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'Other' shorter Camino Routes?

Robo

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015,
2016, 2018
VdlP 2023
I'm not getting any younger.
And there is a bit of uncertainty regarding how many more times it will be viable for me to travel to Europe.

Age, health, travel restrictions, work situation, who knows........

So I'm thinking of trying what has for me so far, been thinkable, but not achievable. :rolleyes:

Walking more than 1 Camino on a trip.

A couple of times I had every intention on arrival in Santiago, of continuing on to the Coast.
But on each occasion my body decided otherwise. :confused:
Perhaps if I can do better physical preparation this time, I'll manage?

So whilst in 'planning mode' I was thinking about which Caminos I could add on to a longer Camino.
Or more like, do after a longer Camino.

Of course I could do any Camino, but just start at a selected distance from Santiago.
Call me a forever Newbie or whatever, but I do prefer to walk a complete Camino.
Let's not get into a debate about what that does and does not mean :)

So an obvious choice is the Ingles, starting in Ferrol.
I'd probably add a side trip to A Coruna for historical interest.
And Yes, I'd like it to be over 100 kms ending in Santiago, as I still like the sense of achievement associated with a Compostela.
Not that I do anything with them......

The other option, would be from Muxia to Santiago via Finesterre.
Is that 'recognised' as a separate Camino?

As my plan at this stage for my next Camino is to walk the VdlP, via Astorga and the Invierno, another option could be to do part of the Sanabres.

I note from Granja, which I think is the 'turn off' to Astorga, it's 385 kms to Santiago.
I'm not sure my body will be 'up for that' but who knows.
Maybe a closer start from Peubla or even Ourense?
Though I'd miss the early parts of the Sanabres.
Is the early part nice?

Any thoughts or suggestions, most appreciated. :)

...
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Any thoughts or suggestions,

The short route that I most want to walk is the Geira e dos Arrieiros. Jungleboy and Wendy walked it earlier this year and wrote a great live thread. The Geira starts in Braga in Northern Portugal and makes its way up to Santiago. It’s a 9 or 10 day walk, has some albergues but suitable private accommodation, and a very active group of people who are tirelessly promoting the route and willing to help pilgrims. And, as you note your desire to get a compostela, this route has been recognized by the pilgrim‘s office, at least that’s what I understand.

I had actually hoped to walk this Geira after the Salvador and Primitivo this past September, but I had a muscle injury and just couldn’t do it. (I was in contact with one of the association’s leaders, who actually volunteered to transport my bag for a few days, but good sense took over and I went home!). I now have the Geira back on my wish list.

And yes,the Muxia-Finisterre-Santiago is a recognized compostela-worthy route.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015,
2016, 2018
VdlP 2023
The short route that I most want to walk is the Geira e dos Arrieiros. Jungleboy and Wendy walked it earlier this year and wrote a great live thread. The Geira starts in Braga in Northern Portugal and makes its way up to Santiago. It’s a 9 or 10 day walk, has some albergues but suitable private accommodation, and a very active group of people who are tirelessly promoting the route and willing to help pilgrims. And, as you note your desire to get a compostela, this route has been recognized by the pilgrim‘s office, at least that’s what I understand.

I had actually hoped to walk this Geira after the Salvador and Primitivo this past September, but I had a muscle injury and just couldn’t do it. (I was in contact with one of the association’s leaders, who actually volunteered to transport my bag for a few days, but good sense took over and I went home!). I now have the Geira back on my wish list.

And yes,the Muxia-Finisterre-Santiago is a recognized compostela-worthy route.

Great idea, many thanks @peregrina2000 :)
 
F

Former member 99290

Guest
Ahh, love the idea of the extended Camino / long walks, what Laurie calls the ‘stitched together’ ❤️

In 2017 the French and I travelled with backpacks for about 3 months and were able to walk the balance of the Mozarabe that we’d had to cut,short due to injury, thé Rota Vicentina from south to north, the Portuguese from Porto to SdeC, the Stevenson Way in France, and the Cami de Ronda on the Costa Brava. It wasn’t continuous in any way - nor was it a Camino in the compostela sense - as we interspersed with visits and travels with family and friends - but it was joyful nonetheless. One aspect I particularly liked is that the latter choices were not in our plans when we began … they just came to us as we were walking.

@Robo I hope that time and other factors will allow you to ‘stitch together’ a wonderful path.
 
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amsimoes

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
I am out.
Friends have my email.
The short route that I most want to walk is the Geira e dos Arrieiros. Jungleboy and Wendy walked it earlier this year and wrote a great live thread. The Geira starts in Braga in Northern Portugal and makes its way up to Santiago. It’s a 9 or 10 day walk, has some albergues but suitable private accommodation, and a very active group of people who are tirelessly promoting the route and willing to help pilgrims. And, as you note your desire to get a compostela, this route has been recognized by the pilgrim‘s office, at least that’s what I understand.

I had actually hoped to walk this Geira after the Salvador and Primitivo this past September, but I had a muscle injury and just couldn’t do it. (I was in contact with one of the association’s leaders, who actually volunteered to transport my bag for a few days, but good sense took over and I went home!). I now have the Geira back on my wish list.

And yes,the Muxia-Finisterre-Santiago is a recognized compostela-worthy route.
It will be my next caminho, starting on the 29th of August.
 

Tom Hagger

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Francés, Norte, Primitivo, Português, Plata etc.
Robo, another excellent short Camino is the Coastal Camino (O Camiño da Costa) from either Baiona or, a little further, from A Pasaxe, in Portugal, just over the Spanish border. (Baiona is a bit easier to get to!) It is a delightful and varied route of seven or eight fairly easy days. At about the halfway point, it joins the Portuguese Camino near Redondela. My wife, who is not a great walker or a spring chicken, managed it comfortably. The route is well marked, apart from where it leaves Vigo, at which point an easier route sticking nearer the coast is a good option in any case. There is plenty of information online about the Camino. Best wishes and Buen Camino! Tom
 

gollygolly

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2000/13/14/15/16/17/18/19/2021/22
An add on short stretch that has interested me is on the Portuguese - Vigo through the Variante Espiritual, which I think qualifies for a Compostela.
It is a wonderful Camino, and could be started in Vigo or depending on your time available, started in Oporto. In my view, the Variante Espiritual, which includes the Ruta de Piedra y Agua, is especially special. However, the Variante Espiritual includes a quite demanding up-hill walk from Combarro to the Monasterio de Armenteira, and this section is not for the unfit. Once in Armenteira it is effectively down hill to Vilanova de Arousa and there is then the intereting possibility of taking a boat on the river route to Pontecesures, and the short walk to Padron.

Bon Camino
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
How about starting in Portugal near the border and going to SdC for a compostela and then use Finisterre and Muxia for another. I think you may be happier to be in Finisterre first and then go to Muxia. If I were doing something similar I think I would try for the full loop, i.e., SdC/Finisterre/Muxia/SdC.
 
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
1989
I'm seeing people recommending the Portugues from Porto and I guess I have two questions before I chime in:
  1. How short is short? A week or less? Two weeks or less? Something else?
  2. Are we limiting ourselves to Caminos that end in Santiago, or open to Caminos that are feeders into other Caminos (like the Aragones, for example?
With the answer to those questions, I might be able to come up with some to throw into the discussion.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
FRuture: Camino Sureste (2022)
I'm not getting any younger.
And there is a bit of uncertainty regarding how many more times it will be viable for me to travel to Europe.

Age, health, travel restrictions, work situation, who knows........

So I'm thinking of trying what has for me so far, been thinkable, but not achievable. :rolleyes:

Walking more than 1 Camino on a trip.

A couple of times I had every intention on arrival in Santiago, of continuing on to the Coast.
But on each occasion my body decided otherwise. :confused:
Perhaps if I can do better physical preparation this time, I'll manage?

So whilst in 'planning mode' I was thinking about which Caminos I could add on to a longer Camino.
Or more like, do after a longer Camino.

Of course I could do any Camino, but just start at a selected distance from Santiago.
Call me a forever Newbie or whatever, but I do prefer to walk a complete Camino.
Let's not get into a debate about what that does and does not mean :)

So an obvious choice is the Ingles, starting in Ferrol.
I'd probably add a side trip to A Coruna for historical interest.
And Yes, I'd like it to be over 100 kms ending in Santiago, as I still like the sense of achievement associated with a Compostela.
Not that I do anything with them......

The other option, would be from Muxia to Santiago via Finesterre.
Is that 'recognised' as a separate Camino?

As my plan at this stage for my next Camino is to walk the VdlP, via Astorga and the Invierno, another option could be to do part of the Sanabres.

I note from Granja, which I think is the 'turn off' to Astorga, it's 385 kms to Santiago.
I'm not sure my body will be 'up for that' but who knows.
Maybe a closer start from Peubla or even Ourense?
Though I'd miss the early parts of the Sanabres.
Is the early part nice?

Any thoughts or suggestions, most appreciated. :)


I'm not getting any younger.
And there is a bit of uncertainty regarding how many more times it will be viable for me to travel to Europe.

Age, health, travel restrictions, work situation, who knows........

So I'm thinking of trying what has for me so far, been thinkable, but not achievable. :rolleyes:

Walking more than 1 Camino on a trip.

A couple of times I had every intention on arrival in Santiago, of continuing on to the Coast.
But on each occasion my body decided otherwise. :confused:
Perhaps if I can do better physical preparation this time, I'll manage?

So whilst in 'planning mode' I was thinking about which Caminos I could add on to a longer Camino.
Or more like, do after a longer Camino.

Of course I could do any Camino, but just start at a selected distance from Santiago.
Call me a forever Newbie or whatever, but I do prefer to walk a complete Camino.
Let's not get into a debate about what that does and does not mean :)

So an obvious choice is the Ingles, starting in Ferrol.
I'd probably add a side trip to A Coruna for historical interest.
And Yes, I'd like it to be over 100 kms ending in Santiago, as I still like the sense of achievement associated with a Compostela.
Not that I do anything with them......

The other option, would be from Muxia to Santiago via Finesterre.
Is that 'recognised' as a separate Camino?

As my plan at this stage for my next Camino is to walk the VdlP, via Astorga and the Invierno, another option could be to do part of the Sanabres.

I note from Granja, which I think is the 'turn off' to Astorga, it's 385 kms to Santiago.
I'm not sure my body will be 'up for that' but who knows.
Maybe a closer start from Peubla or even Ourense?
Though I'd miss the early parts of the Sanabres.
Is the early part nice?

Any thoughts or suggestions, most appreciated. :)

...

I'm not getting any younger.
And there is a bit of uncertainty regarding how many more times it will be viable for me to travel to Europe.

Age, health, travel restrictions, work situation, who knows........

So I'm thinking of trying what has for me so far, been thinkable, but not achievable. :rolleyes:

Walking more than 1 Camino on a trip.

A couple of times I had every intention on arrival in Santiago, of continuing on to the Coast.
But on each occasion my body decided otherwise. :confused:
Perhaps if I can do better physical preparation this time, I'll manage?

So whilst in 'planning mode' I was thinking about which Caminos I could add on to a longer Camino.
Or more like, do after a longer Camino.

Of course I could do any Camino, but just start at a selected distance from Santiago.
Call me a forever Newbie or whatever, but I do prefer to walk a complete Camino.
Let's not get into a debate about what that does and does not mean :)

So an obvious choice is the Ingles, starting in Ferrol.
I'd probably add a side trip to A Coruna for historical interest.
And Yes, I'd like it to be over 100 kms ending in Santiago, as I still like the sense of achievement associated with a Compostela.
Not that I do anything with them......

The other option, would be from Muxia to Santiago via Finesterre.
Is that 'recognised' as a separate Camino?

As my plan at this stage for my next Camino is to walk the VdlP, via Astorga and the Invierno, another option could be to do part of the Sanabres.

I note from Granja, which I think is the 'turn off' to Astorga, it's 385 kms to Santiago.
I'm not sure my body will be 'up for that' but who knows.
Maybe a closer start from Peubla or even Ourense?
Though I'd miss the early parts of the Sanabres.
Is the early part nice?

Any thoughts or suggestions, most appreciated. :)

...
This year I tried to stich the Camino del Norte with two additional routes. The first one which is not a camino but did not want to miss it as I was so close.
I deviated Colombres and took the way towards the Picos de Europa up to refugio de Vega Uriellu for two nights and returned on the Camino del Norte at Ribadesella.
Then the second one was from Ribadeo where I took the Ruta do Mar along the coast and reached Ferrol after walking about 230kms along the remaining Nortern coast.
I found it very enjoyable...a total of 840kms.
Buen Camino,
Raymond Aquilina
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015,
2016, 2018
VdlP 2023
I'm seeing people recommending the Portugues from Porto and I guess I have two questions before I chime in:
  1. How short is short? A week or less? Two weeks or less? Something else?
  2. Are we limiting ourselves to Caminos that end in Santiago, or open to Caminos that are feeders into other Caminos (like the Aragones, for example?
With the answer to those questions, I might be able to come up with some to throw into the discussion.

Maybe 100-200 kms.
And ending in Santiago.
 

Walter James Palmer

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017 Porto-santiago
How about the coastal Portuguese Route? It takes about two weeks if you start in Porto, and it's the one I'm doing next. I did the Frances in 2015 and it was magical!

Buen Camino!
I didn't finish the Coastal Portuguese. We became bored after 2-3 days and crossed over to the Central route - which is glorious.
 
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jimmyc

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2015
I'm not getting any younger.
And there is a bit of uncertainty regarding how many more times it will be viable for me to travel to Europe.

Age, health, travel restrictions, work situation, who knows........

So I'm thinking of trying what has for me so far, been thinkable, but not achievable. :rolleyes:

Walking more than 1 Camino on a trip.

A couple of times I had every intention on arrival in Santiago, of continuing on to the Coast.
But on each occasion my body decided otherwise. :confused:
Perhaps if I can do better physical preparation this time, I'll manage?

So whilst in 'planning mode' I was thinking about which Caminos I could add on to a longer Camino.
Or more like, do after a longer Camino.

Of course I could do any Camino, but just start at a selected distance from Santiago.
Call me a forever Newbie or whatever, but I do prefer to walk a complete Camino.
Let's not get into a debate about what that does and does not mean :)

So an obvious choice is the Ingles, starting in Ferrol.
I'd probably add a side trip to A Coruna for historical interest.
And Yes, I'd like it to be over 100 kms ending in Santiago, as I still like the sense of achievement associated with a Compostela.
Not that I do anything with them......

The other option, would be from Muxia to Santiago via Finesterre.
Is that 'recognised' as a separate Camino?

As my plan at this stage for my next Camino is to walk the VdlP, via Astorga and the Invierno, another option could be to do part of the Sanabres.

I note from Granja, which I think is the 'turn off' to Astorga, it's 385 kms to Santiago.
I'm not sure my body will be 'up for that' but who knows.
Maybe a closer start from Peubla or even Ourense?
Though I'd miss the early parts of the Sanabres.
Is the early part nice?

Any thoughts or suggestions, most appreciated. :)

...
I walked from Granja in 2019 in my 80th year. The previous year I walked the Primitivo which was much more difficult. Do the Sanabres. You will love it.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
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Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Time of past OR future Camino
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
Via Sanabrés is absolutely beautiful and well short...
No masses of people,
remember to stop in Susanah, 1o Km short of Santiago at Reina Lupa
Makes an early entry into the city...

 

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