• PLEASE NOTE: Please think twice before you travel to Spain now. More here.

Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Pimientos myth?

Did you ever find a hot Pimiento de Padron?


  • Total voters
    39

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Eleven different ones in Poland, Finland, Portugal and Spain
Somewhere (Brierley maybe) I read that every fifth Pimiento de Padron is supposed to be very hot, turning the meal into a kind of Galitian culinary roulette. I have eaten at least 10 meals of pimientos de Padron and I love it. However, have I been unlucky (lucky?), because all pimientos have been anything but hot. Who has had a different experience, or shall we call the myth busted?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
I've seen a figure of 1 in 10 bandied about. Try growing your own. The slower they grow the hotter they get. I've encountered some pretty spicy hits in bars in remoter and more rural parts of Spain where the pimientos probably came out of someones garden or veg patch. The poly-tunnel grown mass produced stuff, though still delicious, is generally pretty palate friendly.
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Eleven different ones in Poland, Finland, Portugal and Spain
I've seen a figure of 1 in 10 bandied about. Try growing your own. The slower they grow the hotter they get. I've encountered some pretty spicy hits in bars in remoter and more rural parts of Spain where the pimientos probably came out of someones garden or veg patch. The poly-tunnel grown mass produced stuff, though still delicious, is generally pretty palate friendly.
http://otherspain.com/pages/recipes/pimientos.asp
 

Peter Fransiscus

Be a Rainbow in someone else's cloud.
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
Somewhere (Brierley maybe) I read that every fifth Pimiento de Padron is supposed to be very hot, turning the meal into a kind of Galitian culinary roulette. I have eaten at least 10 meals of pimientos de Padron and I love it. However, have I been unlucky (lucky?), because all pimientos have been anything but hot. Who has had a different experience, or shall we call the myth busted?
You are Lucky :D I had several very hot ones.
Keep trying and maybe you get un lucky.

Wish you well,Peter.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Oily when grilled and never a hot one; now Espelette piments, there is a hot pepper.
 

PDX Bucky

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
First Camino Frances -- April/May 2017
Second Camino Frances -- Sept 2019
Having fallen in love with the humble Pimiento de Padron on our first trip to Barcelona, we've grown our own at home for the past five years. We typically plant around a dozen plants and get a basket full of these delights a couple of times a week. I can attest to the fact that there are "hot" ones. I once thought that it was based on how long they spent on the stem, but they can be big or small and still be hot. On the Scoville scale, they are nowhere near some of the hotter peppers, but they can still leave a lingering "glow" in your mouth.
 

mariam88

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2017)
Dreaming of a 2019 Camino ...
My parents (who are from La Coruña) say that a lot of the Pimientos are called Padrón but they're actually grown around Betanzos and they're not hot. Don't know how true this is. We grow them in our garden in London and we definitely get more than 1 in 10 that are hot, especially if we don't water them properly
 
A

AJ

Guest
Maybe half a dozen hot ones (very hot they were too!!) in I don't know how many plates full over the past 9 years.
 

Mike Savage

So many friends to meet . . . so little time
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés,Inglés
Muxia/Finisterre
Português Coastal
Português Central
Sanabrés
I've eaten dozens nay, hundreds and never had a hot one. I do enjoy spicy food and wish they were grown hotter.

In my experience growing peppers they are hotter when watered less. Too much water washes out the heat on peppers and the taste on tomatoes.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Never in Spain, and I'm very fond of them so I've eaten a lot. Home grown ones from America on the other hand...yeah, about half-half, always depending on how much the plants have been watered--for the fruit to be mild, the plants need to be well-watered.
 

jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(10,11,17), Vasco(12), Salvador(13), CP(13), CN(14), Madrid (16), Mozarabe (18), VdlP(19)
Somewhere (Brierley maybe) I read that every fifth Pimiento de Padron is supposed to be very hot, turning the meal into a kind of Galitian culinary roulette. I have eaten at least 10 meals of pimientos de Padron and I love it. However, have I been unlucky (lucky?), because all pimientos have been anything but hot. Who has had a different experience, or shall we call the myth busted?

Jakke:

I have ordered and eaten them many times. I have never had an even mildly hot one.

Good luck with your survey.

Joe
 

Mike Savage

So many friends to meet . . . so little time
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés,Inglés
Muxia/Finisterre
Português Coastal
Português Central
Sanabrés
If you plant regular peppers anywhere near hot peppers, they will have heat! Best to space them far apart.:oops:

Interesting. I can't imagine why they would: they cannot cross pollinate since peppers are self pollinating.
 

Sarah Olson

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017, Portugues
Okay, y'all made me look it up, just to prove I'm not crazy! This is an excerpt from a study:

A misconception exists among a number of individuals who save their own seed. The misconception is that no crossing has occurred if the fruit and foliage of the first generation (F1 generation) or subsequent generations appear no different than the parental generation. This misconception can be illustrated by performing the following test. The test consists of growing a row of hot peppers next to a row of sweet peppers, both varieties having approximately the same shape and color of fruit and otherwise similar in appearance. The seed from the fruit of the sweet variety is then saved and planted. When the fruit of this planting (F1 generation) is eaten, a high percentage of these peppers will be found to be hot (due to the presence of a dominant gene received from the hot variety). One enthusiastic bite into a hot sweet pepper will illustrate that similarity in appearance does not mean absence of cross-pollination. Incidentally, the hot trait will not disappear in the next generation (F2 generation) or subsequent generations unless the hot plants are rogued out (each plant would have to be grown in isolation to do this). Instead the genes will "move around" in the plants of the subsequent generations. This experiment demonstrates the obvious results of cross-pollination,
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Eleven different ones in Poland, Finland, Portugal and Spain
Oily when grilled and never a hot one; now Espelette piments, there is a hot pepper.
True, but I like olive oil. I'll have to try those Espelettes. Thanks for the tip!
My parents (who are from La Coruña) say that a lot of the Pimientos are called Padrón but they're actually grown around Betanzos and they're not hot. Don't know how true this is. We grow them in our garden in London and we definitely get more than 1 in 10 that are hot, especially if we don't water them properly

You can buy them here in Finland, but when you study the small print. You'll see that they have come from Marocco!
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
For me, I eat one and think mmm, spicy. Then I eat about 3 more and suddenly feel whoa actually these fellas are HOT. It builds up on you, and grabs you after 3 or 4. So people might think that the 5th pimento is the hot one, but actually the sneaky devils are ganging up. And they hang out with cream cheese, which aids in their little game.
 

peregrino_tom

Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
I'm convinced there's some European Union Health directive that's been quietly put in place in the last few years to eradicate the hot ones on the grounds of Health and Safety or minimise the incidence of personal injury litigation.
On my first couple of caminos there was a decent smattering of the fiercesome ones. In later years I'd be warning newbies about these, but none were ever found and they'd look at me like I'd been spending just a bit too long on the camino (I should be so lucky)
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
I wonder if there is an added variable here, being our perception of "hot."
That can that vary as much as the pimentos' actual hotness.
I notice at least 2 people who perceive heat are British. Not to make assumptions, but...;):D

(In Galicia, I've never had one that's more than a wee bit warm. When I ate home-grown ones that had been starved of water a bit...hotter. But still not hot. Or even close. The tiny green bombs that we get here in Burma, on the other hand...terribly wonderful, and always a surprise, hidden in the innocent looking curried eggs or pickled tea leaf salad.:eek:)
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Eleven different ones in Poland, Finland, Portugal and Spain
I wonder if there is an added variable here, being our perception of "hot."
That can that vary as much as the pimentos' actual hotness.
I notice at least 2 people who perceive heat are British. Not to make assumptions, but...;):D

(In Galicia, I've never had one that's more than a wee bit warm. When I ate home-grown ones that had been starved of water a bit...hotter. But still not hot. Or even close. The tiny green bombs that we get here in Burma, on the other hand...terribly wonderful, and always a surprise, hidden in the innocent looking curried eggs or pickled tea leaf salad.:eek:)

Thank you so much! This reply is more than an opinion. Your recepies sound great. I have eaten the pimientos like I got them in Padron: grilled in oil and with sea salt. Curried eggs especially sounds like a good idea. More useful recepies?
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
More useful recepies?
Off topic, but here (thanks to the wonder of the internet) is a recipe for you, Jakke. We just had a veterinarian version of this served at lunch today, very Burmese--except the real Burmese version has much more oil.
The pickled tea-leaf salad is not really reproducible without the actual Burmese fermented tea leaves (I've tried), but this is what it looks like.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
I've just made piperade for dinner, in memory of a wonderful dinner we had at Lavarrenx in the French Basque country, on the Le Puy route. Delicious. A good half cup of olive oil, into which goes finely chopped onions, finely chopped red and green capsicum (I think in the US bell peppers?) and tomatoes - all in about equal quantities. A teaspoon of cider vinegar.

I add some sliced chorizo sausage to make it a substantial main dish. Cook until it softens and all melds together well, serve with crusty bread to sop up the juices. Easy, and a family favourite.
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
I wonder if there is an added variable here, being our perception of "hot."
That can that vary as much as the pimentos' actual hotness.
I notice at least 2 people who perceive heat are British. Not to make assumptions, but...;):D

(In Galicia, I've never had one that's more than a wee bit warm. When I ate home-grown ones that had been starved of water a bit...hotter. But still not hot. Or even close. The tiny green bombs that we get here in Burma, on the other hand...terribly wonderful, and always a surprise, hidden in the innocent looking curried eggs or pickled tea leaf salad.:eek:)

When I was in Kerala some one said the wise words: 'Beware the smallest thing on the Thali'. That little smear of pickle, or the teeny tiny chilli, is gonna get you!

But the Brits love spicy food.
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Eleven different ones in Poland, Finland, Portugal and Spain
Off topic, but here (thanks to the wonder of the internet) is a recipe for you, Jakke. We just had a veterinarian version of this served at lunch today, very Burmese--except the real Burmese version has much more oil.
The pickled tea-leaf salad is not really reproducible without the actual Burmese fermented tea leaves (I've tried), but this is what it looks like.
Gracias!
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Eleven different ones in Poland, Finland, Portugal and Spain
I've just made piperade for dinner, in memory of a wonderful dinner we had at Lavarrenx in the French Basque country, on the Le Puy route. Delicious. A good half cup of olive oil, into which goes finely chopped onions, finely chopped red and green capsicum (I think in the US bell peppers?) and tomatoes - all in about equal quantities. A teaspoon of cider vinegar.

I add some sliced chorizo sausage to make it a substantial main dish. Cook until it softens and all melds together well, serve with crusty bread to sop up the juices. Easy, and a family favourite.
Thanks. Sounds great!
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
I've just made piperade for dinner, in memory of a wonderful dinner we had at Lavarrenx in the French Basque country, on the Le Puy route. Delicious. A good half cup of olive oil, into which goes finely chopped onions, finely chopped red and green capsicum (I think in the US bell peppers?) and tomatoes - all in about equal quantities. A teaspoon of cider vinegar.

I add some sliced chorizo sausage to make it a substantial main dish. Cook until it softens and all melds together well, serve with crusty bread to sop up the juices. Easy, and a family favourite.
Kanga, I have a much cherished container of Piment d'Espelette which I sprinkle cautiously on many things I prepare, but when I grill chipirones (calamari) which are now available in US groceries I usually over do it like they do in Basque Country. Bon appetite!
 
Last edited:

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Again, soon as possible!
I have found about four hot ones in three years walking. It really surprised me the first time I got one! I eat extremely hot chili all the time (addicted), and even I thought the hot ones were hot!
 

Mike Savage

So many friends to meet . . . so little time
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés,Inglés
Muxia/Finisterre
Português Coastal
Português Central
Sanabrés
Okay, y'all made me look it up, just to prove I'm not crazy! This is an excerpt from a study:

A misconception exists among a number of individuals who save their own seed. The misconception is that no crossing has occurred if the fruit and foliage of the first generation (F1 generation) or subsequent generations appear no different than the parental generation. This misconception can be illustrated by performing the following test. The test consists of growing a row of hot peppers next to a row of sweet peppers, both varieties having approximately the same shape and color of fruit and otherwise similar in appearance. The seed from the fruit of the sweet variety is then saved and planted. When the fruit of this planting (F1 generation) is eaten, a high percentage of these peppers will be found to be hot (due to the presence of a dominant gene received from the hot variety). One enthusiastic bite into a hot sweet pepper will illustrate that similarity in appearance does not mean absence of cross-pollination. Incidentally, the hot trait will not disappear in the next generation (F2 generation) or subsequent generations unless the hot plants are rogued out (each plant would have to be grown in isolation to do this). Instead the genes will "move around" in the plants of the subsequent generations. This experiment demonstrates the obvious results of cross-pollination,

Interesting. Thanks for posting this Sarah.
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Eleven different ones in Poland, Finland, Portugal and Spain
Viranani is right -- my request for her recepies is a bit off-topic, so I'll start a new thread where you can share your best Padron peppers recepies.
 
Last edited:

brian560

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, VdlP 2016, Port. Central, Norte , Port. Coastal (2018).San Salvador and Primitivo (2019)
Never found a hot one in Spain. But we get them from a grower here in Australia, and indeed about 1 in 10 is very hot. He explained it was the growing conditions as a long dry spell makes them hotter.
Where do you get them from. I love tham and I want some now lol
 

kerdi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte at the moment, Camino Frances, Camino Ingles in 2013 - 2014, Camino Lebaniego
Somewhere (Brierley maybe) I read that every fifth Pimiento de Padron is supposed to be very hot, turning the meal into a kind of Galitian culinary roulette. I have eaten at least 10 meals of pimientos de Padron and I love it. However, have I been unlucky (lucky?), because all pimientos have been anything but hot. Who has had a different experience, or shall we call the myth busted?
Hi
I have eaten Pimientos de Padron in various places in Spain, not only on the Camino. I had them in Madrid, Barcelona, in Laredo and places which are less visited by tourists. They are an obvious choice for my wife who prefers Vegan food. Never had a hot one - but that might be just my personal impression. We tend to eat hot anyway and consume a lot of chilies at home
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
My 2017 planting is yielding a bountiful crop. Only about one in twenty is hot. I think the secret was to keep them away from the jalapeno pepper plants to prevent cross polination, and, perhaps, harvesting regularly before the pepper gets large. I get a racione every two days!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
falcon, please invite me over. I will wash the dishes, bring the wine, you name it, I just want to eat some. I had some once in a tapas place in Chicago, but they were not the same.

I am not a foodie by any stretch, but I always eat padrón peppers in Galicia. One of my favorite places in Santiago to do this is the Bodeguilla de San Roque, which is very close to the lovely hotel Costa Vella. Anyway, I do have a topic-related point -- when I was in Santiago one May several years ago to volunteer in the pilgrims' office, I went to the Bodeguilla and saw that the peppers were not on the menu. :(When I asked about it, they told me that serving them before summer means that a lot more will be very hot. That's not a theory any of you knowledgeable people have proposed, but I wonder if time of year could also be involved. Whatever it is, viva el pimento de padrón!
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
falcon, please invite me over. . .viva el pimento de padrón!
Can I come too, please???
Better yet lets all go to Bodeguilla de San Roque.
(Like you, Laurie, I could live on these, and do when I'm in Santiago. I'm not fussy about where I go and often end up in a little place near the Cathedral on the Rúa da Acibechería. Next time maybe I'll branch out.)

When I asked about it, they told me that serving them before summer means that a lot more will be very hot.
I'm told by one who should know that the heat happens when the plants get less water, as would happen in hot summer weather. So you may be right.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Wouldn't that be the opposite of the theory heard by @peregrina2000 ?
Ooops, I misread. You're right.
I've always been able to find them in March and April, and nary a hot one yet. Well, go figure.
What's certain is that we can all feel happy for Falcon. Lucky him!:cool:
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
Scientific method took a beating; I changed a lot of variables. I used raised beds what required daily watering instead of the ground soil in my front yard that relied mostly on rain irrigation. The plantings were from three different seed sources, two on eBay and one from a store in Spain. I used liquid fertilizer more often this year, since there was not a lot of soil from which the plants could draw nutrition. I am harvesting more often since the plants are on my back deck, so the peppers are a bit smaller. And, as mentioned, I did not plant other pepper plants anywhere nearby. Last year every pimiento was as hot as a jalapeno. This year they are generally mild, with about one in twenty have some bite. Since I did not change just one factor, I have no idea what caused the difference in 2016 and 2017 harvests. The crop is so bountiful that I think I can drop my multivitamin and just eat peppers!;)
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Scientific method took a beating; I changed a lot of variables. I used raised beds what required daily watering instead of the ground soil in my front yard that relied mostly on rain irrigation. The plantings were from three different seed sources, two on eBay and one from a store in Spain. I used liquid fertilizer more often this year, since there was not a lot of soil from which the plants could draw nutrition. I am harvesting more often since the plants are on my back deck, so the peppers are a bit smaller. And, as mentioned, I did not plant other pepper plants anywhere nearby. Last year every pimiento was as hot as a jalapeno. This year they are generally mild, with about one in twenty have some bite. Since I did not change just one factor, I have no idea what caused the difference in 2016 and 2017 harvests. The crop is so bountiful that I think I can drop my multivitamin and just eat peppers!;)

You obviously have a very green thumb, falcon. From the picture, it looks like the plants are growing in a very shallow nylon basket of sorts. How does that work, doesn't the water drain right through? And I see red round things peeping out in the back of the picture -- gazpacho, anyone?
 

Advertisement

Booking.com

Camino Conversations

Camino Conversations

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 56 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 200 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 329 24.9%
  • June

    Votes: 96 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 24 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.0%
  • September

    Votes: 381 28.8%
  • October

    Votes: 158 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top