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Shoe issues CF from SJPDP

Moniq

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino de Portugues
Hi all,
I have a new question. I am starting the CF from SJPDP on April 5th. Last year I walked the CP in NB Hierro 6 men’s. Liked them because of the roomy toebox and cushioning. The fit of the Hierro 7 is different so a no go, the 6 aren’t available in my size. I have bunions so I need I wide toebox. I have tried:
- Altra Timp 2, too slippery
- Altra Olympus, fits well but zero drop causes problems
- Brooks Cascadia men, too stiff and slippery at the heel
- Brooks Caldera men is not available in my size anywhere so I can’t try them on
- Hoka Challenger 7 men wide but heel slips

Currently I am trying
- Hoka Challenger 6 men. Fits okay not sure about

And I will try Hoka Stinson men and Hoka Speedgoat 5 men (probably not wide enough)

I am also thinking about Hoka Bondi 8 wide.

What I need is:
- wide toebox
- cushioning
- at least 4-5 mm drop
- grippy soles
I have had an accident 4 years ago and still suffer from Post Concussion Syndrome, so I am really afraid of slipping on wet surfaces.

I also would like the to last the whole CF. I don’t read very good reviews about the soles of the Challenger and Stinson (slippery and not durable)

I am wondering whether the Bondis are sturdy enough to bring me down to Roncevalles, Zubiri and all those other hills with rocks etc.

I might be overthinking but …

And for all of you who answered so kindly to my ZPacks question. I decided not to buy them, to bring my Inov 8 rain jacket, GG umbrella, rain skirt and some handmade gaiters.
 
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What I need is:
- wide toebox
- cushioning
- at least 4-5 mm drop
- grippy soles
My New Balance Fresh Foam More shoes meet those requirements, and come in wide.

I find that the cushioning is less effective after 500-700 km, but think that is true for all the super-cushioned shoes. So, it depends on how badly your feet need that cushioning, whether that will be OK for you
 
My New Balance Fresh Foam More shoes meet those requirements, and come in wide.

I find that the cushioning is less effective after 500-700 km, but think that is true for all the super-cushioned shoes. So, it depends on how badly your feet need that cushioning, whether that will be OK for you
I know that cushioning will get less after a while. Are these grippy?
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Drop and soles on my Roclite G 290 also fit the description, toebox is wide-ish but not like Altra. Cushioning was OK for the CF for me, but some need more, some need less... maybe give them a try if you can find them, i am not sure if they have been discontinued.
 
My New Balance Fresh Foam More shoes meet those requirements, and come in wide.
I should add that New Balance has made a mistake in the design of V4, compared to Version 3 that I wear. They have moved a plasticky graphic line forward so it coincides exactly with the widest part of the shoe. This creates a pressure point almost like a seam over my tailor's bunion on the outside of my foot. I might need to go to the extra-wide (now I am wearing wide) in the Version 4. It was a very stupid design error. I promptly ordered 4 pairs of the V3 so I have a year's supply.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Hi all,
I have a new question. I am starting the CF from SJPDP on April 5th. Last year I walked the CP in NB Hierro 6 men’s. Liked them because of the roomy toebox and cushioning. The fit of the Hierro 7 is different so a no go, the 6 aren’t available in my size. I have bunions so I need I wide toebox. I have tried:
- Altra Timp 2, too slippery
- Altra Olympus, fits well but zero drop causes problems
- Brooks Cascadia men, too stiff and slippery at the heel
- Brooks Caldera men is not available in my size anywhere so I can’t try them on
- Hoka Challenger 7 men wide but heel slips

Currently I am trying
- Hoka Challenger 6 men. Fits okay not sure about

And I will try Hoka Stinson men and Hoka Speedgoat 5 men (probably not wide enough)

I am also thinking about Hoka Bondi 8 wide.

What I need is:
- wide toebox
- cushioning
- at least 4-5 mm drop
- grippy soles
I have had an accident 4 years ago and still suffer from Post Concussion Syndrome, so I am really afraid of slipping on wet surfaces.

I also would like the to last the whole CF. I don’t read very good reviews about the soles of the Challenger and Stinson (slippery and not durable)

I am wondering whether the Bondis are sturdy enough to bring me down to Roncevalles, Zubiri and all those other hills with rocks etc.

I might be overthinking but …

And for all of you who answered so kindly to my ZPacks question. I decided not to buy them, to bring my Inov 8 rain jacket, GG umbrella, rain skirt and some handmade gaiters.
I used Salomon 4D Quest boots and I swapped out the stock insole for a set of PowerStep Pinnacle insoles (also took a spare pair of insoles with me and swapped them out along The Way). The Salomon’s have a wide toe box. Of course it all depends on your feet and the fit. Buen Camino.
 
My husband also needs a wide toe box and had Speedgoat 5s, one size larger than his normal size, but had issues with his toes hitting the top/front of the shoe coming down to Zubiri. As he continued to walk in them the issues with his toes became much worse because they continued to rub against the top of the shoe — maybe more of a depth issue than width? Anyway, he had to get new shoes in Logroño and the North Face men's Vectiv Futurelight shoes were perfect! They have a 6mm drop.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Drop and soles on my Roclite G 290 also fit the description, toebox is wide-ish but not like Altra. Cushioning was OK for the CF for me, but some need more, some need less... maybe give them a try if you can find them, i am not sure if they have been discontinued.
I will have a look but haven’t found them yet where live. But thanks!
Have a look at Topo…..they have evolved from running to trail to hiking shoes. Exceptionally light, top quality and very wide toe box!
I tried them but didn’t like them. Don’t know why unfortunately
 
Hi all,
I have a new question. I am starting the CF from SJPDP on April 5th. Last year I walked the CP in NB Hierro 6 men’s. Liked them because of the roomy toebox and cushioning. The fit of the Hierro 7 is different so a no go, the 6 aren’t available in my size. I have bunions so I need I wide toebox. I have tried:
- Altra Timp 2, too slippery
- Altra Olympus, fits well but zero drop causes problems
- Brooks Cascadia men, too stiff and slippery at the heel
- Brooks Caldera men is not available in my size anywhere so I can’t try them on
- Hoka Challenger 7 men wide but heel slips

Currently I am trying
- Hoka Challenger 6 men. Fits okay not sure about

And I will try Hoka Stinson men and Hoka Speedgoat 5 men (probably not wide enough)

I am also thinking about Hoka Bondi 8 wide.

What I need is:
- wide toebox
- cushioning
- at least 4-5 mm drop
- grippy soles
I have had an accident 4 years ago and still suffer from Post Concussion Syndrome, so I am really afraid of slipping on wet surfaces.

I also would like the to last the whole CF. I don’t read very good reviews about the soles of the Challenger and Stinson (slippery and not durable)

I am wondering whether the Bondis are sturdy enough to bring me down to Roncevalles, Zubiri and all those other hills with rocks etc.

I might be overthinking but …

And for all of you who answered so kindly to my ZPacks question. I decided not to buy them, to bring my Inov 8 rain jacket, GG umbrella, rain skirt and some handmade gaiters.
I know that footwear is as individual as there are individuals :) , so with that said, my journey to find a holy grail shoe has taken me through almost every brand ever made. I have RA, so my feet are always a problem and I've been retired for 2 years, so trading in daily work shoes for daily comfy shoes = the need for a very wide toebox!! I've tried trail runners to full on leather hiking boots and everything in between. Luckily I go through REI, so I can wear them out on hikes and really test them, before returning, which I have done with every pair until I found Topo's! They have the toebox of Altras, but they are not 0 drop, which just didn't work for me. I ordered Topo trail runners as well as the boots and really put them to the test. Though I wanted the trail runners to work, it was ultimately the boot that was my HG, along with my PowerStep orthotic. I see you are looking for men's sizing and they do make them in mens. Best of luck on your search and Buen Camino. https://www.topoathletic.com/W-Trailventure-2-WP?quantity=1&color=161
 
As I was writing my response, I see that someone else mentioned Topo's and then you responded. Sorry for cross-posts. Again good Luck!
 
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As I was writing my response, I see that someone else mentioned Topo's and then you responded. Sorry for cross-posts. Again good Luck!
No problem, thank you. I might even look at them again but then voor the road shoes, they are normally a bit more plush and have a bit softer upper. Didn’t like the ultra ventures. Wish we had a REI in the Netherlands, or any other shop that allows you try them out outside
 
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My husband also needs a wide toe box and had Speedgoat 5s, one size larger than his normal size, but had issues with his toes hitting the top/front of the shoe coming down to Zubiri. As he continued to walk in them the issues with his toes became much worse because they continued to rub against the top of the shoe — maybe more of a depth issue than width? Anyway, he had to get new shoes in Logroño and the North Face men's Vectiv Futurelight shoes were perfect! They have a 6mm drop.
I just looked into these shoes. Did he buy the exploits future lights? They seem to be waterproof. How breathable were they? 6 mm drop sounds good!
 
Hi all,
I have a new question. I am starting the CF from SJPDP on April 5th. Last year I walked the CP in NB Hierro 6 men’s. Liked them because of the roomy toebox and cushioning. The fit of the Hierro 7 is different so a no go, the 6 aren’t available in my size. I have bunions so I need I wide toebox. I have tried:
- Altra Timp 2, too slippery
- Altra Olympus, fits well but zero drop causes problems
- Brooks Cascadia men, too stiff and slippery at the heel
- Brooks Caldera men is not available in my size anywhere so I can’t try them on
- Hoka Challenger 7 men wide but heel slips

Currently I am trying
- Hoka Challenger 6 men. Fits okay not sure about

And I will try Hoka Stinson men and Hoka Speedgoat 5 men (probably not wide enough)

I am also thinking about Hoka Bondi 8 wide.

What I need is:
- wide toebox
- cushioning
- at least 4-5 mm drop
- grippy soles
I have had an accident 4 years ago and still suffer from Post Concussion Syndrome, so I am really afraid of slipping on wet surfaces.

I also would like the to last the whole CF. I don’t read very good reviews about the soles of the Challenger and Stinson (slippery and not durable)

I am wondering whether the Bondis are sturdy enough to bring me down to Roncevalles, Zubiri and all those other hills with rocks etc.

I might be overthinking but …

And for all of you who answered so kindly to my ZPacks question. I decided not to buy them, to bring my Inov 8 rain jacket, GG umbrella, rain skirt and some handmade gaiters.
I can’t offer any advice about your shoes but I would advise staying in Orisson after leaving St. Jean rather than trying to get to ronces in one day. The climb across the mountains is not bad and mostly over a single paved lane but the drop to ronces can be quite treacherous with a steep grade and slippery loose gravel. This challenge comes up after a long day crossing over the border and many people have wiped out on tired legs. Better to accept a very short hike to orrison and start with fresh strong legs to get into roncesvalles in my humble opinion.
 
I can’t offer any advice about your shoes but I would advise staying in Orisson after leaving St. Jean rather than trying to get to ronces in one day. The climb across the mountains is not bad and mostly over a single paved lane but the drop to ronces can be quite treacherous with a steep grade and slippery loose gravel. This challenge comes up after a long day crossing over the border and many people have wiped out on tired legs. Better to accept a very short hike to orrison and start with fresh strong legs to get into roncesvalles in my humble opinion.
Thank you that was exactly what I thought. I have a booking at Borda. I think it is also nicer to be up for a whole day. As I am from the Netherlands I can train for the ascent I the gym but not for the descents. So this would be best especially because it is the first day. Thank you for being so thoughtful :)
 
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While we're being offtopic: There's two options for the descent into Roncesvalles. While the left (official) might be a bit prettier, the right one is a lot easier on the legs (and maybe a few hundred meters longer). After having done the right in 2019 i did the left in 2022. Not that i regret it, but it took some toll on me.
 
While we're being offtopic: There's two options for the descent into Roncesvalles. While the left (official) might be a bit prettier, the right one is a lot easier on the legs (and maybe a few hundred meters longer). After having done the right in 2019 i did the left in 2022. Not that i regret it, but it took some toll on me.
Thank you! I’ll most probably will take right :)
 
I can’t offer any advice about your shoes but I would advise staying in Orisson after leaving St. Jean rather than trying to get to ronces in one day. The climb across the mountains is not bad and mostly over a single paved lane but the drop to ronces can be quite treacherous with a steep grade and slippery loose gravel. This challenge comes up after a long day crossing over the border and many people have wiped out on tired legs. Better to accept a very short hike to orrison and start with fresh strong legs to get into roncesvalles in my humble opinion.
While I completely agree with the suggestion of staying over in Pyrenees after leaving SJPdP, the descend to Roncesvalles does not have have to be "treacherous" by simply hooking to the right and taking the path to Ibanetta.
It's slightly longer but a lot safer...and that's,for that matter, what SJPdP Pilgrims Office recommends to do
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
Hi all,
I have a new question. I am starting the CF from SJPDP on April 5th. Last year I walked the CP in NB Hierro 6 men’s. Liked them because of the roomy toebox and cushioning. The fit of the Hierro 7 is different so a no go, the 6 aren’t available in my size. I have bunions so I need I wide toebox. I have tried:
- Altra Timp 2, too slippery
- Altra Olympus, fits well but zero drop causes problems
- Brooks Cascadia men, too stiff and slippery at the heel
- Brooks Caldera men is not available in my size anywhere so I can’t try them on
- Hoka Challenger 7 men wide but heel slips

Currently I am trying
- Hoka Challenger 6 men. Fits okay not sure about

And I will try Hoka Stinson men and Hoka Speedgoat 5 men (probably not wide enough)

I am also thinking about Hoka Bondi 8 wide.

What I need is:
- wide toebox
- cushioning
- at least 4-5 mm drop
- grippy soles
I have had an accident 4 years ago and still suffer from Post Concussion Syndrome, so I am really afraid of slipping on wet surfaces.

I also would like the to last the whole CF. I don’t read very good reviews about the soles of the Challenger and Stinson (slippery and not durable)

I am wondering whether the Bondis are sturdy enough to bring me down to Roncevalles, Zubiri and all those other hills with rocks etc.

I might be overthinking but …

And for all of you who answered so kindly to my ZPacks question. I decided not to buy them, to bring my Inov 8 rain jacket, GG umbrella, rain skirt and some handmade gaiters.
In reference to heels slipping, have you tried using a runner’s knot? I recently started using this method of tying my Hokas after watching a couple of vids like the one attached. It seems to have helped me and my “dogs”. ¡Suerte!
 
In reference to heels slipping, have you tried using a runner’s knot? I recently started using this method of tying my Hokas after watching a couple of vids like the one attached. It seems to have helped me and my “dogs”. ¡Suerte!
Thank you, that’s what I used on the CP. Works very well.
 
I just looked into these shoes. Did he buy the exploits future lights? They seem to be waterproof. How breathable were they? 6 mm drop sounds good!
Sorry I’m just now seeing this — his are not waterproof, and I’m not sure if they’re “exploits” — sorry! They only say FutureLights. But, he wore them in the rain (light showers all day) and with the merino socks his feet were mostly dry!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
The climb across the mountains is not bad and mostly over a single paved lane but the drop to ronces can be quite treacherous with a steep grade and slippery loose gravel.
There is an alternative to the right that the Pilgrim's Office in SJPdP recommends. No need to take a risk on the first day or two of your Camino.
 
In reference to heels slipping, have you tried using a runner’s knot? I recently started using this method of tying my Hokas after watching a couple of vids like the one attached. It seems to have helped me and my “dogs”. ¡Suerte!
I sometimes use the runner's knot on trailrunners. For me it is not to hold my heel in place, but unfortunately I have Morton's toes and it holds my foot back in the shoe a bit more so on downhills it keeps my toes from jamming forward. I only go up a half size bigger because a whole size up makes the shoe a bit too sloppy; I have sometimes tripped over the front of them if too big. Possibly I do not pick up my feet well when walking.
 
I sometimes use the runner's knot on trailrunners. For me it is not to hold my heel in place, but unfortunately I have Morton's toes and it holds my foot back in the shoe a bit more so on downhills it keeps my toes from jamming forward. I only go up a half size bigger because a whole size up makes the shoe a bit too sloppy; I have sometimes tripped over the front of them if too big. Possibly I do not pick up my feet well when walking.
Ah ha! I had to look up Morton’s toes to understand what you meant. I don’t have Morton’s toes, but, like you, using the runner’s knot has certainly helped hold my heels flush with the shoes’ heels. It has made a big difference holding my feet in place so and my toes don’t get all jammed up into the front of the toe box either. ¡Suerte y buen camino!
 
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While we're being offtopic: There's two options for the descent into Roncesvalles. While the left (official) might be a bit prettier, the right one is a lot easier on the legs (and maybe a few hundred meters longer). After having done the right in 2019 i did the left in 2022. Not that i regret it, but it took some toll on me.

Having walked both options, it can depend a lot on the weather.
In dry weather the walk 'straight down' to Zubiri was no problem. In fact we wondered what all the fuss was about. There was a maybe 200 metres, where care needed to be taken.

Previously, worried about the straight down route, I took the right hand road route.
I nearly gone run over 3 times. I thought at one stage a Police car was going to stop and pick me up for my own safety. There are many sharp bends with no with no shoulder. So you have to be ready to jump the guard rail if a car appears. Sometimes you can't due to a drop on the other side.

On balance, I would take the direct route in future.
Though the cyclists can be a danger on that route.
Got hit by one last time, just before he ploughed through a wire fence.........



Ahhh.

Wrong descent! Thank you @trecile
Yes, the one to the right into Roncesvalles is good! :)
 
Last edited:
In reference to heels slipping, have you tried using a runner’s knot? I recently started using this method of tying my Hokas after watching a couple of vids like the one attached. It seems to have helped me and my “dogs”. ¡Suerte!

Often called a 'heel lock' I think.
It's what the extra eyelet is for!
 
Having walked both options, it can depend a lot on the weather.
In dry weather the walk 'straight down' to Zubiri was no problem. In fact we wondered what all the fuss was about. There was a maybe 200 metres, where care needed to be taken.

Previously, worried about the straight down route, I took the right hand road route.
I nearly gone run over 3 times. I thought at one stage a Police car was going to stop and pick me up for my own safety. There are many sharp bends with no with no shoulder. So you have to be ready to jump the guard rail if a car appears. Sometimes you can't due to a drop on the other side.
@Anhalter wasn't talking about the descent into Zubiri, but the descent into Roncesvalles. If you take the gentler path to the right you aren't on a road with a lot of cars.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I am wondering whether the Bondis are sturdy enough to bring me down to Roncevalles, Zubiri and all those other hills with rocks etc.
I have a pair of Bondi 6 and I don’t think I would take them on a camino. The cushioning is great but I don’t think they are grippy enough. I find I am far more unsteady in them as well … perhaps because they are too cushiony.

I did two caminos in a pair of New Balance walking shoes, 2E width. Sadly, they died shortly after.
 
Sorry I’m just now seeing this — his are not waterproof, and I’m not sure if they’re “exploits” — sorry! They only say FutureLights. But, he wore them in the rain (light showers all day) and with the merino socks his feet were mostly dry!
Thank you!
I sometimes use the runner's knot on trailrunners. For me it is not to hold my heel in place, but unfortunately I have Morton's toes and it holds my foot back in the shoe a bit more so on downhills it keeps my toes from jamming forward. I only go up a half size bigger as the rest of the shoe is a bit too sloppy and I have sometimes tripped over the front of a shoe that is a bit too big. Possibly I do not pick up my feet well when walking.
I have a pair of Bondi 6 and I don’t think I would take them on a camino. The cushioning is great but I don’t think they are grippy enough. I find I am far more unsteady in them as well … perhaps because they are too cushiony.

I did two caminos in a pair of New Balance walking shoes, 2E width. Sadly, they died shortly after.
Yes I loved my NB Hierro 6 on my last year Camino but the new version doesn’t fit well unfortunately
 
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