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St James Way or Juliana Trail in Slovenia

2020 Camino Guides

smj6

Siempre hay que ver el positivo
Camino(s) past & future
Oct/Nov 2016 (Via Podensis/ Frances)
Oct 2018 (Via Francigena stage)
Good morning. It's been a while since I've logged in here. I walked 1,000 kms along part of Via Podiensis before joining Camino Frances and walking through to Finisterre (2016); then I walked 200 km (2018) along the Via Francigena (Tuscany/ Umbria area). I'm now researching walking in Slovenia (where my younger son is now living).
I had thought of walking the St James Way in Slovenia, but he's suggesting I try the Juliana Trail. So now I'm looking into that.
If anyone has an input about either of these walks, I'd love to hear. Meanwhile, I'm just beginning to research both walks.
Suzanne
P.S. I'm based between Haute Savoie, France and Umbria, Italy
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
This would be a great question for @KinkyOne! He's from Slovenia. Send him a PM...he's always happy to help!
 

KatjaA

I just walk. Destination unknown!
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, September/October 2017
Camino Portuguese, May/June 2019
Hi, Suzanne! I'm slovenian and am happy to help. Here is what I know:
About Camino Slovenia ... there are a few routes, I haven't walked any of them, just a strech near my home town. They only have a web page in slovene, but if google translate helps, it can be useful for some basic information. https://www.jakobova-pot.si/

About Juliana trail ... it's new. I'm thinking of walking it, or at least a part of it, myself. Stages are known and fantastic, it's an alpine trail that doesn't go high up. It covers nortwest part od Slovenia and includes - in my opinion ;) - the most beautiful part od the country. They say it's marked, stops are in villages and towns where there are accomodations, but there is no discount for hiker like on the camino. Depends on the season, but if you go between may and sebtember some accomodations might be full if you don't book ahead. Oh, and there is no credecial like stamp collecting form on it. Maybe someday, but at this point, the trail is totaly new.

I hope I was helpful. If you have any more questions or need something to translate, please feel free to ask.

Buen Camino!
Katja :cool:
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Dober dan, @smj6

I have followed the Jakobova Pot and other trails from Trieste via Szombathely to Eisenstadt in Austria (Springtime, 2015). It was a lovely experience.

Before setting off @KinkyOne and I had a lengthy conversation about various trails in Slovenia :


Afterwards I put together a simple resource with stages, overnighting possibilites and links (updated 2020) :

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/resources/slovenia-hungary-the-jakobova-pot-and-other-trails-trieste-to-eisenstadt-2015.462/ (sign in to download)


Happy planning, @smj6 !

Regards
Lovingkindness
 
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smj6

Siempre hay que ver el positivo
Camino(s) past & future
Oct/Nov 2016 (Via Podensis/ Frances)
Oct 2018 (Via Francigena stage)
Dober dan Lovingkindness
Thanks a lot
S :)
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
I've not (yet) walked any parts of jakobova pot in slovenia (except the stages into and out of ljubljana where I live), but I've been to a few lectures from people that have done them.
the original jakobova pot (slovenska vas - trst/trieste) is said to be the prettiest in may (orchards in bloom) and the ogrska veja (hodoš - ljubljana) is said to be the nicest in autumn (ripe grapes everywhere). the shortest and the most demanding is the višarska veja (ljubljana - višarje/lussario) with most mountaineous sections (but now the first such section from ljubljana can be divided into two stages).

I am thinking of walking the juliana trail, perhaps this year. it looks really amazing. I did lots of little parts here and there before there was a juliana trail but it would be really nice to link them all together.
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
hello again!

I've been perusing the Juliana Trail website and see that some of the Juliana coincides with or is very close to a trail I attempted but didn't complete in July/Aug 2018 - the E7 trail from Skopje Loka to Tolmin in Italy ...Incidentally, one of the Jakobova Pot trails passes through Skopje Loka where there is a St James Church.

The Juliana Trail (stage 9) passes through Stržišče which is also on the E7 trail. After overnighting in Stržišče, I set off along the E7 aiming for Koča Planina Razor. Initially the trail was easy and rather lovely, as far as the turn off leading to ‘Rodica’ which is on the Via Alpina Slovenia Trail. From this point onwards, going left, the E7 trail was neglected. There were rock falls + tree falls to scramble over. The trail narrowed considerably, eventually arriving at a point where the path had been sheared off the mountainside by an avalanche. All that remained was a narrow ledge too scary to cross. So, I turned back and headed up the ‘Rodica’ trail to the Via Alpina Slovenia, aiming for the Vogel Ski Centre. Awesome scenery, another world.

It was a gorgeous summer's day. There were other hikers out and about exploring the Via Alpina, heading in the opposite direction. When I asked abut the trail up ahead they encouraged me to continue.

About 2/3 of the way to the Vogel Ski Centre I got into difficulty a second time. The path reduced to a rocky scramble then a bulge. I realized I had arrived at something beyond my experience. So I sat down, turned my face to the wall, shut my eyes to calm myself then waited…..to cut a long story short another hiker guided me hand and foot around the bulging cliff face, telling me to chant, ‘I am a spider, I am a spider’ all the while. Eventually we arrived at a safe spot and I was left to pick my way down to the ski centre, 1 ½ hours below…. I didn’t make it to Tolmin. The guide said it might be best if I didn’t continue on -the next two stages of the trail were more challenging than what I had just experienced…..

Happy Trails
-Lovingkindness

ps in 2006 I had completed the Via Alpine in Switzerland which crosses over 16 mountain passes from Sargans to Montreux on Lac Leman, hence my initial confidence. This particular day in Slovenia was at a different level to what I had experienced in 2006 where there had been no avalanches to cross or climbing hand + foot.
_DSC6013.JPG
 
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caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
wow, that was quite a hair-raising experience. I am glad someone was able to help you across the rocky stretch.

it has been some years since the old trail (called mulatjera, these were the mule tracks built by italians during the first world war and the following occupation of that part of slovenia for hauling supplies up to the mountain barracks) followed by E7 has collapsed during winter and it has not been repaired. politics, probably. it's too bad because I saw some pictures from the trail and it looked like a beautifual alternative to the ridge-top path above it. both have been on my wish list for some time but so far have not yet come up.

there are apparently two sections with cables on the juliana trail, too, but it does not go on any of the trails you described above.

I found a short pdf guide of juliana by sections. the trail is waymarked with yellow signposts and two orange romboids with J and A.
 

efdoucette

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011 Camino Frances
Since 2011 - too many to list
wow, that was quite a hair-raising experience. I am glad someone was able to help you across the rocky stretch.

it has been some years since the old trail (called mulatjera, these were the mule tracks built by italians during the first world war and the following occupation of that part of slovenia for hauling supplies up to the mountain barracks) followed by E7 has collapsed during winter and it has not been repaired. politics, probably. it's too bad because I saw some pictures from the trail and it looked like a beautifual alternative to the ridge-top path above it. both have been on my wish list for some time but so far have not yet come up.

there are apparently two sections with cables on the juliana trail, too, but it does not go on any of the trails you described above.

I found a short pdf guide of juliana by sections. the trail is waymarked with yellow signposts and two orange romboids with J and A.
wow, this is a great guidebook, do you know how / where to purchase the hardcopy?
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
wow, that was quite a hair-raising experience. I am glad someone was able to help you across the rocky stretch.

it has been some years since the old trail (called mulatjera, these were the mule tracks built by italians during the first world war and the following occupation of that part of slovenia for hauling supplies up to the mountain barracks) followed by E7 has collapsed during winter and it has not been repaired. politics, probably. it's too bad because I saw some pictures from the trail and it looked like a beautifual alternative to the ridge-top path aortswomanbove it. both have been on my wish list for some time but so far have not yet come up.

there are apparently two sections with cables on the juliana trail, too, but it does not go on any of the trails you described above.

I found a short pdf guide of juliana by sections. the trail is waymarked with yellow signposts and two orange romboids with J and A.
Thanks, Caminka! Receptionists at a youth hostel in Ljubjana had suggested I try the E7 trail from Skopje Loka to Tolmin. They were both experienced sportswomen and confident I'd be able to walk all the way to Tolmin. Perhaps they didn't know about the neglect...

In hindsight I should have asked @KinkyOne about the E7 trail before setting off. He has a wealth of climbing and hiking experience in the Slovenia Alps and he knows all the best cafés in Ljubjana :)

No regrets, though. I aquired some new skills and discovered one or two of my own physical limitations. All for the good.

Cheers.
LK
 
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caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
Thanks, Caminka! Receptionists at a youth hostel in Ljubjana had suggested I try the E7 trail from Skopje Loka to Tolmin. They were both experienced sportswomen and confident I'd be able to walk all the way to Tolmin. Perhaps they didn't know about the neglect...

In hindsight I should have asked @KinkyOne about the E7 trail before setting off. He has a wealth of climbing and hiking experience in the Slovenia Alps and he knows all the best cafés in Ljubjana :)

No regrets, though. I aquired some new skills and discovered one or two of my own physical limitations. All for the good.

Cheers.
LK
E7 is supposed to be an easy trail accessible to everyone. I can't say as I haven't walked it but I've perused the guidebook and it was definitely not a mountain trail.

closed mountain trails in slovenia you can find here. I don't know if that includes less mountaineous trail.

btw, it's Škofja Loka, not Skopje Loka. actually one of the most well preserved medieval towns in slovenia.
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
btw, it's Škofja Loka, not Skopje Loka. actually one of the most well preserved medieval towns in slovenia.
:)...Škofja Loka with an ‘f’, not a ‘p’. Yes, you’re right, Caminka, ha ha! I’m a little dyslexic. I didn’t notice. Thanks.😊

Škofja Loka
_DSC6002.jpg

E7 is supposed to be an easy trail accessible to everyone. I can't say as I haven't walked it but I've perused the guidebook and it was definitely not a mountain trail.
The E7, an easy walk? …. I’m laughing. No, the E7 from Škofja Loka and beyond, I found, wasn’t always easy to walk. Sometimes one couldn’t walk at all. For example,

Between Stari Vrh and Blegoš there are two peaks. Ascending MLADI VRH (1374) involved a section of scrambling hand, knee and foot over tree roots and fallen trees, up a steep incline, progressing slowly from tree trunk to tree trunk. It was long and hard. On the descents I spent a fair amount of time slithering on the seat of my pants tossing my pack ahead picking my way carefully. It was tiring.

Hiking up to Mount Porazen Hut (1640 m) took energy. It was glorious, though, with 360° views at the top…

What some find easy others find a challenge…I didn’t grow up in the mountains. I didn’t learn how to ski or climb trees or cling to rock walls. The closest thing to adventurous in my environment was the school jungle gym and gymnastic equipment, all of which I avoided…I became energetic as an adult. Before that I was a sloth.

Cheers!
 
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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hi, everyone :)

I would like to correct @lovingkindness mistake in her first post that Tolmin is in Italy. It's still in Slovenia although Italy wouldn't mind getting it :D

But to answer the OP.

@caminka already mentioned two branches of Slovenian St.James Way (from Croatian and Hungarian border) that merges in Slovenian capital Ljubljana. From there it goes to Trieste. The one that goes north to Višarje/Monte Lussari is actually St.Mary's Way.

Juliana Trail is newly marked trail that circles the Triglav National Park and doesn't enter it so you can start wherever you want on that loop.. BTW Triglav is the highest peak in Slovenian Julian Alps with 2864mts a.s.l. What I know about it is that it is much easier than St.James Way. It doesn't really climb any serious mountains and is largely combined with cultural and culinary experience. Overnight stays are more or less limited to hotel, pensions and private rooms, no real mountain huts. Helpful link in English:


If you like mountaineerin over hiking than it's worth looking at two other marked trails in/through Slovenia:

1.) Slovenian Mountain Trail is the oldest completely marked trail in the world! It starts (or ends if you go in other direction) very close to Hungarian border and ends just a couple of kilometres from Trieste right by the Adriatic Sea. I walked more or less all of it over years and I would say it could be divided into three sections regarding how demanding the walk is.
- First part from Selo (close to Hungary) and along the Pohorje ridge to the Kamniško-Savinjske Alps could be taged by hiking.
- The second part through Kamniško-Savinjske Alps, Karavanke and Julian Alps is real mountaineering (and that's the part @lovingkindness experienced). Here you can more or less only sleep in mountain huts. On many sections it's advisable to wear the helmet. Also there could be patches of snow all through the year.
- The third part to Ankaran can also be descibed as hiking and you can also sleep in some hostels and other private accommmodation.

2,) Alpe-Adria Trail starts in Austria, goes through Slovenia near the Soča River (Italian Isonzo, Hemingway wrote about it in A Farewell to Arms although he never really got there, he was in hospital in Milan) and ends in Trieste. This trail is on many sections as demanding as the middle part of Slovenian Mountain Trail but nearing the end it gets easier and easier.

Info for both available in English on-line.

Happy planning :)
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
@KinkyOne , Greetings fine fellow!

Hi, everyone :)

I would like to correct @lovingkindness mistake in her first post that Tolmin is in Italy. It's still in Slovenia although Italy wouldn't mind getting it :D
You're welcome :). Correct me everytime. Tolmin 1918-1943


@caminka already mentioned two branches of Slovenian St.James Way (from Croatian and Hungarian border) that merges in Slovenian capital Ljubljana. From there it goes to Trieste. The one that goes north to Višarje/Monte Lussari is actually St.Mary's Way.
I haven't found any information re the St. Mary's Way (Marajina romarska pot) passing through Škofja Loka. Perhaps someone out there can provide a link. There are several other pilgrimage routes, though which pass through this village or near by :

*Jakobova pot (variant ?) : https://www.jakobova-pot.si/gorenjska-veja/

*Sv Emina romarska pot : https://kozjanski-park.si/?page_id=1861&lang=en pdf page 27, Škofja Loka

*Sv Martin (Via Sancti Martini) : https://kozjanski-park.si/?page_id=1861&lang=en pdf page 22, hills of Škofja Loka

*Skofja Loka to Crngrob pilgrimage Church of Annunciation : a 4 km path starting opposite the bus station in Skofje Loka. Brochure available at tourist information centre. http://www.visitskofjaloka.si/en/experiences/theme-paths/path-to-crngrob

Cheers
Lovingkindness
 
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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hi there,

Long time no see :)

Tolmin was indeed under Italy from 1918 to 1943, occupied sort of althought Italy got it as part of a Versailles Peace Treaty (same as Istria and Dalmatia). In this part of Slovenia the population was 100% Slovenians. Even the villages around Triest were Slovenian.

If you zoom in the map in this link:
you will the diversion to the villago of Podbrezje:
Very close is the most important St.Mary's pilgrimage site in Slovenia.
And then the route continues towards Višarje which is almost on Italian-Austrian border and is the second most important St.Mary's pilgrimage site in this area. Because it is tri-lingual area it has name in all three languages.
As I know in past times pilgrims more or less used this route not for St.James but for St.Mary. It was also used in medieval times for pilgrimages to Koeln am Rhein, Germany. But of course it is very likely that it was sometimes used for pilgrimage to Santiago too if for example in north of Italy was unsafe because of wars.

Take care!
 
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lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Hi there,

Long time no see :)

Tolmin was indeed under Italy from 1918 to 1943, occupied sort of althought Italy got it as part of a Versailles Peace Treaty (same as Istria and Dalmatia). In this part of Slovenia the population was 100% Slovenians. Even the villages around Triest were Slovenian.

If you zoom in the map in this link:
you will the diversion to the villago of Podbrezje:
Very close is the most important St.Mary's pilgrimage site in Slovenia.
And then the route continues towards Višarje which is actually on Italian-Austrian border and is the second most important St.Mary's pilgrimage site in this area.
As I know in past times pilgrims more or less used this route not for St.James but for St.Mary. It was also used in medieval times for pilgrimages to Koeln am Rhein, Germany. But of course it is very likely that it was sometimes used for pilgrimage to Santiago too if for example in north of Italy was unsafe because of wars.

Take care!
:)
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
Between Stari Vrh and Blegoš there are two peaks. Ascending MLADI VRH (1374) involved a section of scrambling hand, knee and foot over tree roots and fallen trees, up a steep incline, progressing slowly from tree trunk to tree trunk. It was long and hard. On the descents I spent a fair amount of time slithering on the seat of my pants tossing my pack ahead picking my way carefully. It was tiring.

Hiking up to Mount Porazen Hut (1640 m) took energy. It was glorious, though, with 360° views at the top…

What some find easy others find a challenge…I didn’t grow up in the mountains. I didn’t learn how to ski or climb trees or cling to rock walls. The closest thing to adventurous in my environment was the school jungle gym and gymnastic equipment, all of which I avoided…I became energetic as an adult. Before that I was a sloth.
that does not fall into the easy category, imo. easy are good trails that can be steep sometimes but with no scrambling involved. also clearly marked - this unfortunately does not always cover other waymarkes then the slovenian official red-and-white circles.
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
Hi, everyone :)

I would like to correct @lovingkindness mistake in her first post that Tolmin is in Italy. It's still in Slovenia although Italy wouldn't mind getting it :D

But to answer the OP.

@caminka already mentioned two branches of Slovenian St.James Way (from Croatian and Hungarian border) that merges in Slovenian capital Ljubljana. From there it goes to Trieste. The one that goes north to Višarje/Monte Lussari is actually St.Mary's Way.

Juliana Trail is newly marked trail that circles the Triglav National Park and doesn't enter it so you can start wherever you want on that loop.. BTW Triglav is the highest peak in Slovenian Julian Alps with 2864mts a.s.l. What I know about it is that it is much easier than St.James Way. It doesn't really climb any serious mountains and is largely combined with cultural and culinary experience. Overnight stays are more or less limited to hotel, pensions and private rooms, no real mountain huts. Helpful link in English:


If you like mountaineerin over hiking than it's worth looking at two other marked trails in/through Slovenia:

1.) Slovenian Mountain Trail is the oldest completely marked trail in the world! It starts (or ends if you go in other direction) very close to Hungarian border and ends just a couple of kilometres from Trieste right by the Adriatic Sea. I walked more or less all of it over years and I would say it could be divided into three sections regarding how demanding the walk is.
- First part from Selo (close to Hungary) and along the Pohorje ridge to the Kamniško-Savinjske Alps could be taged by hiking.
- The second part through Kamniško-Savinjske Alps, Karavanke and Julian Alps is real mountaineering (and that's the part @lovingkindness experienced). Here you can more or less only sleep in mountain huts. On many sections it's advisable to wear the helmet. Also there could be patches of snow all through the year.
- The third part to Ankaran can also be descibed as hiking and you can also sleep in some hostels and other private accommmodation.

2,) Alpe-Adria Trail starts in Austria, goes through Slovenia near the Soča River (Italian Isonzo, Hemingway wrote about it in A Farewell to Arms although he never really got there, he was in hospital in Milan) and ends in Trieste. This trail is on many sections as demanding as the middle part of Slovenian Mountain Trail but nearing the end it gets easier and easier.

Info for both available in English on-line.

Happy planning :)
I would just like to add that the second part of the slovenian mountain trail per KinkyOne's devision above is a real mountain trail. it has all: cables, pegs, ledders and airy cliffs. definitely not for the unprepared.
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
zooming into the višarska/gorenjska veja of jakobova pot in slovenia, the alternative blue route has been diverted on leaving the suburbs of ljubljana on account of a very unfriendly owner with a dog. the arrows painted on the ground already follow the new diversion which I have marked with yellow dots.
 

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isaw

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
EPW (2015)
Good morning. It's been a while since I've logged in here. I walked 1,000 kms along part of Via Podiensis before joining Camino Frances and walking through to Finisterre (2016); then I walked 200 km (2018) along the Via Francigena (Tuscany/ Umbria area). I'm now researching walking in Slovenia (where my younger son is now living).
I had thought of walking the St James Way in Slovenia, but he's suggesting I try the Juliana Trail. So now I'm looking into that.
If anyone has an input about either of these walks, I'd love to hear. Meanwhile, I'm just beginning to research both walks.
Suzanne
P.S. I'm based between Haute Savoie, France and Umbria, Italy
Hello Suzanne, maybe have a look at viapostumia.eu There you also might find some information.
 
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