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single accomodation

benandsam

Member
Can people recommend accomodation along the French Camino for St Jean to Santiago. I'm wanting to walk 800k in 20 days so I want a bit of comfort and security every night. Preferably I want a nice room with shower and a bar nearby. I'm willing to pay 30 euro a night.
I have walked from Triacastela in the past so i know such accomodation is available .Thankyou.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
It is available...but not always (or often) in locations that will match your distances for each day.
I think that it would be difficult for anyone to recommend as there would no way for us to determine where you may end up each night. If you know the most likely stops and can post some of them we may be able to help.

I suggest the you google hotels, hostels, etc on "Camino de Santiago" and see if you can put together a list in those places you think it likely you will stop.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
If you go to Google maps, pull up about a 20 km section of the Camino, then search for "hostal" and "hotel", you will get a pretty good indication of the accommodations available.
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
There is a Miam Miam Dodo guide published for the Camino Frances route- similar to one also published for the Le Puy route. It is in French, but with symbols. It lists various kinds of pilgrim accommodation along the way, giving approximate prices and phone numbers where applicable. Is is available from the CSJ bookshop. http://www.csj.org.uk/acatalog/The_CSJ_Bookshop_Pilgrim_Guides_7.html
Margaret
 

benandsam

Member
Thanks guys im hoping the tourist office in santiago with their knowledge will help me out, i have given them a rough draft of my daily schedule
 

Canuck

Veteran wanderer
Camino(s) past & future
?
Sorry, I can't give you specific places. There are lots of good ones along the way.
For a list of most restaurants, hotels, hostales and pensions along the way, you can take a look there: www.mundicamino.com under Camino Frances (list is on the right) and then for each stage click ''hospitajes'' on the left menu.
Another good avenue is the publication called ''Miam Miam Dodo Camino Frances'', available at Amazon.com, which specializes in places to eat and to sleep. It gives a full listing with services and prices.

Enjoy yourself,
Jean-Marc
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
I have a list of companies on my blog that will reserve accommodation for pilgrims this year. I contacted each one to ask if they would act as an accommodation booking service for pilgrims. Some will even try to book you into private albergues. Top of the list is Ivar's Camino Travel Centre. Why not give him a try?

http://www.amawalker.blogspot.com
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Really. Arranging your accommodations for you is a job for a travel agent, not a volunteer interest group. Start walking. Bring a guidebook with you. Take your chances. That´s what makes this trip extraordinary, the not knowing.

Reb. (cranky)
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
benandsam said:
I'm wanting to walk 800k in 20 days so I want a bit of comfort and security every night.
Hello Benandsam, I'm thinking that you have your calculations wrong! 8oo kms in 20 days is exaggerated. At least that's my opinion.
Further, you will be missing most of the essence of doing this Pilgrimage by alienating yourself in Pensions: the sitting around in courtyards, gardens, communal rooms and generally chatting with fellow Pilgrims are what make these great Albergues so special. Not to mention the laundry facilities (or lack of, if you are in a pension on a daily basis) Comfort? Well, many times a well run albergue is as comfortable as a pension. Security? It calls to reason that you keep your personal documents and money with you at all times - and that is YOUR responsibility. You can't blame theft if valuables are left lying around.
My final personal view is that booking ahead, unless under very special circumstances, is not on. Part of this Great Journey is the spontaniety of it: stopping in a village overnight where you had never even had the intention of stopping, but somehow, something, just made you take a break there and it turned out to be one of your more memorable moments of your Camino! Buen Camino! Anne
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
I agree that the 800 km in 20 days is a big load....40 km a day (24 miles) with no cushion for illness or problems. :shock:

However, the Camino is yours to plan in any way that seems best for you and that includes your choice of accommodations. Some have the Opinion that staying in albergues is essential for a proper Camino. This is, of course, nonsense and really only reflects their perception of what they enjoy. This is the way it should be as we all have our own personal Camino. Others can tell you what they think but in the end it is just an opinion.
Like always....enjoy.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
The pilgrim albergues are going to be choc-a-bloc this year.
Hotels and Inns will be bursting with overflow pilgrims - I doub't you'll ever be on your own!
If you were walking through France you would probably have to book ahead so use one of the many tour groups who are offering an accommodation booking service and be happy in the knowledge that you will have a bed at the end of the day.
If you decide to do it another way next time, when the path might be quieter, you can go the albergue route.
Do it your way. WTMB.
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
Hi,
We, and many of our fellow pilgrims that ended up using our edition, found the John Brierley guide (2009 edition) the best for providing a full range of options from Albergues and private Hostals to Hotels*****. All with correct contact numbers and websites where available.
With a 20 day time frame and a daily target 40km a day (a supersonic Camino!) it would be a pain in the...well foot to discover that all available accommodation is taken, and worse still that you have walk another 7 or 8km to find a bed.
In what is going to be such a busy year perhaps the price of such a tight and ambitious schedule is some rigidity in terms of planning each days specific destination? Its a balancing act I guess but the 20 day limit would seem to swing it towards the 'structured accommodation' route?
Best of luck with your planning and journey.
Nell
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
My walk from SJPP took 20 days and, on average, I walked for 7.5 hours each day - the latest I arrived at an albergue was about 6.30 but more typically it would be 4pm - so plenty of time to check my email, have a shower, evening meal and rest up for the next day's walking

As ever, Reb talks a good deal of sense in not over-planning it all beforehand - as the camino progresses you will have a better idea of how far you can comfortably walk each day and plan where you'd like to end the day - but one of the joys is then letting fate play its part

Carrying the Brierley guide is a great help for the overall maps, the detailed town plans and the rise and fall each day - then the CSJ guide allows you to see where there are food shops, hotels or hostels or albergues to avoid
 

jeff001

Active Member
Even in May-June 2008 it was often difficult to reserve single accommodation for 1-2 days ahead and the alburgues were filling up in the early afternoon. It looks to be far worse this year and starting to reserve now would not be too soon.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
When I was planning to walk the Via Francigena from Switzerland, many former VF walkers remarked that the most difficult part of the walk was finding accommodation. Many small hamlets only had one inn or casa rurual and accommodation was limited. Some had to get taxis to other villages and then get a taxi back the next day to carry on from where they'd left off.
As there were five of us (all ladies, average age 55) I decided to book rooms ahead and we were all pleased that I did. Some days were very long and knowing that we had a bed and a shower ahead of us kept us going!
It took a bit of searching to find beds in each town but using the regional tourism offices helped. We stayed in youth hostels, casa rurals, agri-turismo, B&Bs, small hotels and a couple of monasteries. The average cost of our accommodation was 21 euro and without exception, all of the accommodation was good. About 21 places (out of 31 nights) provided breakfast in the cost.
Its not the same as ambling along, stopping when you feel like it and taking pot-luck but I think in a Holy Year I would book a few beds ahead.
 

jeploss

Member
I want to thank Sillydoll very much for her listing of resources on her blog AMAWALKER. I,too,want to avoid uncertainty about getting food, a good night's rest and a shower. I reviewed what Sillydoll had on her blog, and have chosen to work with Garry of Spanish Adventures, who is helping me to arrange my lodging. As someone doing the camino alone (but of course not alone - many of you will be joining me in May), it's a good feeling to have a helper and someone whose expertise I can draw upon. So far it's been great working with Garry. I'd recommend him.

Yes, I want adventure and surprises, but I do not want anxiety each day about whether or not I'll have a clean and comfortable place to sleep and food to eat.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
I am so pleased for you that you have someone helping. I'm sure Gary will mix it up a bit and find you places in a few private albergues along the way. These have a variety of accommodations from the pilgrims' dorm to 4 bed and 2 bed rooms. You'll have lots of opportunities to mix with other peregrinos.
Don't let anyone tell you that you are not a 'real' pilgrim because you are not going to be a part of the mad 4am rush for beds! You will walk the same paths, in the same footsteps as pilgrims past, through the same villages and towns, see the same monuments, and will probably suffer the same sore feet, blisters, sunburn and backache as everyone else. You are going to earn your stripes, and I wish you a buen, buen camino!
 

CyndyA

New Member
I also thank you, Sil, for the download of companies available that are willing to do accomodations only. My companion and I are older (average age 63), both diabetics and have the usual aches and pains - nothing that means we can't walk it but we certainly can't race the crowds to the next albuergue. Thanks to others, as well, for info and advice. Cyndy
 

benandsam

Member
Thankyou for all the replies, the camino well we all have our reasons for doing it whatever mileage or way we have time for.
I have the month of may off work and i have many more places to visit in the world so im doing it all in one hit for a few personal reasons of my own.
Despite the fact i will be walking a longer day and walking at a faster pace than most, you are never alone on the camino. Everyone must stop at the cafes every 10/15 k so thats a opputunity to talk with whoever and enjoy the camraderie and we all wish each other buen camino while walking.
7hours walking a day is like doing a solid days work, it will be hard some days but everyone is going in the same direction with the goal of reaching their stage end so thats a morale booster
IVAR in santiago is helping me with my accomodation and i will post here after my trek with my expierience
Good luck to all wherever in the planet you are travelling from
Maybe we will have a few pints together some evening

benandsam
 

Lemonkid

Member
My only concern is accommodation as well, I have the feeling I'm just going to "wing-it" - making sure I have a good Brierly guidebook and a working cell phone. I'm still debating whether or not to bring a tent.. we shall see.
 

benandsam

Member
best of luck lemonkid, i got my flights today, to and back cost me 150 euro, the extra charges are murder that are charged by the airlines.
Good backpack spent 150 on it, so shouldnt burden me for the trekand good walking shoes so im ready, i have no digital camera as i dont use one too often ,hardly worth spending 300 on a decent one unless one can get me a good one cheap haha.
I gave frank fischer and ivar email with my dates so im hoping they will get me good albergues to stay in every night
All sset fair so, after such a cold winter and spring im looking forward to a few pints every day and some sunshine and some heat into the bones
good luck everybody
 

SantiPeregrino

New Member
Hi all,

I walked the camino frances from SJPDP earlier this year, sleeping in single accommodations the entire way to Santiago. At the time that I made my arrangements, I wondered whether the experience would be less "real" somehow. However, once I embarked on my camino any foggy notions of Templar-like "authenticity" gave way to the overwhelming practical reality of hauling myself 800km. I realized quickly that being able to rest adequately was going to be the key to my success, so I was grateful to have my own bed and shower in a clean room at the end of each day! Plus, having a reserved room also meant that I didn't have to rush out at the crack of dawn every morning for fear of not getting a bed at my destination, which really allowed me to relax and focus on the walking itself. For anyone thinking of making private arrangements for any part of their camino, I happily recommend Garry from spanishadventures.com, who pre-books lodging according to an agreed itinerary, with meals and much more (annotated maps, background info, remote support, even bag transfers).

Buen camino!
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
I have walked 4 Caminos with no booked accommodation and 2 with rooms booked ahead. It doesn't have to be either-or anymore. There are so many private albergues and Casa these days that have mixed accommodation - some dorms and a few private rooms - that you really can have the best of both worlds. (That's why I called the amaWalkers Camino walks the 'Best of Both').

You can now stay in an albergue, relax with the other pilgrims, share a meal with them and then go to your own room and have a good night's sleep. If you have decided on a 20km to 25km day you can book the rooms ahead of time. And, as SantiPeregrino says, no rushing in the morning, you can take your time on the trail, can wait for a church to open or linger over your lunch. Its amazing how just that one little factor can make such a huge difference to the enjoyment of your Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
I am one of these private accommodation people (although my first Camino was in albergues, so I have punched my albergue communal-life ticket and am very grateful for the friends I made and for the experience). With the rarest of exceptions, I did not plan ahead, and walked into the pueblo with no room booked. As I have walked only in September and October, I rarely ran into difficulty. This year, I only encountered two spots in two months where I did. In one (a town in northern France, the owner of a hotel closed for the night opened it up for me and the other, on the Vadiniense, I just went to the next town). By not scheduling, I freed myself from worrying about rushing to the next stage, or pushing myself beyond my energy level. It worked out well.

Very much as a Brazilian (repeat) pilgrim told me on my first Camino: Do not worry; there will be somewhere to stay and there will be enough to eat. It's never failed.
 

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