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LIVE from the Camino OzAnnie -Camino Mozárabe de Almería to Mérida Start 28 Oct2022

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Oct/Nov 2022_Mozarabe from Almeria
Long story - flight delays - missed connections etc. Arrived Almería train station just before 9pm on wed night (26th) & was met by wonderful Nely of the association Camino Mozárabe de Almeria. I will stay with Nely for 2 nights & start off on Friday 28th.
Already she has done so much for me. Taken me to Vodafone / later to Decathlon for poles .
Now she has dropped me at La Alcazaba. We have plans to meet with another peregrina at 1.30pm. There is a blessing at Catedral tonight at 7.30pm.

Weather. Hot. 27celsius. I have prepared with warm gear but I’m sure it will get cooler at some point further along in November. The next week looks perfect tho.

Pic below is where I meditated at the beginning of Alcazaba and sent this post from.

Hasta luego
Annie
 

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€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Long story - flight delays - missed connections etc. Arrived Almería train station just before 9pm on wed night (26th) & was met by wonderful Nely of the association Camino Mozárabe de Almeria. I will stay with Nely for 2 nights & start off on Friday 28th.
Already she has done so much for me. Taken me to Vodafone / later to Decathlon for poles .
Now she has dropped me at La Alcazaba. We have plans to meet with another peregrina at 1.30pm. There is a blessing at Catedral tonight at 7.30pm.

Weather. Hot. 27celcius. I have prepared with warm gear but I’m sure it will get cooler at some point further along in November. The next week looks perfect tho.

Pic below is where I meditated at the beginning of Alcazaba and sent this post from.

Hasta luego
Annie
In Merida now and wish I could have added Granada and Cordoba. Excited for you and your trip! Please continue posting, as I want to learn more about your Camino in preparation for a similar one of my own.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Long story - flight delays - missed connections etc. Arrived Almería train station just before 9pm on wed night (26th) & was met by wonderful Nely of the association Camino Mozárabe de Almeria. I will stay with Nely for 2 nights & start off on Friday 28th.
Already she has done so much for me. Taken me to Vodafone / later to Decathlon for poles .
Now she has dropped me at La Alcazaba. We have plans to meet with another peregrina at 1.30pm. There is a blessing at Catedral tonight at 7.30pm.

Weather. Hot. 27celcius. I have prepared with warm gear but I’m sure it will get cooler at some point further along in November. The next week looks perfect tho.

Pic below is where I meditated at the beginning of Alcazaba and sent this post from.

Hasta luego
Annie
Buen Camino @OzAnnie !
Looking forward to following your steps! 👣👣👣
 
Long story - flight delays - missed connections etc. Arrived Almería train station just before 9pm on wed night (26th) & was met by wonderful Nely of the association Camino Mozárabe de Almeria. I will stay with Nely for 2 nights & start off on Friday 28th.
Already she has done so much for me. Taken me to Vodafone / later to Decathlon for poles .
Now she has dropped me at La Alcazaba. We have plans to meet with another peregrina at 1.30pm. There is a blessing at Catedral tonight at 7.30pm.

Weather. Hot. 27celcius. I have prepared with warm gear but I’m sure it will get cooler at some point further along in November. The next week looks perfect tho.

Pic below is where I meditated at the beginning of Alcazaba and sent this post from.

Hasta luego
Annie
Annie, you’re a glutton for punishment. Buen Camino.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Long story - flight delays - missed connections etc. Arrived Almería train station just before 9pm on wed night (26th) & was met by wonderful Nely of the association Camino Mozárabe de Almeria. I will stay with Nely for 2 nights & start off on Friday 28th.
Already she has done so much for me. Taken me to Vodafone / later to Decathlon for poles .
Now she has dropped me at La Alcazaba. We have plans to meet with another peregrina at 1.30pm. There is a blessing at Catedral tonight at 7.30pm.

Weather. Hot. 27celcius. I have prepared with warm gear but I’m sure it will get cooler at some point further along in November. The next week looks perfect tho.

Pic below is where I meditated at the beginning of Alcazaba and sent this post from.

Hasta luego
Annie
Fantastic.
Hot Tip for stage 1: the albergue in Rioja, which is not actually in a sports centre, but behind it, will have the swimming pool available for your personal use! At least, this is what I was told by a fellow pilgrim who stayed there about 3 weeks ago.
Whatever you do, get out of the dry riverbed by bridge with the Black Bull on the hill. This will then take you through the orange groves instead of suffering added kilometres along the rough terrain of the dry river bed to Santa Fe de Mondújar. Ask Nely, she will explain. She also sent me a link for an excellent app for maps and routes for all caminos in Spain
 
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Long story - flight delays - missed connections etc. Arrived Almería train station just before 9pm on wed night (26th) & was met by wonderful Nely of the association Camino Mozárabe de Almeria. I will stay with Nely for 2 nights & start off on Friday 28th.
Already she has done so much for me. Taken me to Vodafone / later to Decathlon for poles .
Now she has dropped me at La Alcazaba. We have plans to meet with another peregrina at 1.30pm. There is a blessing at Catedral tonight at 7.30pm.

Weather. Hot. 27celcius. I have prepared with warm gear but I’m sure it will get cooler at some point further along in November. The next week looks perfect tho.

Pic below is where I meditated at the beginning of Alcazaba and sent this post from.

Hasta luego
Annie
Hi Annie sounds wonderful. I am leaving for Spain in 10 days. I wanted to walk the Mozarabe de Almeria but was given the impression it would be too difficult in this time of year. But sounds from you like all is possible?
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Long story - flight delays - missed connections etc. Arrived Almería train station just before 9pm on wed night (26th) & was met by wonderful Nely of the association Camino Mozárabe de Almeria. I will stay with Nely for 2 nights & start off on Friday 28th.
Already she has done so much for me. Taken me to Vodafone / later to Decathlon for poles .
Now she has dropped me at La Alcazaba. We have plans to meet with another peregrina at 1.30pm. There is a blessing at Catedral tonight at 7.30pm.

Weather. Hot. 27celcius. I have prepared with warm gear but I’m sure it will get cooler at some point further along in November. The next week looks perfect tho.

Pic below is where I meditated at the beginning of Alcazaba and sent this post from.

Hasta luego
Annie
Good luck Annie, lucky you. I really want to do this route. Please do let us know how you ger along. Buen camino.
 
Long story - flight delays - missed connections etc. Arrived Almería train station just before 9pm on wed night (26th) & was met by wonderful Nely of the association Camino Mozárabe de Almeria. I will stay with Nely for 2 nights & start off on Friday 28th.
Already she has done so much for me. Taken me to Vodafone / later to Decathlon for poles .
Now she has dropped me at La Alcazaba. We have plans to meet with another peregrina at 1.30pm. There is a blessing at Catedral tonight at 7.30pm.

Weather. Hot. 27celcius. I have prepared with warm gear but I’m sure it will get cooler at some point further along in November. The next week looks perfect tho.

Pic below is where I meditated at the beginning of Alcazaba and sent this post from.

Hasta luego
Annie
Good luck Annie I will not make it.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Long story - flight delays - missed connections etc. Arrived Almería train station just before 9pm on wed night (26th) & was met by wonderful Nely of the association Camino Mozárabe de Almeria. I will stay with Nely for 2 nights & start off on Friday 28th.
Already she has done so much for me. Taken me to Vodafone / later to Decathlon for poles .
Now she has dropped me at La Alcazaba. We have plans to meet with another peregrina at 1.30pm. There is a blessing at Catedral tonight at 7.30pm.

Weather. Hot. 27celcius. I have prepared with warm gear but I’m sure it will get cooler at some point further along in November. The next week looks perfect tho.

Pic below is where I meditated at the beginning of Alcazaba and sent this post from.

Hasta luego
Annie
Buon Camino Annie! Looks fabulous! Wish I could be there but will be back in Spain next year! Keep posting
 
Long story - flight delays - missed connections etc. Arrived Almería train station just before 9pm on wed night (26th) & was met by wonderful Nely of the association Camino Mozárabe de Almeria. I will stay with Nely for 2 nights & start off on Friday 28th.
Already she has done so much for me. Taken me to Vodafone / later to Decathlon for poles .
Now she has dropped me at La Alcazaba. We have plans to meet with another peregrina at 1.30pm. There is a blessing at Catedral tonight at 7.30pm.

Weather. Hot. 27celcius. I have prepared with warm gear but I’m sure it will get cooler at some point further along in November. The next week looks perfect tho.

Pic below is where I meditated at the beginning of Alcazaba and sent this post from.

Hasta luego
Annie
Annie, you are a machine !! Have a great camino and look forward to your updates :)
 
St James' Way - Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading to Southampton, 110 kms
Long story - flight delays - missed connections etc. Arrived Almería train station just before 9pm on wed night (26th) & was met by wonderful Nely of the association Camino Mozárabe de Almeria. I will stay with Nely for 2 nights & start off on Friday 28th.
Already she has done so much for me. Taken me to Vodafone / later to Decathlon for poles .
Now she has dropped me at La Alcazaba. We have plans to meet with another peregrina at 1.30pm. There is a blessing at Catedral tonight at 7.30pm.

Weather. Hot. 27celcius. I have prepared with warm gear but I’m sure it will get cooler at some point further along in November. The next week looks perfect tho.

Pic below is where I meditated at the beginning of Alcazaba and sent this post from.

Hasta luego
Annie
Buen Camino Annie, it's amazing you're going all the way to Mérida. From Almería to Granada will have a lot of hill climbs and corresponding descents, some are very steep. I'm told that after Granada the way becomes relatively easier.
The provinces of Almería and Granada are truly beautiful in their own way.
When you get to Guadix, please take advantage of the fantastic cathedral tour given by Paco. He's a real gem of the Camino.
I look forward to hearing about your Camino. No doubt Nely will upload to the FB page of the Association of Camino Mozárabe some photos you share with her. I only found that out after someone here told me about it.
 
Just saw the photos Nely posted on the Camino Mozárabe FB page. Buen Camino @OzAnnie !

Hot Tip for stage 1: the albergue in Rioja, which is not actually in a sports centre, but behind it, will have the swimming pool available for your personal use! At least, this is what I was told by a fellow pilgrim who stayed there about 3 weeks ago.
When we were there on 22 September 2022, the water was green, and I wouldn't have been game to swim in it.
PXL_20220922_133117750.jpg
Apart from the basketball courts, the sports centre didn't appear to be used much.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Fantastic.
Hot Tip for stage 1: the albergue in Rioja, which is not actually in a sports centre, but behind it, will have the swimming pool available for your personal use! At least, this is what I was told by a fellow pilgrim who stayed there about 3 weeks ago.
Whatever you do, get out of the dry riverbed by bridge with the Black Bull on the hill. This will then take you through the orange groves instead of suffering added kilometres along the rough terrain of the dry river bed to Santa Fe de Mondújar. Ask Nely, she will explain. She also sent me a link for an excellent app for maps and routes for all caminos in Spain
Good of you to post tips Marky. Will help all. I’m just reading them now as I sit having lunch 2pm at the bar at Sante Fé de Mondujar. (Too late for me tho/ I passed through Rioja. I did stop for cafe con leche etc. . Nely thought I was strong enough to walk here (Santa Fé)today. I did manage to notice the exit on right side of river bed as soon as you go under the bridge with the iconic Black bull on the left. That 2nd section was a bit dodgier than the first short section of dry river bed (DRB) before Pechina.
I was glad to get off the 2nd DRB section. Which brings you into Rioja.

I showed Nely the forum and she was excited to see posts by you MarkyD.
Also AJ 🥰. She had flattering comments AJ

Nely called ahead for me (to Eleana) / Albergue Posada (in between school arriving to Santa Fé. Rate E15 per person.
Looks like I have a 2 bed room to myself - air con / towels etc / private bathroom (for 2 beds ). Very comfortable.




Going well
X
 
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Hi Annie sounds wonderful. I am leaving for Spain in 10 days. I wanted to walk the Mozarabe de Almeria but was given the impression it would be too difficult in this time of year. But sounds from you like all is possible?
Hi Lisa
Why did you think it might be difficult at this time ?
I’m heading for Mérida (joins VDLP)
I can’t speak for other routes but this one Mozárabe de Almeria has an amigos group that are top notch … they tell me that their Albergues are open year round.
The weather is historically warm … exceeded temps for any year in October.
I’ve been advised to post some warm gear ahead (because the forecast shows warm for awhile. ). But I will keep carrying it. No one can guarantee the weather and I wouldn’t like to get caught out.
Ie very doable oct nov.

Btw it’s so dry down here - they haven’t had rain in Almeria for some time.
 
Good of you to post tips Marky. Will help all. I’m just reading them now as I sit having lunch 2pm at the bar at Sante Fé de Mondujar. (Too late for me tho/ I passed through Rioja. I did stop for cafe con leche etc. . Nely thought I was strong enough to walk here (Santa Fé)today. I did manage to notice the exit on right side of river bed as soon as you go under the bridge with the iconic Black bull on the left. That 2nd section was a bit dodgier than the first short section of dry river bed (DRB) before Pechina.
I was glad to get off the 2nd DRB section. Which brings you into Rioja.

I showed Nely the forum and she was excited to see posts by you MarkyD.
Also AJ 🥰. She had flattering comments AJ

Nely called ahead for me (to Eleana) / Albergue Posada (in between school arriving to Santa Fé. Rate E15 per person.
Looks like I have a 2 bed room to myself - air con / towels etc / private bathroom (for 2 beds ). Very comfortable.




Going well
X
Excellent, you spotted the DRB exit sign!
Eleana is lovely, her albergue is immaculately well kept, with free use of a washing machine and detergent. When me and my daughter arrived there on the 12th of October, we realised that we were carrying too much "just-in-case gear", so we off-loaded about 3kg of non-essentials which we left with Eleana to collect on our return to Almería, via a detour to Santa Fe de Mondújar. Luckily, my sister, who lives on the Costa Tropical, took us there by car.
The advantage of reaching Santa Fe is that in the morning you get to walk the three successive hills and then the rest of the day is easy. The three hills afford spectacular views of the sunrise behind you and they open the senses to the wonderful hilly terrain before dropping down into the last valley. It was one of my favourite stages.
Buen Camino peregrina Annie
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
Day 0 - Almería
Update on free day. While I was at the Alcazabar (which is not to be missed ) - Nely bought 2 sets poles from Decathlon (one set for me and one set for another pilgrim ). One set 2 poles = E12. Wow.
Basic poles but work fine. (You can’t equal that in Australia).
In one of the pics at the Alcazabar you can see they are laying out the ground (circles etc) in preparation of a new park area in it.
So many cats in this city. 😍.
We had lunch at a seafood restaurant (too busy chatting to take notice of the name 🤣. The other pilgrim (Katrina) lives in Asturias and was doing the section Granada to Cordoba but Quit at Baena because of the heat. @MarkyD I believe she walked with you.
Nely had to pick up another French peregrina returning to Almeria because of leg problems too. It can happen to anyone.
Nely also took me to the Cathedral to look around and made sure I was at the mass so that I could get a blessing for the camino. I was the only one.
Three of us (Michelle ,Nely and I ) enjoyed a drink nearby and tapas before returning to the Albergue. Fantastic tapas. Unheard of prices too / really great.
 

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Day 1. (28 oct)
Almería to Santa Fé de Mondújar
About 23-24? klms
Nely walked with 2 of us starting today. A younger Frenchman & me. To the beginning of the flechas amarillas.
She left us there to start on our way -(at the Avenue see pic)which runs thru that part of the city. Very nice exit. For the first hour approximately as you wind along the streets ., there are plenty of bars and also farmacias.. just after that you wind left for a while and the arrows take you to where you start walking the DRB. (Dry river bed)
The first section was okay, and it didn’t seem too long. Once off there you wind thru pueblos like Pechina (pic ) Later returning to the DRB. 2nd section today was a bit more tedious. , exiting near the iconic black bull after passing under the big bridge. The exit from that one was over to the far right.
This brought me into Rioja. I had lost sight of Antoine just before the exit and I stopped for a break in Rioja for cafe con leche at first bar. No more DRB after that but the sun was getting hot. It’s not a great distance to Santa Fé from Rioja. Going to Santa Fé means that the following day (tomorrow ) I will tackle the 3 hills first thing rather than finding them later when hot and weary.
The albergue Posada here is very very good. Wifi. A few dorms. Mostly with 2 or 3 beds. (Not bunks ). Each room has private bathroom . Air conditioned too ! Towels included.
I have a room to myself / as does the French Peregrino.
I arrived just before 2pm so decided I would go to the bar first and have menu Del dia.. after which shower and short. siesta.
Washing machine here so did my gear (I had been travelling a few days from USA ).
So up to date ! .
Hopefully I’ll start around sun-up tomorrow - the bar here opens at 7.30am but I think I’ll take my breakfast at Alhabia approx 8ks along the camino. It’s not a long day tomorrow but there are the hills to start.
 

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A selection of Camino Jewellery
G'Day - Annie - yes take joy in every step. You are giving me much Camino Envy. In her book Sinning Across Spain, Ailsa Piper related her adventures walking from Granada through Cordoba to Merida.
Hope to catch up at Sydney Pilgrims when you get home (prob be the Jan 2023 one ). A very special Buen Camino.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
Hola Annie - so pleased you are on your way - with all of that travel chaos behind you. We haven't walked from Almeria to Granada (another for the future) but we did walk the Mozarabe from Granada to Merida in 2015. We saw maybe 4 or 5 other pilgrims in that whole time.

I join the chorus of others in saying we found the local people incredibly welcoming and delighted to see pilgrims and asking us to spread the word about the Mozarabe. Not every stop we made had an albergue but those that did were top notch. Some were unattended - and we picked up the key from the local police station. On two occasions, long stretches, the Guardia Civil drove by us on the trail and stopped to make sure we were ok and had sufficient water.

All in all, a thoroughly enjoyable experience - and with Granada, Cordoba and Merida - what more could you ask (other than perhaps starting in Almeria as you have done).

Buen camino peregrina.😎
 
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Day 2
Santa Fé de Mondújar to Alboloduy
Since the bar in Santa Fé was open at 7.30 and it was still dark I changed my mind and had breakfast there. I’m glad I was fuelled as the climbs from Santa Fé were something ! But the descent into Alhabia was a doozy. Wow. As mentioned by AJ @AJGuillaume - I’m glad the amigos put in some switchbacks . The descents are not unusual but the surface on them makes the steps a bit tricky. Watch your footing.
Had a coffee break in Alhabia and bought sun cream (sun is still strong!) and some supplies for walking later and Sunday when the tiendas will be closed. The bar in Nacimiento will be open tho so no one will go hungry 😋

2nd part of the day from Alhabia was beside the DRB on paved paths mostly. Sun was hot so very pleased to get to Alboloduy. Staying at the Almería association Albergue for peregrinos. A donativo albergue. 3 others here .

So tomorrow I note that the clock winds back here so sunrise will be around 7.30 instead of 8.30.
 

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St James' Way - Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading to Southampton, 110 kms
Day 2
Santa Fé de Mondújar to Alboloduy
Since the bar in Santa Fé was open at 7.30 and it was still dark I changed my mind and had breakfast there. I’m glad I was fuelled as the climbs from Santa Fé were something ! But the descent into Alhabia was a doozy. Wow. As mentioned by AJ @AJGuillaume - I’m glad the amigos put in some switchbacks . The descents are not unusual but the surface on them makes the steps a bit tricky. Watch your footing.
Had a coffee break in Alhabia and bought sun cream (sun is still strong!) and some supplies for walking later and Sunday when the tiendas will be closed. The bar in Nacimiento will be open tho so no one will go hungry 😋

2nd part of the day from Alhabia was beside the DRB on paved paths mostly. Sun was hot so very pleased to get to Alboloduy. Staying at the Almería association Albergue for peregrinos. A donativo albergue. 3 others here .

So tomorrow I note that the clock winds back here so sunrise will be around 7.30 instead of 8.30.
Be careful looks tricky and isolated Annie take care x. Mick how many Kms today.?
 
Day 2
Santa Fé de Mondújar to Alboloduy
Since the bar in Santa Fé was open at 7.30 and it was still dark I changed my mind and had breakfast there. I’m glad I was fuelled as the climbs from Santa Fé were something ! But the descent into Alhabia was a doozy. Wow. As mentioned by AJ @AJGuillaume - I’m glad the amigos put in some switchbacks . The descents are not unusual but the surface on them makes the steps a bit tricky. Watch your footing.
Had a coffee break in Alhabia and bought sun cream (sun is still strong!) and some supplies for walking later and Sunday when the tiendas will be closed. The bar in Nacimiento will be open tho so no one will go hungry 😋

2nd part of the day from Alhabia was beside the DRB on paved paths mostly. Sun was hot so very pleased to get to Alboloduy. Staying at the Almería association Albergue for peregrinos. A donativo albergue. 3 others here .

So tomorrow I note that the clock winds back here so sunrise will be around 7.30 instead of 8.30.
An excellent day peregrina. Rest well, because tomorrow "la etapa reina" awaits you! We also found it to be a good strategy to fuel up in the morning before embracing the hill climbs. The stage from Alboloduy to Abla was one of the hardest for us when we did it earlier in the month, partly because of the relentless sun and also due to the severity of parts of the climb. We saw wild mountain goats up there, and we wished were them at times!

On the descent, a local man, dressed in camouflage gear by his hut, advised us on a different entry point to the DRB, as it was knee deep in running water. So we did some bushwacking to skirt around it, but still ended up having to swap walking shoes for flip-flops to walk through the lovely streams and allow our feet to enjoy nature! It was a good move and so much fun. It was still a long walk to the town for the first stop of the day in Nascimiento. The other villages, Doña Maria and Ocaña, are likely to be completely closed on a Sunday, although you might get lucky and gate-crash a village fiesta!

Once you get to Abla, don´t be misled by the 2km sign, because the albergue is a further 1km up a very steep route through the town streets. We arrived late on our day, but the amazing hospitalero Ramón had walked to meet us by the bridge under the motorway. Nely was concerned that we hadn´t arrived by then, so he set out to meet us. It was almost 8pm by the time we arrived at the albergue in Abla. That was the day that put paid to my daughter´s Camino, because the heel injury she developed the day before would never recover and she had to pull out by the time we got to Guadix, even with two rest days and two stage jumps to give it a chance to heal. The next day, Ramón kindly drove us to Huéneja, to have a rest day at the beautiful albergue donativo of Casa Violeta.
 
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Thankyou soo very much for every tip/information about this stage @MarkyD

It makes me so much more confortable with my decision made (discussion Thursday with Nely). My plan had been on paper to walk to Abla but she suggested a stop a Nacimiento to break the stage into 2 rather than a hot slog with climbs (and you point out fording streams ) …. At first I baulked at the idea as I didn’t have enough days stored away /what with delays etc ) but took her advice on that stage and will walk Nacimiento to Abla on Monday 31st.
I will have to make later decisions of a couple of stages to shave off now due to flight delay and now making this stage into two stages. However., it will be good for meditation to take it easy. Sun is still cooking a bit. Not much shade etc. I notice in forecast that temps are getting slightly lower especially at night. Thank goodness. So I’m happy enough that I’ve not posted my warm gear ahead at this point.

Interesting to read about the water section being before Nacimiento tomorrow. I hope I don’t have too much trouble getting out of the DRB etc. I’ll report back for sure.

Btw. How is your daughter now ? Has she recovered ?

🙏. Annie.
 
My plan had been on paper to walk to Abla but she suggested a stop a Nacimiento to break the stage into 2 rather than a hot slog with climbs (and you point out fording streams )
A good decision. Santiago has a room in a house with half levels, it's quite unique.
 
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Day 0 - Almería
Update on free day. While I was at the Alcazabar (which is not to be missed ) - Nely bought 2 sets poles from Decathlon (one set for me and one set for another pilgrim ). One set 2 poles = E12. Wow.
Basic poles but work fine. (You can’t equal that in Australia).
In one of the pics at the Alcazabar you can see they are laying out the ground (circles etc) in preparation of a new park area in it.
So many cats in this city. 😍.
We had lunch at a seafood restaurant (too busy chatting to take notice of the name 🤣. The other pilgrim (Katrina) lives in Asturias and was doing the section Granada to Cordoba but Quit at Baena because of the heat. @MarkyD I believe she walked with you.
Nely had to pick up another French peregrina returning to Almeria because of leg problems too. It can happen to anyone.
Nely also took me to the Cathedral to look around and made sure I was at the mass so that I could get a blessing for the camino. I was the only one.
Three of us (Michelle ,Nely and I ) enjoyed a drink nearby and tapas before returning to the Albergue. Fantastic tapas. Unheard of prices too / really great.
Sounds and looks great! I wish I was there.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
OzAnnie,
Between you, Marky, and AJG there seems to be a WisePilgrim app in the making, so comprehensive are your comments.
The ministrations of the Amigos sound amazing. What wonderful people.
Yes the Almeria amigos !! They are 2nd to none.
We had 2 ladies from the association drop in the check on us at the Alboloduy albergue tonight. The president (Mercedes) and Veronica - they WhatsApp info on upcoming stages. Send the codes to gain access to unattended albérgues etc that are part of ‘their’ network. (They cover Almeria to Granada ).
If you have a problem with accommodation , need something etc. They are there for you. Yes - wonderful people … like many hospitalero/as - all over caminos. Selfless.
 
Thankyou soo very much for every tip/information about this stage @MarkyD

It makes me so much more confortable with my decision made (discussion Thursday with Nely). My plan had been on paper to walk to Abla but she suggested a stop a Nacimiento to break the stage into 2 rather than a hot slog with climbs (and you point out fording streams ) …. At first I baulked at the idea as I didn’t have enough days stored away /what with delays etc ) but took her advice on that stage and will walk Nacimiento to Abla on Monday 31st.
I will have to make later decisions of a couple of stages to shave off now due to flight delay and now making this stage into two stages. However., it will be good for meditation to take it easy. Sun is still cooking a bit. Not much shade etc. I notice in forecast that temps are getting slightly lower especially at night. Thank goodness. So I’m happy enough that I’ve not posted my warm gear ahead at this point.

Interesting to read about the water section being before Nacimiento tomorrow. I hope I don’t have too much trouble getting out of the DRB etc. I’ll report back for sure.

Btw. How is your daughter now ? Has she recovered ?

🙏. Annie.
Hi Annie,
Glad to be of help. I think you made a good decision to break up that stage. On paper it looks straightforward, one hill and a straight run to the finish! Hahaha, but that is not the reality once you are on that stage. Another stage you might want to consider to shorten is the route from La Peza to Quéntar, although it´s a very beautiful stage and at a steady pace it´s perfectly achievable in one day. However, as there are no towns or villages, apart from the detour option to Tocón de Quéntar, you´ll need to carry extra weight in water and food. I carried 3L of water and I needed it all.

Regarding the stage for you tomorrow, from Alboloduy to Nascimiento. When we arrived at the bar in Nascimiento, there was one local man who took great delight in telling us that we could have saved many kilometres by not following the yellow arrows! Mind you, I had that said to me a few times during my route to Granada. They often don´t get it, they would rather send us the easy and short route, which invariably means more asphalt and being close to traffic. Admittedly, there is little traffic to speak of in that area, but being in contact with nature is one of the attractions of the Camino, it´s not just about the destination, as you know.

Regarding my daughter´s heel injury, thank you for asking. She is a physiotherapist, so she used the experience of treating her own injury as part of her own professional development. She has been back in the gym and training and has made a full recovery.

For an experienced peregrina like yourself, the risk of injury would be minimal. Like me, I´m sure you already learnt the hard way on your first ever Camino, I know I did!
 
Another stage you might want to consider to shorten is the route from La Peza to Quéntar, although it´s a very beautiful stage and at a steady pace it´s perfectly achievable in one day.
And Tocón de Quéntar, although seemingly isolated and without mobile network (unless you have a Movitel SIM card), is a quiet place, where you can rest and enjoy the scenery. The albergue is nice and well equipped.
The Asociación Jacobea de Almería-Granada angels clean it, and we got there the day after Paco from Guadix had cleaned it.
 
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And Tocón de Quéntar, although seemingly isolated and without mobile network (unless you have a Movitel SIM card), is a quiet place, where you can rest and enjoy the scenery. The albergue is nice and well equipped.
The Asociación Jacobea de Almería-Granada angels clean it, and we got there the day after Paco from Guadix had cleaned it.
Great to know, thanks. Also, Annie wouldn't necessarily lose another day, because Tocón de Quéntar to Granada would be perfectly doable in a day and it wouldn't be necessary to lug so much extra weight up those steep climbs!
 
Btw @MarkyD
I mentioned to Mercedes tonight ; the water you encountered in the DRB earlier this month. She’s pretty sure it’s dry now.

@MarkyD Obviously it’s not any easier today.

EDIT: After walking it !!! 🤣🤣🤣🤣
Dry ? Día de los muertos is tomorrow but I feel like I went across on that (trek) / yes trek or hike as description fits this stage. Just dragged myself in to the bar at 12.15pm. Started at 7am !!!
 
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Btw @MarkyD
I mentioned to Mercedes tonight ; the water you encountered in the DRB earlier this month. She’s pretty sure it’s dry now.
Here are a couple of photos from us walking that section of the "dry riverbed" to Nascimiento on 14th October this year.
 

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@OzAnnie Hi Annie - I think you can have confidence in your Decathlon poles. I bought a pair from Decathlon 7 or 8 years ago. They've had quite a workout since then and are still going strong and no trick to extending and collapsing them! I sometimes find the fancier things are - with more moving parts - the more can go wrong! Buen camino!
 
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Day 3
Hi from Nacimiento.
@MarkyD and @AJGuillaume
I’ve been flipping back to read your threads. !!!!!

I needed to read them a bit more carefully I think.
Today would rate as the hardest I’ve ever had. At the beginning of the day leaving Alboloduy I thought : Ha… too short to
Nacimiento- I’ll probably keep going. (Famous last thoughts ).
The river was definitely NOT dry / impossible to find tracks without getting muddy and soaking feet. (I notice in your thread AJ G (Andrew ) that you were warned by Nely of the condition of the trail and Santiago picked you up .
I would definitely have chosen walking the road at that point if I’d known how to find it. The signage on the river wasn’t really there much. I had to resort to what @MarkyD also did. Bushwhacking in and off the river bed. So many times there were fences which forced me back to the muddy trail in the river. I can’t count how many times I rolled my ankle clambering up or down the gravelly , slaty banks. Heading cross country in search of cutting a bit out but / “back to the river ‘ each time. I tumbled a couple of times and found it hard to right myself with the weight of my mochila weighing on me.
In despair around 2k nacimiento I headed right looking for a way to a road and found more fences. Called out for help a couple of times. The dogs didn’t reply … just barked. Eventually dragged myself into nacimiento around 12.15 pm !! Such slow progress.

The French pilgrim had moved further ahead when we were still in the mountain climb. I told him not to wait for me as I was going slowly uphill. He WhatsApp ‘d me from Abla to let me know that there was no more water after nacimiento. So tomorrow might be dry sailing. 🙏🙏

Marvellous what a meal and a shower can do to the spirits though. I’m back to normal now. Sitting in the Bar Centro with a vino Tinto 🍷 waiting for tapas to start at 8.30pm.

Sorry to post a complaining post but so many times I read people worrying about asphalt etc. It would have been a Godsend today.
The views were spectacular over the mountain though. Even though it was tiring; the sense of achievement was wonderfull.
Anyway. Tomorrow will be different again

Looking forward to it now that I’m rested.

Annie

Some pics. The mountain pics show the climb from way down below. Concentration required !! Some of those paths were narrow and loose. A foot trip and ‘bye bye’. No one would know !! Just realised I didn’t take any of the river section -(the pic with river was the easier bit prior to the climb ) the yukky difficult bit was after the mountain climb. I wasn’t feeling in a photo mood at the time.
My trail runners were a mess. So I washed them in the laundry tub. Tried to get them dry in the sun but still very wet. Can’t get old newspaper anywhere. I managed to buy a huge roll of kitchen paper E3 at the tienda beside the bar / to stuff the shoes overnight. Hope they dry out.
 

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there was one local man who took great delight in telling us that we could have saved many kilometres by not following the yellow arrows! Mind you, I had that said to me a few times during my route to Granada. They often don´t get it, they would rather send us the easy and short route, which invariably means more asphalt and being close to traffic. Admittedly, there is little traffic to speak of in that area, but being in contact with nature is one of the attractions of the Camino, it´s not just about the destination, as you know.
Marky
I truly understand your message but
I would have joyfully taken the easier way today if I’d had the chance. 😇😉
The bushwhacking and muddy river bed didn’t feel like a pilgrimage.
 
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Day 3
Hi from Nacimiento.
@MarkyD and @AJGuillaume
I’ve been flipping back to read your threads. !!!!!

I needed to read them a bit more carefully I think.
Today would rate as the hardest I’ve ever had. At the beginning of the day leaving Alboloduy I thought : Ha… too short to
Nacimiento- I’ll probably keep going. (Famous last thoughts ).
The river was definitely NOT dry / impossible to find tracks without getting muddy and soaking feet. (I notice in your thread AJ G (Andrew ) that you were warned by Nely of the condition of the trail and Santiago picked you up .
I would definitely have chosen walking the road at that point if I’d known how to find it. The signage on the river wasn’t really there much. I had to resort to what @MarkyD also did. Bushwhacking in and off the river bed. So many times there were fences which forced me back to the muddy trail in the river. I can’t count how many times I rolled my ankle clambering up or down the gravelly , slaty banks. Heading cross country in search of cutting a bit out but / “back to the river ‘ each time. I tumbled a couple of times and found it hard to right myself with the weight of my mochila weighing on me.
In despair around 2k nacimiento I headed right looking for a way to a road and found more fences. Called out for help a couple of times. The dogs didn’t reply … just barked. Eventually dragged myself into nacimiento around 12.15 pm !! Such slow progress.

The French pilgrim had moved further ahead when we were still in the mountain climb. I told him not to wait for me as I was going slowly uphill. He WhatsApp ‘d me from Abla to let me know that there was no more water after nacimiento. So tomorrow might be dry sailing. 🙏🙏

Marvellous what a meal and a shower can do to the spirits though. I’m back to normal now. Sitting in the Bar Centro with a vino Tinto 🍷 waiting for tapas to start at 8.30pm.

Sorry to post a complaining post but so many times I read people worrying about asphalt etc. It would have been a Godsend today.
The views were spectacular over the mountain though. Even though it was tiring; the sense of achievement was wonderfull.
Anyway. Tomorrow will be different again

Looking forward to it now that I’m rested.

Annie

Some pics. The mountain pics show the climb from way down below. Concentration required !! Some of those paths were narrow and loose. A foot trip and ‘bye bye’. No one would know !! Just realised I didn’t take any of the river section -(the pic with river was the easier bit prior to the climb ) the yukky difficult bit was after the mountain climb. I wasn’t feeling in a photo mood at the time.
My trail runners were a mess. So I washed them in the laundry tub. Tried to get them dry in the sun but still very wet. Can’t get old newspaper anywhere. I managed to buy a huge roll of kitchen paper E3 at the tienda beside the bar / to stuff the shoes overnight. Hope they dry out.
Uff, sounds like you had a tough passage to Nascimiento. I guess that's why they call it "la etapa reina". Glad to hear you made it relatively unscathed, as some of those paths are quite narrow with a long way down to the bottom!

Tomorrow will be a breeze, apart from last 1km through the steep winding streets up to the albergue in Abla. We chose to keep out of the DRB from Nascimiento onwards to Abla. The road runs virtually parallel to it and traffic is very light.

if you have lots of energy and time on your side by the time you reach Abla, then maybe you could go on to the next village at Fiñana, but I didn't walk the stage from Abla to Huéneja, so I can't help you there. Sounds like a short, easy day to Abla would be enough anyway, then a gentle, steady walk to Huéneja the next day.

Regarding your hard earned tapas in Nascimiento: buen provecho y buen Camino para mañana ❤
 
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For God's sake be careful this sounds dangerous if you find company stick with them, only if you feel comfortable with it.
Take the easy path everytime, are there any markings does not look like it.?
Stay safe thinking of you Annie, with you in spirit .x
 
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I notice in your thread AJ G (Andrew ) that you were warned by Nely of the condition of the trail and Santiago picked you up .
Nely told us that someone had to resort to a taxi. Turned out that it was @george.g , and he had the same issues as you did: after the climb out of the river, and then back down, he encountered a lot of water. Nely was concerned about my darling, and so was I, so we called Santiago at the turn off before returning down to the river.
Bushwhacking in and off the river bed
Until we got to the climb out of the river, we also bushwhacked.
He WhatsApp ‘d me from Abla to let me know that there was no more water after nacimiento. So tomorrow might be dry sailing. 🙏🙏
All the water from Nacimiento to Alboloduy comes from Nacimiento.
PXL_20220925_134109313.jpg
If you go down to the river bed just under the fountain, you'll see the water gushing out. It's dry upstream.
if you have lots of energy and time on your side by the time you reach Abla, then maybe you could go on to the next village at Fiñana
My suggestion is that you stop at Abla, and experience the 5 star albergue there. Yes, it's at the far end of town, but it's great. Until recently, there was a hospitalero (not while we were there), Ramón, from Tarragona.
It's then a 20km walk from Abla to Huéneja. Take water with you: the stretch from Fiñana to La Huertezuela was dry and hot.
 
Nely told us that someone had to resort to a taxi. Turned out that it was @george.g , and he had the same issues as you did: after the climb out of the river, and then back down, he encountered a lot of water. Nely was concerned about my darling, and so was I, so we called Santiago at the turn off before returning down to the river.

Until we got to the climb out of the river, we also bushwhacked.

All the water from Nacimiento to Alboloduy comes from Nacimiento.
View attachment 135852
If you go down to the river bed just under the fountain, you'll see the water gushing out. It's dry upstream.

My suggestion is that you stop at Abla, and experience the 5 star albergue there. Yes, it's at the far end of town, but it's great. Until recently, there was a hospitalero (not while we were there), Ramón, from Tarragona.
It's then a 20km walk from Abla to Huéneja. Take water with you: the stretch from Fiñana to La Huertezuela was dry and hot.
Tks AJ.
- I’m getting the code from Mercedes’ tomorrow for the Abla albergue. (So that’s the 5 star one I’ve heard about. 😄 I’d wondered where that one was ).
Distances are quite doable if it’s on trail.
Temperatures are starting to get better.
Tomorrow forecast as 13 - 27. Which is still hot in the sun with a backpack, but I’m guessing /hoping that the trail won’t be as rugged.
@MickMac Mercedes msgd just now to say that they are expecting 4 French , a Spanish person and me at the Abla albergue tomorrow. I’ll keep your advice in mind too re keeping near company when possible. Re markings / some areas where fine - others a bit sparse. Very few on river to indicate best place to go.
Lights out for me.
X
 
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Mercedes msgd just now to say that they are expecting 4 French , a Spanish person and me at the Abla albergue tomorrow.
Two of the French are a couple, Serge and Carole. Serge owned the Caminoloc hiking equipment shops in Condom and Cahors, on the Via Podiensis. Serge is an expert on equipment, so if you have any doubts, ask him.

It'll nearly be a full house at the Abla albergue! :)
 
O
Two of the French are a couple, Serge and Carole. Serge owned the Caminoloc hiking equipment shops in Condom and Cahors, on the Via Podiensis. Serge is an expert on equipment, so if you have any doubts, ask him.

It'll nearly be a full house at the Abla albergue! :)
Oh how wonderful. Serge is delightful. We met him in Condom in may this year. 🥰

Sorry for the diversion but Andrew, you say ‘owned’. Has he sold the shop/s?

PS. Reading your reply below, I now realise it was not Serge we met, but Phillipe!
 
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Oh how wonderful. Serge is delightful. We met him in Condom in may this year. 🥰

Sorry for the diversion but Andrew, you say ‘owned’. Has he sold the shop/s?
I think he has handed the shops over to Mahdi du Camino in Cahors, and to Philippe in Condom, so he can focus on his gîte, la Casa del Trel. But I could be mistaken. He may still have ownership.
 
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G'Day Annie - all I can say is WOW. That track looked more like a Mars training run for NASA astronaughts.
You are to be commended for pressing on, not taking a taxi. Best wishes for the remainder of your Camino.
I would say it's still a wonderful Camino route, but nothing like the Camino Frances for the following reasons:

1. Far less, hardly any other pilgrims - but that can be good for people who prefer more time to themselves
2. Less infrastructure and options - but the basics are certainly available and the people are ever so friendly and helpful
3. Temperatures generally hotter, so absolutely avoid the summer months unless you are familiar and experienced with through-walks in extreme heat (even then, it would be mad crazy to do it)
4. The hills can be challenging due to the rough terrain and steepness of some of the gradients - however, this does make for fantastic views and a wonderful sense of achievement at the end of each day - something to be celebrated despite the fatigue!

The Association of Caminos Mozárabe provides an excellent guide in PDF, which has more realistic looking profile maps. The ones I used from Gronze made the hills look less extreme than they were.

Those of us who have walked on The Camino Frances would also have found challenging hills and descents too, such as: the climb from SJPP, the descent into Molinaseca, the climb up to O'Cebereiro, etc. I wouldn't say that the hills and descents on the Camino Mozárabe are any more difficult, apart from the terrain being more rugged in places. The dry riverbeds I had heard people say they were boring after a while, but I found them to be just difficult and tiring to walk on in places. However, there are alternatives to many sections of dry riverbeds, but that would mean more road walking. There is very little road walking on the Camino Mozárabe from Almería to Granada, and the roads have very little traffic anyway. Many of these "road routes" are marked for Camino Cyclists to use, but I used some sections when walking, just because I wanted a break from dry riverbeds or dry, rocky streams. However, if you are used to harder walking, have good legs and the proper footwear, then none of this should be a problem if you take your time, stop frequently and enjoy the beauty of this interesting route.

There has been a lot of effort put into marking the routes, but there are places where it can be missed or be a bit confusing if one doesn't pay attention. I found the map app that Nely sent me to be very helpful in those situations. I was also able to phone Nely on several occasions to get advice and guidance at certain points, not just for directions but also availability, access codes and contact numbers for the albergues.

I would highly recommend the route, but also advise people on where they might encounter difficulties so they can opt to skirt around certain sections and yet still have a wonderful Camino Mozárabe experience. The history about this route, as told by Paco in Guadix, is truly amazing and moved me to tears to be honest.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
G'Day Annie - all I can say is WOW. That track looked more like a Mars training run for NASA astronaughts.
You are to be commended for pressing on, not taking a taxi. Best wishes for the remainder of your Camino.
Hi Mike.
Thankyou for your good wishes but I’m not a purist. I pressed on because even if I’d wanted to call a taxi ; there would be no possibility of one on those mountain goat tracks or on the muddy river beds.

yesterday’s etapa would have been doable if I had checked into the state of the river bed between Alboloduy and Nacimiento.
I could have chosen to walk the road ., or have been prepared with beach shoes and just walked through the water.
In hindsight, I should have changed into my sketchers and enjoyed the water.
The mountain climb I expected so I was prepared to expend energy there.

A good rest last night and back to normal.

Regarding the look of the landscape. It’s extremely dry in this part of Spain (apart from the pumped water being released at Nacimiento into the río. 🤣🤣 heading downstream towards Alboloduy to supply farms along that way with water ) .
The landscape is similar to Las Vegas in USA ‘s. Nevada. I was visiting my son there for 5 weeks before coming to Spain).
I’m in awe of how the Spanish manage what they have in tough conditions.

Good part Mike. The river bed onwards was dry ! Yippee. I’ll never complain about dry river beds .
See you in December Amigo.
Annie
 
Day 4 to Abla
The pueblo on a hill.
The albergue is a good climb after you arrive - I received the code for the albergue from Almería amigos earlier. All done now and wandering back down hill to see what there is to see. ??
Easy dry river bed most of the way
Nothing open in Dona Maria. ., same in Ocaña.. I popped in to get a coffee but the restaurant won’t open until 6pm so back to the DRB

Coming up to Abla there is a huge spaghetti junction of modern bridges etc.
You have to exit the DRB to come up to the road for a short way. I had my attention diverted for a couple of minutes as there was a deer on the carretera… I must have missed the arrow to take me back to the trail below at that point ., So found myself on the carretera into Abla.
Another tip: Don’t drop concentration anywhere. I was on this even stretch of road and reached into my front purse and missed a slight ridge in the asphalt (where they’ve added a new layer ). & over I went onto the road .. came down like a ton of bricks on the road (that happens when you’re wearing a backpack ) …
No injuries !!! Im being looked after.

So a good day !!
Annie

Pics. Last 2 are the dry river bed. No problem with that. The 3 pics before were of accomm at Nacimiento.. washing machine there too.

Restaurant from last night Nacimiento on leaving this morning. Breakfast there.
Ist pic is view from entrance to Abla albergue. 12 bunks. 3 sets x2 in 2 separate rooms. Only 2 coming tonight now. The 4 French are stopping in Ocaña (as advised by Nely ).

Also took pics of many olive trees dead (I guess water scarcity has a lot to do with this )
Huge bridge section not far from Abla.
 

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New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
I must have missed the arrow to take me back to the trail below at that point ., So found myself on the carretera into Abla.
The trail used to go under the carretera, and when we got there, we looked for the arrows. All we could see were big yellow crosses, so we, too, ended up on the carretera.
I then queried with Nely, and she told me that it was the official route, as the trail along the riverbed was "too rocky". I have a feeling that it may be because access to a private property on the approach of Abla may have been denied, but I'm not certain.

And I agree, it's really important to watch where you step ...
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
There's not a huge amount to see, except the main plaza, but we walked up the town to get the view
View attachment 135895View attachment 135896
Tks AJ.
the way to the albergue passes under that arch., and continues quite high. I came down. And tried that restaurant in your pic but wasn’t very happy with it. I’ve wandered way way way down off the way and found a friendlier place (IMO). El Carmelo.
Back up the hill now.
 
Tks AJ.
the way to the albergue passes under that arch., and continues quite high. I came down. And tried that restaurant in your pic but wasn’t very happy with it. I’ve wandered way way way down off the way and found a friendlier place (IMO). El Carmelo.
Back up the hill now.
The Mirasierra restaurant was the only place open on a Monday, so we didn't have a choice. Apart from cooking at the albergue, which we did in the evening.

Just saw the picture of your room in Nacimiento: when we were there, there was nothing in that room :)
 
Day 4 to Abla
The pueblo on a hill.
The albergue is a good climb after you arrive - I received the code for the albergue from Almería amigos earlier. All done now and wandering back down hill to see what there is to see. ??
Easy dry river bed most of the way
Nothing open in Dona Maria. ., same in Ocaña.. I popped in to get a coffee but the restaurant won’t open until 6pm so back to the DRB

Coming up to Abla there is a huge spaghetti junction of modern bridges etc.
You have to exit the DRB to come up to the road for a short way. I had my attention diverted for a couple of minutes as there was a deer on the carretera… I must have missed the arrow to take me back to the trail below at that point ., So found myself on the carretera into Abla.
Another tip: Don’t drop concentration anywhere. I was on this even stretch of road and reached into my front purse and missed a slight ridge in the asphalt (where they’ve added a new layer ). & over I went onto the road .. came down like a ton of bricks on the road (that happens when you’re wearing a backpack ) …
No injuries !!! Im being looked after.

So a good day !!
Annie

Pics. Last 2 are the dry river bed. No problem with that. The 3 pics before were of accomm at Nacimiento.. washing machine there too.

Restaurant from last night Nacimiento on leaving this morning. Breakfast there.
Ist pic is view from entrance to Abla albergue. 12 bunks. 3 sets x2 in 2 separate rooms. Only 2 coming tonight now. The 4 French are stopping in Ocaña (as advised by Nely ).

Also took pics of many olive trees dead (I guess water scarcity has a lot to do with this )
Huge bridge section not far from Abla.
Great to hear of your progress. Despite a bit of tumbling, you have made it in one piece. Yeah, the concentration always seems to waver when we need it most! By walking with someone else, we were able to help spot for each other. It was amazing how many things one would miss and the other would see it!

I have a couple of tips for you up ahead:

1. If you get the opportunity to spend a bit of time with Violeta in Huéneja, you´ll be amazed by what her and her husband are doing on their farm. Although I think we were only able to do this because we took a rest day there.

2. The route through "The Badlands" of Spain, Guadix to La Peza, is a feast for the senses. The changes in scenery and terrain are like being on another planet. There are also several villages to have a snack or lunch. Be careful of the directions from Purullena to Marchal, I messed up there and ended up walking 2km on the road, but as luck would have it, that enabled me to have a look inside the Olive Oil pressing and bottling plant of S. Bonifacio.

3. The albergue in La Peza is an old school converted into a dormitory. They didn´t have any of those disposable mattress or pillow covers, so I hope you have a "silk liner" or something similar. I just roughed it under the bare blankets, I was that tired I didn´t care. The downstairs seems to be used by the local "Bomberos Forestales" - heroes who risk their lives every year to fight forest fires. The large "school kitchen" is shared by them and is well-equiped, but may well lack stock for what you may want to cook. The only shop in the village has very little to offer, but the lady who runs it is super friendly and will help you find things you need.

4. In Quéntar, assuming you stop there, which you may not if you stop at Tocón de Quéntar instead, I stayed in the only hotel in town. However, I later found out that there was a beautiful albergue there!
The hotel manager, Domingo, seems to run the local bar and a few other things, so he´s very helpful and the bar, near the hotel, do great homemade food.

Way up ahead, is fellow OZ called Mark, well he´s a Brit who has lived in Sydney for most of his adult life. He may be able to share tips on the section Granada to Mérida. I think Nely may be able to contact him.

I don´t think I can add much more, but I shall be following your posts to help me compile some of your tips for the section Granada to Córdoba and Córdoba to Mérida. I hope to try one, or both of those sections in 2023/24.

Buen Camino OZAnnie
 
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Hi Annie. I’ve just received some what’s app messages from our friend Pierre to discover he is also walking the Mozarabe right now. Pierre owns Boutique du Pelerins in SJPP so he usually walks this time of year after the shop closes for the season. He’s only walking a few days on the Mozarabe before crossing to the Levante.

He writes that he is currently walking with a Catalan pilgrim and, from the albergue registers, he sees that there is an English pilgrim one day ahead of him, Serge and Carol are two days behind him now - and an Australian one day behind him. I’m guessing that’s you! 😎

Pierre has walked the Mozarabe before and gave us some valuable tips before we walked from Granada back in 2015. It’s a small world 🙏
 
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If you get the opportunity to spend a bit of time with Violeta in Huéneja, you´ll be amazed by what her and her husband are doing on their farm.
Nely strongly suggested we avoid the municipal albergue. It is not run by the Asociación, and apparently is often filthy. She said we we should book a room at Casa Violeta, which we did. We didn't get to see either Violeta or her husband, but we spoke to them on WhatsApp. They have a key box next to the door. You'll love Casa Violeta!
PXL_20220927_122349638.jpg
The albergue in La Peza is an old school converted into a dormitory. They didn´t have any of those disposable mattress or pillow covers, so I hope you have a "silk liner" or something similar
The albergue in La Peza is also a municipal albergue, and is not run by the Asociación Jacobea de Almería-Granada. Paco told us they had put a heater in every room, and they were all stolen. If something isn't right, let the Asociación know, Paco is the closest and might come and fix things. He was on his way back from cleaning Tocón de Quéntar, and handed us (there were 6 pilgrims) the disposable bedsheets.
In Quéntar, assuming you stop there, which you may not if you stop at Tocón de Quéntar instead, I stayed in the only hotel in town. However, I later found out that there was a beautiful albergue there!
If you want to stay at the Fundalucia albergue, which is the only alternative to the Hotel Quéntar, enquire early. We couldn't stay there because they were fully booked with a religious group.
 
Nely strongly suggested we avoid the municipal albergue. It is not run by the Asociación, and apparently is often filthy. She said we we should book a room at Casa Violeta, which we did. We didn't get to see either Violeta or her husband, but we spoke to them on WhatsApp. They have a key box next to the door. You'll love Casa Violeta!
View attachment 135906

The albergue in La Peza is also a municipal albergue, and is not run by the Asociación Jacobea de Almería-Granada. Paco told us they had put a heater in every room, and they were all stolen. If something isn't right, let the Asociación know, Paco is the closest and might come and fix things. He was on his way back from cleaning Tocón de Quéntar, and handed us (there were 6 pilgrims) the disposable bedsheets.

If you want to stay at the Fundalucia albergue, which is the only alternative to the Hotel Quéntar, enquire early. We couldn't stay there because they were fully booked with a religious group.
Great tips AJGuillaume :)
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Wow - it’s so good getting refreshed tips from both of you AJ & MarkyD
MarkyD
1. Nely has called Casa Violeta for me. Hopefully she will confirm ok for tomorrow. Tues 1st.
2. Taken note of tip on directions Markyd
3 . Uncertain about place in La Peza. Bring alone I prefer not to shop and cook for one. But if there is no bar in any other place I may just have to. 🤣
4. Quentar or Tocón de Quentar. Still undecided.

@AJGuillaume
Thanks for your tips. Really appreciate them from both of you.
Halloween crazies out now so might retire early.
 
Uncertain about place in La Peza. Bring alone I prefer not to shop and cook for one. But if there is no bar in any other place I may just have to. 🤣
We were in La Peza on a Monday, so we didn't have much choice. We didn't like the state of the kitchen in the albergue, so we ate at the only bar open then, the Bar Fernando
PXL_20221003_123955288.jpg
 
AJ. If I’m in La Peza - then that’s the bar I’ll be eating at if it’s open.
Abla is a place that is sooooooo steep isn’t it. I feel sorry for the residents. A lot of aged ones too. You’d really need to be sure you didn’t forget anything at the shops below. It’s all uphill to everywhere.
Kids playing ball have to learn fast / not to miss catching it. It’s downhill fast !!
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
Wow - it’s so good getting refreshed tips from both of you AJ & MarkyD
MarkyD
1. Nely has called Casa Violeta for me. Hopefully she will confirm ok for tomorrow. Tues 1st.
2. Taken note of tip on directions Markyd
3 . Uncertain about place in La Peza. Bring alone I prefer not to shop and cook for one. But if there is no bar in any other place I may just have to. 🤣
4. Quentar or Tocón de Quentar. Still undecided.

@AJGuillaume
Thanks for your tips. Really appreciate them from both of you.
Halloween crazies out now so might retire early.
If you decide on the full stage La Peza to Quéntar, then you'll need to take food and lots of water with you. There is absolutely nothing in between these two towns that are 27km apart. It will take all day, but hey, you have all day! It is a stunningly beautiful route and there will be shade in the pine forests. When you come down off the first mountain down on to the road, it then takes you onto a dry stream route that is quite rocky and undulating. I took the road route, signed for cyclists. I dropped back onto the rocky dry stream path for a bit to sit down and have a snack and change my socks. It's not too long before you get off the road at Puerto de Los Blancares - one of the few spots that you might get a phone signal.

Note: the phone signal disappears as you get over the first hill when leaving La Peza.

There are also a few well placed concrete benches that can be used for picnic and stretching out on. Here are some pictures I took from that stage on the 18th of October.
 

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3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
Wow 😯 @OzAnnie, plain & simple...I'm in awe of you...tough lady.
All those tumbles...I want to send you some bubble wrap!
Unlike @VNwalking, the Mozarabe is on My List; although not in the short term I will definitely be referring to this thread when the time comes.
So glad you've had help & support both on the ground & here on the Forum. However at the end of the day, it's still you strapping on the backpack & clocking up the k's...amazing, well done.
Despite (or perhaps, because of,) all the ups & downs (literally & metaphorically), a cracking good read to boot!
Wishing you happy & smoother trails ahead.
Take care 🤗
👣🌏
 
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Wow 😯 @OzAnnie, plain & simple...I'm in awe of you...tough lady.
All those tumbles...I want to send you some bubble wrap!
Unlike @VNwalking, the Mozarabe is on My List; although not in the short term I will definitely be referring to this thread when the time comes.
So glad you've had help & support both on the ground & here on the Forum. However at the end of the day, it's still you strapping on the backpack & clocking up the k's...amazing, well done.
Despite (or perhaps, because of,) all the ups & downs (literally & metaphorically), a cracking good read to boot!
Wishing you happy & smoother trails ahead.
Take care 🤗
👣🌏
@OzAnnie
For the stopover at Huéneja, there is a local food shop just down the short hill from the wonderful donativo Albergue Casa Violeta. Check the kitchen cupboards first though, because it was fantastically well-stocked of everything you could think of to knock up a nutritious meal, plus Violeta often brings freshly harvested produce from her finca.

At the bottom of the hill, there is the huge church next to the "rambla". Then going up the other hill is a lovely tree-encircled square opposite the ayuntamiento. A bit further up is the entriguing mini-roundabout with metallic sculptures of a mother wolf and two cubs. To the right of that is a fantastic bar with amazing tapas. They even have a "futbolín" table there. Did you know that "table football" was invented by a local man from Finisterre? It had a perspex top, which made the game even more skilful.

Here are some pictures of Casa Violeta. There is a washing machine and detergent there, plus a great place to hang out to dry the clothes - which at night can double as an observatory of the night sky 😀

In the second picture Ramón took the selfie with me and my daughter in the background about to enter the albergue. Ramón drove us from Abla so that my daughter, Abbiher, could have a rest day, which I thoroughly enjoyed too 😀.

Ramón is an amazing character, his story of recovery from serious health issues is something of a miracle according to his doctors. His "secret remedy" has been WALKING, but walking an average 20km a day, sometimes 50km. He told me that he no longer needs medication and that most of his symptoms have completely gone. He swears by it, refuses to take any medication except his own discipline of walking everyday in the hills or wherever. Apparently, he was interviewed about his story by a Japanese TV company.
 

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Wow MarkyD.
So helpful for me today and those who follow. ❤️🙏
I just edited it, but I'm not sure if you get notified of the changes. Apart from typos that I've corrected, I added some information about Ramón which I think people might find interesting.
 
Thankyou Marky - I just read through your edit about. Ramón.
I’m having a coffee at the albergue now - 6.40am. Ready to go but will wait for better light around 7.10. I haven’t met Ramón. He hasn’t been to albergue yesterday or last night. Probably taking a rest on Halloween. I wish I’d met him.
Great pic of you and your daughter with Hospi Ramón in front.
A good message for living longer (his example/discipline of walking in the hills.) for his health.
🙏. Annie

Ps. I’ve found that any edits made to a post after someone reads that post are not noticed or notified to them (at least not to me on my settings)., unless the reader notices a change and reads again. Tks.
 
Thankyou Marky - I just read through your edit about. Ramón.
I’m having a coffee at the albergue now - 6.40am. Ready to go but will wait for better light around 7.10. I haven’t met Ramón. He hasn’t been to albergue yesterday or last night. Probably taking a rest on Halloween. I wish I’d met him.
Great pic of you and your daughter with Hospi Ramón in front.
A good message for living longer (his example/discipline of walking in the hills.) for his health.
🙏. Annie

Ps. I’ve found that any edits made to a post after someone reads that post are not noticed or notified to them (at least not to me on my settings)., unless the reader notices a change and reads again. Tks.
Ramón told me that many pilgrims walk back down through the town to continue, but he says you can go out from the albergue at the top somewhere and join up with the trail further ahead. Sorry. I don't have accurate info on that. No doubt you'll decide your own way. Buen Camino today and every day of your life. I look forward to hearing about the stage I skipped and seeing a few lovely photos too 😊
 
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Ramón told me that many pilgrims walk back down through the town to continue, but he says you can go out from the albergue at the top somewhere and join up with the trail further ahead. Sorry. I don't have accurate info on that. No doubt you'll decide your own way. Buen Camino today and every day of your life. I look forward to hearing about the stage I skipped and seeing a few lovely photos too 😊
Hi MarkyD. I’m in Fiñana having tostada and a 2nd coffee. Did you miss this stage ?
Manuel ., the other peregrino in Abla albergue last night was choosing to walk the other way you mentioned. Nely suggested it to him as he wanted to look at the pueblo Abrucena. You can see in the maps me screenshot that I am on the normal trail back downtown via Calle Real etc. The albergue is quite away closer to Abrucena than shows in this pic. So leaving the albergue you do see the flechas pointing right in that direction. He then will walk the road up under the autovía thru rotundas to meet up with marked trail on screen shot.
I felt the (back thru town ) marked way suited me.
 

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Hi MarkyD. I’m in Fiñana having tostada and a 2nd coffee. Did you miss this stage ?
Manuel ., the other peregrino in Abla albergue last night was choosing to walk the other way you mentioned. Nely suggested it to him as he wanted to look at the pueblo Abrucena. You can see in the maps me screenshot that I am on the normal trail back downtown via Calle Real etc. The albergue is quite away closer to Abrucena than shows in this pic. So leaving the albergue you do see the flechas pointing right in that direction. He then will walk the road up under the autovía thru rotundas to meet up with marked trail on screen shot.
I felt the (back thru town ) marked way suited me.
Yes, we skipped that stage to give time for my daughter's heel injury to recover. We gave it another go after a day's rest in Huéneja by walking to Alquife. However, that evening she decided she couldn't risk further damage and it was very painful. So the next morning Lacho took us to Guadix. So we missed the stage from Alquife to Guadix too. Oh well, maybe we'll go back and walk those two stages another time.
 
St James' Way - Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading to Southampton, 110 kms
Day 5. Abla to Huéneja
I arrived Huéneja & found first place for a coffee. Not great - had very little to eat - so tapa it had to be. Hungry so ‘ una más por favor ‘ 😁🙏. Then to Casa violeta. I thought I had a problem with no hot water in the shower but had not found the ‘real’ shower. I hadn’t opened that door on right thinking it was a private storage room. Waited for Violeta to come up & find the problem . I had let the water run for a while (in rear bedroom shower )thinking it might take a while to come from the hot water service (boiler ). But still frío. Apparently that one doesn’t work !
So Violeta arrived and opened the (?storage door ! It was a shower and the water did get hot. ). Duh. Dumbo I felt. It is a really unusual residence. Exterior paint work and rooms all over the place. She was very helpful and brought her young 5 yr old son with her. I complimented her on her beautiful little girl. Uhmmmm. Long hair on a child doesn’t automatically mean a girl. Another foot in mouth. I still said her little boy was beautiful and she was happy with that.

The trail from Abla. It went really quickly to Fiñana (8klms). But the last 12.9 to
Huéneja kept on and on. They must all be mountain goats here. When I messaged Violeta to say I’d arrived - (you guessed it) I had to slog back UP the way I’d come down into the pueblo. No way was I going back to eat later. After shower - a siesta. I really needed it.
There was a little section of DRB before Fiñana but lots of it into Huéneja. I notice on Gronze now (too late) that there is a cyclist route - the trail is extremely tough underfoot after a while. A lot better than wet & muddy like into Nacimiento but tiring still. It was one of those “ are we there yet ?” sections. I even started talking to myself and saying : “Someone is playing a joke on me - these kilometres into Huéneja are stretching further & further”. @MarkyD - I wouldn’t come back to retrace this etapa ever. It would be a different thing if it was eg Fuenfría pass going over the mountains on camino Madrid. I had to miss that in 2018 due to snow. If I’m still on camino in the future - I ‘would’ return to complete that stage into Segovia. But MarkyD / just put the stage Abla to Huéneja off your ‘to do’ list.

On one section of the DRB today there was an incorrect flecha amarilla.. I followed it and the farmer explained that it was wrong / back to the DRB !!!
Sun was still hot 🥵 🔥 even though the temps read much lower than it was for AJ and Rachel and MarkyD. I really can’t conceive how anyone could walk this trail in the heat (DRB’s absorbing the heat too).

I haven’t taken any pics of Huéneja. A pic from the roof of Casa Violeta is all in this group.
There are a few pics getting closer to Huéneja where the landscape reminded me a lot of around Las Vegas - Nevada (where my son lives )
There was a pleasant spot in shade where I stopped to sit on bench and have a rest and drink, thinking destination was close. Just after that you’re whipped off to the right (would be easy to miss that one ) and into that long DRB into Huéneja.
The pic of pueblo on hill was coming into Fiñana. Another place where people are all mountain goats. I had an hour break there …. Then straight up when you leave the plaza / then straight back down !! The routing all seems like it’s a test 🤣🤣
of pilgrim stamina.
I asked Violeta if the people in this region suffered many heart attacks She laughed and said it made them strong.
 

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Day 5. Abla to Huéneja
I arrived Huéneja & found first place for a coffee. Not great - had very little to eat - so tapa it had to be. Hungry so ‘ una más por favor ‘ 😁🙏. Then to Casa violeta. I thought I had a problem with no hot water in the shower but had not found the ‘real’ shower. I hadn’t opened that door on right thinking it was a private storage room. Waited for Violeta to come up & find the problem . I had let the water run for a while (in rear bedroom shower )thinking it might take a while to come from the hot water service (boiler ). But still frío. Apparently that one doesn’t work !
So Violeta arrived and opened the (?storage door ! It was a shower and the water did get hot. ). Duh. Dumbo I felt. It is a really unusual residence. Exterior paint work and rooms all over the place. She was very helpful and brought her young 5 yr old son with her. I complimented her on her beautiful little girl. Uhmmmm. Long hair on a child doesn’t automatically mean a girl. Another foot in mouth. I still said her little boy was beautiful and she was happy with that.

The trail from Abla. It went really quickly to Fiñana (8klms). But the last 12.9 to
Huéneja kept on and on. They must all be mountain goats here. When I messaged Violeta to say I’d arrived - (you guessed it) I had to slog back UP the way I’d come down into the pueblo. No way was I going back to eat later. After shower - a siesta. I really needed it.
There was a little section of DRB before Fiñana but lots of it into Huéneja. I notice on Gronze now (too late) that there is a cyclist route - the trail is extremely tough underfoot after a while. A lot better than wet & muddy like into Nacimiento but tiring still. It was one of those “ are we there yet ?” sections. I even started talking to myself and saying : “Someone is playing a joke on me - these kilometres into Huéneja are stretching further & further”. @MarkyD - I wouldn’t come back to retrace this etapa ever. It would be a different thing if it was eg Fuenfría pass going over the mountains on camino Madrid. I had to miss that in 2018 due to snow. If I’m still on camino in the future - I ‘would’ return to complete that stage into Segovia. But MarkyD / just put the stage Abla to Huéneja off your ‘to do’ list.

On one section of the DRB today there was an incorrect flecha amarilla.. I followed it and the farmer explained that it was wrong / back to the DRB !!!
Sun was still hot 🥵 🔥 even though the temps read much lower than it was for AJ and Rachel and MarkyD. I really can’t conceive how anyone could walk this trail in the heat (DRB’s absorbing the heat too).

I haven’t taken any pics of Huéneja. A pic from the roof of Casa Violeta is all in this group.
There are a few pics getting closer to Huéneja where the landscape reminded me a lot of around Las Vegas - Nevada (where my son lives )
There was a pleasant spot in shade where I stopped to sit on bench and have a rest and drink, thinking destination was close. Just after that you’re whipped off to the right (would be easy to miss that one ) and into that long DRB into Huéneja.
The pic of pueblo on hill was coming into Fiñana. Another place where people are all mountain goats. I had an hour break there …. Then straight up when you leave the plaza / then straight back down !! The routing all seems like it’s a test 🤣🤣
of pilgrim stamina.
I asked Violeta if the people in this region suffered many heart attacks She laughed and said it made them strong.
Aaww, @OzAnnie , you're having a bit of a test it would seem. I must admit, I felt like that at times too. It does get easier, but not easy. Up ahead, Guadix to La Peza is beautiful, but there are some long inclines and descents, albeit on much nicer surfaces for walking on (except the "rock and gravel ski-slope" into La Peza). The last 7km are a real test for stamina and will power.

The good news is that Huéneja to Alquife is much easier and you'll see the fantastic castle on the hill at La Calahorra (which I believe might be open to the public on Wednesdays). Ferreira is a lovely town, worth stopping there for lunch or a decent second breakfast!

On the way to Alquife you'll pass the 100km waymarker, but it's not 100km to go, it's 100km since leaving Almería. There are some hills, but much easier than the early stages. Mind you, the final walk up to Albergue Lacho is up a long steep road. Why would it not be? The house has some interesting art work and he'll put the heater on for you at night (on a timer, of course). The hot shower is limited to 50L a go, after that you'll need to wait for it to fill up and get to temperature. The large, plane-glaze window in the bathroom means you get a lovely view over the town. I guess if a neighbour looks up, then they might get a good look at you too! The albergue Lacho has a large well-equipped kitchen, but no food stock to speak of. They can usually make an evening meal and breakfast for an additional charge, or you can buy your own stuff to cook there.

The opencast iron-ore mine makes for something different on the landscape as you approach Alquife. I don't know what else is in the town, because I was there on a Sunday and everything was closed. No doubt Lacho can advise you.

Rest well, sink deep into positive meditation and tomorrow will bring a new day. Buen Camino peregrina Anne from Oz

PS. Thanks for the tip not to do today's stage! Maybe I might try it on a bike, thereby avoiding the dreaded DRBs...
 
Last edited:
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Aaww, @OzAnnie , you're having a bit of a test it would seem. I must admit, I felt like that at times too. It does get easier, but not easy. Up ahead, Guadix to La Peza is beautiful, but there are some long inclines and descents, albeit on much nicer surfaces for walking on (except the "rock and gravel ski-slope" into La Peza). The last 7km are a real test for stamina and will power.

The good news is that Huéneja to Alquife is much easier and you'll see the fantastic castle on the hill at La Calahorra (which I believe might be open to the public on Wednesdays). Ferreira is a lovely town, worth stopping there for lunch or a decent second breakfast!

On the way to Alquife you'll pass the 100km waymarker, but it's not 100km to go, it's 100km since leaving Almería. There are some hills, but much easier than the early stages. Mind you, the final walk up to Albergue Lacho is up a long steep road. Why would it not be? The house has some interesting art work and he'll put the heater on for you at night (on a timer, of course). The hot shower is limited to 50L a go, after that you'll need to wait for it to fill up and get to temperature. The large, plane-glaze window in the bathroom means you get a lovely view over the town. I guess if a neighbour looks up, then they might get a good look at you too! The albergue Lacho has a large well-equipped kitchen, but no food stock to speak of. They can usually make an evening meal and breakfast for an additional charge, or you can buy your own stuff to cook there.

The opencast iron-ore mine makes for something different on the landscape as you approach Alquife. I don't know what else is in the town, because I was there on a Sunday and everything was closed. No doubt Lacho can advise you.

Rest well, sink deep into positive meditation and tomorrow will bring a new day. Buen Camino peregrina Anne from Oz

PS. Thanks for the tip not to do today's stage! Maybe I might try it on a bike, thereby avoiding the dreaded DRBs...
Re (Alquife) Albergue Lacho info MarkyD
I notice on the Mozárabe (Almería amigos site) they have this info :
Do you think it’s incorrect that they have a breakfast included. ??

————- Albergue Lacho ——-
16 € incluido Desayuno, Wifi, lavadora (2,50 €)

Thanks again for all the detail on stages ahead.
Annie
 
The albergue is quite away closer to Abrucena than shows in this pic. So leaving the albergue you do see the flechas pointing right in that direction.
We didn't see any arrows pointing to Abrucena, so we just went back down the Calle Real, as you did.
I thought I had a problem with no hot water in the shower but had not found the ‘real’ shower. I hadn’t opened that door on right thinking it was a private storage room. Waited for Violeta to come up & find the problem . I had let the water run for a while (in rear bedroom shower )thinking it might take a while to come from the hot water service (boiler ). But still frío. Apparently that one doesn’t work !
Oh dear, I should have warned you! Sorry, @OzAnnie ! When we spoke to Violeta's husband on the phone, he explained to us that that shower didn't have hot water, and I assumed he or Violeta might have done the same...
But the last 12.9 to
Huéneja kept on and on.
Yep. Same here. Are we there yet ... Glad my darling had stamina on that day...
But MarkyD / just put the stage Abla to Huéneja off your ‘to do’ list.
I agree.
The good news is that Huéneja to Alquife is much easier and you'll see the fantastic castle on the hill at La Calahorra (which I believe might be open to the public on Wednesdays).
We stopped in La Calahorra on a Wednesday. The castle is open in the morning, until 2 pm, and then opens again at 4pm. We had met a couple in Huéneja, Jojo and Aurora, and they visited the castle in the afternoon, and after the visit, continued to Alquife.
Note that the visit is guided, costs 3 Euros, and the guide speaks Spanish fast :)

The walk through the pine forest when you see the castle is very nice.
 
Re (Alquife) Albergue Lacho info MarkyD
I notice on the Mozárabe (Almería amigos site) they have this info :
Do you think it’s incorrect that they have a breakfast included. ??

————- Albergue Lacho ——-
16 € incluido Desayuno, Wifi, lavadora (2,50 €)

Thanks again for all the detail on stages ahead.
Annie
We didn't stay in Alquife, but pilgrims we spoke to said that as the albergue was out of town, Lacho provides breakfast. And if you need a lift from Alquife to the albergue, he'll come and meet you.
 
A guide to speaking Spanish on the Camino - enrich your pilgrim experience.
Just thinking ahead about accommodation in Guadix...
If you've been to Coober Pedy, you might not need/want the cueva experience.
If you do choose the cueva accommodation, just bear in mind that it's not central. That's not an issue if Paco knows you're in town, because he'll come and pick you up to show you the cathedral. So make sure he knows you're there ☺️ Let him know anyway, wherever you stay: Paco is another Camino angel!
If you choose to stay more centrally, then you can always have a look at a cueva when you arrive in Guadix. There's a mirador just after the cuevas interpretation centre, and as you climb up, you'll see the Cueva de José. Donativo entry.
PXL_20220930_091727358.jpg
We were celebrating a milestone in our lives, so we stayed at the hotel Abentofail, but it doesn't have pilgrim rates. La Casona de la Luz has pilgrim rates, and is more central.
 

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