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What do I wear?

Christina

New Member
Beginning the Camino April 27th. I am now at the interesting stage of choosing what to wear. Should I spend £150 to £200 on a jacket to make sure I will remain dry or can I get away with a cheaper one. When I read the descriptions on the websites they all sound the same no matter what they are asking me to pay, they all say they are brilliant! I have tried in my nearby town but they don't have much of a selection and seem to be pushing me in the expensive direction, I am not sure whether they are being totally honest or just trying to get a good sale. Also what would seasoned Camino walkers suggest for a light weight shoe to wear when the boots come off, would crocs be a good idea or not very practical. I have loads more questions but I think that is enough to start with. Thanks for all the info on this forum it has been so helpful.
 
St James' Way - Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading to Southampton, 110 kms
You do not say where you are starting your camino. This may affect the advice you get.

If the jacket you have been looking at is a bulky (though warm) item it is probably better to look at layering and to use a lightweight shell or poncho.

For the evening relaxing, any sort of lightweight footwear which you can wear without socks are good. The emphasis is on lightweight so flip-flops, some Crocs etc.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
For alternative footwear I would suggest some kind of sport sandal. I couldn't wear my boots and ended travelling a considerable distance wearing my sandals something that I don't think would have been as practical in crocs or flip-flops.

john
 
I used crocs as my after hiking wear. They are very lightweight and are comfortable with socks on colder days and without on warmer days.
 
I would suggest waterproof and breathable jacket and pants. I purchased a brand called Marmot, but there are cheaper brands. Jacket was $120, pants about $100. Rainwear is a personal preference of course, but I found this gear super valuable...its difficult enough walking in the rain..jacket and pants keep you dry and warm. Also, on footwear, I would say crocks after a long days walk.
I have posted my entire gear list as well as commentary for each item on my website - http://www.30daystosantiago.com. Buen Camino!
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
good question but a can of worms! - personally I am a poncho man, now converted to the Altus long coat/poncho .. you could buy ten of them instead of an expensive coat! :shock: and give nine away to the poorest of pilgrims that you will meet - can you imagine what fun that would be?

It really depends what you do at home - if you don't walk at home then you will most likely be anxious so will be going for the armour-plated I have to have everything for ALL eventualities, and everything of the best ..

if you walk at home then what you have at home will almost do fine - Spain is full of shops .. in the wet areas they sell umbrellas, ponchos, raincoats ... in the hot areas they sell sunglasses, straw hats, cold beers ... etc ..

weather can change, shops can be shut or you may be a day or so away but then .. so you get cold for a day or so? or wet? so?

So I say be relaxed ... but it is all choice and what makes you feel comfortable and safe .....

as for sandals - personal choice again but my brand and model are (is?) Merrell Kahunas ... Fab!
But, like boots, you must try them on. The Kahunas were replaced with an improved version but they moved the front strapping section back by about just 3mm - my Kahunas wore out after three years and I tried the new ones but couldn't walk in them .. my big toes sort of stuck out and rubbed against - so I didn't buy them but eventually found a company that sold the old stock ... happy now ...

so I suppose - take your time on choosing.. but if you really are set on going to buy an expensive coat and leggings try borrowing some from a friend first and wear them for five or six hours in warm weather with a large bag of potatos on your shoulders .. go into an office building and walk up and down the stairs ... see how you feel - for a few hours now, no cheating ... then go and buy an Altus poncho :wink:
(just my personal opinion now, folks)

Incidentally, I'm not absolutely certain but I think it is still illegal to wear socks with sandals in the UK ... :lol:
 
Br. David said:
good question but a can of worms! - personally I am a poncho man,
I am sure that socks with sandals is a no-no in australia as well (my children certainly tell me it is!!!).
thanks for advice on sandals, i am looking at them now. We are looking at starting from SJPP on 7th April and have one change of clothes ie. 1 shorts, 1 long pants, 2 tee shirts and then warm long sleeve top and jacket (but we are now looking at the Altus pnocho!!!! :lol: ) question is???? should we take waterproof pants in case it is raining? we thought.."so what if we get wet", when we stop for the day, just dry our pants and we have the other pair if needed. My brother, who has done other types of treks, says we are mad not to take them...any thoughts??
Mish...from Gold Coast in Aus (still hot here!!!) :D
 
Mish said:
question is???? should we take waterproof pants in case it is raining? we thought.."so what if we get wet", when we stop for the day, just dry our pants and we have the other pair if needed. My brother, who has done other types of treks, says we are mad not to take them...any thoughts??
Mish...from Gold Coast in Aus (still hot here!!!) :D

Hi Mish,
There are always lots of answers and opinions to equipment questions! I took some 'waterproof' pants with me when I started from Le Puy. First big downpour over Aubrac showed me how useless they really were. I got very cold and thoroughly wet despite the waterproof pants. I ditched the waterproof pants and reverted to the usual "Kiwi" solution- ie if I woke up and found it was wet and cold, I put my polyprop longjohns on under my shorts. (Only downside of this was that if it warmed up again as it often did, I was looking for a secluded road-side spot to re-dress myself without the polyprops!) The polyprops were light enough that they usually dried out overnight, but I guess Kiwi trampers are also used to putting wet clothes back on in the morning!
Margaret
 
The 9th edition the Lightfoot Guide will let you complete the journey your way.
Hi Mish - for poyprops in KiwiNomads reply read "thermals". They are usually brightly coloured and multi striped - and she is right - all NZ'ers wear them just like that (under shirts as well as shorts), but then, so do the Aussies from the more southern climes. They are available at Scout Shops/Snowgum, Anna Purna, Paddy Palin etc. Cheers, Janet
 
jl said:
- for poyprops in KiwiNomads reply read "thermals".
Thanks Janet and Margaret :D Think we will stick to our original plan now..i do have thermal "long johns" to take....am thinking that those under shorts could be the same as Sandals with socks!!!!!!!! :lol: mish
 
Mish said:
.i do have thermal "long johns" to take....am thinking that those under shorts could be the same as Sandals with socks!!!!!!!! :lol: mish

Yep mish...you have got it...... they certainly got me some looks.... even worse than wearing socks under sandles...... but as I was feeling much better and warmer with them on, I never really minded. And as I say, I always found a spot that I hoped was secluded (!!) to get changed out of them as soon as the need was past!!
And actually, the ones I took were quite sedate. Just navy blue and white stripes. I left the rainbow ones at home!!!
Margaret
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
Some of our scout leaders have been known to dress in such a way - you can imagine the comments from the scouts!!!! They remind me of leprechauns or beetles with the striped legs! Be quite confident that tramping in NZ thermals worn in such a way is a usual form of dress, and like I said, in many of the colder parts of southern Aust too. You could always set a new fashion trend on the camino! Cheers, Janet
 
You could make a pair of spats-cum-gaiters to cover the bottom of your longs and boots. I've made these and they look and feel great! Make them out of waterproof material and make them a little longer up the leg. Add two small hooks to the tpe piece and they won't move about. Great for shoes as well.
 

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Christina said:
....... Also what would seasoned Camino walkers suggest for a light weight shoe to wear when the boots come off, would crocs be a good idea or not very practical. I have loads more questions but I think that is enough to start with. Thanks for all the info on this forum it has been so helpful.

Teva sandals or equivalent. I find that I need a sandal that allows the choice of wearing socks if it is cold. I do not wear Croc's but if you happen to end up with those nasty blisters some of us experience then Croc's might be as painful as wearing your boots. With Teva's (or similar) should you find yourself needing to walk through water (unusual) you can take off the socks/boots and feel confident in the Teva's.

Cheers,
Luiza
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
Luiza,
I agree with you about the crocs. They can be painful even without blisters. They are way too soft against the hard and stoney ground, you´ll feel every little stone and pebble under your feet. Sure they are easy to carry but you need something solid, socks or no socks.
-T-
 
I only wore the crocs after the day's walk--for showering, around the albergue, walking around the village for dinner, etc.
 
Has anyone tried the new All Terrain Crocs? Or the Off Road Crocs?

I'm seriously thinking of buying a pair of Off Road Crocs, not only for casual wear after showering, but also for walking occasionally on the road.

Here is a review "Crocs Walk Inca - No Blisters and No Problem" for the All Terrain Crocs from a South African website:
http://www.mycrocs.co.za/testimonial.php
About a week before leaving for South America and the Inca Trail, I was still not sure what type of walking shoes to wear / or buy. Then, by pure co-incidence, I walked into the CROCS shop and saw the All-Terrain shoes. I picked one up ........light as a feather !! They looked robust, strong and comfortable .....my mind was made up these shoes would be my partners on the GREAT INCA TRAIL !! I bought some thick LAMA WOOLEN socks from a hiking shop and was ready to walk - - - - -To test them out, I played 9 holes of golf wearing the new CROCS - no slip, no problem and NO BLISTER or discomfort -- I was even more convinced that these were the shoes for me and the INCA TRAIL. Then the walk began !! Early morning and cold - Altitude around 2500meters - my feet were warm and comfortable. The walk lasted 3 and 1/2 days ., 3 overnights in small tents ... close to 50 Km distance and altitude variation between 2500 and close to 4500 meters (dead woman's pass) ..... Lots of uphill and downhill !!! The CROCS did the job for me - no matter whether the air temperature was hot or cold.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
For my first camino I bought Crocs and Tevas and until the day I left I was not sure which to take. I had read (in those days) of people walking in Crocs and they loved them. Even someone who said they knew of people who had walked the whole camino in them, which is why I bought them. I have since tried the trail ones and they are definitely sturdier (sole wise) that the pair I bought. I would definitely try those. Very comfy.
Lillian
 
Hello,
I checked in local outdoors shop these out door Crocs. They certainly have thicker sole and they could work well on a flat ground. I´m afraid that they don´t have support to your feet sideways. I think I have to try them myself (on a flat trail).
-T-
 
Howdy all...

I guess I am just a dork!!! I love socks with my sandals.... I love my sandals without socks too! I say go for what you LOVE and what YOU think is comfortable...and if people don't like it.... look the other way!!!

You know that old saying.... if you can't take a joke....

Love and Blessings....
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
I am wondering about specifics related to raingear. Does anyone have any preference between poncho versus rain jacket and/or rain pants?

Poncho advantages seem to ability to cover pack but there may also be issues related to wind and coverage.

Any thoughts or suggestions?
 
saskatoonwalking - the question is no longer a dichotomy - besides poncho or rain suit, there is now a third option - the ALTUS rainponcho.

There is a lot of disussion on the ALTUS - start by reading here:

equipment-questions/topic5009.html
 
sillydoll said:
Has anyone tried the new All Terrain Crocs? Or the Off Road Crocs?

I'm seriously thinking of buying a pair of Off Road Crocs, not only for casual wear after showering, but also for walking occasionally on the road.

Here is a review "Crocs Walk Inca - No Blisters and No Problem" for the All Terrain Crocs from a South African website:
http://www.mycrocs.co.za/testimonial.php

My husband bought a pair of the Off Road Crocs prior to our Camino in October. He loves them and has worn them regularly since.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
I think this thread, with its discussions of striped longjohns with shorts, off-road crocs with socks, and ponchos of all kinds, should be re-titled "How To Be A Camino Fashion Victim (but dry and comfy.)" Just imagine a pilgrim dressed up in all three at once, with a gale blowing! :shock:
 
I remarked to my daughter-in-law yesterday that I was concerned I might be cold on the Camino but didn´t want to carry too much.

She suggested the following: get a thick pair of tights, cut off the feet and cut a hole in the crotch. Put your arms in the legs and your head in the hole, and voilá - a stretchy, warm light top :idea: . I think it is a brilliant idea and am already hunting through my tights drawer!

Sandra
 
Sansthing said:
I remarked to my daughter-in-law yesterday that I was concerned I might be cold on the Camino but didn´t want to carry too much.She suggested the following: get a thick pair of tights, cut off the feet and cut a hole in the crotch. Put your arms in the legs and your head in the hole, and voilá - a stretchy, warm light top :idea: . I think it is a brilliant idea and am already hunting through my tights drawer! Sandra


My husband used to wear just that when he was doing his army training in the 1960's. I tried it once but the new tights don't have the same wide gusset that the old ones used to have and it was almost impossible to cut a hole large enough to pull over the head.
 
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Cuddle Duds or silk longjohns are lightweight and very warm.

Also, I went to Goodwill, bought a men's cashmere sweater, and felted it in my washer/dryer. It's EXTREMELY lightweight, VERY dense and warm, and it's going to replace my polyfill jacket.

I bought another sweater, felted it, and made a pair of cashmere longjohns... soooo warm and lightweight.
 

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