Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.

What kind of bike is most suitable?

Prætor

New Member
Hello,
I wonder what type of bike is most suitable to to the Camino? I am thinking of both hybrid or cyclocross, or even a mountainbike. What is the suggestions from others that have cycled the Way?
I am planning to go from SJPP til Santiago, or even the whole way from Le Puy? (not decided yet). I will be grateful for others sharing their experiences...
 
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.

newfydog

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
Welcome!

I have a stock answer I've posted before, but I can copy and paste faster than you'd search it up:

(Note---I have lots of bikes--road cyclocross, hardtail, full suspension. My wife and I have done 5,000 km of varios Caminos, all on hardtail MTB's. You'll find other opinions, but we have not been tempted to bring different bikes.

The route, bike and tires

I looked all over the web trying to figure out if the Camino was best on road or mountain bikes and what tires to use, and never found a decent answer. There are tour groups and road cycling groups riding the route and the paralleling roads who try to make a case for road bikes but I think it would be a big mistake to use anything but a mountain bike with full size mountain bike tires. The route is not difficult mountain biking, more often it is on a dirt road rather than a hiking trail. There is not much pavement, maybe 10% in the first half and 30% for the rest of it. It is a wonderful ride and it would be a shame to miss it by riding the roads. There are people who ride road bikes on paved alternative routes, but unlike France, where the roads are wonderful, much of the route is crowded with high speed truck traffic. We followed the walker's route 95% of the way, and only walked our bikes about 2 km in the entire trip.

I would use a 1.9-2.2 tire with small to medium knobs in the rear and a 1.9 mountain bike racing tire with side knobs and a smoother center in the front. The first year we had a 1.5 rear tire with road tread in the rear and a side knob front tire and bought full sized rear tires halfway through the trip. Last year we had mountain bike racing tires with very little tread and were happy until it rained, when we again bought some knobby rear tires.

Most walkers are glad to share the path with a bike, just ding a bell to let them know you are on the trail and pass them politely.
 

k1ypp

Member
I haven't biked the Camino, but I agree with newfydog, most definitely get a BELL! We walked the Camino Frances last year and I can't tell you how many times I had the daylights scared out of me by bikes approaching without any warning, especially if there was traffic nearby making some noise.

It was amazing how many bikers couldn't understand the concept of letting people know they were approaching. Then the pedestrians would suddenly jump out of the way, often into the path of the bicyclist, instead of away. Please use a bell, it is not rude, it is VERY helpful. Ring it early and often.

I also agree the mountain bike tires would be preferred. People do it with street bikes (on the unpaved route) but they have lots of flats.

Oh, I'm both a serious bicyclist AND hiker. I love long distance bike touring. There is plenty of room for both on the unpaved route, but there needs to be more cooperation between the two groups.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
I didn't think I'd have enough info to fill a whole chapter on cycling the Camino in my book but ended up with 12 pages.
Here is an excerpt:

Which bike is best
As most of Camino hiking paths are on cross country trails, the majority of cyclists use mountain bikes or front suspension touring bikes. Full suspension mountain bikes are definitely not recommended as they are not suitable for carrying a heavy load on the back wheel.
Low gears with MTB tyres are recommended although a good compromise would be tyres like the Continental Travel-Contact that are smooth on top for tar cycling and have ‘knobs’ on the edges for the off-road stretches. If you intend riding mostly on roads, a road bike will suffice.

Mountain bikes
Entry-level mountain bikes are made for dirt roads, easy-to-moderate level trails and tar road or pavement riding. A touring bike does not have to be high spec like those used for mountain biking. The higher cost goes into lower weight (which when touring is not such high priority) and the groupset (gears). ‘The entry level groupsets are heavier but also tougher than the higher level groupsets and can take quite a bit of punishment and be repaired at any Tienda de bicicletas. I used a €250 Scott Aspect 70 and did not even suffer a puncture over 2500 km.’ Riaan

Tyres
The correct tyres on a bike are essential in ensuring stability and traction. Make sure the tyres are inflated to the recommended pressure on the sidewall to ensure they’re at their best. Don’t be afraid to inflate them to the lower limit as a slightly softer tyre offers more traction and comfort.

Pedals
Riding with the flat pedals can be problematic. You have no pull-up option when pedalling and there is a chance that your feet will slip off the pedals over bumps. If you’re going to be riding for a week or two we highly recommend spending a bit extra on clip-less pedals and mountain bike shoes.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
sillydoll said:
Full suspension mountain bikes are definitely not recommended as they are not suitable for carrying a heavy load on the back wheel.

Actually they work fine with a rack from Old Man Mountain. These racks work on any bike and are so much stronger and more stable than anything else that they are well worth the cost. On one trip I did everyone with a cheap rack broke it.

http://www.oldmanmountain.com/

If you have a full suspension bike it will be fine. If you are buying one for the trip, a hardtail is lighter, cheaper, and more reliable.

I don't subscribe to the theory that high end parts are delicate. We have 14 year old top end bikes which have seen 14 tours, from three to eight weeks each. I have hardly had to fix anything on the way. I can't say the same about cheap bikes----I sometimes stop and repair other pilgrims' bikes daily, usually some cheap piece of crap. Super top end wheels are indeed delicate, but low end wheels are a disaster waiting to happen. Bikes in the Shimano Deore LX to XT range are a good bet.
 
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.
Camino Masks
12 different designs, shipped world wide from Santiago.

Davroos

Active Member
The entry level groupsets are heavier but also tougher than the higher level groupsets and can take quite a bit of punishment

I'm sorry, but this statement is in fact very incorrect. Having raced mountain bikes, the higher end groupsets are in fact made to last whereas the cheaper ones are heavier and do break.

I rode a 19 year old hardtail with period top of the line Shimano groupset and had no problems. I rode the il Primitivo and this wasn't always a walk in the park. I am happy with the weight of my bike and would rather push a light bike up a hill than a heavier one.

As I have ridden all of my life, I tend to use only Shimano XTR parts as I believe that it is better to spend a little bit more for something that will last longer.
 

jim456

New Member
Last august/sept I cycled the Camino Francis on an old mountain bike.I used Schwalbe marathon cross tyres as I rode on and off road.I enjoyed it so much that I am considering repeating the trip again this year on the same 20 year old bike.The only problem I had was that the pannier weld parted company which I fixed with 2 cable ties,I have baught a stronger rack for the next trip as you do get bounced around a bit riding off road.I would strongly recommend doing as much off road as you can,do a bit of research first to find out which bits to avoid,not difficult with the various publications eg Michelin's Guide to the Camino and John Brierly's guide.Have a good trip.
Jim Heyes.
 

Prætor

New Member
Thanks Jim and you others for good advice!

I have read a lot of guides, and about other people that have done this trip, and I have made up my mind on what bike I will use. :D
It will be a Merida Cyclocross 3, modified gearing. I change the Tiagra system: Rear: change of cassette from 11-25 to 12-32, change the arm from Tiagra to XT, and change the crank from 46-36 to 50-34. In addition I put on fenders and backrack. My cycleshop does this without any extra cost. The tires are Maxxis Raze 35 kevlar (700x35) with knobs for dirty road biking, and there are discbrakes. This will be a good bike for dirt roads, as well for making good speed at the ordinary roads, and sufficent low gearing for the hills. (hopefully.... :oops: )
Prætor
 

William Marques

Moderator
Staff member
Sounds like a good set up for the Camino. A triple would be better but where you are likely to need the granny gear you will probably find it is single track with plenty of walkers and you can join them on foot. I have always been able to survive the tracks on Conti Top Touring tyres but then we have been cycling in mid-summer and the conditions are usually very dry then.

Buen Camino
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
A cyclocross bike would be a good bike it you avoid some of the real rough stuff, like the descent from O'Cebriero.

I'd go with a bigger tire than the 35c. I run my cyclocross bike with Continental cyclocross speed 42c front and Ritchey Speedmax 40c rear. They are far less likely to rim pinch and roll great on pavement. The 35c size came from UCI race regulations (now 32c), but we don't need to worry about that.

I'd definitely look at the Old Man Mountain rack.

Nice that you have disc brakes. We did a descent in Switzerland where we had to stop and cool the rims about ten times. Sometimes we run a 26" disc brake wheel on the cyclocross bikes, a trick not possible with rim brakes. It gives more mud clearance andlets us run 1.5" mtb tires, which are great for mixed paved/dirt routes.
 
Camino Cups
Browse our selection of Camino Cups on the forum store
Camino Jewellery
A selection of Camino Jewellery

Davroos

Active Member
Get a triple front ring. Granny gear wil be your best friend. From Melide, there are climbs you will need granny gear. I rode up in granny three to the airport. There is no shame in using granny !!!

As for racks, I used a seat attached one and carried minimum weight
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
Davroos said:
Get a triple front ring. Granny gear wil be your best friend. From Melide, there are climbs you will need granny gear. I rode up in granny three to the airport. There is no shame in using granny !!!

That involves changing many things, but I totally agree. There are cyclocross bikes out there which come with a triple, so it would be cheaper to find one rather than switch.

I used to race road and mtb. I carry very little weight, and I use a 22 x 34 some everyday.
 

Davroos

Active Member
Its funny, I carried around 10Kgs on my walks, but on the bike I had 6. 22 is small, but it all depends on what gearing is on your rear cassette. With a 22 you should go up anything really but is a 34 enough? On the il Primitivo, I did get into the big ring !!! I am not running micro drive.

I am using the same setup for via de la plata in April. My bike will be 20 years old, and so is my XTR groupset. Hopefully the legs will make it !!!
 

Bobbydigital

New Member
Welcome!

I have a stock answer I've posted before, but I can copy and paste faster than you'd search it up:

(Note---I have lots of bikes--road cyclocross, hardtail, full suspension. My wife and I have done 5,000 km of varios Caminos, all on hardtail MTB's. You'll find other opinions, but we have not been tempted to bring different bikes.

The route, bike and tires

I looked all over the web trying to figure out if the Camino was best on road or mountain bikes and what tires to use, and never found a decent answer. There are tour groups and road cycling groups riding the route and the paralleling roads who try to make a case for road bikes but I think it would be a big mistake to use anything but a mountain bike with full size mountain bike tires. The route is not difficult mountain biking, more often it is on a dirt road rather than a hiking trail. There is not much pavement, maybe 10% in the first half and 30% for the rest of it. It is a wonderful ride and it would be a shame to miss it by riding the roads. There are people who ride road bikes on paved alternative routes, but unlike France, where the roads are wonderful, much of the route is crowded with high speed truck traffic. We followed the walker's route 95% of the way, and only walked our bikes about 2 km in the entire trip.

I would use a 1.9-2.2 tire with small to medium knobs in the rear and a 1.9 mountain bike racing tire with side knobs and a smoother center in the front. The first year we had a 1.5 rear tire with road tread in the rear and a side knob front tire and bought full sized rear tires halfway through the trip. Last year we had mountain bike racing tires with very little tread and were happy until it rained, when we again bought some knobby rear tires.

Most walkers are glad to share the path with a bike, just ding a bell to let them know you are on the trail and pass them politely.



At the end of this video there is a run down of my gear. The set up was superior to everyone else on the trail... not that that matters.
 
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.

David

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2005
The best way is to read all the other posts about wheels and tyres and so on and build your own.

Top tip! Start with a working bell and then bolt things onto it until you have a complete bike - (and when you are out there call out 'Buen Camino' every time you pass a foot pilgrim ;) )

The Camino Frances is fine for cycling, in any weather, regardless of what folk might think. When the track is muddy and squelchy and you can't cycle fast (why would anyone want to race on the Camino?), get off and walk until the path improves - this way you can stay on Camino the whole way.

Buen Camino!
 

obinjatoo@yahoo.com

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2012 Dieppe, FR Bici CF.
2014 Ruta Vasco/CF/Primativo
I rode beginning in Dieppe on the north coast of France last year and picking up the French route in SJPP. I rode all the foot paths and took to pavement only where the route led. I rode a good touring bike (Salsa Fargo) with Schwalbe Marathon Supreme tires 50x622 or 28x2.00. It's a road worthy slick tire and my bike has no suspension. It was just fine. I used a Tubus rear rack and Ortlieb bags. In the front I went with a handlebar harness for my tent. I had an awesome time. I met folks doing 100 or 150 K a day and I often asked myself: why? I took my time and made some side trips. As bike tours go, it was awesome. As a pilgrimage I would not ride it again.
My 2 cents but probably not worth that much...
 

gracie

New Member
Hello,
I wonder what type of bike is most suitable to to the Camino? I am thinking of both hybrid or cyclocross, or even a mountainbike. What is the suggestions from others that have cycled the Way?
I am planning to go from SJPP til Santiago, or even the whole way from Le Puy? (not decided yet). I will be grateful for others sharing their experiences...

Have you come across someone who rented a bike and have it delivered to refuge municipal in SJPDP? I am renting a bike and would like to experience the refuge municipal at SJPDP, so i wonder if t\it is possible to have it delivered?
 

Bikeguy

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy to SJPP via velo, June 2010
Completed camino last month on my very sturdy Bike Friday Pocket Llama folding bike with 20" wheels and 1.75" Marathon tires. Bike's fourth Eurpean tour. 27 speeds with very low gearing (17"), rear rack with panniers and handlebar bag. No suspension, no problem. Travelled maybe 40% on path 60% road averaging 60 km per day. Foldability a huge plus for flights, trains and taxis. Recommend fenders (mudguards) for which you would be thankful on those wet and muddy days. I personally prefer caliper brakes over disc for robustness and abilty to maintain in the field; a bent disc = no brakes (from experience). A bell and some patience mandatory. This is first tour where I used platform rather than clipless peddels and cycling shoes and this was just fine. Cost me 2 Euros to have chain lubed at mid way bike shop. Awesome trip!
 

Bikeguy

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy to SJPP via velo, June 2010
Fopgot one - a kick stand. Lots of serious bikes would never consider a stand (one time me included) being uncool and extra weight. It is just invaluble when touring when you are parking your trusty bike numerous times every day. No always a convenient wall or tree when you want one!
 
John Brierley Camino Frances Guide
This guide is one of the ones that has been around for over 15 years. Updated yearly. Please read the reviews.
CaminoSupply.com
Apparel and accessories for your Camino

obinjatoo@yahoo.com

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2012 Dieppe, FR Bici CF.
2014 Ruta Vasco/CF/Primativo
I rode a Salsa Fargo fully loaded for touring. I rode the entire French route from SJPDP on slick but fairly wide tires (I forget what size width). I had no problems. Any decent touring bike can do it. A mountain bike is NOT necessary but a bell sure is.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
It always amazes me that those Schwalbe Marathon tires end up in every thread. They are really slow pigs.

I recently saw this post on Adventure Cycling, by a rider who won several Great Divide MTB races, on Camino like roads, from Canada to Mexico. His tires made the 2000 miles of gravel every time:

"Schwalbe Big Apple 50 mm is an excellent choice. In laboratory tests they easily beat most 28 mm tires in low rolling resistance. Don't let yourself fool into buying 'unpuncturable' tires like Schwalbe Marathon Plus. They are heavy going."
 

KentuckyJay

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Hiked Leon to Santiago in May, 2014.
Hiked Porto to Santiago in May, 2016.
Hello,
I wonder what type of bike is most suitable to to the Camino? I am thinking of both hybrid or cyclocross, or even a mountainbike. What is the suggestions from others that have cycled the Way?
I am planning to go from SJPP til Santiago, or even the whole way from Le Puy? (not decided yet). I will be grateful for others sharing their experiences...
I kind of like a good old fashion foot mobile. :)
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
A bell is really over rated. How you pass your fellow travelers is what matters. Slow down, say hello, continue on. No need to go DING DING, get out of my way! A little "ding, I'm here" can sometimes be nice, but is no substitute for riding with courtesy and patience.
 
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.

Bikeguy

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy to SJPP via velo, June 2010
Absolutely agree Newfydog - courtesy and patience. I found when catching up to walkers I would sound my bell well back to notify but not alarm them and then slow right down and pass when possible. Courtesy begets courtesy. I found with the wind blowing in their ears and hoods pulled up the walkers could sometimes not hear the bell or my hello until I was quite close at which point some would be startled which was not my intention.
 

trevorcc

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPD to Santiago 2013,2014, Camino de Levante Sept. 2016, Frances March 2018, planning 2020
Hello,
I wonder what type of bike is most suitable to to the Camino? I am thinking of both hybrid or cyclocross, or even a mountainbike. What is the suggestions from others that have cycled the Way?
I am planning to go from SJPP til Santiago, or even the whole way from Le Puy? (not decided yet). I will be grateful for others sharing their experiences...
One that goes up hills without you pushing it. or simpler still throw the pack on the back and walk.
 

Andres Cano

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April 9 - May 3 2018 on regular bicycle.
Actually they work fine with a rack from Old Man Mountain. These racks work on any bike and are so much stronger and more stable than anything else that they are well worth the cost. On one trip I did everyone with a cheap rack broke it.

http://www.oldmanmountain.com/

If you have a full suspension bike it will be fine. If you are buying one for the trip, a hardtail is lighter, cheaper, and more reliable.

I don't subscribe to the theory that high end parts are delicate. We have 14 year old top end bikes which have seen 14 tours, from three to eight weeks each. I have hardly had to fix anything on the way. I can't say the same about cheap bikes----I sometimes stop and repair other pilgrims' bikes daily, usually some cheap piece of crap. Super top end wheels are indeed delicate, but low end wheels are a disaster waiting to happen. Bikes in the Shimano Deore LX to XT range are a good bet.
in addition there are panniers that can be attached to the front fork and packs that suspend from the seat. More than enough room for the 8kg max.
 

Andres Cano

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April 9 - May 3 2018 on regular bicycle.
Absolutely agree Newfydog - courtesy and patience. I found when catching up to walkers I would sound my bell well back to notify but not alarm them and then slow right down and pass when possible. Courtesy begets courtesy. I found with the wind blowing in their ears and hoods pulled up the walkers could sometimes not hear the bell or my hello until I was quite close at which point some would be startled which was not my intention.
courtesy and a bell are number 1.
 
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.

Andres Cano

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April 9 - May 3 2018 on regular bicycle.
Fopgot one - a kick stand. Lots of serious bikes would never consider a stand (one time me included) being uncool and extra weight. It is just invaluble when touring when you are parking your trusty bike numerous times every day. No always a convenient wall or tree when you want one!
Absolutely, The bike plus your 8kg of gear makes it a pain to pick up 4 to 6 times a day. A kickstand is a must.
 

Andres Cano

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April 9 - May 3 2018 on regular bicycle.
Have you come across someone who rented a bike and have it delivered to refuge municipal in SJPDP? I am renting a bike and would like to experience the refuge municipal at SJPDP, so i wonder if t\it is possible to have it delivered?
yes, but do not use bikeiberia. they delivered broken seven year old bikes which we had to pay to have repaired twice because they wouldn't answer their e-mail or phone. bicigrinos has a couple of resources i've heard are good on the facebook pages.
 

Andres Cano

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April 9 - May 3 2018 on regular bicycle.
That involves changing many things, but I totally agree. There are cyclocross bikes out there which come with a triple, so it would be cheaper to find one rather than switch.

I used to race road and mtb. I carry very little weight, and I use a 22 x 34 some everyday.
1 x 11 or 1 x 12 groupsets are now available from sram for as little as 300 dollars. This gives you an almost 400 % gear range and a 50 Tooth granny gear.
 

Andres Cano

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April 9 - May 3 2018 on regular bicycle.
Have you come across someone who rented a bike and have it delivered to refuge municipal in SJPDP? I am renting a bike and would like to experience the refuge municipal at SJPDP, so i wonder if t\it is possible to have it delivered?
bicigrino rents and delivers their rental bikes. Do not use bikeiberia, they delivered broken seven year old bikes and refused to answer our phone and e-mails.
 

Burgos

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
June2015
Hello,
I wonder what type of bike is most suitable to to the Camino? I am thinking of both hybrid or cyclocross, or even a mountainbike. What is the suggestions from others that have cycled the Way?
I am planning to go from SJPP til Santiago, or even the whole way from Le Puy? (not decided yet). I will be grateful for others sharing their experiences...
A recumbent trike using parallel roads when the trail is difficult
 
Camino Masks
12 different designs, shipped world wide from Santiago.
Camino Cups
Browse our selection of Camino Cups on the forum store

Barbara

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Hi Burgos
You might well be right but this is an old old thread and I expect the OP decided a while back. Just out of interest, do you cycle both ways?
 

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 100 ratings
Downloads
15,078
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
7,730
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,571
Updated
Top