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Orange Juice- a topic of interest to me re: Portuguese Camino

shefollowsshells

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several alone and with children
After just watching a video John found for me here it mentions exactly what I thought the whole time I was in Portugal.
So many beautiful orange trees but difficult to be served a fresh glass of orange juice, or even a carton of regular (more natural tasting) orange juice.
I found when places included breakfast the orange juice was very fake, "Tang" like in taste...
Wondered why, even in wonderful establishments it seemed to be difficult to get a orange juice that tasted more natural.
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
Madrid (April '19)
So many beautiful orange trees but difficult to be served a fresh glass of orange juice, or even a carton of regular (more natural tasting) orange juice.
I'm not sure if you can find this in the smaller towns and villages on the camino, but here in Lisbon, the two major supermarket chains (Pingo Doce and Mini-Preço) both have machines for freshly squeezed orange juice. You just take an empty bottle of the size you want, put it under the machine, turn the handle and watch the oranges come down from the basket above, get sliced in two and then squeezed into your bottle.
 

shefollowsshells

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several alone and with children
Yes! Not really speaking of grocery stores, that is where I would find my orange juice needs!
I'm also not really putting the emphasis on the fresh squeezed as much as I am surprised that the orange juice of choice in breakfast places was not a natural orange juice taste to me. They tasted very fake, like a drink from my childhood known as Tang.
I might have brought this up before, but watching this video just now I notice he says the same...
I do know that I by accident I bought the wrong orange juice in the grocery stores often ...
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
The term "zumo" comes from a brand of juicing machine - actually Zummo. Many bars in Spain have zumo machines and will make fresh juice.
Really? I thought that there were two words for juice in Spanish, and that in Spain the preferred word is zumo, while in the Americas it is jugo. I was told that in Spain jugo refers to the "juice" from meat, like jus in French.
 

Charles Zammit

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances , St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra May/ June 2017
Le Puy en Velay - Ales May 2018
The '' Tang '' is usually an indication of the use of reconstituted orange concentrate powder ,at least in part if not all . This has added ascorbic acid which provides the tangy aftertaste . It sounds counter intuitive to be adding what is essentially Vitamin C to Orange juice however in these instances its purpose is as a preservative and anti oxidant .
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
Really? I thought that there were two words for juice in Spanish, and that in Spain the preferred word is zumo, while in the Americas it is jugo. I was told that in Spain jugo refers to the "juice" from meat, like jus in French.
Thanks for this good question. I admit that when I read/heard the explanation, I accepted it at face value, since the word "zumo" was unfamiliar to me as I learned my Spanish in South America many years ago. Now I have done a bit of research and should retract my statement. According to one source I've found, the word "zumo" comes from Greek and Arab. (Likely the machine was named after the word, not the other way around.) There seem to be regional differences - zumo in Spain, being an example. And "zumo" tends to be extracted by pressure, rather than, say, cooking.

I'll delete my previous post.
 
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Darby67

Enólogo caminando
Camino(s) past & future
2018 CF Jan-Feb, Roncesvalles - SdC - Muxia - Fisterra
Really? I thought that there were two words for juice in Spanish, and that in Spain the preferred word is zumo, while in the Americas it is jugo. I was told that in Spain jugo refers to the "juice" from meat, like jus in French.
That has always been my understanding as well. Huge fan of those fresh juice machines in Spain. Do they not have them in Portugal as well?

Taken a step further certain juices also have their own name such as grape juice, mosto. The Spanish version is not sickly sweet and made with Vitus vinifera, wine grapes. Definitely not Welch's!
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
Madrid (April '19)
According to one source I've found, the word "zumo" comes from Greek and Arab.
I had thought that the word for orange in Spanish/Portuguese (naranja/laranja) also came from Arabic. But now I'm reading even more interestingly that the word for orange (the fruit) in Arabic/Greek/Persian is basically 'portugal'. This makes some sense as it was the Portuguese who brought oranges from China to the Mediterranean. They also brought another similar fruit and planted it in their colony on the northern tip of today's Morocco. We get our name for that fruit (tangerine) from that place (Tangiers).
 

Darby67

Enólogo caminando
Camino(s) past & future
2018 CF Jan-Feb, Roncesvalles - SdC - Muxia - Fisterra
I had thought that the word for orange in Spanish/Portuguese (naranja/laranja) also came from Arabic. But now I'm reading even more interestingly that the word for orange (the fruit) in Arabic/Greek/Persian is basically 'portugal'. This makes some sense as it was the Portuguese who brought oranges from China to the Mediterranean. They also brought another similar fruit and planted it in their colony on the northern tip of today's Morocco. We get our name for that fruit (tangerine) from that place (Tangiers).
So interesting! Your post got me more curious. So the Valencia orange that I remember being used was actually a portokali!
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
Madrid (April '19)
So interesting! Your post got me more curious. So the Valencia orange that I remember being used was actually a portokali!
Cool link! Among other things, it says this: alteration of Arabic naranj, which supports what I had originally thought about the ESP/POR naranja/laranja. So it's possible that the Spanish and Portuguese took the original Arabic word for orange, but then the Arabs changed their word and named it after Portugal.

Getting off-topic now, but I'm currently writing a tour of Lisbon and I want to include some things about the Muslim period and Islamic legacy in Portugal today, and language is an obvious place to start because unfortunately the physical remains of the Muslim period in Portugal are nothing like what they are in Spain. Here's part of it:

About 1000 words in Portuguese are derived from Arabic, including a lot of place names. In Arabic, the definite article, corresponding to the English the, is al, which which you can see in Arabic words like al-Jazeera, for example. And many of the Portuguese words derived from Arabic still have this al, or a trace of it, at the beginning of the word.

Some obvious examples: Alfama (the most famous of Lisbon's historical neighbourhoods - derived from the Arabic word for baths, al-hamma); Algarve (which comes from the Arabic word al-Gharb, meaning the west), alface (lettuce - people from Lisbon are often called alfacinhas or 'little lettuces', because apparently a lot of lettuce was grown here during the Muslim period).
 

Camino Chris

One step forward...
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I found fresh OJ all along the route, myself.
This is good news to me. I loved the fresh OJ in Spain, and hope to find it along the way in Portugal when I walk that route in late April...so after all these posts, what is the actual name in the Portuguese language when I make my request to prevent getting fake or concentrated as I dislike both!
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
Madrid (April '19)
This is good news to me. I loved the fresh OJ in Spain, and hope to find it along the way in Portugal when I walk that route in late April...so after all these posts, what is the actual name in the Portuguese language when I make my request to prevent getting fake or concentrated as I dislike both!
Sumo de laranja natural.

Edit: Or 'sumo natural de laranja' per the pic below.
 
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jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
Madrid (April '19)
I'm not sure if you can find this in the smaller towns and villages on the camino, but here in Lisbon, the two major supermarket chains (Pingo Doce and Mini-Preço) both have machines for freshly squeezed orange juice. You just take an empty bottle of the size you want, put it under the machine, turn the handle and watch the oranges come down from the basket above, get sliced in two and then squeezed into your bottle.
And a photo to illustrate this:

fds.jpg
 

Bert45

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2003) Francés, (2014) Francés, (2016) Portugués , (2016) Aragonés, (2018) del Norte to Primitivo
What got to me was how expensive a small glass of OJ, fresh squeezed, was in bars and cafés. Considering how cheap oranges were, especially bought in bulk, the mar-up must be terrific!
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
What got to me was how expensive a small glass of OJ, fresh squeezed, was in bars and cafés. Considering how cheap oranges were, especially bought in bulk, the mar-up must be terrific!
I don't know. Think about the purchase, maintenance and cleaning of that machine, which is not a cheap appliance. Each glass of orange juice requires that the oranges be cut (for some machines) and placed, the counter wiped and hands rinsed off. At the end of the day, cleaning must be a chore. The cost of the oranges must be the least part.
 

Jacobus

Pilgrim since 2008
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2008 09 14
Del Norte 2011. Portuguese 2015, 2017Ingles 2015 Fisterre 2015.
After just watching a video John found for me here it mentions exactly what I thought the whole time I was in Portugal.
So many beautiful orange trees but difficult to be served a fresh glass of orange juice, or even a carton of regular (more natural tasting) orange juice.
I found when places included breakfast the orange juice was very fake, "Tang" like in taste...
Wondered why, even in wonderful establishments it seemed to be difficult to get a orange juice that tasted more natural.
Hi
In Porrino at the hotel we were told breakfast was included in the charge for the room. Orange juice was emphatically excluded from the menu offered. In the morning there was a “cool aid” sized jug of fresh squeezed oj visible through the glass doors of the drink cooler.
When I went to fill my water glass the waitress stepped in front of me and said I couldnt have juice. Remeniscent of a Saturday night live sketch about the soup nazi...my Italian friends and I found it quite humorous and orange juice was a topic of our banter the rest of the way!
Thanks for the memory😄
 

JCLima

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Português (Out/2016)
I don't know. Think about the purchase, maintenance and cleaning of that machine, which is not a cheap appliance. Each glass of orange juice requires that the oranges be cut (for some machines) and placed, the counter wiped and hands rinsed off. At the end of the day, cleaning must be a chore. The cost of the oranges must be the least part
And you need quite a few oranges just to get one glass of juice.
 

Amich

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019
On the Costa del Sol there is a supermarket called Mercadona which has the fresh juice machines in the produce section. I think a liter of fresh juice was only 3.5 Euros which included a sturdy reusable bottle.
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
Madrid (April '19)
Yesterday at the Casal Santa Maria vineyards near Sintra, part of the western-most vineyards in continental Europe.

IMG_5325.JPG
 

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