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Sleeping Bag Compression Sack

Time of past OR future Camino
04/2024
I just received my ultralight Enlightened Revelation APEX Sleeping Quilt. I have a 34L pack, and I’m looking for the best way to compress it so I can pack it inside to keep it dry. This quilt was not cheap! Thanks in advance!!!
 
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I have an EE Revelation Apex like you, and a 36L pack (though the main body of the pack is only 28L). What I have opted to do is what a lot of American thru-hikers do: I will use a pack liner.

You put the pack liner into your backpack first. You drop the quilt in next. You pile everything else that needs to stay dry on top of the quilt, which compresses it simply due to weight. You close the pack liner. Anything like a food bag or tupperware container goes in next, on top of the closed pack liner. Then you close the pack.

A nylofume bag that will fit a 35-ish-liter bag is only 28g and pretty cheap - $4-5.

A big trash compactor bag is only around 60-70g and very cheap.

A fancy Osprey "ultralight" pack liner in size 35L is 74-80g and expensive compared to the first two.
 
Wow -- that is a mighty nice quilt! I agree with the recommendation on the pack liner. I use a large Ultra Sil dry bag (25 or 30 liter -- would need to check) from Sea to Summit for my clothes and then a few smaller ones for sleeping bag, shave kit, etc. For less delicate items (Crocs, dirty laundry), I occasionally use Zip-loc bags with the air squeezed out.

For that epic quilt, I humbly suggest grabbing an Ultra Sil dry bag dedicated to just the quilt. Since it's synthetic insulation in the quilt, I suspect that pressing the air out before sealing up the bag won't affect the amount of loft (I have a down bag that I don't like to store in a compression sack for long because of fear of loss of loft / insulative ability).

Would love to hear a report back on what you think of the quilt for use on the Camino. I'm curious about the sections that wrap under the body -- e.g., are there any seams that rub, is there excessive fill material, etc. Good luck!
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
I have an EE Revelation Apex like you, and a 36L pack (though the main body of the pack is only 28L). What I have opted to do is what a lot of American thru-hikers do: I will use a pack liner.

You put the pack liner into your backpack first. You drop the quilt in next. You pile everything else that needs to stay dry on top of the quilt, which compresses it simply due to weight. You close the pack liner. Anything like a food bag or tupperware container goes in next, on top of the closed pack liner. Then you close the pack.

A nylofume bag that will fit a 35-ish-liter bag is only 28g and pretty cheap - $4-5.

A big trash compactor bag is only around 60-70g and very cheap.

A fancy Osprey "ultralight" pack liner in size 35L is 74-80g and expensive compared to the first two.
Great idea! Thanks! I haven’t done a thru hike yet, but would love to do the AT, PCT and the AZT.
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
I line my pack with a sturdy white trash compactor bag. For my lightweight sleeping bag I fold it up on my bunk to fit in a one gallon size ziplock bag and sit on it to squish out all the air before zipping it up. Works great and is so much faster than cramming it in the little bag it came in. I use no dry bags at all, preferring a couple of small lingerie laundry bags instead.
 
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Just a word of caution. I had an Enlightened Equipment quilt that I stored in a compression dry sack on my first caminos. However, I didn't take it out of the compression bag when I returned home. Eventually, the down won't de- compress and loses its insulation. Remember to store it uncompressed when you're not using it.
 
Wow -- that is a mighty nice quilt! I agree with the recommendation on the pack liner. I use a large Ultra Sil dry bag (25 or 30 liter -- would need to check) from Sea to Summit for my clothes and then a few smaller ones for sleeping bag, shave kit, etc. For less delicate items (Crocs, dirty laundry), I occasionally use Zip-loc bags with the air squeezed out.

For that epic quilt, I humbly suggest grabbing an Ultra Sil dry bag dedicated to just the quilt. Since it's synthetic insulation in the quilt, I suspect that pressing the air out before sealing up the bag won't affect the amount of loft (I have a down bag that I don't like to store in a compression sack for long because of fear of loss of loft / insulative ability).

Would love to hear a report back on what you think of the quilt for use on the Camino. I'm curious about the sections that wrap under the body -- e.g., are there any seams that rub, is there excessive fill material, etc. Good luck!
Thanks for sharing your tips! I will do my best to report back on the quilt!
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Anything I need to stay dry I alway place in a Dyneema stuff sack or compression sack. Or sometimes I use my larger Dyneema pack liner and stuff everything in there together.
 
I just received my ultralight Enlightened Revelation APEX Sleeping Quilt. I have a 34L pack, and I’m looking for the best way to compress it so I can pack it inside to keep it dry. This quilt was not cheap! Thanks in advance!!!
As an avid "all season" backpacker, I stopped using a compression sack years ago! I put a trash can liner in my pack and stuff my sleeping back and hammock under quilt in that. I find a bag in a compression sack to be too bulky and solid against my lower back. Plus, you end up with a lot of unused spaces in the corners of the pack. Every bit of volume counts when you're trying to pack as light as you can. By putting the bag in loose, I can tuck it into all the little corners of the pack and make the best use of the volume.
 
As an avid "all season" backpacker, I stopped using a compression sack years ago! I put a trash can liner in my pack and stuff my sleeping back and hammock under quilt in that. I find a bag in a compression sack to be too bulky and solid against my lower back. Plus, you end up with a lot of unused spaces in the corners of the pack. Every bit of volume counts when you're trying to pack as light as you can. By putting the bag in loose, I can tuck it into all the little corners of the pack and make the best use of the volume.
That is what I do too. I use dry bags, without compression. I load, then squeeze out all the air, then roll and seal. The contents can still remain flexible don't have problems with rigidity or wasted space.
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
I also have a quilt that needs to be kept ultra dry. I bought a 13 litre (a smaller one may suffice) Sea-to-Summit dry bag. I carelessly stuff the quilt in then roll close it compressing it as I go. It's at least as good as a compression sac, but has the added benefit of being waterproof.
First thing I do on accommodation arrival is to fluff it out across my bed to give the down time to expand fully.
Regards
Gerard
 
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