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Luggage Transfer Correos

20 irish pilgrims rescued yesterday in Lepoeder

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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
That's an interesting article as it also provides the opinion of the person in charge and details about how they got themselves into this situation and what they did to get out of it. They were not newcomers to camino walking, and with 4 blind persons in this group of 20 persons they obviously thought about how long it would take to cross and they knew that a change in weather was coming, as they state in the article.

And yet, despite their justification attempt, I still think that people are pushing too hard to cross the pass on the Napoleon Route on the day of their choosing "for the views" and "for the experience".

Thank you for posting this link!
 

Telboyo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
I intend to leave the UK the day Before Brexit and walkMarch -April 2019 Camino Frances
When walking in mountains always always always take appropriate clothing and equipment with you. This includes sleeping bags and shelter, you never know when the weather will change. I don't know if these folks had used a baggage transfer service but I would not advise doing that in the mountains.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
I don't know if these folks had used a baggage transfer service
"Daily luggage transfers" is included in the trip. I guess this article is also damage control because, as the article mentions, the group had contracted a commercial travel operator who specialises in camino trips and who provided the two guides.

For those who don't read the article: the guides even arranged for four taxis to pick them up but given the circumstances (weather and I suppose 4 blind people in the group and it was getting later than they had calculated beforehand), they judged it unsafe to walk from the shelter to the road as taxis cannot reach the shelter. There is a 5 km (I think) section on the Route Napoleon that is not accessible for cars.
 
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Telboyo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
I intend to leave the UK the day Before Brexit and walkMarch -April 2019 Camino Frances
"Daily luggage transfers" is included in the trip. I guess this article is also damage control because, as the article mentions, the group had contracted a commercial travel operator who specialises in camino trips and who provided the two guides.

For those who don't read the article: the guides even arranged for four taxis to pick them up but given the circumstances (weather and I suppose 4 blind people in the group and it was getting later than they had calculated beforehand), they judged it unsafe to walk from the shelter to the road as taxis cannot reach the shelter. There is a 5 km (I think) section on the Route Napoleon that is not accessible for cars.
As an experienced tour company they should have known taxis were not an option for those 5 km and shoild have ensured appropriate equipment was available. The photograph shows them wearing shorts and t shirts on a mountain, where were their layers and protective clothing? On a mountain it is imperative that you have ALL the equipment and clothing with you. The weather changes all the time on a mountain.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
As an experienced tour company they should have known taxis were not an option for those 5 km
To their credit, when they realised that the group was in potential trouble, they tried to arrange for the taxis first and only after some further deliberation they called the rescue services. Individual pilgrims with little experience of the territory will call rescue services straight away, even when they just feel lost and don't have a decent map. So no surprise that they had 84 interventions to date this year - on average, that's nearly one intervention every second day.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sarria to Santiago March 18 , Camino Frances June 18 Camino Frances May 19
When walking in mountains always always always take appropriate clothing and equipment with you. This includes sleeping bags and shelter, you never know when the weather will change. I don't know if these folks had used a baggage transfer service but I would not advise doing that in the mountains.
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sarria to Santiago March 18 , Camino Frances June 18 Camino Frances May 19
I do not think they look that unprepared , possibly they started too late and as a charity walk maybe they could not speed up with the four others . Of course when you get wet you then get cold . I hope it does not deter them from carrying on .
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
From that photograph it seems fairly certain that they were neither suffering from exhaustion nor hypothermia (when the photo was taken) - if they were they wouldn't be standing around, they would be sitting, heads down, shivering, covered in foil blankets ...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
If they even had foil blankets. I agree with your comments, David. Even in summer, when our hikes take us into the high country of the Cascade Mountains, we carry more than the 10 essentials. Weather can be capricious. The Pyrenees perhaps more so. Years ago, I hiked in the Parque Nacional de Ordesa y Monte Perdido. I was caught up in a fast moving snow storm. It was July 4th. Semper paratus.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
From that photograph it seems fairly certain that they were neither suffering from exhaustion nor hypothermia (when the photo was taken) - if they were they wouldn't be standing around, they would be sitting, heads down, shivering, covered in foil blankets ...
I would humbly suggest that that photo wasn’t taken at the point of rescue. If they needed rescuing from the “Santiago 700” sign they’ve little hope of making Hunto let alone Santiago 😉
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
I would humbly suggest that that photo wasn’t taken at the point of rescue. If they needed rescuing from the “Santiago 700” sign they’ve little hope of making Hunto let alone Santiago 😉
Ah! So the photo is them getting out of the rescue vehicles, not in!
I am pretty dumb sometimes (actually, quite often ;) )
 

MikeyC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - September 2016
CF - April May 2017
Shikoku - October 2017
Kumano Kodo - October 2017
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The Spanish article mentions a 10°C low with a 3°C feels like temperature. I certainly wouldn't be wearing shorts though I guess some people are hardier than others!
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Ah! So the photo is them getting out of the rescue vehicles, not in!
I am not sure where*) and when the photo in question was taken but the papers said that the rescue team evacuated a first group that was in worse condition by vehicle while a member of the First Responder team lead the rest of the group to the road. So the photo may show the hardier lot (I count less than 20 pilgrims in the photo).

I think there was a memorable thread once on the forum where posters defended their habit of walking in shorts in subzero temperatures and while it was snowing, no matter whether they were at home or abroad.

*) That was easy 🤣. One look into Google Earth and I'm pretty sure now: the photo shows the location where the path splits into the direct descent to Roncesvalles through the forest and the descent to the Ibañeta pass. So you were right, they are about to get into the vehicles, after they had walked from the shelter to the road. A member of the rescue team took this photo and posted it on their twitter account. Elementary. 😇
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sarria to Santiago March 18 , Camino Frances June 18 Camino Frances May 19
Well this is August regarded as one of the hotter months for Irish people to walk and the risk of snow is lower than home 😁. How many threads have you read here on the forum advising wear shorts and skirts in the rain as your legs dry quickly.
 

Moorwalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
The Saint's Way, Cornwall
As an experienced tour company they should have known taxis were not an option for those 5 km and shoild have ensured appropriate equipment was available. The photograph shows them wearing shorts and t shirts on a mountain, where were their layers and protective clothing? On a mountain it is imperative that you have ALL the equipment and clothing with you. The weather changes all the time on a mountain.
It's always going to be a balancing act between carrying enough for an emergency but not overloading yourself. I've walked on Dartmoor in England for most of my life and it's notorious for suddenly dropping thick mist on you. I've walked a number of people off because they didn't have a map and compass or didn't know how to use it, and didn't have a sweater and waterproof. In summer I don't take full kit but I always have a warm layer and waterproofs/windproofs. I've spent one night out unexpectedly which was a bit uncomfortable but not a problem because I had clothes to deal with it and knew what I was doing, but someone wearing shorts and tee shirts could be in real trouble.

People often underestimate the Pyrenees mountains but they are real mountains. I've cycled up several of the well known Tour de France routes and it took my triathlon club 3 visits before we got up the Tourmalet because the snow often lies on the top for most of the year.

In the case of the Napoleon route I wouldn't do it if there was a poor weather forecast even in summer, and I'd certainly have my waterproofs and a bit of spare food and water.
 

oldman

oldman
Camino(s) past & future
C/Frances. SJPP - Estella May 2009.
C/frances. SJPP - Santiago April/ May 2013.
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C/Frances. SJPP - Santiago May - June 2015.
C/Finisterre. Santiago - Muxia - Finisrerre - Cee. June 2015.
C/Frances. Logrono - Burgos May 2016.
There is very little evidence of backpacks,to carry enough clothing, that is something I think the organizer's of this type group should not be allowed send all the bags forward. There has to be enough cold weather clothes for everyone with them everyday, even if it means employing someone to carry them.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
We really do not know what they had with them,do we? However, guides with four blind pilgrims IMO should not have been leaving Orisson at 11am?? Might it have been prudent to split the walk into two segments??

And they definitely should have prepared for inclement weather.

I certainly do not fault the group for sending bags ahead.Many of us do it,especially on the mountain sections. If the guides thought it too strenuous for some of their members to carry weather protective clothing,they might have made arrangements to have others,or a cart to accompany them.

Finally the article indicates the leaders took 3/4 of an hour to finally call for assistance....was that perhaps too long of a period to wait given their clients.

And the guides should have known exactly where taxi services ended??
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
Well, I spied one foil blanket in the photo. However, it seems everyone was wearing shorts or capris, and one guy isn't even wearing socks! Not surprised, when walking this past May I encountered a woman who wasn't even carrying a bottle of water! I'm not sure if all of these companies are making it clear that the Camino isn't the same as three-hour social walk in a nearby national park.
 

oldman

oldman
Camino(s) past & future
C/Frances. SJPP - Estella May 2009.
C/frances. SJPP - Santiago April/ May 2013.
C/Finisterre. Santiag - Finisterre - Muxia May 2013.
C/Ingles. Ferrol - Santiago May 2013.
C/Frances. SJPP - Santiago May - June 2015.
C/Finisterre. Santiago - Muxia - Finisrerre - Cee. June 2015.
C/Frances. Logrono - Burgos May 2016.
We really do not know what they had with them, do we?
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( Yes we do, look at the photo only one person wearing long pants and some very flimsy wet gear )
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And they definitely should have prepared for inclement weather.
----------------------------------
( I totally agree with you )
---------------------------------
I certainly do not fault the group for sending bags ahead. Many of us do it, especially on the mountain sections.
-------------------
( Neither do I )
-------------------
If the guides thought it too strenuous for some of their members to carry weather protective clothing, they might have made arrangements to have others, or a cart to accompany them.
--------------------------
( My point exactly
--------------------------
Finally, the article indicates the leaders took 3/4 of an hour to finally call for assistance....was that perhaps too long of a period to wait given their clients.

And the guides should have known exactly where taxi services ended??
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I question the whole thing of companies organizing trips like this. are their rules and regulations governing their conduct. do they have a code of practice?. it's not good enough to say they have 2 experienced guides, if you have 4 blind people then should they not have atleast been on a one to one with a guide?
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Tony Maguire

Member
Camino(s) past & future
20th August 2014
This below is from 1 of the blind lads on this trip:

Hi gang maybe some of ye read in the tabloid papers this week of the and I quote , the dramatic rescue mission of a group of irish walkers on top of a mountain while trecking the Camino. The papers declared that this rescue happened in severe conditions and that the rescued were suffering hyperthermia etc etc. Just to let ye know that wee the walkers never had such a great laugh at this reported dribble and astonished how a little story can run and eventually be blown out of all proportion. Yes we came into bad weather but nothing severe and certainly nothing to cause us hyperthermia or that it suddenly dropped from 32degrees down to 3degrees as was reported. yes we had reached the summit at 4,200ft when the weather became foggy and we had 3km left of a descent through some rockey terrain before reaching our hotel, so our extremely experienced guide may Iadd, made the wise decision not to take this route , but decided to call for back up in the collection of us getting into trucks. These same so call rescue trucks were able to drive to us on the mountain and pick us up which we could easily have walked but for the only reason it was another 10km adding another 7km to our walk. The only reason that I am hylighting this that after all the laugh we had reading and hearing how much this was blown out of proportion is that there is a serious side to this and that is how much of it was blown out of proportion and how so called investicated journalism can get it so wrong. Our two guides were quite concerned as so as well was the charity guide dogs as how this ridiculous story would reflect on them and their business. I know the month of August is referred to silly season and I know that tabloid papers should be taken with a pinch of salt, but some times it is ridiculous reporting like this that can cause untold damage to individuals, their livelihood and their carreer.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sarria to Santiago March 18 , Camino Frances June 18 Camino Frances May 19
This below is from 1 of the blind lads on this trip:

Hi gang maybe some of ye read in the tabloid papers this week of the and I quote , the dramatic rescue mission of a group of irish walkers on top of a mountain while trecking the Camino. The papers declared that this rescue happened in severe conditions and that the rescued were suffering hyperthermia etc etc. Just to let ye know that wee the walkers never had such a great laugh at this reported dribble and astonished how a little story can run and eventually be blown out of all proportion. Yes we came into bad weather but nothing severe and certainly nothing to cause us hyperthermia or that it suddenly dropped from 32degrees down to 3degrees as was reported. yes we had reached the summit at 4,200ft when the weather became foggy and we had 3km left of a descent through some rockey terrain before reaching our hotel, so our extremely experienced guide may Iadd, made the wise decision not to take this route , but decided to call for back up in the collection of us getting into trucks. These same so call rescue trucks were able to drive to us on the mountain and pick us up which we could easily have walked but for the only reason it was another 10km adding another 7km to our walk. The only reason that I am hylighting this that after all the laugh we had reading and hearing how much this was blown out of proportion is that there is a serious side to this and that is how much of it was blown out of proportion and how so called investicated journalism can get it so wrong. Our two guides were quite concerned as so as well was the charity guide dogs as how this ridiculous story would reflect on them and their business. I know the month of August is referred to silly season and I know that tabloid papers should be taken with a pinch of salt, but some times it is ridiculous reporting like this that can cause untold damage to individuals, their livelihood and their carreer.
Glad to hear everyone is ok , just to clarify a few details for us please
Was it 6 pm and if it was what time had ye started walking that morning ?
Was there a cost incurred when the rescue vehicles were called out ?
How is the rest of the journey going for ye now? , I heard it is high temperatures again on the Camino .
Buen Camino
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
certainly nothing to cause us hyperthermia
I see that the story has now made it into the English language and into Irish newspapers and I guess that is meant by the reference to "tabloid" newspapers. The discussion in this thread is based on what local newspapers reported in Spanish for Navarra. It was the Bomberos who mentioned the words "rescue" and "severe fatigue and hypothermia" in their tweet (see below) when they announced their intervention to the world.

The local newspapers often pick up these tweets and report them in an article of two or three lines and that's the end of it. In this case, however, there was a longer follow-up article with interviews with one of the firefighters and one of the group leaders. This is rare. It was José Romero from the Bomberos team who is quoted as "una sensación térmica de unos 3ºC” (= a felt temperature of 3ºC; the actual temperature is given as 10ºC in the article).

The discussion on the forum is not meant to be an exercise in blaming and finger pointing but rather has the aim of understanding why and how something happened so that others will avoid getting into a similar or even worse situation.

Bomberos.jpg
 
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Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
I find it amazing that you call the report “dribble” but still needed to be rescued? I believe the firefighter mentioned the temperature @ 3degrees centigrade? The picture suggests that some might not have had appropriate clothing on for such a mountain hike?

Tony Maguire
“These same so call rescue trucks were able to drive to us on the mountain and pick us up which we could easily have walked but for the only reason it was another 10km adding another 7km to our walk.”

Are you suggesting that you did not want to walk down the trail to the right which is longer but safer....did folks run out of steam? And the trail to the left was too steep, in the fog, and particularly for someone who is not sighted? If so, this is where experienced guides need to assess the abilities of their group and plan accordingly.

Sorry, I do not think this report was just “dribble”.....and IMO minimizing the situation does not serve other pilgrims who may decide to attempt this route. Even when things go wrong, it can be a learning experience for all.:);)
 
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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
The OP's account was deleted. I wonder why?
 

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Again, soon as possible!
The OP's account was deleted. I wonder why?
Maybe he deleted his account due to people endlessly trying to 'blame' someone for something they know nothing about. There are a lot of ammeter detectives around suddenly.

It was aliens abducting them obviously. I happened to a mate of a mate of mine. He had just left this bar, he suddenly felt really drunk and could not find his clothes! He got 'rescued' by the police, but they didn't believe he'd been abducted by aliens at all. Its a cover up mate. I tell you.

Ok, I'll go and hide under the table again....
 
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MikeyC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - September 2016
CF - April May 2017
Shikoku - October 2017
Kumano Kodo - October 2017
CF - 2019
This below is from 1 of the blind lads on this trip:

Hi gang maybe some of ye read in the tabloid papers this week of the and I quote , the dramatic rescue mission of a group of irish walkers on top of a mountain while trecking the Camino. The papers declared that this rescue happened in severe conditions and that the rescued were suffering hyperthermia etc etc. Just to let ye know that wee the walkers never had such a great laugh at this reported dribble and astonished how a little story can run and eventually be blown out of all proportion. Yes we came into bad weather but nothing severe and certainly nothing to cause us hyperthermia or that it suddenly dropped from 32degrees down to 3degrees as was reported. yes we had reached the summit at 4,200ft when the weather became foggy and we had 3km left of a descent through some rockey terrain before reaching our hotel, so our extremely experienced guide may Iadd, made the wise decision not to take this route , but decided to call for back up in the collection of us getting into trucks. These same so call rescue trucks were able to drive to us on the mountain and pick us up which we could easily have walked but for the only reason it was another 10km adding another 7km to our walk. The only reason that I am hylighting this that after all the laugh we had reading and hearing how much this was blown out of proportion is that there is a serious side to this and that is how much of it was blown out of proportion and how so called investicated journalism can get it so wrong. Our two guides were quite concerned as so as well was the charity guide dogs as how this ridiculous story would reflect on them and their business. I know the month of August is referred to silly season and I know that tabloid papers should be taken with a pinch of salt, but some times it is ridiculous reporting like this that can cause untold damage to individuals, their livelihood and their carreer.
If, as is stated, you could have easily walked out then I'm not sure I understand why the emergency services were called.
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
This below is from 1 of the blind lads on this trip:

Hi gang maybe some of ye read in the tabloid papers this week of the and I quote , the dramatic rescue mission of a group of irish walkers on top of a mountain while trecking the Camino. The papers declared that this rescue happened in severe conditions and that the rescued were suffering hyperthermia etc etc. Just to let ye know that wee the walkers never had such a great laugh at this reported dribble and astonished how a little story can run and eventually be blown out of all proportion. Yes we came into bad weather but nothing severe and certainly nothing to cause us hyperthermia or that it suddenly dropped from 32degrees down to 3degrees as was reported. yes we had reached the summit at 4,200ft when the weather became foggy and we had 3km left of a descent through some rockey terrain before reaching our hotel, so our extremely experienced guide may Iadd, made the wise decision not to take this route , but decided to call for back up in the collection of us getting into trucks. These same so call rescue trucks were able to drive to us on the mountain and pick us up which we could easily have walked but for the only reason it was another 10km adding another 7km to our walk. The only reason that I am hylighting this that after all the laugh we had reading and hearing how much this was blown out of proportion is that there is a serious side to this and that is how much of it was blown out of proportion and how so called investicated journalism can get it so wrong. Our two guides were quite concerned as so as well was the charity guide dogs as how this ridiculous story would reflect on them and their business. I know the month of August is referred to silly season and I know that tabloid papers should be taken with a pinch of salt, but some times it is ridiculous reporting like this that can cause untold damage to individuals, their livelihood and their carreer.
As you were laughing over how the “rescue” was written.

Did you not think about your need to “Not be rescued” impacted those rescuers and others?

Maybe their services were needed elsewhere. Maybe the Spanish will have to financially absorb the cost of your “non-rescue”.

Even if there was some hyperbole in the write up. It would have been nice if you’d thanked the first responders in your post. Or, at least acknowledged your group needed: assistance, a rescue.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Those bomberos are pros - and they understand the danger of that Col way more than those of us who occasionally wader across it.
So if they discerned rescue was needed, it was. No matter what the people being rescued thought (or think).
as how this ridiculous story would reflect on them and their business.
This seems the crux of it, and I am not the least apologetic in thinking that's just too bad. Why blame the tabloids when the initial event happened, regardless of how it was reported in the end? It seems the guide's actions were responsible once everyone was in the middle of the dicey situation - but these situations don't happen without cause. Those 20 people who got up there were being guided, so obviously there was some miscalculation of risk, somewhere along the way.
 
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Robo

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(May 2015)
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Kathar1na

Member
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Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
How is the rest of the journey going for ye now? I heard it is high temperatures again on the Camino.
They are back home. It was just a 1 week trip with 5 days walking from SJPP to Estella. Perhaps the reason why they were inadequately equipped for a change of the weather. (Note: the poster said that he's not a member of the group).

"Summer clothing", "thin raincoats", "even with flip-flops (alguno con chancletas)", "it's a mountain hike with 1400 m altitude", "dense fog is common up there and then conditions change", "I think the majority doesn't know what to expect", that's what the locals from the firefighters & rescue team had to say on local TV, not in some tabloids. They sound calm and matter-of-fact, with some shrugging of shoulders.

I guess one has to add to the potential risks of the first day out of SJJP that one might end up in the news, even in the news back home ☺... luckily with a happy ending!
 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
It's old news anyway. Only two days ago, the Burguete Bomberos had to pick up three pilgrims after they got a 112 call from them and transported them to Roncesvalles. One had a swollen knee that made it impossible to walk any further and the other two were exhausted ("síntomas de agotamiento").
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Coming from Alps country it's kind of unusual for me that bomberos are doing these rescues. I mean Pyrenees aren's just hills... Our firefighters deal with fires (of course ;) ), floods, car accidents and even cats in the trees etc. but all the mountain rescues are done by Mountain Rescue Service which contains experienced rock climbers and doctors. Accompanied by police or army helicopters if needed.

So why bomberos here on this part of Pyrenees?
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Coming from Alps country it's kind of unusual for me that bomberos are doing these rescues.

So why bomberos here on this part of Pyrenees?
I can't answer this and it's the reason why I usually translate bomberos as First Responders.

I understand that mountain rescue is quite differently organised in various countries, ie. what kind of entity is the umbrella organisation. In the German Alps, surprisingly, the Bergwacht is part of the Red Cross, so they are a public corporation, but few people know that.

In Spain they also have a Grupo de Rescate e Intervención en Montaña (GREIM) for mountain rescues and they are part of the Guardia Civil. The Burguete Bomberos are government employees but there is also a voluntary bomberos group in Valcarlos.
 
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Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
I think this post will be very helpful for those planning their first Napolean route.

This is not an easy segment!
Plan carefully:

Get a map...know where you can get water, where the taxis sit, where the emergency phones are. Where to turn to get down on the easier descent (though longer).

Know your fitness and endurance capacity. If you have not walked above 1000 meters before expect additional fatigue from thinner air. Of course, injuries or illness can occur and that is why such wonderful emergency services are available in mountain areas. However, a number of folks put themselves at risk by going up mountains that they are not physically prepared for! The Camino starts wherever you do. So think about alternatives?
Maybe Start the Camino in Roncevalles or Pamplona
Or, Take the Valcarlos route...which has its own challenges.
Break the Napolean route into two or even three days if you fitness is limited.
Two days...plan to stay at Orisson
EvenThree days, use the taxi service to transport you down...back to SJPdP....they will transport you back up the next morning.
Finally,you can send your bag ahead but dress appropriately and carry clothing should the temperatures drop and rain or, yes, even snow suddenly come your way!
 
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Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
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(May 2015)
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Coming from Alps country it's kind of unusual for me that bomberos are doing these rescues. I mean Pyrenees aren's just hills... Our firefighters deal with fires (of course ;) ), floods, car accidents and even cats in the trees etc. but all the mountain rescues are done by Mountain Rescue Service which contains experienced rock climbers and doctors. Accompanied by police or army helicopters if needed.

So why bomberos here on this part of Pyrenees?
I'm from the UK originally and there we have 'Mountain Rescue' teams too.
But the walk over the Pyrenees is not really the same is it?
It's on a marked track, with open landscape and woods.
Most rescues (by the Bomberos) I think involve driving their all terrain truck or a 4 WD up the mountain and 'collecting ' Pilgrims.
Sometimes in deep snow they have to cover a section on foot maybe.
I'm sure they are also trained in 'Mountain Rescue' as in abseiling with stretcher patients etc, but would seldom need those skills I think.
 
Last edited:

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I'm from the UK originally and there we have 'Mountain Rescue' teams too.
But the walk over the Pyrenees is not really the same is it?
It's on a marked track, with open landscape and woods.
Most rescues I think involve driving their all terrain truck or a 4 WD up the mountain and 'collecting ' Pilgrims.
Sometimes in deep snow they have to cover a section on foot maybe.
I'm sure they are also trained in 'Mountain Rescue' as in abseiling with stretcher patients etc, but would seldom need those skills I think.
On the contrary. Our Mountain rescue help on unmarked trails, in "walls" (climbing), but firefighters can help on flatter terrain in much different circumstances or usually not at all in mountains. But that's not important actually. @Kathar1na already mentioned different approaches. On that particular part of the Pyrenees they have bomberos to do the job :)
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
On the contrary. Our Mountain rescue help on unmarked trails, in "walls" (climbing), but firefighters can help on flatter terrain in much different circumstances or usually not at all in mountains. But that's not important actually. @Kathar1na already mentioned different approaches. On that particular part of the Pyrenees they have bomberos to do the job :)
I'll edit my post as it was not clear........sorry.
Most rescues (by the Bomberos) I think involve driving their all terrain truck or a 4 WD up the mountain and 'collecting ' Pilgrims.
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
and we had 3km left of a descent through some rockey terrain before reaching our hotel, so our extremely experienced guide may Iadd, made the wise decision not to take this route , but decided to call for back up in the collection of us getting into trucks. These same so call rescue trucks were able to drive to us on the mountain and pick us up which we could easily have walked but for the only reason it was another 10km adding another 7km to our walk.
I'm still trying to make sense of this. It seems that the group was right at the junction where the trail through the woods (the 3K) and the road down to Ibaneta (the 7K) meet, i.e. Lepoeder. The guides (rightly so) decided that the group should not take the route through the woods. They're saying that it was due to the conditions, but with four blind walkers that path shouldn't have been under consideration in the first place. So that leaves the road, an extra 7K for sure but shouldn't have been a problem even under foggy conditions as it's the easiest part of the day. Kind of monotonous for sure with the endless zig-zagging but should have gotten them to Roncesvalles in about two hours. Which is what makes me (and it seems a few other people) feel that there was something else going on.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
I'm still trying to make sense of this. It seems that the group was right at the junction where the trail through the woods (the 3K) and the road down to Ibaneta (the 7K) meet, i.e. Lepoeder. The guides (rightly so) decided that the group should not take the route through the woods. They're saying that it was due to the conditions, but with four blind walkers that path shouldn't have been under consideration in the first place. So that leaves the road, an extra 7K for sure but shouldn't have been a problem even under foggy conditions as it's the easiest part of the day. Kind of monotonous for sure with the endless zig-zagging but should have gotten them to Roncesvalles in about two hours. Which is what makes me (and it seems a few other people) feel that there was something else going on.
Yes, I suggest the same in my post (28).
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
The road descent down is only about 400 metres longer than the steep descent through the woods, so less than half a km.
 

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