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The longest, reasonably marked & with infrastructure, Camino?

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
I will begin my seventh Camino on May 24 (this time only from León), but I am already starting to plan my eighth Camino for when I retire (probably in April 2020), and I intend it to be a little longer!! :)

Do you know which is the longest Camino de Santiago?

What I'm looking for is the longest Camino de Santiago (historical Camino) that is reasonably marked (it may not be completely marked but where mostly you can find some signs to follow), for which you can find tracks for the GPS, where you can find Albergues for pilgrims (maybe not every day, but at least most days), etc... In short: a Camino de Santiago counting with a reasonable (even if not complete) infrastructure for pilgrims.

The longest without signs, albergues, tracks, etc .... I already know that!! From New Zeland (which happens to be at the antipodes!!), but unfortunately I am not such a good swimmer!!😂😂😂

I know I have a lot of time to plan, but it will probably be a bit difficult to find all the necessary information. Even making the decision on which Camino to follow will become complicated.🤔
 

Martyduc

Hunter Valley,Australia
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 15,Portuguese 16,Finisterre Muxia 16,Ingles16,, Almeria to Muxia,Finesterre 18,,Via Serrana
If you mean in Spain,,,,, last year I walked from Almeria on the Mozarabe to Merida,, continued up the Via de la Plata onto the Sanabres to Santiago,, finished by walking out to Muxia and then Finesterre,, about 1500Kms,,, is that what you are thinking of??
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
If you mean in Spain
No, no, I mean all over the world (I guess it's the same as saying in Europe - I doubt there is any historic Camino that starts outside Europe)
 
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Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
You could walk to Jerusalem.... 🤨 About 4500 km (from London)
This could be an alternative 🤔 Initially I was thinkg only about Camino de Santiago. I know there are Caminos comming even from Norway or Latvia ... but I am not so sure if they are marked at all or if they count with a minimum infrastructure :confused:
 

timr

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
You could walk to Jerusalem.... 🤨 About 4500 km (from London)

Just noticed you wanted infrastructure.... In that case, Canterbury to Rome?
I've walked from Canterbury to Brindisi and apart from France and bits of Southern Italy it's well waymarked. I'm in Albania now hoping to reach Istanbul, on the way to Jerusalem, but no waymarking here. But you begin to get the knack after the first 3000km😉😎
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. Next: Toulouse to Lourdes
I'm in Albania now hoping to reach Istanbul, on the way to Jerusalem, but no waymarking here. But you begin to get the knack after the first 3000km😉😎
Indeed, no waymarking or ‘pilgrim’ accommodation but at least - after France - I never went without food 🙂 (Following your journey with interest btw and not a little envy! 😎)
 

NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
You could start in the Orkney Islands, do the St Magnus trail, carrying on to the mainland of Scotland at John O'Groats, then head towards Dover - perhaps taking the East and West Highland Ways. Once in Calais, head to Paris, Tours etc en route to St Jean Pied de Port and the Frances. Or head westerly from Calais to Mont St-Michael, then head south from there.

It would have the advantage of starting out with a language that resembles English. 😀
 

Pilger99

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
addicted since 1999 (Aragones, CF), lots of caminos in Spain and Portugal since then
Le Puy is just a few weeks from Galicia. It is good for a rest day after you passed e.g. Poland, Germany and half of France. Look at your credencial. The map gives you an idea.
I'm not so sure about the infrastructure in Poland, but at least the waymarking is much more than a GPS track or someones mind planning. Throughout Germany you have some routes with good guide books and accomodation and other places like Berlin with not even arrows. I think they still believe one will take the train oder metro to cross the city. Between Poland and Berlin the waymarking is good and at least some albergues help you on your way. Check at the eastern edge of EU to find some valid starting point. There seems to be a way near Kaunas.
"Droga św. Jakuba" stands for way of St. James in Polish. With google I soon found some maps: http://bractwojakuboweszczyrk.pl/szlak-sw-jakuba (check the last one).
Poland is also in discussion here: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/krakow-to-le-puy.61425/
If a straight line isn't enough just connect e.g. Poland, Germany, Austria, Switzerland ... and plan after Santiago the continuation to Rome, maybe Jerusalem.

In far southwestern Spain you can find a few Caminos de Santiago, with the same handicap as New Zealand.
At least the one in Gran Canaria starts and end at the sea, so train your swimming capabilities or take the ferry to Cadiz.

PS: What are you up to this year? Salvador+Primitivo or rather Camino de Invierno?
 
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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Well @Lirsy this is a bit confusing.
First you ask: "Do you know which is the longest Camino de Santiago?"
And then you posted: "No, no, I mean all over the world (I guess it's the same as saying in Europe - I doubt there is any historic Camino that starts outside Europe)"

As I know there are St.James pilgrim routes only in Europe (possibly in South America also). Caminos de Santiago (plural) are only in Spain. In France they are Chemins in Portugal Caminhos etc.
So which will it be? What are you really interested in? You have to be more specific for us to help you otherwise this thread will go waaaaaay off. People already posted London/Canterbury to Rome/Jerusalem suggestions. That's not a Camino and certainly it's not Camino de Santiago ;)
 
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Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Seven Compostelas in Three years and counting......
I have been thinking about a really long camino. My first one was from Geneva, I will class that as a 'medium' distance camino (in my mind as I walk 5-6 months at a time).

I have two in mind, one of which I hope to complete at some point in one go.

There is Tallinin in Estonia to Santiago. The Baltic states are being marked now/have been marked with accommodation on route (not just pilgrim accommodation). That would mean walking say Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Czech Republic, Germany, Switzerland, France, Spain. 9 countries. And that is only MY route from Tallinin, there are various route you could go. I am even considering starting in St. Petersburg Russia to make it 10 countries. Still planning and working on it now.

Secondly, Istanbul to Santiago. Istanbul to Vienna would be on the Sultan Trail http://www.sultanstrail.com/en/
Not a Camino but. The Sultans trail is a 'peace walk' between the cultures of Christianity and Islam. I would start at the Blue Mosque (Sultanahmet) and walk to the Cathedral of Santiago. I would carry a message of peace. Sultans trail goes via Turkey, Italy (small distance only), Bulgaria, Serbia, Hungary, Austria. From Vienna you pick up the camino route Austria, Germany, Switzerland, France, Spain. It is marked and has accommodation en route. The Sultans trail also uses camino style credentials and stamps. In fact it was designed on the camino.

There is also Jerusalem to Santiago. The way is blocked at the moment by Syria being on route (not recommended). Maybe walkable soon. We hope.

Happy planning!

Davey
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
There is the account of the Belgian fellow who stared at St. Basil's Cathedral in Red Square, Moscow (that's the big red Orthodox Church in the background of all those REALLY BIG Soviet - then Russian military parades). I believe that was over 4,000 km.

This fellow walked west across the steppes of Russia and Poland. Entering Germany, he turned southwest, through Bavaria, and eventually over the Alps into Switzerland. He again walked over the Alps west of Geneva into southern France. He walked across Provence headed for the Spanish frontier. Crossing the Pyrenees at the Somport Pass, he walked the Camino Aragones to Jaca, and then joined the main Camino Frances flow at Puente la Reina. This, last leg, took him into Santiago a month later. I recall that this entire journey took four months.

To my recollection, this was the longest all in Europe Camino TO Santiago that I have ever heard of or read about.

In that vein, I am presently reading the book Clear Waters Rising: A Mountain Walk Across Europe, by Nicholas Crane. This is the account of his CRAZY 10,000 km walk during the 1990s, backwards on the Camino (in the beginning), from Finisterre, through Santiago and up to Bilbao.

From there, he walked the mountain ranges starting with the western Pyrenees and continuing into France, then along the Alps, though Switzerland, Germany, Austria, eastern Europe, then southeastern Europe and eventually to Istanbul. Many of us forget that the small bit of Turkey on the north side of the Bosporus Strait is technically IN Europe.

When he did this, he only rarely followed marking trails, there were few at that time. His gear was heavy and primitive, relative to what is available today. He wore COTTON during the winter, slept rough most days, using a down sleeping bag and a bivouac sack. He walked straight through the Alps in the winter, dodging downhill skiers in the process. Mr. Crane also adopted the theme of walking 100% of the route. So, he never rode in cars, trucks, buses, trains, or airplanes to make forward movement on his route, once he started out. IN short, he did just about everything we on the Camino do not do. Yet, he made it.

Enjoy your research and planning.
 

Martyduc

Hunter Valley,Australia
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 15,Portuguese 16,Finisterre Muxia 16,Ingles16,, Almeria to Muxia,Finesterre 18,,Via Serrana
Well @Lirsy this is a bit confusing.
First you ask: "Do you know which is the longest Camino de Santiago?"
And then you posted: "No, no, I mean all over the world (I guess it's the same as saying in Europe - I doubt there is any historic Camino that starts outside Europe)"

As I know there are St.James pilgrim routes only in Europe (possibly in South America also). Caminos de Santiago (plural) are only in Spain. In France they are Chemins in Portugal Caminhos etc.
So which will it be? What are you really interested in? You have to be more specific for us to help you otherwise this thread will go waaaaaay off. People already posted London/Canterbury to Rome/Jerusalem suggestions. That's not a Camino and certainly it's not Camino de Santiago ;)
Thank you for clarifying the Camino de Santiago !!!!!
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
There's the Via Romea Germanica (Stade to Rome) http://www.viaromeagermanica.com/en/.

You could begin in Trondheim along the St Olav's Way (or even in Sweden, and across to Trondheim) https://pilegrimsleden.no/en/ and walk to Oslo and then through Denmark on Jakobsweg https://pilgern-im-norden.de/pilgerwege/der-haervejen-in-daenemark/ - down to Rome on the Via Romea. From there you could head onto Jerusalem, or alternatively turn around and head across to Santiago.

I know that the Via Romea is 2,200kms. Here's my blog if you are interested - http://wanderingyetagain.blogspot.com/.

Lots of variant to these paths too - you could zig zag your way to Santiago for thousands of kilometres - there is nothing set in stone that you have to walk a straight path!
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
In that vein, I am presently reading the book Clear Waters Rising: A Mountain Walk Across Europe, by Nicholas Crane. This is the account of his CRAZY 10,000 km walk during the 1990s, backwards on the Camino (in the beginning), from Finisterre, through Santiago and up to Bilbao.
It is a marvellous story. I loved his account of meeting a Swiss pilgrim who had trouble understanding his plans. Good to know that all these years later we Brits can still behave in incomprehensible ways.... ;)

crane.jpg
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Ah, I see you've read the book as well... Presently, we are in the Swiss Alps...

This reminds me of the old screed about mad dogs and Englishmen out in the midday sun.. It also harkens to the seeming inbred sense of curiosity that led most of our early explorers to be British, and to make great discoveries and journeys: Darwin, Hillary, Scott, etc.
 

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
I will begin my seventh Camino on May 24 (this time only from León), but I am already starting to plan my eighth Camino for when I retire (probably in April 2020), and I intend it to be a little longer!! :)

Do you know which is the longest Camino de Santiago?

What I'm looking for is the longest Camino de Santiago (historical Camino) that is reasonably marked (it may not be completely marked but where mostly you can find some signs to follow), for which you can find tracks for the GPS, where you can find Albergues for pilgrims (maybe not every day, but at least most days), etc... In short: a Camino de Santiago counting with a reasonable (even if not complete) infrastructure for pilgrims.

The longest without signs, albergues, tracks, etc .... I already know that!! From New Zeland (which happens to be at the antipodes!!), but unfortunately I am not such a good swimmer!!😂😂😂

I know I have a lot of time to plan, but it will probably be a bit difficult to find all the necessary information. Even making the decision on which Camino to follow will become complicated.🤔
My husband and I did Camino Podiensis last year - from Le Puy to Santiago - so of course the second half is just Camino Frances. It is well-marked all the way from Le Puy and beautiful. Might be an option worth considering unless of course the Oceans part and you can walk all the way from New Zealand😉
 

NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Ah, I see you've read the book as well... Presently, we are in the Swiss Alps...

This reminds me of the old screed about mad dogs and Englishmen out in the midday sun.. It also harkens to the seeming inbred sense of curiosity that led most of our early explorers to be British, and to make great discoveries and journeys: Darwin, Hillary, Scott, etc.
Perhaps the other early explorers didn't write in English. Vasco de Gama, Colon Columbus, Marco Polo, Amerigo Vespucci, Magellan, Cabot, Leif Erikson, etc etc 🙂
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
You are of course, correct. I was referring to the spate of English / British explorers in the 1700s, 1800s, and 1900s. I should have been more precise.

I live in a US state that was formerly discovered by Spanish explorers in the early 1500s, and possessed by the Spanish, the French, then the Spanish again, followed by the English, then as part of the newly independent US. During the 1860s, Florida was part of the US Confederate states during our Civil War, before returning to the Union afterwards. In fact Saint Augustine, in northeast Florida is considered to be the oldest, continually occupied, original European settlement in North America. Wonderful place, with a decidedly Spanish accent.

Then, there is all that Spanish treasure off the east coast of Florida. The stretch of Atlantic Ocean beaches where I live is called the "Treasure Coast." Most serious ocean storms or hurricanes reveal new 'stuff' on or just off the beaches. Spanish treasure from Central and South America is still being found on a regular, though not frequent basis.

Thank you for the correction.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
French route (04,05,06) Portugues (07) VDLP (09,10,11) Aragon (0413) Levante (16) French (18)
If you mean in Spain,,,,, last year I walked from Almeria on the Mozarabe to Merida,, continued up the Via de la Plata onto the Sanabres to Santiago,, finished by walking out to Muxia and then Finesterre,, about 1500Kms,,, is that what you are thinking of??
That is a monster walk! How was the walk from Almeria to Merida; days, terrain, albergues?
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
I am even considering starting in St. Petersburg Russia to make it 10 countries.
Might be easier to get that 10th country by starting in St. Petersburg than it would be to attempt to get it by going through Kaliningrad.
That is a monster walk! How was the walk from Almeria to Merida; days, terrain, albergues?
Quite a lot of variety over 25-30 days
Terrain: Spaghetti Western deserts, Sierra Nevada mountains, Olive groves, Grasslands, Rice fields
Albergues: Mostly donativo municipal network from Almeria to Granada, then 50/50 Albergues and cheap hotels from Granada to Cordoba, then mostly cheap municipal albergues and a couple of cheap hotels from Cordoba to Merida.
Some good discussions about it on the Mozarabe sub-forum:
 
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CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021"
Might be easier to get that 10th country by starting in St. Petersburg than it would be to attempt to get it by going through Kaliningrad.
AHH!! Ya... Unser Wunderschöner Königsberg!!!!

I think I posted in one of the earlier treads - since the continents are together - it is some eastern-most point in Russia to Finisterre ("From Sea to Shining Sea"). I don't know how many signs one is going to get, however I am sure that one will not go hungry and will be able to get places to sleep. Large metropolitan cities abound and I am sure small villages may not disappoint either...
This baby would clock at roughly 13,000+ km and span 7 countries
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
First, let me thank you all for your help!!! I am impressed about how many of you have commented my post!!

Ok, let me try to answer a little to your different comments:

I luv your SERIOUSLY preplanning mind!
Deadly seriously!! 😅

Orkney Islands
That looks pretty attractive! It will be one of the Caminos that I will consider.

Le Puy to Santiago
Le Pui is too close to Santiago. Most probably (depending on the starting point) I will go through Le Pui and follow the Camino from there, but it is too close as a starting point.

That would mean walking say Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Czech Republic, Germany, Switzerland, France, Spain. 9 countries. And that is only MY route from Tallinin, there are various route you could go. I am even considering starting in St. Petersburg Russia to make it 10 countries. Still planning and working on it now.
This could be exactelly what I am looking for!! For sure I will study and develope this alternative!!!

PS: What are you up to this year? Salvador+Primitivo or rather Camino de Invierno?
Now, at the end of May I will start with my son in Leon. Later on, most probably in September I plan to take the Salvador + Primitivo ... and with this I will run out of holidays for this year!!!😂

I'm not so sure about the infrastructure in Poland
For sure I will need to check the infrastructure there. For the family of Caminos coming from the north, looks like Poland will be mandatory as an starting point or most probably as a country I will cross.

This fellow walked west across the steppes of Russia and Poland. Entering Germany, he turned southwest, through Bavaria, and eventually over the Alps into Switzerland. He again walked over the Alps west of Geneva into southern France. He walked across Provence headed for the Spanish frontier. Crossing the Pyrenees at the Somport Pass, he walked the Camino Aragones to Jaca, and then joined the main Camino Frances flow at Puente la Reina. This, last leg, took him into Santiago a month later. I recall that this entire journey took four months.
This sounds quite a lot to what I am looking for!!!

BTW ... one problem I had forgotten about .... Obtaining the visa for the non EU countries!🤔

The longest Camino I know is a pilgrim from Taiwan. He crossed to continental China, took a bike and ride through Mongolia and Russia up to Paris. In Paris he sold the bike and started walking up to Santiago. I met this guy when I was a volunteer hospitalero in Calzada del Coto (near Sahagun).

You could begin in Trondheim along the St Olav's Way (or even in Sweden, and across to Trondheim)
Yes, it absolutely seems that the longer Caminos from the north start in Sweden or in Norway (a little shorter if starting in the Baltic States). Do you know if I would find infrastructure there (accommodation, etc ...). I would not like to carry all the necessary things to camp, this means I would need lodging every 25/35 km.

you could zig zag your way to Santiago for thousands of kilometres - there is nothing set in stone that you have to walk a straight path!
👍😁
For sure I will!! Anyhow, I plan to keep "mostly" a direction pointing to Santiago.

Sumarizing, I have now several alternatives to work with, most of them starting somewhere in the Northern Europe.

The main alternatives are the following:

From Northern Europe:
  • Starting at the very north of the UK
  • Starting in Norway or Sweden
  • Starting in Russia or Baltic States
From the East:
  • Estambul (possibly through Rome)

Ok ... now is the time to start developing the alternatives ... a lot of homework!!!😂

Thank you all for your collaboration!!
 

Robert Nystrom

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2016, SJPP-Santiago),Portuguese Central (2017, Lisboa-Santiago),Camino Primitivo (2018)
If you mean in Spain,,,,, last year I walked from Almeria on the Mozarabe to Merida,, continued up the Via de la Plata onto the Sanabres to Santiago,, finished by walking out to Muxia and then Finesterre,, about 1500Kms,,, is that what you are thinking of??
And Martin was only slightly less annoying by the end of it then when he started 😉 ...teasing, we love you Martin !!!
 

michael

Member
This is the website of cycle tracks through Europe. The two that stand out are EV1 and EV6. They may or may not exist at present but might help with planning. Most if not all exist in France. Elsewhere its a lottery but the route details will tell you.
http://www.eurovelo.com/en/eurovelos
Another possibility but will need researching is a route via Marian shrines or other sacred sites in Europe or beyond.
edit. See also https://www.csj.org.uk/swiss-route-jakobsweg/
 
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4 Eyes

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF from SJPP 14, VDLP from Seville 15, DN&P from Irun 16, Portuguese from Lisbon 17, CF from SJPP 18
I've walked from Canterbury to Brindisi and apart from France and bits of Southern Italy it's well waymarked. I'm in Albania now hoping to reach Istanbul, on the way to Jerusalem, but no waymarking here. But you begin to get the knack after the first 3000km😉😎
Where can one get information on the route from Rome to Brindisi?
 

timr

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
Where can one get information on the route from Rome to Brindisi?
Hello @4 Eyes I have put together some thoughts for others. I'm currently in Albania and the IT is challenging here along with many other things... If you private message me your email I can forward something, though probably without personalising it for you! 🤔🙄Others will help too. How soon might you go? It's a great trip with good tracks and fairly good accommodation infrastructure. Tim
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Have you thought of the Jacobova Pot through Slovenia down to Trieste on to the Via Postumia to Genoa, on to the Via Tolosana and either up to Le Puy on the Voie Regordaine from St Gilles just after Arles and on from Le Puy or continue on the Via Tolosana where you eventually reach Puente la Reina on the Frances.
The Jakobova Pot and Via Postumia are well served with a range of lodgings and so is the Regordaine and are well marked.
 

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Seven Compostelas in Three years and counting......
First, let me thank you all for your help!!! I am impressed about how many of you have commented my post!!

Ok, let me try to answer a little to your different comments:


Deadly seriously!! 😅


That looks pretty attractive! It will be one of the Caminos that I will consider.


Le Pui is too close to Santiago. Most probably (depending on the starting point) I will go through Le Pui and follow the Camino from there, but it is too close as a starting point.


This could be exactelly what I am looking for!! For sure I will study and develope this alternative!!!


Now, at the end of May I will start with my son in Leon. Later on, most probably in September I plan to take the Salvador + Primitivo ... and with this I will run out of holidays for this year!!!😂


For sure I will need to check the infrastructure there. For the family of Caminos coming from the north, looks like Poland will be mandatory as an starting point or most probably as a country I will cross.


This sounds quite a lot to what I am looking for!!!

BTW ... one problem I had forgotten about .... Obtaining the visa for the non EU countries!🤔

The longest Camino I know is a pilgrim from Taiwan. He crossed to continental China, took a bike and ride through Mongolia and Russia up to Paris. In Paris he sold the bike and started walking up to Santiago. I met this guy when I was a volunteer hospitalero in Calzada del Coto (near Sahagun).


Yes, it absolutely seems that the longer Caminos from the north start in Sweden or in Norway (a little shorter if starting in the Baltic States). Do you know if I would find infrastructure there (accommodation, etc ...). I would not like to carry all the necessary things to camp, this means I would need lodging every 25/35 km.


👍😁
For sure I will!! Anyhow, I plan to keep "mostly" a direction pointing to Santiago.

Sumarizing, I have now several alternatives to work with, most of them starting somewhere in the Northern Europe.

The main alternatives are the following:

From Northern Europe:
  • Starting at the very north of the UK
  • Starting in Norway or Sweden
  • Starting in Russia or Baltic States
From the East:
  • Estambul (possibly through Rome)
Ok ... now is the time to start developing the alternatives ... a lot of homework!!!😂

Thank you all for your collaboration!!
No problem with visas from Tallinin, EU all the way. (I might have a problem soon due to Brexit though)!!!
But from St Petersburg or elsewhere in Russia, you need a visa. Also, unsure if you can actually 'walk' across the border itself. I have heard mixed reports.

Istanbul to Rome to Santiago walking is a bit convoluted, as in not a straight line. Walking you would enter Italy from the North through Slovenia, head South to Rome, then back North again. A few (not pilgrims) I know who walked Istanbul to Rome go through Greece, and catch the ferry Igoumenista to Bari or Brindisi.

Heard there are some paths through Finland, don't know about them though.

Happy planning!

Davey
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
Have you thought of the Jacobova Pot through Slovenia down to Trieste on to the Via Postumia to Genoa, on to the Via Tolosana and either up to Le Puy on the Voie Regordaine from St Gilles just after Arles and on from Le Puy or continue on the Via Tolosana where you eventually reach Puente la Reina on the Frances.
The Jakobova Pot and Via Postumia are well served with a range of lodgings and so is the Regordaine and are well marked.
Thanks a lot!!

This looks like an interesting alternative!!

I will add to the list of possible Caminos!!
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
No problem with visas from Tallinin, EU all the way. (I might have a problem soon due to Brexit though)!!!
But from St Petersburg or elsewhere in Russia, you need a visa. Also, unsure if you can actually 'walk' across the border itself. I have heard mixed reports.
Yeah, from Tallin I will be within the EU.

Regarding Russia, I had an incomfortable experience (but I am speaking about year 1998, probably now situation is better) in the border between Russia and Finland. I was intending to cross the border on foot and fortunatelly the finish policeman stop me and told me that I absolutelly couldn´t do that!! He was really kind, stopped a truck and I crossed the border in the truck.
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
The problem that I will find for sure is the number of bars that I will find on the way! ;)

I really love stopping every 7/8 km to have a beer or a coffee and take a 10 minute break (occasionally, this 10 minute break becoming a 1 hour talk with a local bartender or another client).

In some areas finding those bars will be difficult!:confused:
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
Hi all!!

I am making some progress (slowly ... but I still have near one year!!) in the preparation of the Camino.

I have found a lot of maps and trails. The main difficulty I am finding is finding lists of albergues.

I know that mostly I will not find albergues like you can find along the Camino in Spain or France, but I need to find the most similar accommodation available in the different countries I intend to cross.

On one hand I need to keep a reasonable budget (being such a long Camino it won´t be cheap!!😢) and in the other hand I need to secure accommodation every 25 km😄/30 km🤔/max. 35 km😫.

I don´t like much the idea of camping (extra weight, more uncomfortable and lonely, etc.).

I have started analyzing the Camino coming from the Baltic States (including some small detours -> around 4000 km = aprox. 5 months including there some days for visiting some cities and some very few days for resting).

Do you know where I can find websites listing albergues / hostels / other similar lodging for any of the following countries:
  • Estonia
  • Latvia
  • Lithuania
  • Poland
  • Germany
  • France (via Turonensis)

Thank you all for your help!!!
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
Thanks a lot Domigee!!

I assume I will succeed in planing this!! It won´t be so easy, but OK, that is also an interesting part of the Camino!! 😁
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. Next: Toulouse to Lourdes
You’re welcome 🙂
I don’t know which route you are planning in Germany but I followed the Danube and bought (once in Germany) the guide books for the ‘Danube cycle path’. I can’t remember what they were called, sorry, but their main use was that (budget) accommodation was listed.
 

Pilger99

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
addicted since 1999 (Aragones, CF), lots of caminos in Spain and Portugal since then
Don't see any Danube here :p. You mean Havel, Spree or Elbe, right?

Please check the "famous" yellow german guide books for pilgrims at https://www.conrad-stein-verlag.de/produkt-kategorie/aktivitaeten-themen/pilgern/
This map can be old, but it's a good overview. https://foren.fernwege.de/jakobsweg-karte/index.html
(I haven't found it on conrad-stein-verlag anymore).

If you have guide books you can expect signs and accomodation along the route and with the title or the town you can look for sources in english.

But yet again german. This link http://www.jakobus-info.de/compostela/95.htm often ends in a list of accomodation for a particular route or further links.
One of the few english sources for an long distance way is https://www.via-regia.org/eng/index.php This historic route started in Vilnius or Kiew. The 450km part from Görlitz to Vacha is known for the pilgrimage and a good infrastructure. Other parts might only be trading routes.
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
Thank you so much!

I am not sure about the route. I am just trying to stablish one depending on the infrastructure.

The route starting in the Baltic States is just one of the three posibilities I am managing. Second route starts at the very north of the UK, and the third starts in Ukraine going south-west, north Italy, France, Spain.

I will keep analyzing the three of them (and may be some alternatives that could apear) and the final decision will be mostly based in the possibility of finding accomodation along the way.

Walking restricts me to very short and not too flexible stages (max lenght around 35 km).
 

Pilger99

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
addicted since 1999 (Aragones, CF), lots of caminos in Spain and Portugal since then
Walking restricts me to very short and not too flexible stages (max lenght around 35 km).
Not bad at all. Some will find 35km a challenge and would rather say 15-20km ;).
I wouldn't mind to hop on a bus/train to get to a place to sleep and come back the next day to continue.
It's more the problem, that where you have no place to sleep, transportation is also very limited.
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
Some will find 35km a challenge
I do!! 😂 ... but I consider that as a doable challenge!

My record is in 40 km/day 3 consecutive days, but I like a more relaxed camino, with time to see things, to take a beer, to chat, to....

where you have no place to sleep, transportation is also very limited
That´s very true!:confused:
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Hi all!!

I am making some progress (slowly ... but I still have near one year!!) in the preparation of the Camino.

I have found a lot of maps and trails. The main difficulty I am finding is finding lists of albergues.

I know that mostly I will not find albergues like you can find along the Camino in Spain or France, but I need to find the most similar accommodation available in the different countries I intend to cross.

On one hand I need to keep a reasonable budget (being such a long Camino it won´t be cheap!!😢) and in the other hand I need to secure accommodation every 25 km😄/30 km🤔/max. 35 km😫.

I don´t like much the idea of camping (extra weight, more uncomfortable and lonely, etc.).

I have started analyzing the Camino coming from the Baltic States (including some small detours -> around 4000 km = aprox. 5 months including there some days for visiting some cities and some very few days for resting).

Do you know where I can find websites listing albergues / hostels / other similar lodging for any of the following countries:
  • Estonia
  • Latvia
  • Lithuania
  • Poland
  • Germany
  • France (via Turonensis)

Thank you all for your help!!!
I would not walk the Turonensis...lots of road walking and not so well served with pilgrim accommodation.
I would go through Germany on the Via Regia ( good pilgrim infrastructure and quirky) and then head south to Lake Constance and walk through Switzerland, which is expensive, but you can do it under the radar a bit by using the pilgrim albergues in combo with sleeping in the straw and some convents and monasteries. Self cater and take coffee sachets, so you don't have to buy coffees. The scenery is spectacular. Take the boat along Lake to Geneva, like the old pilgrims, as this part is not nice and very expensive.
From Geneva you get into France on the Gebenennsis and then onto the Le Puy route. Very good infrastructure for pilgrims and affordable.
For the via regia:
Oekonomischer Pilgerweg website. They have a guidebook too.
There is a website for Via Jacobi Switzerland, they will send you brochures with maps and accommodation if you email them and there is a yellow Guidebook from the Association de St Jacques Rhone d' Alpes for the Via Gebenennsis with accommodations including private donativo Accueil Jacquaire, order on line from them.
Numerous guidebooks for Le Puy route.
www.chemindecompstelle.com is a website for Le Puy GR 65) with a few accommodations you can click on and see...
 
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Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
I would not walk the Turonensis.
and then onto the Le Puy
I was already thinking that the Turonensis have to have some disadvantages in front of Le Pui (just by the number of pilgrims on each Way), but I could not find how to get to Le Pui from the north!



I will check what you proposed. Just a pity about the prices in Switzerland! :eek: For such a long Camino I will have a very adjusted budget😢
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I was already thinking that the Turonensis have to have some disadvantages in front of Le Pui (just by the number of pilgrims on each Way), but I could not find how to get to Le Pui from the north!



I will check what you proposed. Just a pity about the prices in Switzerland! :eek: For such a long Camino I will have a very adjusted budget😢
Yes, but it is swings and roundabouts. Walking through the Vosges area towards Le Puy is prob no cheaper, as mainly Bed and Bfast. The Via Jacobi has good infrastructure.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
The Via Jacobi has good infrastructure.
If you are walking as far as you seem to envision, it would be a shame to miss the eastern half of Switzerland (Konstanz to Interlaken) along the Via Jacobi. In all the European ways of st james, this region has the. most. spectacular. scenery.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
Do you know which is the longest Camino de Santiago?
You have received a lot of information about various long historic caminos. For the longest overland route to Santiago, I can suggest the route from Korea to Santiago bicycled by two young men whom I met at Emaus Albergue in Burgos in 2017. They took twenty-two months for the journey. Most delays were caused by difficulties in getting visas. Have fun planning.
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
For the longest overland route to Santiago, I can suggest the route from Korea to Santiago bicycled
je je .... that is really too long!!

I knew near Sahagun a pilgrim from Taiwan that started his Camino in China, just in front of Taiwan and he bicycled China, Russia .... up to Paris and walked from Paris to Sahagun!!!

Too long for me!!! 😂 I would be happy starting as far as possible but within Europe!! That is long enough!!😂
 
Camino(s) past & future
Geneva to Irun then Norte to SDC 2015, Piemont Pyreneen 2018
I love the idea of a LONG walk. I know someone who knows someone who knows someone who did the Iron Curtain Route or the EuroVelo13 which is roughly 10,000 kms from the Barents Sea to the Black Sea. They were not heading to Santiago but there would have been many times in which they would have crossed one of the Eastern European Caminos which would have sent them west rather than south.
Last year in France I met a young Russian woman who had started from her home in Moscow who did not seem to think that was a big deal. Her command of English and French was pretty limited and she described her time so far (three months) simply as "Fine".
 

Phil71

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (2014,2016),Primitivo (2015), San Salvador (2017), Norte (2018), Ingles (2018)
Maybe check out the E1 trail from Norway or the E4 from Cypress - that would get you to southern Spain and then finish off with the VDLP. That would clock in at about 11000 km.
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2017), Norte (2017), Frances (2017), Portugues (2018), La Plata (2018)
I had not idea about that E4! I will check!! Tnx a lot!
 

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