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Walking in cooler temperatures.

  • Thread starter Deleted member 67185
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Deleted member 67185

Guest
There have been a couple of threads about early Spring walking, and what clothing to include for cool and cold temperatures. The information that I have written below - - and have posted previously - - is not really a list or an inventory of suggested clothing or gear. It is focused on techniques of walking in cold or cool temperatures so that one can stay dry, avoid chilling and hypothermic concerns, and to utilize the clothing at hand more efficiently.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Layering is a biggie in cool and cold weather, as is controlling exertion levels to minimize perspiration.

Another important principle is this: You never dress with the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm at the start of walking or hiking... you wear the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm 10 minutes after you start walking.

In cold weather, or even cool weather, one needs to do what is necessary to prevent overheating and sweat. That includes how fast a pace one is moving as part of one's total level of exertion, as well as how much clothing one is wearing, and how much air circulation one is able to maintain.

It does not take long, with any layering amount, to saturate clothing with sweat. THAT is when the danger of hypothermia, and at the very least a chilly discomfort will begin to take its toll. If saturation or wetness happens, the only recourse is to change into dry clothing. Since there is usually a limited amount of clothing carried in a backpack, it is essential to adopt strategies to control sweating. Keep in mind that the material of your layers will also determine the effect to you from the above scenario. Focus on clothing made from merino wool or specialized synthetics. These will allow the garment to remain somewhat insulative even though saturated with sweat. Cottons and cotton blends are a menace and can accelerate a hypothermic condition.

Strategies include those mentioned above:
  • Limit layers of clothing to only that which is needed when full exertion is achieved. For those who just can't suck it up for a few minutes when first starting to walk, wear only layers which can be quickly and easily removed. For instance, adding a poncho will add about a 15 degree F advantage to existing layers. It allows for good air circulation. As you warm up during the first 10 minutes of your walk, the poncho is easily removed and stashed into a side pocket of your pack.
  • Move as slow as you need to, within reason, to keep perspiration to a minimum. This may also mean stopping to allow your body to cool down. Even with a single, lightweight layer, some folks walking under load will tend to over-heat. Keep monitoring yourself.
  • Keep an insulative layer, like a puffy down jacket or vest, near at hand so that if you are wetting-out while walking, you can put it on quickly when you stop for a break. Keep it in an outside pocket or on top of the other contents in your pack. A light puffy jacket or mid-weight fleece or a down vest works well here. The key is to keep this layer dry and to use it as a last resort when at rest. If this strategy is needed, do not continue walking until you have been able to stop sweating and you can achieve some level of dryness to your clothes.
In the above scenario, you may actually become warmer by removing your saturated layers so that you only have on your dry insulative layer. Dig out a towel and dry off excess sweat as best you can. Wring out your other layers and let them start to dry. If you have a second shirt, put it on. Hang your wet things from your pack so that they can dry. After you have cooled down, and with your dry layer and your insulative layer on, walk slowly to avoid re-heating. You will make progress down the path, stay warm, while letting your wet layers become dry. The real goal at this point is to dry your layers, not achieve distance.
  • Do not discount the amount of added warmth a light scarf or bandanna or a buff will bring as it insulates your neck. Wearing one can make wearing less layers very comfortable. It will also be a good first line of defense against over-heating and excess sweating by the ability to remove it, thus allowing the neck to act as a radiator in helping to shed body heat.
  • Yes, the type of head gear worn makes a big difference in one's body's heat loss or retention. A hat that works well for sun is not going to be the best choice for cold weather. Wool is king, as it is far less impacted by sweat affecting its inuslative properties than most other materials. And even though wool weighs more than other types of insulation, you do not need a heavy cap of wool to keep you warm. Wool is also far more breathable than many materials which aids in heat control.
As with neck wear, a wool cap can be easily removed to assist with cooling the body to prevent overheating.

Much of the above is what I have used when mountain climbing at high altitudes. Patience and light, multiple layers is the key to preventing hypothermia when being active outdoors.
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
you can put it on quickly when you stop for a break
I think discipline over this is really important. It's really easy to stop for a break feeling a bit hot and bothered and it feels great to cool off in the cold air. That is exactly when you'll get chilled through. You need to put the layer on the second you stop, whether you feel like it or not.

Another thing is that a lot of people wear a single layer on their lower half and about 4 on the top half, but I personally like to have my lower half a bit over dressed, and my top half a bit under dressed. This is on the grounds that the top half sweats more, plus it's far easier to add and peel layers on the top half.
 

malingerer

samarkand
Camino(s) past & future
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
There have been a couple of threads about early Spring walking, and what clothing to include for cool and cold temperatures. The information that I have written below - - and have posted previously - - is not really a list or an inventory of suggested clothing or gear. It is focused on techniques of walking in cold or cool temperatures so that one can stay dry, avoid chilling and hypothermic concerns, and to utilize the clothing at hand more efficiently.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Layering is a biggie in cool and cold weather, as is controlling exertion levels to minimize perspiration.

Another important principle is this: You never dress with the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm at the start of walking or hiking... you wear the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm 10 minutes after you start walking.

In cold weather, or even cool weather, one needs to do what is necessary to prevent overheating and sweat. That includes how fast a pace one is moving as part of one's total level of exertion, as well as how much clothing one is wearing, and how much air circulation one is able to maintain.

It does not take long, with any layering amount, to saturate clothing with sweat. THAT is when the danger of hypothermia, and at the very least a chilly discomfort will begin to take its toll. If saturation or wetness happens, the only recourse is to change into dry clothing. Since there is usually a limited amount of clothing carried in a backpack, it is essential to adopt strategies to control sweating. Keep in mind that the material of your layers will also determine the effect to you from the above scenario. Focus on clothing made from merino wool or specialized synthetics. These will allow the garment to remain somewhat insulative even though saturated with sweat. Cottons and cotton blends are a menace and can accelerate a hypothermic condition.

Strategies include those mentioned above:
  • Limit layers of clothing to only that which is needed when full exertion is achieved. For those who just can't suck it up for a few minutes when first starting to walk, wear only layers which can be quickly and easily removed. For instance, adding a poncho will add about a 15 degree F advantage to existing layers. It allows for good air circulation. As you warm up during the first 10 minutes of your walk, the poncho is easily removed and stashed into a side pocket of your pack.
  • Move as slow as you need to, within reason, to keep perspiration to a minimum. This may also mean stopping to allow your body to cool down. Even with a single, lightweight layer, some folks walking under load will tend to over-heat. Keep monitoring yourself.
  • Keep an insulative layer, like a puffy down jacket or vest, near at hand so that if you are wetting-out while walking, you can put it on quickly when you stop for a break. Keep it in an outside pocket or on top of the other contents in your pack. A light puffy jacket or mid-weight fleece or a down vest works well here. The key is to keep this layer dry and to use it as a last resort when at rest. If this strategy is needed, do not continue walking until you have been able to stop sweating and you can achieve some level of dryness to your clothes.
In the above scenario, you may actually become warmer by removing your saturated layers so that you only have on your dry insulative layer. Dig out a towel and dry off excess sweat as best you can. Wring out your other layers and let them start to dry. If you have a second shirt, put it on. Hang your wet things from your pack so that they can dry. After you have cooled down, and with your dry layer and your insulative layer on, walk slowly to avoid re-heating. You will make progress down the path, stay warm, while letting your wet layers become dry. The real goal at this point is to dry your layers, not achieve distance.
  • Do not discount the amount of added warmth a light scarf or bandanna or a buff will bring as it insulates your neck. Wearing one can make wearing less layers very comfortable. It will also be a good first line of defense against over-heating and excess sweating by the ability to remove it, thus allowing the neck to act as a radiator in helping to shed body heat.
  • Yes, the type of head gear worn makes a big difference in one's body's heat loss or retention. A hat that works well for sun is not going to be the best choice for cold weather. Wool is king, as it is far less impacted by sweat affecting its inuslative properties than most other materials. And even though wool weighs more than other types of insulation, you do not need a heavy cap of wool to keep you warm. Wool is also far more breathable than many materials which aids in heat control.
As with neck wear, a wool cap can be easily removed to assist with cooling the body to prevent overheating.

Much of the above is what I have used when mountain climbing at high altitudes, on thru-hikes on the PCT and Colorado Trail, and thousands of other miles while backpacking.

Patience and light, multiple layers is the key to preventing hypothermia when being active outdoors.

This is what I call a good solid post! I have almost followed this advice myself over years of Camino etc. I am a merino fanatic but the cost is becoming prohibitive and I am not happy with synthetics. At 82 however, I can afford to keep grumpy!

Many thanks and buen Camino!

The Malingerer.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
I think discipline over this is really important. It's really easy to stop for a break feeling a bit hot and bothered and it feels great to cool off in the cold air. That is exactly when you'll get chilled through. You need to put the layer on the second you stop, whether you feel like it or not.

Another thing is that a lot of people wear a single layer on their lower half and about 4 on the top half, but I personally like to have my lower half a bit over dressed, and my top half a bit under dressed. This is on the grounds that the top half sweats more, plus it's far easier to add and peel layers on the top half.
I'm one of those single layer on the bottom people. I have to say that I haven't walked in snow or anything very cold, and a lot of people on this forum live in a more extreme climate, but I live pretty much year round in shorts. Even in the winter I hate the feeling of walking in long pants, as long as I have my sweater or puffer jacket I'm good. It has to be really cold for me to put a layer on my legs, if I do, its tights. (Its just a personal thing - long pants feel very restrictive to me, other than stretch jeans (for work), and trackies I dont own any).
So some of us do have quite hardy lower halves, and whimpy top halves. My feet getting cold now, thats another matter, they match my whimpy top half, and need nice warm merino socks.
Two years ago my friend and I were hiking in the South Island (NZ) in March and were the only people on the track in shorts for 4 days. It became a joke with the other hikers, teasing us about our legs (lack of length). Their joke was that as both of us are just over 5', and that being so short, that there isn't enough leg exposed to get cold.

(Side and irrelevant note - I have a cottage in a tiny rural fishing settlement, that I retreat to, every minute I can. A few years ago I called into the local store to buy something on my way to a friend's wedding, wearing a nice dress and shoes. The people in the store didn't recognise me at first as they had only ever seen me in shorts)
 
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amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
A foldable windbreaker, 260g, is a lifesaver and protects against mild drizzle too. To me, it is the most versatile option ever!
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
brilliant thread



Interesting. Got a pic Amancio? tks
uhnmmm, not as such! it is basically a foldable jacket, fits in your pocket, has a backmesh for transpirability, weighs nothing and protects against wind and cold. A must for any rucksack! You can spend anything between 15 and 100 euro in this type of technical clothing, I have a cheap and cheerful one. You can open the zip to ventilate if needed. Basic, simple, light, handy, I bought mine in Decathlon
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
There have been a couple of threads about early Spring walking, and what clothing to include for cool and cold temperatures. The information that I have written below - - and have posted previously - - is not really a list or an inventory of suggested clothing or gear. It is focused on techniques of walking in cold or cool temperatures so that one can stay dry, avoid chilling and hypothermic concerns, and to utilize the clothing at hand more efficiently.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Layering is a biggie in cool and cold weather, as is controlling exertion levels to minimize perspiration.

Another important principle is this: You never dress with the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm at the start of walking or hiking... you wear the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm 10 minutes after you start walking.

In cold weather, or even cool weather, one needs to do what is necessary to prevent overheating and sweat. That includes how fast a pace one is moving as part of one's total level of exertion, as well as how much clothing one is wearing, and how much air circulation one is able to maintain.

It does not take long, with any layering amount, to saturate clothing with sweat. THAT is when the danger of hypothermia, and at the very least a chilly discomfort will begin to take its toll. If saturation or wetness happens, the only recourse is to change into dry clothing. Since there is usually a limited amount of clothing carried in a backpack, it is essential to adopt strategies to control sweating. Keep in mind that the material of your layers will also determine the effect to you from the above scenario. Focus on clothing made from merino wool or specialized synthetics. These will allow the garment to remain somewhat insulative even though saturated with sweat. Cottons and cotton blends are a menace and can accelerate a hypothermic condition.

Strategies include those mentioned above:
  • Limit layers of clothing to only that which is needed when full exertion is achieved. For those who just can't suck it up for a few minutes when first starting to walk, wear only layers which can be quickly and easily removed. For instance, adding a poncho will add about a 15 degree F advantage to existing layers. It allows for good air circulation. As you warm up during the first 10 minutes of your walk, the poncho is easily removed and stashed into a side pocket of your pack.
  • Move as slow as you need to, within reason, to keep perspiration to a minimum. This may also mean stopping to allow your body to cool down. Even with a single, lightweight layer, some folks walking under load will tend to over-heat. Keep monitoring yourself.
  • Keep an insulative layer, like a puffy down jacket or vest, near at hand so that if you are wetting-out while walking, you can put it on quickly when you stop for a break. Keep it in an outside pocket or on top of the other contents in your pack. A light puffy jacket or mid-weight fleece or a down vest works well here. The key is to keep this layer dry and to use it as a last resort when at rest. If this strategy is needed, do not continue walking until you have been able to stop sweating and you can achieve some level of dryness to your clothes.
In the above scenario, you may actually become warmer by removing your saturated layers so that you only have on your dry insulative layer. Dig out a towel and dry off excess sweat as best you can. Wring out your other layers and let them start to dry. If you have a second shirt, put it on. Hang your wet things from your pack so that they can dry. After you have cooled down, and with your dry layer and your insulative layer on, walk slowly to avoid re-heating. You will make progress down the path, stay warm, while letting your wet layers become dry. The real goal at this point is to dry your layers, not achieve distance.
  • Do not discount the amount of added warmth a light scarf or bandanna or a buff will bring as it insulates your neck. Wearing one can make wearing less layers very comfortable. It will also be a good first line of defense against over-heating and excess sweating by the ability to remove it, thus allowing the neck to act as a radiator in helping to shed body heat.
  • Yes, the type of head gear worn makes a big difference in one's body's heat loss or retention. A hat that works well for sun is not going to be the best choice for cold weather. Wool is king, as it is far less impacted by sweat affecting its inuslative properties than most other materials. And even though wool weighs more than other types of insulation, you do not need a heavy cap of wool to keep you warm. Wool is also far more breathable than many materials which aids in heat control.
As with neck wear, a wool cap can be easily removed to assist with cooling the body to prevent overheating.

Much of the above is what I have used when mountain climbing at high altitudes, on thru-hikes on the PCT and Colorado Trail, and thousands of other miles while backpacking.

Patience and light, multiple layers is the key to preventing hypothermia when being active outdoors.
This is some of the best advice you have given. I walked in November and December this year. The weather was pretty miserable throughout the Camino. Especially late on the Meseta and into Galicia. Rain, wind, snow, fog in the morning, cold especially in the morning. You directed me to a mid-weight shirt and long johns. I bought a super light weight puff jacket that was good to 32 degrees (maybe lower) jacket. I was wet alot and cursed the weather alot but was never cold.
It took less than 10 minutes for me to warm up. I had to buy a better pair of gloves and stocking cap along the way, that also made a world difference.
One thing you mentioned that I thought was about the most essential item was the $10 buff that I bought. When it was really cold I could pull it down to cover my neck under my jacket. Pull it up over my nose and face and pull it over my beanie to cover the back of my neck and all an extra layer of warmth on my head.
There were times when I would pull it over my head completely when it was too warm for my beanie and too cold to keep my head uncovered. It is an amazing invention!
I was really warm with just two layers and rarely had to worry about sweating too much.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2 Camino Frances, next: April 2020 Primitivo
Thank you 😊👍 So valuable information! I live in Finland and we get used to deal with cold, but the cold on camino is different. Thanks.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
brilliant thread



Interesting. Got a pic Amancio? tks
The better performing windshells will shed wind and breezes, have excellent breathability, tend to be ultralight weight, are tough and durable, sheds drizzle and light rain for a little while, and will add about 15 to 20 degrees F to the layer(s) you are wearing.. run in the $100 to $180.00 range.

Here are a few I have tried that perform well. I frequently take the Houdini on Camino with me.

For a windshell/windbreaker, at 50 grams / 1.7 ounces this Zpacks is an absolutely brilliant performing shell. It is around $115.

The Patagonia Houdini is about 105 grms / 3.7 ounces, and is also a good performer.

It was surprising to find this Rab Vital Windshell Jacket at $45.00 (sale priced). That is a good bargain.


The Decathlon Men's Fast Hiking Jacket Windproof Helium Wind 500 is the Frogg Toggs of windshells. It is cheap, effective, but does not have long term durability. Production and manufacturing of the garment is not top notch, but for under $25.00, who cares. For a Camino or two, it will be sufficient. If you one is looking for a long-lasting and durable garment beyond that time frame, this isn't the one.






4180
 

malingerer

samarkand
Camino(s) past & future
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
A foldable windbreaker, 260g, is a lifesaver and protects against mild drizzle too. To me, it is the most versatile option ever!
is this the same as a wind shirt? I have two: one by Rab and the other Paramo. The Rab is the lightest and is my rucksack choice for warm weather Caminos. I proof both with Nikwax ( Rab is currently drying hanging over the bath), and Paramo thus treated is as good as any l/wt cagoule. I too am a great believer in versatility! :)

Buen Camino,

The Malingerer.
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
IT is more like a jacket, the full frontal zip helps you ventilate, you can scrunch it and takes no space. Indeed, for a camino, versatility is ESSENTIAL. Dreaming about my next Camino now, Buen Camino!
 

Theresa Brandon

Artist, photographer, dreamer
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (2018), Camino Ingles (from La Coruña, 2019), Camino Portugues (2020)
I find that half gloves, and woolen wrist/pulse warmers are a helpful addition to add to my comfort/warmth level. I make the wrist warmers out of the cuff of worn out wool socks.
 

WalkingJane

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
There have been a couple of threads about early Spring walking, and what clothing to include for cool and cold temperatures. The information that I have written below - - and have posted previously - - is not really a list or an inventory of suggested clothing or gear. It is focused on techniques of walking in cold or cool temperatures so that one can stay dry, avoid chilling and hypothermic concerns, and to utilize the clothing at hand more efficiently.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Layering is a biggie in cool and cold weather, as is controlling exertion levels to minimize perspiration.

Another important principle is this: You never dress with the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm at the start of walking or hiking... you wear the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm 10 minutes after you start walking.

In cold weather, or even cool weather, one needs to do what is necessary to prevent overheating and sweat. That includes how fast a pace one is moving as part of one's total level of exertion, as well as how much clothing one is wearing, and how much air circulation one is able to maintain.

It does not take long, with any layering amount, to saturate clothing with sweat. THAT is when the danger of hypothermia, and at the very least a chilly discomfort will begin to take its toll. If saturation or wetness happens, the only recourse is to change into dry clothing. Since there is usually a limited amount of clothing carried in a backpack, it is essential to adopt strategies to control sweating. Keep in mind that the material of your layers will also determine the effect to you from the above scenario. Focus on clothing made from merino wool or specialized synthetics. These will allow the garment to remain somewhat insulative even though saturated with sweat. Cottons and cotton blends are a menace and can accelerate a hypothermic condition.

Strategies include those mentioned above:
  • Limit layers of clothing to only that which is needed when full exertion is achieved. For those who just can't suck it up for a few minutes when first starting to walk, wear only layers which can be quickly and easily removed. For instance, adding a poncho will add about a 15 degree F advantage to existing layers. It allows for good air circulation. As you warm up during the first 10 minutes of your walk, the poncho is easily removed and stashed into a side pocket of your pack.
  • Move as slow as you need to, within reason, to keep perspiration to a minimum. This may also mean stopping to allow your body to cool down. Even with a single, lightweight layer, some folks walking under load will tend to over-heat. Keep monitoring yourself.
  • Keep an insulative layer, like a puffy down jacket or vest, near at hand so that if you are wetting-out while walking, you can put it on quickly when you stop for a break. Keep it in an outside pocket or on top of the other contents in your pack. A light puffy jacket or mid-weight fleece or a down vest works well here. The key is to keep this layer dry and to use it as a last resort when at rest. If this strategy is needed, do not continue walking until you have been able to stop sweating and you can achieve some level of dryness to your clothes.
In the above scenario, you may actually become warmer by removing your saturated layers so that you only have on your dry insulative layer. Dig out a towel and dry off excess sweat as best you can. Wring out your other layers and let them start to dry. If you have a second shirt, put it on. Hang your wet things from your pack so that they can dry. After you have cooled down, and with your dry layer and your insulative layer on, walk slowly to avoid re-heating. You will make progress down the path, stay warm, while letting your wet layers become dry. The real goal at this point is to dry your layers, not achieve distance.
  • Do not discount the amount of added warmth a light scarf or bandanna or a buff will bring as it insulates your neck. Wearing one can make wearing less layers very comfortable. It will also be a good first line of defense against over-heating and excess sweating by the ability to remove it, thus allowing the neck to act as a radiator in helping to shed body heat.
  • Yes, the type of head gear worn makes a big difference in one's body's heat loss or retention. A hat that works well for sun is not going to be the best choice for cold weather. Wool is king, as it is far less impacted by sweat affecting its inuslative properties than most other materials. And even though wool weighs more than other types of insulation, you do not need a heavy cap of wool to keep you warm. Wool is also far more breathable than many materials which aids in heat control.
As with neck wear, a wool cap can be easily removed to assist with cooling the body to prevent overheating.

Much of the above is what I have used when mountain climbing at high altitudes, on thru-hikes on the PCT and Colorado Trail, and thousands of other miles while backpacking.

Patience and light, multiple layers is the key to preventing hypothermia when being active outdoors.
Good advice. I agree that merino wool is great though I cannot wear it as an under layer. Socks, yes! But what works for me for inner layer is light weight silk. I tend to be cold and use silk long underwear at home in winter, as well as having worn them in early May and October on the Camino. There are silk/wool mixtures that are lovely. Mostly I like natural fibers. Also second the comment on using a buff. So much easier for covering that gap that no hat and scarf combo can quite manage. Outerwear is a lightish fleece jacket with a Marmot on top. Pants - heavy nylon fabric from REI. Has below knee zip off that I never used. Found some light pants at a 2nd hand store in Burgos that take minimal space and are a nice change for evenings.
 
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Introibo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances ( March 2015 )
Camino Portugues ( September 2015 )
Berghaus used to do a jacket called the Vapourlight. It seemed to be made of nothing but thin nylon. However it had a very very thin layer of insulator sandwiched between the two nylon layers. A fantastic mid layer to put on when having a rest break. Sadly unavailable now, but hopefully someone will know of a similar garment?
 

Dadhairday

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2020)
I’m setting out from Irun on 21st March so have the same equipment challenges. I’m also checking local weather and note maximum day temperature in Bilbao varies from 10 to 24 degrees at the moment. That’s quite a challenge to deal with so layers and a mix of warm and cold weather gear seem necessary. I’m also assuming evenings will be cooler still. No specific advice other than prepare of the varied weather.
 

Tandem Graham

Every new day an adventure
Camino(s) past & future
Bike: Mont St Michel-SdC. Budapest-Vezelay. Alicante-Burgos
Walk: Le Puy-SJPdP. Dax-(CF)-SdC.
I’m setting out from Irun on 21st March so have the same equipment challenges. I’m also checking local weather and note maximum day temperature in Bilbao varies from 10 to 24 degrees at the moment. That’s quite a challenge to deal with so layers and a mix of warm and cold weather gear seem necessary. I’m also assuming evenings will be cooler still. No specific advice other than prepare of the varied weather.
Buen Camino! I will set out from Bayonne on 25th March, also on the Norte, but 5 or so days behind you. The temperature isn't the only factor: April typically is a rainy month along the coast. I will flex my packing list according to the 10 day forecast for Northern Spain, just before I leave home!

But layers are definitely the trick, for my top half. Technical t-shirt plus long sleeved hiking shirt plus light fleece when needed and wind/waterproof jacket. Add down-filled gilet for first thing and for sightseeing on chilly late afternoons, with buff and woolly hat as required.

The OP recommendation to modulate pace to achieve a comfortable body temperature and (vice versa), adapting layering to expected level of effort, is also solid advice.

I find shorts preferable to long trousers for walking in everything except lying snow. My hard-working legs dry quicker than hiking trousers! I admit having felt a little regret and no little pain on my calves when crossing the wild Aubrac on the Le Puy route with peanut-sized hailstones carried sideways on a 30mph wind ...... but I was dry and warm soon afterwards in the hotel bar in Royal Aubrac, where my skinny bare legs earned me pity and a free hot chocolate!
 

Dadhairday

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2020)
Buen Camino! I will set out from Bayonne on 25th March, also on the Norte, but 5 or so days behind you. The temperature isn't the only factor: April typically is a rainy month along the coast. I will flex my packing list according to the 10 day forecast for Northern Spain, just before I leave home!

But layers are definitely the trick, for my top half. Technical t-shirt plus long sleeved hiking shirt plus light fleece when needed and wind/waterproof jacket. Add down-filled gilet for first thing and for sightseeing on chilly late afternoons, with buff and woolly hat as required.

The OP recommendation to modulate pace to achieve a comfortable body temperature and (vice versa), adapting layering to expected level of effort, is also solid advice.

I find shorts preferable to long trousers for walking in everything except lying snow. My hard-working legs dry quicker than hiking trousers! I admit having felt a little regret and no little pain on my calves when crossing the wild Aubrac on the Le Puy route with peanut-sized hailstones carried sideways on a 30mph wind ...... but I was dry and warm soon afterwards in the hotel bar in Royal Aubrac, where my skinny bare legs earned me pity and a free hot chocolate!
Agreed! You will probably catch me as I’m not aiming for a hurried experience. I’ll probably switch to the Primitivo at Oviedo as fancy the variety.
 

Tandem Graham

Every new day an adventure
Camino(s) past & future
Bike: Mont St Michel-SdC. Budapest-Vezelay. Alicante-Burgos
Walk: Le Puy-SJPdP. Dax-(CF)-SdC.
@Dadhairday I may see you along the Primitivo then - if I do catch up, it'll be two or three weeks in, I'm sure. I'll take the Primitivo unless the weather is shocking in the mountains.
Buen Camino!
 

GettingThere

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles-SdC Apr-Jun 2015
Roncesvalles-Sarria Sep-Oct 2017
C. Frances sections Apr-Jun 2019
Well the original post was great, but why has it been deleted? I was thinking it should be made a sticky....
 

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