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Luggage Transfer Correos

2019 Statistics

2020 Camino Guides

Peregrinopaul

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP(2012) Madrid(2014)Frances(2015) VdlP(2016)
VdlP(2017)Madrid/Sanabres/Frances reverse(2018)
Is there any country in the world not represented on this list? it's mind-blowing!
 

Aurigny

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés; Português Central; Português Interior; Primitivo; Português da Costa; Invierno
Nobody from Niger (there wasn't last year, either), and only two from Burkina Faso. Significantly more Britons this year than last, but the big five are always the same: Spain, Italy, Germany, the U.S. and Portugal.

The picture's almost unchanged for the non-Francés routes, with a few exceptions. The Invierno, to which I made a one-man contribution to the numbers this summer, got a nice bump of around 40% over the previous year, and is now above 1,000 finishers for the first time. The two main Portuguese routes also showed significant growth: this year's hands-down winner across all categories is the Coastal, which posted numbers better than 50% higher than in 2018. I imagine that its existing infrastructure is now approaching saturation-point. The Norte, VdlP and Primitivo are virtually unchanged: a relief for those on the latter, which is drawing twice as many pilgrims as it did just a very few years ago. Some modest growth for the Inglés, and among the comparative handful who go on to Fisterra or Muxia. And a respectable bounce for the also-rans (Mozárabe, CPI, etc.). There's no breakdown for those, but I'd guess the recent improvements along the Olvidado might account for a good proportion of the increase.

As for the Francés itself, the number of through-pilgrims beginning at SJPP remains constant at 33,000-odd. The Roncesvalles-starters were down about 10%; likewise those beginning at Pamplona. There must also have been a significant drop-off of at least that much at Burgos. It seems, then, that for most of the way, the crowds were actually a little less densely-packed until Sarria, whose numbers grew by almost a tenth. This is reassuring for those doing the whole thing. The last 100 km is always a zoo; now it's just a little more zoo-like. For the rest, the population has levelled out. At least until the Holy Year, when all these patterns will no doubt be turned on their head.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
@Kiernan: There‘s no irony. You can do the camino by sailing boat.
Check your pilgrim‘s passport (Credencial). You‘ll find the appropriate symbol ⛵ for it.
A boatfull of Irish pilgrims sailed close to Santiago ( from home) and I think even brought their curragh into to city itself...
 
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happymarkos

HappyMark
Camino(s) past & future
2013 CF
2014 Le Puy-St Jean. 2014&16 Volunteer St JP
2016 Portuguese
2017 Porto-Santiago
2018

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
I wonder if it's possible to have data on the numbers leaving SJPDP compared to the numbers who arrive in Santiago?
I was discussing this with someone yesterday. Very hard to estimate drop-out rates because there is no real way of recording how many people set off. Or indeed who arrive but do not receive a Compostela. You do not have to register anywhere. I found one set of figures for comparison though. In 2018 the pilgrim office in SJPDP recorded 57,881 pilgrims departing from there while the Santiago office issued 32,899 Compostelas to people who gave SJPDP as their departure point. A significant difference between the two figures.
 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
There has been some commentary that over 50% drop out although hard to know how to obtain accurate information.
Jean-Louis Aspirot from the SJPP Pilgrims Office said in their FB group some time ago that only 25% of the pilgrims don't reach Compostela and that this figure hasn't changed over the years. No explanation how they arrive at that figure, though. Here are some thoughts:
  • During 2019, about 61,000 pilgrims were registered in SJPP, compared to about 58,000 for the previous year. So let's say 60,000.
  • In Santiago, for 2019, they registered 33,000 with starting point SJPP, 3,200 started in Le Puy and 2,600 started in "resto".
  • Let's assume that the pilgrims with starting point "resto" came from Belgium, the Netherlands, France, Italy, Switzerland and they all passed through SJPP, so that would be a total of some 40,000 pilgrims who had passed through SJPP and arrived in Santiago.
  • So that leaves some 20,000 (60,000-40,000) who had started in or passed through SJPP but did not arrive in Santiago.
Now it gets a bit complicated 🤭: we cannot explain this deficit by the sections walkers because even if people walk only 2 weeks per year, there was a continuous stream of sections walkers along the CF in 2019, ie the ones from 2019, 2018, and 2017 (assuming it takes 6 weeks over 3 years to reach Santiago).

So who makes up the deficit? Walkers who arrive in Compostela but don't set foot into the Pilgrims Office there? Walkers who were forced to abandon their aim of reaching Compostela? Section walkers who never had the opportunity or even the intention of ever reaching Compostela?

I personally know six people who at one time spent the night at SJPP and then walked several sections and that was already several years ago. Four have the intention of maybe one day continuing towards SdC but not in the near future, one enjoyed it but would rather walk in other parts of the world and one had done Burgos-SdC previously and may or may not finish SJPP-Burgos one day. I don't know how representative they are or whether they were even registered at the SJPP Pilgrim's Office ...
 
Camino(s) past & future
2017, 2018 neither successful
Jean-Louis Aspirot from the SJPP Pilgrims Office said in their FB group some time ago that only 25% of the pilgrims don't reach Compostela and that this figure hasn't changed over the years. No explanation how they arrive at that figure, though. Here are some thoughts:
  • During 2019, about 61,000 pilgrims were registered in SJPP, compared to about 58,000 for the previous year. So let's say 60,000.
  • In Santiago, for 2019, they registered 33,000 with starting point SJPP, 3,200 started in Le Puy and 2,600 started in "resto".
  • Let's assume that the pilgrims with starting point "resto" came from Belgium, the Netherlands, France, Italy, Switzerland and they all passed through SJPP, so that would be a total of some 40,000 pilgrims who had passed through SJPP and arrived in Santiago.
  • So that leaves some 20,000 (60,000-40,000) who had started in or passed through SJPP but did not arrive in Santiago.
Now it gets a bit complicated 🤭: we cannot explain this deficit by the sections walkers because even if people walk only 2 weeks per year, there was a continuous stream of sections walkers along the CF in 2019, ie the ones from 2019, 2018, and 2017 (assuming it takes 6 weeks over 3 years to reach Santiago).

So who makes up the deficit? Walkers who arrive in Compostela but don't set foot into the Pilgrims Office there? Walkers who were forced to abandon their aim of reaching Compostela? Section walkers who never had the opportunity or even the intention of ever reaching Compostela?

I personally know six people who at one time spent the night at SJPP and then walked several sections and that was already several years ago. Four have the intention of maybe one day continuing towards SdC but not in the near future, one enjoyed it but would rather walk in other parts of the world and one had done Burgos-SdC previously and may or may not finish SJPP-Burgos one day. I don't know how representative they are or whether they were even registered at the SJPP Pilgrim's Office ...
On my first attempt, I had a serious problem at home and had to quit in Pamploma.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
I know, I know. I thought @MisterH was beeing ironic. Sorry for the misunderstanding
Not so much a misunderstanding as perhaps an attempt to make a joke that not everyone got. @MisterH made a reference to Google Translate and to "candel" as "being used for transportation". One has to know how to use automatic translation. In translation, context matters. Even a machine like Google Translate is clever enough to know this.

Put just vela into Google Translate and it may give you candle because that's one meaning of the Spanish word in English. Put pie, bicicleta, vela, caballo, silla de ruedas into Google Translate and it will give you foot, bicycle, sail, horse, wheelchair - the five means of travel that are listed in the Oficina's monthly and yearly statistics as they qualify for a Compostela.
 
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Jakobsvejen.dk

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (1997/2006/2011), Via de la Plata (2012), Camino del Norte (2012/2016) Camino Portugues (2013/2016); Camino primitivo (2016)Le Puy (2010/2014), Arles (2015) Jakobsweg Österreich (2013) etc.
Jean-Louis Aspirot from the SJPP Pilgrims Office said in their FB group some time ago that only 25% of the pilgrims don't reach Compostela and that this figure hasn't changed over the years. No explanation how they arrive at that figure, though. Here are some thoughts:
  • During 2019, about 61,000 pilgrims were registered in SJPP, compared to about 58,000 for the previous year. So let's say 60,000.
  • In Santiago, for 2019, they registered 33,000 with starting point SJPP, 3,200 started in Le Puy and 2,600 started in "resto".
  • Let's assume that the pilgrims with starting point "resto" came from Belgium, the Netherlands, France, Italy, Switzerland and they all passed through SJPP, so that would be a total of some 40,000 pilgrims who had passed through SJPP and arrived in Santiago.
  • So that leaves some 20,000 (60,000-40,000) who had started in or passed through SJPP but did not arrive in Santiago.
Now it gets a bit complicated 🤭: we cannot explain this deficit by the sections walkers because even if people walk only 2 weeks per year, there was a continuous stream of sections walkers along the CF in 2019, ie the ones from 2019, 2018, and 2017 (assuming it takes 6 weeks over 3 years to reach Santiago).

So who makes up the deficit? Walkers who arrive in Compostela but don't set foot into the Pilgrims Office there? Walkers who were forced to abandon their aim of reaching Compostela? Section walkers who never had the opportunity or even the intention of ever reaching Compostela?

I personally know six people who at one time spent the night at SJPP and then walked several sections and that was already several years ago. Four have the intention of maybe one day continuing towards SdC but not in the near future, one enjoyed it but would rather walk in other parts of the world and one had done Burgos-SdC previously and may or may not finish SJPP-Burgos one day. I don't know how representative they are or whether they were even registered at the SJPP Pilgrim's Office ...
Dear Katharine;
Maybe I can give you an explanation. I have gone on countless pilgrimages in Europe. And many of them in Spain and France. On my pilgrimages in France, I have met many French pilgrims who ended their pilgrimage in Saint Jean Pied de Port (Roncevaux/Roncesvalles), some who finished in the Somport Pass, and again others who had Lourdes as their final destination.
Pax et Bonum
Poul Erik
 

Donjek

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012 SJPdP - Fisterra
Jean-Louis Aspirot from the SJPP Pilgrims Office said in their FB group some time ago that only 25% of the pilgrims don't reach Compostela and that this figure hasn't changed over the years. No explanation how they arrive at that figure, though. Here are some thoughts:
  • During 2019, about 61,000 pilgrims were registered in SJPP, compared to about 58,000 for the previous year. So let's say 60,000.
  • In Santiago, for 2019, they registered 33,000 with starting point SJPP, 3,200 started in Le Puy and 2,600 started in "resto".
  • Let's assume that the pilgrims with starting point "resto" came from Belgium, the Netherlands, France, Italy, Switzerland and they all passed through SJPP, so that would be a total of some 40,000 pilgrims who had passed through SJPP and arrived in Santiago.
  • So that leaves some 20,000 (60,000-40,000) who had started in or passed through SJPP but did not arrive in Santiago.
Now it gets a bit complicated 🤭: we cannot explain this deficit by the sections walkers because even if people walk only 2 weeks per year, there was a continuous stream of sections walkers along the CF in 2019, ie the ones from 2019, 2018, and 2017 (assuming it takes 6 weeks over 3 years to reach Santiago).

So who makes up the deficit? Walkers who arrive in Compostela but don't set foot into the Pilgrims Office there? Walkers who were forced to abandon their aim of reaching Compostela? Section walkers who never had the opportunity or even the intention of ever reaching Compostela?

I personally know six people who at one time spent the night at SJPP and then walked several sections and that was already several years ago. Four have the intention of maybe one day continuing towards SdC but not in the near future, one enjoyed it but would rather walk in other parts of the world and one had done Burgos-SdC previously and may or may not finish SJPP-Burgos one day. I don't know how representative they are or whether they were even registered at the SJPP Pilgrim's Office ...
I'd guess the place to start is to count how many start from SJPdP actually get to Roncesvalle. There may be regiments of Pilgrims wandering lost in between.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
how many start from SJPdP actually get to Roncesvalle
When I finished at SJPdP, the train to Bayonne had about 8 pilgrims who limped onto the train. I don't know how many made it up the mountains, but there are those who do not finish the first day to Orisson/Roncesvalles.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
On my pilgrimages in France, I have met many French pilgrims who ended their pilgrimage in Saint Jean Pied de Port (Roncevaux/Roncesvalles), some who finished in the Somport Pass, and again others who had Lourdes as their final destination.
Of these French pilgrims, only those who set foot into the Pilgrims Office in SJPP appeared in their statistical end of year list ☺. My earlier comment was an attempt to put all these numbers into some kind of meaningful perspective as a tentative answer to someone's question.

The people who collect these data, whether in SJPP or in SdC, are not the most rigorous statisticians in the world. And why should they? SJPP counts the people who visit their office. If they record where these people go next, whether they return home, walk along the Nive valley or over one of the nearest mountain passes, they don't publish it.

I did a quick search and found a comment that during one particular week in one particular month in one particular year, 348 pilgrims passed through the office: 4 stopped in SJPP, 3 walked to Irun and 341 left for the Camino Frances. For the kind of estimates we are doing here, one can ignore those 7 people vs those 341 people. It's a somewhat valid extrapolation, in the absence of more concrete information about these data.
 
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Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
I think it's obvious that the people who collect these data, whether in SJPP or on SdC, are not the most rigorous statisticians in the world. And why should they?
The Santiago Compostela figures are useful for showing trends but they can never be a definitive picture. No one has to register anywhere at the start of their Camino. They do not have to start from fixed locations. They do not have to report a decision to pack it in part way. And they do not have to register with the Santiago pilgrim office on arrival. But the Santiago office does at least publish a lot of information on the people it has actually heard about :) I have been trying to find any vaguely accurate figures for numbers walking the Via Francigena and I am drawing a blank. The Vatican does not publish details of the number of Testimoniums it gives out. The best kept records on the VF seem to be those of Danilo the ferryman on the Po near Piacenza. But his records obviously only cover those who are walking well north on the route and only those who choose to cross by ferry rather than walk the north bank and cross by bridge as I did. By comparison with the VF the Santiago and SJPDP statistics are encyclopedic :)

Edit: Stop press news - I managed to find some Testimonium figures :cool: Not in huge detail but it does give some basis for comparison with the Caminos. In 2018 9,372 Testimoniums were issued in Rome. So a little way to go before they catch up with Santiago's 347,578 :)
 
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Edit: Stop press news - I managed to find some Testimonium figures :cool: Not in huge detail but it does give some basis for comparison with the Caminos. In 2018 9,372 Testimoniums were issued in Rome. So a little way to go before they catch up with Santiago's 347,578 :)
Although still almost twice as many as Santiago was issuing only 30 years ago (which may seem like a long time but is actually pretty short in the more than a thousand year history of the pilgrimages).
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Although still almost twice as much as Santiago was issuing only 30 years ago (which may seem like a long time but is actually pretty short in the more than a thousand year history of the pilgrimages).
Yes - pretty close to the number of Compostelas issued in 1992. And that in itself was almost double the number in 1990! Things were growing fast then. The 1993 Holy Year saw a ten-fold jump in numbers. Would be interesting to see a blip like that in 2021 :cool:
 

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