three weks on the Camino de Torres.

Buen camino anyway!
Ina
PS I copy your posts into my Mozarabe planning files as I have done with your Olvidado posts
Hi Ina, this camino is totally fine for walking alone. And there are people in the fields, people walking, etc. Your post reminded me that I forgot to attach some pics from today, so I will do it here.
 

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peregrina2000

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Donating Member
#12
Good to hear from you Laurie!
Oh how I remember the climb up to Moclín! I too slept in Pinos Puente but continued on to Alcalá after resting a bit in the square in front if the ayuntamiento in Moclín (where I got a stamp). I guess you were luckier than I was - I got terribly lost in the olive groves. I ended up having to backtrack to the road. I was exhausted when I finally reached Alcalá.

As you know, I too was alone (all the way from Granada to Mérida). At least you have the choice to rejoin the group should you choose.

Ultreia dear peregrina!
Hi LT,

I have searched for but haven’t found your stages from this route. I am not quite the power walker you are, but I’m having trouble finding stages that are more than the low 20s and less than 40. Any suggestions are most welcome! Too bad you missed exploring the castle in Alcala because it is awesome. Lots of excavations and good explanations.

I am pretty sure the marking has improved dramatically because I never even got my GPS out today! And I am the queen of getting lost. Abrazos.
 
#13
I left Granada alone today. Percy went home from Guadix, the Austrian couple didn’t stop yesterday in Granada, and Alun succumbed to the appeal of poolside sunning with friends in Malaga. And as far as I can tell, I am the only peregrina tonight in Moclin.

I had hoped to find a shorter alternative to Moclin through Abolote but failed. So I wound up in Pinos Puente. Those first 19 kms are not brutal but not beautiful either. Pretty typical city exit with lots of asphalt, warehouses, sone dumps, unfinished subdivisions, abandoned factories. But then things changed for the better.

Ten km or so of untraveled but asphalt road through nothing but olive groves. There is a point at which the arrows take you off road but the paved road will stay low and take you into Olivares. I went off road and went up through olives and then back down to Olivares. The bar on the other side of the river was open but I was not particularly welcome, it seems. After that there are 3+ kms straight up to Moclin. Beautiful views all the way. So I am here in the Casa rural. 25€ for pilgrims. There is s small grocery store and bar/restaurante. The castle is stunning, I was glad to be here on a weekend when it is open, but even if it is not open you can get inside the first ring of walls. Views all the way back to Sierra Nevada are just incredible.
Tomorrow I just have 24 km but I imagine it has a killer descent from Moclín.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, Primitivo, Plata, Salvador Torres
#15
Hi Ina, this camino is totally fine for walking alone. And there are people in the fields, people walking, etc. Your post reminded me that I forgot to attach some pics from today, so I will do it here.
Hi Laurie! Thank you for your reassuring post. It seems that the mob has "disbanded".....
Enjoy yourself anyway and let us know how you are doing! Buen camino!
Ina
 

natefaith

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Sarria-Santiago (2009)
León-Ponferrada (2014)
Camino Inglés (2017)
#16
Buen Camino, Laurie!!
 

HedaP

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Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#17
Every photo from the Mozárabe mob gives me more Mozárabe envy. Is it the most spectacular camino or are the mob, or what was once the mob, just very good photographers?
 

LTfit

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Donating Member
#19
Hi LT,

I have searched for but haven’t found your stages from this route. I am not quite the power walker you are, but I’m having trouble finding stages that are more than the low 20s and less than 40. Any suggestions are most welcome! Too bad you missed exploring the castle in Alcala because it is awesome. Lots of excavations and good explanations.

I am pretty sure the marking has improved dramatically because I never even got my GPS out today! And I am the queen of getting lost. Abrazos.
Hey Laurie,
Forgot to "watch" the thread so only see your post now. I will go dig out my information and post my stages on this thread.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#20
Ok Laurie, here were my stages September-October 2014:

1) Granada - Pinos Puente (municipal) 19 km
2) Pinos Puente - Alcala La Real (pension Rio del Oro) 38 km
3) Alcala - Alcaudete (polideportivo) 24 km
4) Alcaudete - Baena (albergue de la Ruta del Califato) 25 km
5) Baena - Castro del Rio (municipal) 20 km
6) Castro - Cordoba (Hostal Alcazar) 39 km
7) Cordoba
8) Cordoba - Cerro Muriano (only 17 km but wanted to stay with Dutch hospitalero friends who have since closed their refugio and have moved to Barcelona)
9) Cerro Muriano - Villaharta (polideportivo) 21 km
10) Villaharta - Alcaracejos (hostal Tres Jotas) 35 km
11) Alcaracejos - Hinojosa del Duque (municipal) 23 km
12) Hinojosa - Monterrubio (casa parochial) 32 km
13) Monterrubio - Campanario (polideportivo) 40 km
14) Campanario - Medellin (polideportivo) 37 km
15) Medellin - Merida 40 km
(two stages in one but after being alone for 15 days wanted to reach Merida asap

So yes you do seem to be correct - unless things have changed in the last 4 years - you have the choice of a shortish stage or close to 40 km. Luckily there were few consecutive days that were long (edit: just see the last 3 long stage days :eek:. Curious to see where you end up. Un abrazo fuerte!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
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Donating Member
#21
Alcala to alcaudete today was a very nice stage. Nothing challenging except the little “water feature” I just posted about on a separate thread, and the realization that complacency will do you in every time. My poncho was in the bottom of my pack when it started to rain and thunder. By the time I got it on, there were just a few more minutes of drips.

I got to Alcaudete around noon and did NOT go to the polideportivo. (I would have done it only if I were with my hard core pal LT). There is a 20€ pension about two minutes off the camino.

I have taken a long walk up through the nearly abandoned old town (all the action is in the ugly new part around the national highway). Since it’s Minday, the castle is closed but I was able to walk around the ring between inner and outer walls.

Right now I am finishing up a lunch in the little bit upscale restaurant Almocaden, recommended to me by a woman I was chatting with in the park.

On to Baena tomorrow.
 

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pelerine

Active Member
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Camino(s) past & future
Norte, Primitivo, Plata, Salvador Torres
#22
Ok Laurie, here were my stages September-October 2014:

1) Granada - Pinos Puente (municipal) 19 km
2) Pinos Puente - Alcala La Real (pension Rio del Oro) 38 km
3) Alcala - Alcaudete (polideportivo) 24 km
4) Alcaudete - Baena (albergue de la Ruta del Califato) 25 km
5) Baena - Castro del Rio (municipal) 20 km
6) Castro - Cordoba (Hostal Alcazar) 39 km
7) Cordoba
8) Cordoba - Cerro Muriano (only 17 km but wanted to stay with Dutch hospitalero friends who have since closed their refugio and have moved to Barcelona)
9) Cerro Muriano - Villaharta (polideportivo) 21 km
10) Villaharta - Alcaracejos (hostal Tres Jotas) 35 km
11) Alcaracejos - Hinojosa del Duque (municipal) 23 km
12) Hinojosa - Monterrubio (casa parochial) 32 km
13) Monterrubio - Campanario (polideportivo) 40 km
14) Campanario - Medellin (polideportivo) 37 km
15) Medellin - Merida 40 km
(two stages in one but after being alone for 15 days wanted to reach Merida asap

So yes you do seem to be correct - unless things have changed in the last 4 years - you have the choice of a shortish stage or close to 40 km. Luckily there were few consecutive days that were long (edit: just see the last 3 long stage days :eek:. Curious to see where you end up. Un abrazo fuerte!
Hi LTfit! Thank you for indicating the stages you walked. I have just copied them into my planning folder. As I see from Laurie's post #12, there are short stages which are just the ones I need.

Laurie, you posted a detailed description of difficulties you had going from Alcala. You say you posted them in a separate thread. I cannot find them any longer! Help! Ina
 

peregrina2000

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Donating Member
#23
Hi LTfit! Thank you for indicating the stages you walked. I have just copied them into my planning folder. As I see from Laurie's post #12, there are short stages which are just the ones I need.

Laurie, you posted a detailed description of difficulties you had going from Alcala. You say you posted them in a separate thread. I cannot find them any longer! Help! Ina
Here is the thread Ina. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/a-little-tricky-after-alcala.54788/#post-612945
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
#25
For any of the "mob" still en route, there is a half way house in Alcaudete between the polidiportivo and the pensión. There is a "casa de acogida" down from the castle run by an English ex-pat called Peter Nickson. It has four (bunk) beds, and a washing machine. Very welcoming, donativo.

https://jaenjacobea.es/se-abre-la-casa-acogida-peregrinos-peter-alcaudete/
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#26
For any of the "mob" still en route, there is a half way house in Alcaudete between the polidiportivo and the pensión. There is a "casa de acogida" down from the castle run by an English ex-pat called Peter Nickson. It has four (bunk) beds, and a washing machine. Very welcoming, donativo.

https://jaenjacobea.es/se-abre-la-casa-acogida-peregrinos-peter-alcaudete/
Good to know should I ever return. The polideportivo was doable, sleeping on a gymnastic mat in the women's changing room, but the option you mention seems a bit friendlier. Of course I know what you meant Alan, but a "halfway house" has another meaning for me (American English?). It is a transition (half way) from a rehabilitation setting, usually for substance abusers, who still need support before returning home. Not sure if you guys also use the same term.

@peregrina2000 Laurie, the polideportivos were at times a step up from some of the places we slept in on the Cami Catalan;)
 
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peregrina2000

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#27
Alcaudete to Baena. 25 km. Like the last few days, this is a perfect walk. Almost all off road, far from traffic noise, lots and lots of wildflowers. Cool temps and clear blue skies. You can tell we are moving north. The white towns off in the distance, along with the small embalse we ringed, made for a very pleasant day. I left at 7:15 and was sitting in the town park sorting out my options by noon. It was a great day for brisk walking. The only encounter I had to avoid was the tractor spraying something on the olive trees as I walked through. Nothing like the threat of breathing in that gunk to put a pep in your step! Otherwise, there were several nice interludes with men out in the fields pruning the trees. To a one, they told me how “valiente” I was.

I met my first pilgrim since leaving my pals in Granada. A nice guy who was having muscle pain issues, when he told me he was going to the Albergue, I started to think about plan B. His gravelly smoker’s voice led me to think he was probably a snorer. As I walked into town I saw a hotel sign. Looked out of my budget but there is no harm in asking. Turns out this 3*** Hotel La Casa Grande gives pilgrims a 25€ room (single). Nice room. VERY nice bathroom. 8 € menu del dia that’s not bad.

There’s a weird castle up on the hill. I was told that in the post-Civil War era, two rich families took enough stones from the castle to build their homes. The rebuilding of the castle has been done in a way that leaves no doubt about how much was stolen. It’s shockingly modern but makes its point.

I toyed with the idea of continuing on to Castro today,but only briefly. But I’m fairly confident, based on the last few days (pride comes before the fall, I know) that I can enjoy 40+ tomorrow.

Very happy to be here and hoping to meet some more before Mérida, where I will merge with the mob on the Vdlp! Buen camino,Laurie
 

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LTfit

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#28
@peregrina2000 Laurie, I assume that you will meet up with others on the VdlP as of Merida or are you taking a different route?

The entry into Merida felt quite strange as you come into the city from the opposite side. I crossed the Roman bridge as you would if you were on the VdlP but realized that I was already on the right side and had to turn around and go back!:rolleyes:
 

peregrina2000

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#29
Hi LT, Merida is still way off in the distant future but I guess it really isn’t that far now! Thanks for the heads up on the bridge. It seems much more fitting to walk into town on that marvelous bridge but oh well.
 

peregrina2000

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#30
Just had a nice chat with a mom and three kids in a park. She told me the temps here stay in the mid40s during July-Sept. Seems like LT was crazy to walk then, but we already knew that.

I also asked her about the rain because I heard thunder last night but saw no evidence of rain today. And what she told me was that it rained a lot last night and that the reason all the cars in town look like they’ve been driving off road is because the rain was full of sand/dirt blown in from the deserts in Africa. Is that possible?
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Breda (Holland) to Santiago (2016)
Camino Ingles (2017)
#31
the reason all the cars in town look like they’ve been driving off road is because the rain was full of sand/dirt blown in from the deserts in Africa. Is that possible?
Entirely possible: that Sahara sand reached the Netherlands too last weekend. A southern wind carrying the sand on high altitude gave us not only hot air, but also dirty windows and cars. The dust also makes for extra colorful sunrises and sunsets, by the way. I sound like the weather nitwit...
 

Erik Anderson

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Camino(s) past & future
GR11 Hondarribia - Cabo de Creus
3 X CF SJPP to Finisterre
Camino Mozarabe, VP and Sanabres
#32
I'm currently hiking in the Sierra Contraviesa, immediately south of Sierra Nevada, and last night's storms deposited Sahara sand right across the region. The Sirocco is the best known wind (which mainly troubles Italy) but any southerly wind originating in North Africa can cause this to happen across parts of Europe. Standing on the mountain top today I could have seen North Africa had the visibility not been severely reduced by the dust held in the lower atmosphere. You may have reduced visibility too, all along the Mozàrabe, until a new weather system clears our current airmass. Buen Camino, Laurie
 

C clearly

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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#33
Hi Laurie! Following on a day or 2 behind you! It sounds like you ard having a great time. I am, too, but I have to say that some of us are finding this route to be fairly strenuous!

We have noticed the haze, and the cars are covered with dust here in Alcalá la Real.
 

VNwalking

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St Olav/Francés (2016)
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#35

Momy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés May 2018
#36
I left Granada alone today. Percy went home from Guadix, the Austrian couple didn’t stop yesterday in Granada, and Alun succumbed to the appeal of poolside sunning with friends in Malaga. And as far as I can tell, I am the only peregrina tonight in Moclin.

I had hoped to find a shorter alternative to Moclin through Abolote but failed. So I wound up in Pinos Puente. Those first 19 kms are not brutal but not beautiful either. Pretty typical city exit with lots of asphalt, warehouses, sone dumps, unfinished subdivisions, abandoned factories. But then things changed for the better.

Ten km or so of untraveled but asphalt road through nothing but olive groves. There is a point at which the arrows take you off road but the paved road will stay low and take you into Olivares. I went off road and went up through olives and then back down to Olivares. The bar on the other side of the river was open but I was not particularly welcome, it seems. After that there are 3+ kms straight up to Moclin. Beautiful views all the way. So I am here in the Casa rural. 25€ for pilgrims. There is s small grocery store and bar/restaurante. The castle is stunning, I was glad to be here on a weekend when it is open, but even if it is not open you can get inside the first ring of walls. Views all the way back to Sierra Nevada are just incredible.
Tomorrow I just have 24 km but I imagine it has a killer descent from Moclín.
I lived in Granada for one year and I loved it!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#37
Baena to Santa Cruz. 42.8 km. I had planned to leave at 7, but woke up early and left around 6:20. It was still very dark, but with my phone flashlight, I was fine.

The first part of the walk was olives,olives, olives. In Castro Del Río I had a rest by the river and talked with a retired couple who still had a House here but lived in Bilbao. They confessed they would be unable to spend the summer here anymore.

More olives followed, but after Espejo with its pretty little privately owned castle on top of the hill, the olives were interspersed more with brilliant green fields of wheat (I think). I had a long boots-off break at the top of the hill with a beautiful 360 view of fields, a few isolated houses, and the town in the back. Really nice, though springtime and all the wildflowers and green fields have a lot to do with it.

One little spot where I had to take my boots off to cross the water but it was pretty straightforward. As us usually the case the last few kms started to drag, especially since you could see that you were circling the town in order to get to the bridge across the Guadajoz River.

This was a good choice for me to try a long stage. There was very little elevation and lots of off-road trails. I was very lucky that it was very cloudy most of the time and temps were not bad. So tomorrow I hope to have a lot of time to visit Córdoba. I haven’t been there since1995, but I remember how I felt upon entering the mezquita and seeing those arches. Can’t wait!!!!
 

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C clearly

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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#38
As I slogged along today on my 24 km route, I actually said at one point "peregrina2000 is probably already at her accommodation now". Congrats on a long day. I agree, the weather was good for walking.
 
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amancio

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Lebaniego-Vadiniense, Invierno (2018)
#39
wow, Laurie, you are flying your way to Cordoba, great! If you visit the Mezquita at 3:30 pm or so, it might be fairly empty, which makes it a much nicer experience.
The Sahara dusty rain is quite common over here, even the Sierra Nevada looks a dull pink at places instead of the glistening white peaks you saw last week.

I do not know if you knew this, but there is a new way to sort of "shortcut" the Via de la Plata, instead of in Merida, you would join in Aldeanueva del Camino. Along the way you would go through some quite interesting places like Monfragüe National Park, where you actually need a special permission to cross and is an absolute paradise for birdwatching, or the historical cities of Trujillo and Plasencia, and near the stunning monastery of Guadalupe

And you also cut 90 km!


http://www.periodicodelcamino.com/una-util-guia-del-camino-alternativo-mozarabe-por-trujillo/

It does seem to make sense and it looks appealing enough, but you would most definitely be on your own. IT is one I want to try one day when I walk to Santiago from my doorstep one day. The Track is here

https://es.wikiloc.com/rutas-sender...ramo-campanario-aldeanueva-del-camino-9372640


and there is a facebook page with further info

https://www.facebook.com/groups/j.a.ortega/

en cualquier caso, buen camino, compañera, you lucky thing!!!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#40
Santa Cruz to Córdoba. 26 km
It is definitely worth it to start early and walk with a purpose because some time in Córdoba is so nice. I got a last minute 26€ room on booking, halfway between the mosque and the Santiago church, tomorrow’s starting point.

Great walk today, at least till the last 10 kms. At that point the olive trees totally disappeared (replaced by grains and some other crop I couldn’t identify—possibly sunflowers???). Then the huge sprawling city comes into view and your path meanders around, never seeming to get much closer. But finally you are in the city, thankfully with no commercial or industrial outskirts to walk through. You go straight from the country into a modest residential area and from there to the mezquita.

I took Amancio’s advice and ate lunch before heading to the Mezquita at about 3:30. The ticket guy told me they had a lot of bus loads coming soon and that 5:15 or 5:30 would be better.

Plenty of time to do grocery shopping and wander around, running into a 1C Roman temple and a plaza or two.

No doubt the highlight of the day was my hour in the Mezquita. What a jewel. Don’t miss it if you walk the Mozárabe.
 

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LTfit

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#41
The entry into Cordoba reminded me of that into Zamora or Salamanca - never ending - the only difference is that you see Cordoba to your right forever rather than head-on.

Enjoying your pictures Laurie, I just loved the Mezquita.
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#42
Wow, I just googled images of the Mezquita...it's an astonishing place with a complicated history.
You are in Cordoba already. I'd be tempted to have a rest day in such a place, with all that history...but I assume you will press on?
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
#43
For anybody else who wants to enjoy the mezquita (I think possibly the most beautiful thing ever made by human hands) without the hoards of bus tours and selfie-sticks, 8.30am is another good time to arrive. There were only about 30 of us waiting for the great gates to open when I was there, and we had relative peace until about 10am.
 

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peregrina2000

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#45
Wow, I just googled images of the Mezquita...it's an astonishing place with a complicated history.
You are in Cordoba already. I'd be tempted to have a rest day in such a place, with all that history...but I assume you will press on?
I was tempted, but I have been there several times before. The mob has also discovered that Córdoba is totally booked this weekend. Festival de las cruces or something like that. I saw people putting crosses up in little squares and decorating with lots of flowers. Very nice city!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#46
Córdoba to Villaharta. 40 kms
I wasn’t sure about this but I was fine. And finally I have met up with other peregrinos. In fact there’s a big bunch. Thr bar is full and I got a special bed in the corner of their garage. The polideportivo has been opened. Mats and showers, but I’m glad I have a real bed.

The walk was a good one with some not so lovely parts. Leaving Córdoba I got a little lost looking for the Puente Romano. After you leave the first suburban hamlet there is a beautiful walk up to Cerro Murano, sort of Extremadura-like. Lots of rocks, flowers, all the makings of a good walk.

After Cerro Murano there’s an endless army base. It made for interesting viewing.

Bars in El Vacar, and then a long walk alongside the highway. At times the arrows keep you on asphalt while there’s a nice dirt path over to the left. So I just hopped over.

Tomorrow’s another long day to Alcacarejos, but I am getting used to them. Weather is very good for walking, so all is well.
 

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laineylainey

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012 - 2015 CF
2015 SdC-Fisterra-Muxia
2016 Porto-SdC
2017 Salvador&Primitivo
2017 Mozarabe
#48
Hi Laurie I have missed the posts on your walk up to Granada? I didnt see it in the weekly round up . Do you have a blog link?
I was really looking forward to reading how you enjoyed the bit I did last December.
Buen camino x
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#49
Villaharta to Alcaracejos. 36 and NOT 38! Another great walk. Except for a few asphalt kms at the beginning and end, this was all off road and far from cars. Some good ups and downs, a few “water features” (only one required taking off boots and only one of the others was a bit hairy). So many of the paths were lined with Jara bushes whose buds were ready to burst open. I imagine that when the forum mob passes through in a few days it will be spectacular.

Starting to see more animals— pigs, sheep, goats and a few cows. I will miss the olive groves, strange as that sounds. I found them mesmerizing and dignified somehow. And I kept singing Andaluces de Jaén, a song written and sung by Paco Ibáñez in the 70s, based on a poem by Miguel Hernandez. I bet @alansykes and @KinkyOne know the words. It’s a very moving “workers of the world unite” kind of song.

But here I am in Alcaracejos and have most unselfishly left the 6 bed Albergue to others and am in the very adequate 3Jotas for @18€. I think my romance with albergues may have run its course.

Looks like a bit of rain tomorrow. I surely can’t complain after two weeks with not a drop!
 

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NualaOC

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: Francés, Inglés, Fisterra/Muxia, Baztanés x2, Primitivo, Norte. 2018:Porto to Santiago.
#50
Hi Laurie I have missed the posts on your walk up to Granada? I didnt see it in the weekly round up . Do you have a blog link?
I was really looking forward to reading how you enjoyed the bit I did last December.
Buen camino x
Hi Elaine, you can follow Laurie on Find Penguins.
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
#51
And I kept singing Andaluces de Jaén, a song written and sung by Paco Ibáñez in the 70s, based on a poem by Miguel Hernandez. I bet @alansykes and @KinkyOne know the words. It’s a very moving “workers of the world unite” kind of song.
It's a great day, and I was relieved there was a fuente de San Juan at about the half way point. Didn't know Paco Ibáñez had done a version of the Miguel Hernández poem - I was at his graveside in Alicante on Wednesday: as usual there were fresh flowers, always moving. Much tho' I love Hernández, I think my favourite olive poem is the Lorca one, - I am slightly in love with

La niña del bello rostro
sigue cogiendo aceituna,
con el brazo gris del viento
ceñido por la cintura.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#52
It's a great day, and I was relieved there was a fuente de San Juan at about the half way point. Didn't know Paco Ibáñez had done a version of the Miguel Hernández poem - I was at his graveside in Alicante on Wednesday: as usual there were fresh flowers, always moving. Much tho' I love Hernández, I think my favourite olive poem is the Lorca one, - I am slightly in love with

La niña del bello rostro
sigue cogiendo aceituna,
con el brazo gris del viento
ceñido por la cintura.
Lorca is much loved in these parts. In fact he was said to have spent a lot of time in what was then a tavern in Córdoba in Plaza Séneca (now a 1* Hotel where I stayed).

I don’t think it’s breaking the no politics rule to put in a link to a version of the song. My voice was not nearly as good as the young Paco Ibáñez of course though I got pretty good with lots of practice in those many olive groves. This is the most famous version but you have to get past the banter with the French crowd.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#53
Alcaracejos to Hinojosa del Duque 23 km.

The associations that mark this camino need to get a huge shout-out. There are very very few kms on the road (I’ve been told that tomorrow is an exception, however.)

These were about 21 flat, lovely but VERY COLD kms. All through dehesa kind of terrain and with smatterings of animals. Because it was so cold I had my fleece pulled on without it going over my head (very awkward, but it allowed me to wrap up my freezing fingers). That meant that every time I come to a picture-perfect scene of mama sheep and baby lamb, by the time I extricated my hands and got to my phone to take a picture, the animals had already moved away and just left me with their rumps to photograph.

This is another town with not much going on. I am trying to think of new exciting ways to “smell the roses” but I am clueless. I can’t even go sit in the plaza and talk to folks (my fallback) because it’s so cold no one is there. Two Spanish friends decided to forge ahead another 33 km but I do know my limits.

No rain in the forecast but it looks like cold for the foreseeable future! Buen camino, Laurie.
 

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LTfit

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#54
But here I am in Alcaracejos and have most unselfishly left the 6 bed Albergue to others and am in the very adequate 3Jotas for @18€. I think my romance with albergues may have run its course.

Looks like a bit of rain tomorrow. I surely can’t complain after two weeks with not a drop!
Interesting to hear that Alcaracejos now has an albergue. I too stayed in Tres Jotas as it was the first hostal I came across when entering town. They put me up across the street from the restaurant and if I recall it was quite luxurious with a private bathroom. The menu del dia was also quite good.

I must say that I didn't miss getting out of the olive groves but that may be because the signage was at that time iffy. Or maybe it was because heading north reminded me of the Plata which I had already walked twice, it was a sort of "coming home".

Thanks @NualaOC . I guess I missed that Laurie would be posting on Find Penguins.
 
Last edited:

LTfit

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#55
Alcaracejos to Hinojosa del Duque 23 km.

The associations that mark this camino need to get a huge shout-out. There are very very few kms on the road (I’ve been told that tomorrow is an exception, however.)

These were about 21 flat, lovely but VERY COLD kms. All through dehesa kind of terrain and with smatterings of animals. Because it was so cold I had my fleece pulled on without it going over my head (very awkward, but it allowed me to wrap up my freezing fingers). That meant that every time I come to a picture-perfect scene of mama sheep and baby lamb, by the time I extricated my hands and got to my phone to take a picture, the animals had already moved away and just left me with their rumps to photograph.

This is another town with not much going on. I am trying to think of new exciting ways to “smell the roses” but I am clueless. I can’t even go sit in the plaza and talk to folks (my fallback) because it’s so cold no one is there. Two Spanish friends decided to forge ahead another 33 km but I do know my limits.

No rain in the forecast but it looks like cold for the foreseeable future! Buen camino, Laurie.
A bit of a sleepy town, especially if you can not sit outside and watch the locals go by. The most momentous event happened at night when I was woken up at midnight with a flashlight in my face! It was the police from next door! They saw a light on in the albergue and thought it strange. Geez, did I freak out being woken up that way. I told them to never do that again (I was alone in the albergue) and that I had left the light on in the bathroom in case I had to get up at night. So...turn off all the lights before you go to bed;)

Ultreia peregrina:)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Catalan, (May-July 2012), Via Francigena (Barcelona to Rome - 2015), Via Francigena (Rome to Canterbury - 2016)
#56
I left Granada alone today. Percy went home from Guadix, the Austrian couple didn’t stop yesterday in Granada, and Alun succumbed to the appeal of poolside sunning with friends in Malaga. And as far as I can tell, I am the only peregrina tonight in Moclin.

I had hoped to find a shorter alternative to Moclin through Abolote but failed. So I wound up in Pinos Puente. Those first 19 kms are not brutal but not beautiful either. Pretty typical city exit with lots of asphalt, warehouses, sone dumps, unfinished subdivisions, abandoned factories. But then things changed for the better.

Ten km or so of untraveled but asphalt road through nothing but olive groves. There is a point at which the arrows take you off road but the paved road will stay low and take you into Olivares. I went off road and went up through olives and then back down to Olivares. The bar on the other side of the river was open but I was not particularly welcome, it seems. After that there are 3+ kms straight up to Moclin. Beautiful views all the way. So I am here in the Casa rural. 25€ for pilgrims. There is s small grocery store and bar/restaurante. The castle is stunning, I was glad to be here on a weekend when it is open, but even if it is not open you can get inside the first ring of walls. Views all the way back to Sierra Nevada are just incredible.
Tomorrow I just have 24 km but I imagine it has a killer descent from Moclín.
Thank you for the post. I had hoped to make the Camino Mozarabe this year starting April 1 but a grandchild changed that plan. Definitely next year. April 1 I'll be starting in Almeria. I look forward to reading your future posts.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#57
Villaharta to Alcaracejos. 36 and NOT 38! Another great walk. Except for a few asphalt kms at the beginning and end, this was all off road and far from cars. Some good ups and downs, a few “water features” (only one required taking off boots and only one of the others was a bit hairy). So many of the paths were lined with Jara bushes whose buds were ready to burst open. I imagine that when the forum mob passes through in a few days it will be spectacular.

Starting to see more animals— pigs, sheep, goats and a few cows. I will miss the olive groves, strange as that sounds. I found them mesmerizing and dignified somehow. And I kept singing Andaluces de Jaén, a song written and sung by Paco Ibáñez in the 70s, based on a poem by Miguel Hernandez. I bet @alansykes and @KinkyOne know the words. It’s a very moving “workers of the world unite” kind of song.

But here I am in Alcaracejos and have most unselfishly left the 6 bed Albergue to others and am in the very adequate 3Jotas for @18€. I think my romance with albergues may have run its course.

Looks like a bit of rain tomorrow. I surely can’t complain after two weeks with not a drop!
Hola, amiga!

I didn't know the poem so thanks for mention it and also posting the YT link!

Warm regards from chilly Zamora
 

digger

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Mozarabe; Almeria to Santiago May & June 2016
#58
Hi Laurie,
Missed your posts a few days but happy to see you keepin' on truckin'.
Magacela will lift you (Lit & Fig).
I heartily recommend Hostal Rio in Medellin
In the fields after Yelbes arrows become scarce but farm workers happy to help
BC
Digger
 

NualaOC

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: Francés, Inglés, Fisterra/Muxia, Baztanés x2, Primitivo, Norte. 2018:Porto to Santiago.
#59
Laurie, thanks so much for posting here and on Find Penguins. I've only been able to take a quick look at both, but I'm becoming increasingly intrigued by this route.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#61
Hi Laurie,
Missed your posts a few days but happy to see you keepin' on truckin'.
Magacela will lift you (Lit & Fig).
I heartily recommend Hostal Rio in Medellin
In the fields after Yelbes arrows become scarce but farm workers happy to help
BC
Digger
Hi Digger, I look at your notes, Maggie’s and carel’s most mornings before setting off. All very helpful. Maggie cautions against the Yelbes alternative but I’ll see what it looks like when I get there in a couple of days.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#62
Hinojosa del Duque to Monterrubio. 32 km

Terrific walk till the camino hits the road at about km 20. Then all asphalt all the rest of the way. I felt like I was in that scene from Buñuel’s Chien Andalou where the characters just keep walking and walking down the road. But for the first 20 there was no person, no noise, no car. Just fields, scrub oaks and wildflowers. You couldn’t have ordered prettier flowers.

Only one little catch. Luckily someone told me yesterday in the Cafe Plaza to avoid the very high river water and stay on road. Attached map shows how, but in words: a couple of km after crossing RR tracks you come to the road. Camino crossed road, but you should take a left and stay on the road for the rest of the way. There was s romeria yesterday that crossed the river carrying Nuestra Señora de Gracia de Alcantarilla, and a man cleaning up the after the two day fiesta told me water was shoulder high on the adults.

Not sure whether I will go all the way to Campanario tomorrow. If the rain comes as predicted, a stop in Castuera after 20 might be the thing to do. Buen camino, Laurie
 

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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#63
I am definitely out of the loop! Are you walking the Plata @KinkyOne? If so Buen Camino! Zamora is one of my favorites.
Actually I'm on Madrid/Levante/Plata/Sanabres/Finisterre/Muxia combo. Yesterday hit Plata. Will post some heads up in Levante section now. Otherwise search for On the road again post in Madrid section.

K1
 
#64
Hi Laurie, Its nearly 7 years since we walked. I am just updating my notes for any Australians who may be walking the Mozarabe and found that you are on the way. Just notes the romeria at the ermita you mentioned. It was 33°C the day we walkid into Castuera. I am interested to know your accommodation arraignments at Campanario.

Kevin
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#65
Monterrubio to Campanario. 40 km.

Long but lovely day, except for the 12 km of asphalt at the beginning, and the cold rain and hail at the end!!

Extremely well marked. The kms after Castuera had the most wonderful wildflowers I have ever seen on any camino. Castuera makes s good stopping point for coffe and snack. It’s about halfway.

There was a heavy thunderstorm with hail. I got totally soaked but survived. Hot shower, warm clothes, and hot meal work wonders.

Last night I stayed in Hotel Coto de la Serena, 25€ single. Today in Campanario at Pension Malay, 20€ for shared bath and windowless room. It’s the worst place so far, but it’s hard to complain when the price is 20€.

Tomorrow to Medellin if possible. I am looking forward to the castle and Roman theater. buen camino, Laurie
 

Erik Anderson

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
GR11 Hondarribia - Cabo de Creus
3 X CF SJPP to Finisterre
Camino Mozarabe, VP and Sanabres
#66
There is a memorial to Camino Mozárabe at the Parroquia de Campario church in Plaza Carmen in Campanario, one of the few on this camino. The church will also provide a stamp for the Credencial. Buen Camino. Erik
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
#67
For any of the "mob" on your heels, an alternative to your hostal is the private albergue at the old railway station a km or two beyond the town. It was 12€ for a very decent twin room, it does quite adequate food and it has a washing machine, which might be handy (can't remember one on the Mozárabe since the day before Granada).
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#68
Campanario to Medellín, 38 or so. Great walk, with two parts having hilltop castles oh so far away but in sight for so long. Soon after leaving Campanario, you get on a great dirt road through field almost all the way to Magacela. There I took a detour to visit the castle and must have missed the dolmen in the process.

From Magacela to La Haba (Albergue, which looked quite nice) off road and through lots of fields with sheep grazing.

La Haba to Don Benito was a meseta-like stretch through cultivated fields, all dirt, undulating a bit.

Don Benito to Medellin was close to but mercifully off the busy road. A man on the way told me lots of peregrinos stay on the road shoulder. Bad idea. When you come over the RR tracks leaving Don Benito, arrows point in a counterintuitive way back to Don Benito. But it gets you to a path that goes all the way to Medellin, unplaced and no traffic.

I am in Hostal Río exactly at the spot where the camino begins tomorrow and starts by crossing the Guadiana. Room is 21€, good value IMO, and menu at 9 was pretty good too. Off to visit the castle and the Roman ruins.

Beautiful day, cool and sunny. Wildflowers were not as amazing as yesterday but plenty fine nonetheless. Buen camino, Laurie.
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Frances (October 2013)
Via de La Plata (2016)
Portuguese, Camino Ingles, Fisterra and Muxia (return)
#69
Hello Laurie,
Sounds like another great adventure! I have just finished reviewing your notes from your Catalan Camino from a few years ago to glean whatever other details I can find about this route. I'll be heading off on the Catalan route from my home in Barcelona on Sunday. In any event, wishing you sunshine and beautiful trails as you carry on!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#70
Medellín to Merida. 41 or thereabouts.

This is a stage that needs some work. Leaving Medellin is fine, but a few kms before Yelbes you get on a road with a fair amount of local traffic and no shoulder.

Yelbes to the bridge is fine, all ag tracks but very poorly marked. Once over the bridge (which is where the Santa Amalia longer alternative merges) there are 5 or 6 hair raising kms into Torrefresnalda. Truly horrendous. One of the most dangerous pieces of any camino I’ve walked.

From Torrefresnalda the scary part is over but there are many long kms on roads alongside the autovía. Magically,just as I thought I couldn’t walk another km on asphalt, the last 6 or 7 into Merida are on dirt tracks far from highways.

There is so much to see in Mérida but since I have been here four times or so (most recently in February for a full day bring a tourist), I decided to just find a nice place and crash. So that’s what I have done.

Because of my plans to visit Santa Lucía fro Trampal on my way into Alcuéscar, I am (luckily) locked into a 16 km day tomorrow. I can’t even imagine what that will feel like, but I’m willing to try to go back to sleep when I wake up at 5 as I always do and see what leaving late feels like!
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#71
Yes, it was a deadly boring and long stage but you did it!!!
A well deserved rest day tomorrow. Do sleep in otherwise you will arrive before the cafés open up in Alcuescar;)
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#73
No I am not going to Alcuescar. I am only going to Aljucen tomorrow. That’s because I have Alan’s tracks to make a detour to go to Santa Lucía del Trampal from Aljucen and that makes the Aljucén to Alcuéscar stage somewhere around 30 though I am not sure. This probably doesn’t make sense but there is a method to my madness.
 

Erik Anderson

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
GR11 Hondarribia - Cabo de Creus
3 X CF SJPP to Finisterre
Camino Mozarabe, VP and Sanabres
#74
The alternative at Yelbes is far better, providing you don't mind a small river crossing. Following the A5 and roadways is one of the poorest sections of route. Enjoy your rest. Buen Camino. Erik
 


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