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A new pack that could be a Camino fav!

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Gossamer Gear has just released a new bag called the Ranger which is a 35 litre panel loader with a mesh pocket on the back as well. This means it only opens half way but still might be what people are looking for!

Ranger 35
That does look like a great pack! I'm going to post it on the "perfect panel load backpack" thread.
 
Camino(s) past & future
😱
100% agree with the above. Verses a top loader where you have to push everything to the bottom. Many newer packs are top loaders because they are about lighter but they sacrifice the ease of use If you need the thing at the bottom of the pack you can just grab it out in a panel loader. A top loader means you have to pull everything out.
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
Madrid (April '19)
Having it only open halfway defeats much of the purpose of being a panel loader for me. The whole point of them is that you have easy access to everything in the bag. If it only opens halfway, you are probably going to have to take out some stuff to get to the stuff at the bottom/end.
 

Dennis Ferguson

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2016
Gossamer Gear has just released a new bag called the Ranger which is a 35 litre panel loader with a mesh pocket on the back as well. This means it only opens half way but still might be what people are looking for!

Ranger 35
35 litre bag seems a little on the small side though? I'd like to see a 50/55 litre one...thanks for the heads up I'll have a look at thier range. God bless.
 

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
Gossamer Gear has just released a new bag called the Ranger which is a 35 litre panel loader with a mesh pocket on the back as well. This means it only opens half way but still might be what people are looking for!

Ranger 35
Can’t seem to find the specs. Is it rain-proof? How much does it weigh?
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Can’t seem to find the specs. Is it rain-proof? How much does it weigh?
No, the pack is not rain proof.


Weight
  • Total - 33.93 oz / 962 g
  • Pack - 26.95 oz / 764 g
  • Frame - 6.98 oz / 198 g
Capacity
  • 2135 c.i. (35 l.) total
  • 1891 c.i. (31 l.) in main pack body
  • xx lb maximum carry capacity, xx lbs for comfort.
Materials
  • Main fabric: 100D Robic Diamond Rip
  • Boot / accent fabric: 200D Robic velocity
  • Darlington Mesh and Supreme Airmesh
Dimensions
  • Height 19.5” / 49.53 cm
  • Width 10.75” / 27.30 cm
  • Depth 6" “ / 15.24 cm
The product support folks also sent me this additional information about sizing:

Given it is one size fits all we would recommend a similar size range to our Kumo.
  • One Size (16" - 24" torso) Generally fits people 5'4"-6'4"
  • 28" - 48" waist for waist belt
 
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NavyBlue

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy and Camino Frances. Via Francigena. Tro-Breiz in progress.
Having it only open halfway defeats much of the purpose of being a panel loader for me. The whole point of them is that you have easy access to everything in the bag. If it only opens halfway, you are probably going to have to take out some stuff to get to the stuff at the bottom/end.
Good point, jungleboy. More on this in a (sound) analysis of various backpack features here.
 

kcaldaba

Camino Frances, 2016. Camino del Norte, 2018.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Spring 2016; Camino del Norte, Spring 2018; Camino Primitivo, Spring 2019
Gossamer Gear also makes a plastic liner for their backpacks. I used their 36 liter with a plastic liner, along with an REI 40 liter pack cover, on the Camino del Norte last year and everything stayed dry. (And I had my share of rain!). Headed back to walk the Primitivo in May and using the same system.
 

Opa Theo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francais to Santiago

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Gossamer Gear has just released a new bag called the Ranger which is a 35 litre panel loader with a mesh pocket on the back as well. This means it only opens half way but still might be what people are looking for!

Ranger 35
Thanks for this. I have been searching for a panel loading pack....30-35 liters...(I usually get by with 28 liters). I think I may go ultralight instead..(ULA Photon which weighs 28 oz). It is squishy enough to fit under seat if necessary. Then, to deal with top loading issues, I will get a packing cube to lift out...which will unzip all the way. I hate searching in the botton of the pack..and dragging everything out daily..which is the main reason for a panel load. Has anyone used the ULA or the Mountain Laurel Designs Ultralights...or even Zpacks (which have frameless, and some with a minimal arc frame.)
 

H Richards

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2017 Francés
Oct 2017 Incomplete Le Puy / Francés
June/July 2018 Norte
Oct/Nov 2018 Francés
Thanks for the info. Looks like it could be a useful one for a summer camino. I wouldn't want to try and fit my cold-weather sleeping bag into it though. There'd be no room for anything else!

Has anyone any suggestions for a ultralight 40-50 litre backpack suitable for caminos? I'm in the market for one.

The main things I want are front-loading, elastic space / attachments for flip-flops and water bottles, at least one quick access pocket for glasses / suncream etc, and ideally an extra compartment to keep wet or outdoors items separate. Currently my trekking backpack more than fulfills this, but it weighs 1.85kg. I'd love something around the 1kg mark instead.
 

robertt

Active Member
This is personal, but I've never looked for lightness in the pack itself, just comfort and performance. Useful features which add weight can make a pack lighter in effect once it's loaded.

Best to save weight on what I put into the pack. Like a lot of walkers, especially Australians who've gone bush hundreds of miles from shops, accommodation etc, I've learned the hard way that I don't need that spare kitchen sink on my back when walking the Camino. Next time I may leave out kitchen sinks altogether.

As a winter pilgrim I've also learned to wear as much as possible so I don't need to carry. In fact, I now have the saying "If it's not a layer it's an at-home stayer". (For some reason this ingenious slogan has not gone viral or achieved the popularity it so obviously deserves.)
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Thanks for the info. Looks like it could be a useful one for a summer camino. I wouldn't want to try and fit my cold-weather sleeping bag into it though. There'd be no room for anything else!

Has anyone any suggestions for a ultralight 40-50 litre backpack suitable for caminos? I'm in the market for one.

The main things I want are front-loading, elastic space / attachments for flip-flops and water bottles, at least one quick access pocket for glasses / suncream etc, and ideally an extra compartment to keep wet or outdoors items separate. Currently my trekking backpack more than fulfills this, but it weighs 1.85kg. I'd love something around the 1kg mark instead.
I have heard good things about the ULA CDT 54 Liter...weighs about 24 oz.
 
Camino(s) past & future
😱
Thanks for the info. Looks like it could be a useful one for a summer camino. I wouldn't want to try and fit my cold-weather sleeping bag into it though. There'd be no room for anything else!

Has anyone any suggestions for a ultralight 40-50 litre backpack suitable for caminos? I'm in the market for one.

The main things I want are front-loading, elastic space / attachments for flip-flops and water bottles, at least one quick access pocket for glasses / suncream etc, and ideally an extra compartment to keep wet or outdoors items separate. Currently my trekking backpack more than fulfills this, but it weighs 1.85kg. I'd love something around the 1kg mark instead.
I have a 60 litre that weighs 1 kg. Granite Gear Crown 2. Outstanding pack but it’s a top loader 😬
 

Rudie

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (Irun - Oviedo), Primitivo, Fisterra, Muxia (2017);
Via Podiensis, Via Gebennensis (2019)
I don't think there is such a thing as a panel loader in the 40-50 L range that weighs only a kilo or less. I don't see the love for panels either. If you want to keep your stuff really dry you need to use a trash compactor bag anyway. And if you use that you have to pull everything out of it even if you have a panel. Maybe I am looking at this too much from a hiker's point of view. Anyways, I find that on a Camino where you don't even have to carry a shelter or food for several days I just don't need more than 30 L. And a 30 L pack is so small that taking out everything to get at something in the bottom is not an issue for me.

What I do find important when comparing pack capacity is that brands like Osprey and Deuter count only the volume in the closed compartments like the main body of the pack or the top lid. Cottage manufacturers usually also count the volume in the external pockets. So for example, an Osprey Kestrel is 38 L without the outer pockets, but its capacity probably equals that of a 50 L pack made by a cottage manufacturer. OTOH a Gossamer Gear Mariposa is listed with 60 L when the main compartment only holds 36 L and the rest goes into the huge open external pockets.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
I have a 60 litre that weighs 1 kg. Granite Gear Crown 2. Outstanding pack but it’s a top loader 😬
I went round and round on trying to find panel loader...all of them I have tried are too bulky and heavy. How about getting a light, 3 side zip, packing cube that fits down into the pack. Just pull it out, and see all your stuff neatly arrayed....just like a panel loader.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
35 liter is the perfect size for me.
me too...or even less....I have hiked the Appalachian packing food, 2 liters water, stove, hammock, tarp, etc...in that size....Will let you know how the ULA Photon 35 Liter frameless works...I have ordered it to try out. Weighs 25 oz.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Thanks for the info. Looks like it could be a useful one for a summer camino. I wouldn't want to try and fit my cold-weather sleeping bag into it though. There'd be no room for anything else!

Has anyone any suggestions for a ultralight 40-50 litre backpack suitable for caminos? I'm in the market for one.

The main things I want are front-loading, elastic space / attachments for flip-flops and water bottles, at least one quick access pocket for glasses / suncream etc, and ideally an extra compartment to keep wet or outdoors items separate. Currently my trekking backpack more than fulfills this, but it weighs 1.85kg. I'd love something around the 1kg mark instead.
Do you use a heavy sleeping bag in winter even when staying in Albergues? Or do you camp?.....
 

Felipo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spanish camino
With the greatest respect to my fellow learned peregrinos, I have used a low cost pack which has an airflow frame and at 28 -33 litres is both suited for your 6-8kg camino load + hydration sack. And it's carry on most airlines. Take a look at https://www.trespass.com/deimos-dlx-28-litre-rucksack
I've worn this pack out over 3 (and a half) and caminos as well as hundreds of miles hiking, and sadly just had to let it go. I've not seen anything else on the market similar and would probably end up buying another!
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
That pack looks really nice...The ULA CDT has 50+ liters...about the same weight.
I like the CDT, it is definitely a good pack and one that I have seen a couple of times being carried on Camino.

It differs from the Arc Zip in that the CDT is a frameless pack. So while the Arc Zip has a comfortable carrying capacity up to 35 pounds, the ULA CDT is best with a weight load under 18 pounds.
 

H Richards

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2017 Francés
Oct 2017 Incomplete Le Puy / Francés
June/July 2018 Norte
Oct/Nov 2018 Francés
Do you use a heavy sleeping bag in winter even when staying in Albergues? Or do you camp?.....
I use a quite bulky down sleeping bag weighing about 1.3kg It was good this winter down to temperatures close to freezing at night, but it would fill more than half of a 30 liter backpack, unless I hooked it onto the outside.

The packing cube idea is an interesting one.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
I don't think there is such a thing as a panel loader in the 40-50 L range that weighs only a kilo or less. I don't see the love for panels either. If you want to keep your stuff really dry you need to use a trash compactor bag anyway. And if you use that you have to pull everything out of it even if you have a panel. Maybe I am looking at this too much from a hiker's point of view. Anyways, I find that on a Camino where you don't even have to carry a shelter or food for several days I just don't need more than 30 L. And a 30 L pack is so small that taking out everything to get at something in the bottom is not an issue for me.

What I do find important when comparing pack capacity is that brands like Osprey and Deuter count only the volume in the closed compartments like the main body of the pack or the top lid. Cottage manufacturers usually also count the volume in the external pockets. So for example, an Osprey Kestrel is 38 L without the outer pockets, but its capacity probably equals that of a 50 L pack made by a cottage manufacturer. OTOH a Gossamer Gear Mariposa is listed with 60 L when the main compartment only holds 36 L and the rest goes into the huge open external pockets.
:) Yeah, that is something that has been batted around for years among the backpacking community: how do you count the true capacity of a backpack? Pockets vs no pockets in the total. I remember some vigorous arguments surrounding that whole thing over the last couple of decades. As you pointed out, the external pockets can hold a lot of extra stuff.

Part of the argument went along the lines that there are things that do not get packed into the main bag so that they remain within easy access, but are still part of the total inventory of gear that the pack carries. In fact that is why some of the cottage manufacturers departed from the "Total capacity equals the main bag", and went to "Break down the total capacity to include all compartments" so that the consumer gets a better feel for the overall usability of the backpack as far as its flexibility is concerned.

Some of that is to help ultralight backpackers to skip packs whose total weight is more focused on the main bag's capacity which if too large adds more weight, when what is wanted is that same capacity with a smaller main bag but with the increased flexibility of larger pockets which can be made from lighter materials. With smaller ultralight loads and gear, this strategy can be a much better fit to the packs usability.

The cottage manufacturers like ULA and Gossamer Gear are pretty good at breaking down the capacity of the backpacks component pockets and main bag in their specifications so that thee consumer gets a good feel, as far as one can from an online purchase, how the capacity is distributed. They will even break down the weight totals by component, like the weight of the shoulder harness and hipbelt (if one or both can be removable).

Sometimes a backpack's capacity gets understated, which is what I have noticed periodically when I've done a gear test for a cottage manufacturer. Sometimes there can be as much as a 10 to 15% increase over the stated capacity of the main bag when I have independently measured the volume. And sometimes the actual capacity will not include the expanded capacity -- if the pack has that capability.

An example of this is the Gossamer Gear Mariposa that you mentioned. The main bag's capacity is only measured to the top of the main bag. However, the Mariposa also has an extension collar which allows another 20 liters or space. Normally, it is kept tucked down as part of the 'closure' at the top. I have comfortably and securely been able to carry a 75 liter equivalent load, quite comfortably and stable, with the Mariposa because of that feature..... as long as the weight is below 40 pounds. This is also similar to what some ULA backpacks and a few others also do with their largest offerings.

Hopefully the consumer will look at the total description of the bag and its stated specifications so that if they want all of the capacity to be within a "bloody large main bag", and sometimes there is a great reason for needing it that way, they get what they think they are purchasing.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Looks ok but Ospreys still rule, particularly their new ultra light range.
:) Personally, I wouldn't know what 'rules' for me until I have actually tried out a backpack in comparison to others I have tried. Looks are only a small part of the story.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Via Tolosana
Thanks for the info. Looks like it could be a useful one for a summer camino. I wouldn't want to try and fit my cold-weather sleeping bag into it though. There'd be no room for anything else!

Has anyone any suggestions for a ultralight 40-50 litre backpack suitable for caminos? I'm in the market for one.

The main things I want are front-loading, elastic space / attachments for flip-flops and water bottles, at least one quick access pocket for glasses / suncream etc, and ideally an extra compartment to keep wet or outdoors items separate. Currently my trekking backpack more than fulfills this, but it weighs 1.85kg. I'd love something around the 1kg mark instead.
I like the Osprey Exos ... The 48 size M is just over 1kg and very comfortable (to me!). Ah, top loading though, sorry. Never found it a problem: 3 dry bags inside, first one with my sleeping bag, second one with my clothes in, 3rd one for toiletries.... First aid in top pocket. Sandals or raingear in back mesh pocket....
Side pockets for water bottle(s), hip belt pockets for phone etc and even a strap pocket .... Sorted ;)
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Thanks for the info. Looks like it could be a useful one for a summer camino. I wouldn't want to try and fit my cold-weather sleeping bag into it though. There'd be no room for anything else!

Has anyone any suggestions for a ultralight 40-50 litre backpack suitable for caminos? I'm in the market for one.

The main things I want are front-loading, elastic space / attachments for flip-flops and water bottles, at least one quick access pocket for glasses / suncream etc, and ideally an extra compartment to keep wet or outdoors items separate. Currently my trekking backpack more than fulfills this, but it weighs 1.85kg. I'd love something around the 1kg mark instead.
There are some great packs that fit the bill, but they are not panel loading at that size. There is one offering from Zpacks -- the Arc Haul Zip -- which you might be interested in, though it is a 64 liter total volume which includes all pockets. It is only 0.78 Kg in total weight. It costs around $330.00, mainly because of its use of Cuben Fiber which really cuts down the pack's weight.
http://www.zpacks.com/backpacks/arc_haul_zip.shtml
 

wynrich

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2013, 2014
Portugués 2016
Norte 1st half 2018
Norte 2nd half 2019
+ Via Francigena 2017
me too...or even less....I have hiked the Appalachian packing food, 2 liters water, stove, hammock, tarp, etc...in that size....Will let you know how the ULA Photon 35 Liter frameless works...I have ordered it to try out. Weighs 25 oz.
I'm considering ordering the ULA Photon as well. Am a little nervous going frameless even though my load is light. Will be interested to hear what you think.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
I'm considering ordering the ULA Photon as well. Am a little nervous going frameless even though my load is light. Will be interested to hear what you think.
As long as your load is 15 pounds / 6.8 kg or less, it should be quite capable. I found it to be very competent at that weight range.

Interestingly, I did not care for the Photon but NOT because of how it carries the load, but because of how the pack's 'footprint'/size felt against my back. Because of it's dimensions it felt too 'narrow', not quite fitting across my upper back the way most of my backpacks do. It wasn't uncomfortable, just odd and nagging, if that makes any sense at all.

That was the reason I preferred the CDT to the Photon, even though both are frameless and about the same capacity -- the CDT is a bit more capacity -- and the CDT is a bit lighter in weight.

So if the Photon does not feel right after adjustment, give the CDT a try for a frameless. You could also consider the Ohm, which weighs 6 ounces more, but it's main bag is 34 liters in capacity. It has a good, composite internal frame.
 

wynrich

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2013, 2014
Portugués 2016
Norte 1st half 2018
Norte 2nd half 2019
+ Via Francigena 2017
As long as your load is 15 pounds / 6.8 kg or less, it should be quite capable. I found it to be very competent at that weight range.

Interestingly, I did not care for the Photon but NOT because of how it carries the load, but because of how the pack's 'footprint'/size felt against my back. Because of it's dimensions it felt too 'narrow', not quite fitting across my upper back the way most of my backpacks do. It wasn't uncomfortable, just odd and nagging, if that makes any sense at all.

That was the reason I preferred the CDT to the Photon, even though both are frameless and about the same capacity -- the CDT is a bit more capacity -- and the CDT is a bit lighter in weight.

So if the Photon does not feel right after adjustment, give the CDT a try for a frameless. You could also consider the Ohm, which weighs 6 ounces more, but it's main bag is 34 liters in capacity. It has a good, composite internal frame.
Thanks for the quick reply. Interesting about how the small size felt against your back. I had been planning to get the OHM but Chris at ULA suggested I try the Photon. He said he and his wife hiked the Great Glen Way in Scotland with Photons and they worked quite nicely. (They carried 15 pounds each.) The three I'm considering: Photon, CDT, OHM. Decisions!
 

Theresa Brandon

Artist, photographer, dreamer
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (2018)

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Thanks for the quick reply. Interesting about how the small size felt against your back. I had been planning to get the OHM but Chris at ULA suggested I try the Photon. He said he and his wife hiked the Great Glen Way in Scotland with Photons and they worked quite nicely. (They carried 15 pounds each.) The three I'm considering: Photon, CDT, OHM. Decisions!
Chris and I have had discussions on what he likes versus what I like during times I have been to his facility in Logan. :D He is, shall we say, smaller boned in his build than I am. ;) You may very well like the Photon, as a lot of folks do. I only mentioned how I reacted to the feel of the pack while testing it out so that you can know that it can carry a load comfortably, but there may be other considerations with the fit. And it is those other considerations which may be valid if you decide that the Photon isn't quite 'right'. :)

All three of the packs you mentioned, and some of the larger ones like the Circuit, will still work as an airline carry on, too.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
As long as your load is 15 pounds / 6.8 kg or less, it should be quite capable. I found it to be very competent at that weight range.

Interestingly, I did not care for the Photon but NOT because of how it carries the load, but because of how the pack's 'footprint'/size felt against my back. Because of it's dimensions it felt too 'narrow', not quite fitting across my upper back the way most of my backpacks do. It wasn't uncomfortable, just odd and nagging, if that makes any sense at all.

That was the reason I preferred the CDT to the Photon, even though both are frameless and about the same capacity -- the CDT is a bit more capacity -- and the CDT is a bit lighter in weight.

So if the Photon does not feel right after adjustment, give the CDT a try for a frameless. You could also consider the Ohm, which weighs 6 ounces more, but it's main bag is 34 liters in capacity. It has a good, composite internal frame.
Dave,
I am still waffling between Photon, OHM and CDT... .... I would love to carry a frameless pack such as Photon....or CDT....BUT....BUT.....I usually love load lifters....and I want to be sure I can carry (even a light load of 10 pounds for a reasonable distance)...so I wonder about the OHM....
The drawback for the OHM for me...I believe (could be wrong)...that the frame is 22"...if so...then it would not fit under airplane seat, while the other 2 would fit. I am 68 years old, 5 ft 2....and want a pack I can carry well for years to come. Sure, you can stuff a pack overhead...but that might limit you for economy prices on some airlines. Would the OHM provide enough "carry weight" ease difference to justify the size? I realize this is all quite subjective...but even so...what do you think...?
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Economy ticket...is usually one bag, under seat. So there is a savings.....I feel good having a pack I can just put under the seat....and easily swing into a bus, etc....I am minimalist personality....Do not want to sacrifice my health though.

Reading this over...I see how ridiculous it sounds. I am definitely and over thinker. It helps to discuss though. Where am I stuck?
 
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davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Dave,
I am still waffling between Photon, OHM and CDT... .... I would love to carry a frameless pack such as Photon....or CDT....BUT....BUT.....I usually love load lifters....and I want to be sure I can carry (even a light load of 10 pounds for a reasonable distance)...so I wonder about the OHM....
The drawback for the OHM for me...I believe (could be wrong)...that the frame is 22"...if so...then it would not fit under airplane seat, while the other 2 would fit. I am 68 years old, 5 ft 2....and want a pack I can carry well for years to come. Sure, you can stuff a pack overhead...but that might limit you for economy prices on some airlines. Would the OHM provide enough "carry weight" ease difference to justify the size? I realize this is all quite subjective...but even so...what do you think...?
:) I get where you are coming from.

The Ohm's internal frame is flexible. . . to an extent. Like my ULA Circuit, the Ohm has an adjustable cinch strap which is sewn into the back of the pack, near the top. The strap can go over the top of the backpack, where it can fasten to its connection on the front. If the pack is not stuffed tightly and filled to the very top, you can actually tighten down the cinch strap enough so the frame will flex downward. It does not hurt the frame a bit, and it will cause the pack to "shorten" its 22" height a few inches.

However, I have never had a problem storing my Circuit either in an overhead or under the seat in front of me, so I would imaging with the Ohm, that wouldn't be much of an issue either.

As an internal framed pack, it will carry a heavier load comfortably: it is 'rated' to carry up to 30 pounds, vs 18 pounds for either the Photon or the Ohm. Personally, I would be more 'comfortable' keeping the Ohm's load at less than 26 pounds. As a reference, on backpacking trips that last longer than 7 days, my total pack weight is around 22 to 23 pounds. For backpacking, besides all of the stuff I take with me and carry on the Camino which is about 9 pounds total, I am adding the additional gear and consumables which includes my tent, air mattress, food, cooking gear, fuel, etc.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
PERFECT!......I have just put in an order for the OHM. I do backpacking on the AT etc...with Hammock and gear....plus the Camino, and other trekking ... I have been using an OSPREY Sirrus, ...tired of it...and going lighter every time.
Thank you so much for your thoughtful responses. I appreciate that more than you know.
Jill
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
PERFECT!......I have just put in an order for the OHM. I do backpacking on the AT etc...with Hammock and gear....plus the Camino, and other trekking ... I have been using an OSPREY Sirrus, ...tired of it...and going lighter every time.
Thank you so much for your thoughtful responses. I appreciate that more than you know.
Jill
Be sure that you spend time testing it out with the maximum weight you think you will ever carry in it to make sure it feels good to you. ULA has great videos which explains the adjustment process to their backpacks, which will be familiar to you, anyway, as it is similar to how one adjusts most every other pack.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Be sure that you spend time testing it out with the maximum weight you think you will ever carry in it to make sure it feels good to you. ULA has great videos which explains the adjustment process to their backpacks, which will be familiar to you, anyway, as it is similar to how one adjusts most every other pack.
Can't wait to test it out. I have been watching the videos....on fitting...etc...I especially enjoyed the video about the 'guts' of the packs...
Kiki Outdoors: What's Inside the OHM, Circuit, and Catalyst.
Will let y'all know what it feels like...and if it works for me.
 

Swift3

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP, Porto to SdC, May/June 2016
While not a panel loader, I just ran across a new to me cottage outdoor gear manufacturer, Waymark.
They make a sort of made to order set of minimalist packs. Their "Thru 40" for example is a simple, roll top 40 L pack that weighs in at about 22 oz. with a padded hipbelt, or under 20 with just a 1" web belt or no belt at all. You can add various features you may want like shoulder strap pockets, hipbelt pockets, etc. So very customizable. And lots of wild and crazy colors, and color combinations (sides one color, body another, shoulderstraps a third, bottom a fourth color, etc) to chose from. About 4-6 week lead time from order to delivery and only around $220 USD for a "plain" version. Good reviews from some PCT hikers whove used these on their hikes. See here: https://www.waymarkgearco.com/ At around 2 lbs, and those price points, if you don't want a panel loader, and are cool with simplicity, this might be something you would want to consider. these are frameless packs, so you may want to consider, as they mention in one of their FAQs, putting, for example, a GG Sit Pad in the back of the pack to give it some extra stability/back cushion. I thought this post from a seasoned hiker who used a Z-Packs Arc Blast for the past 2 years on most of his trips, but opted for a Waymark 40 on the last 500 Miles of his recent PCT was helpful.
 
Done several thousand miles on many trails, though not the Camino, stories of bed bugs, snoring, no camping put me off.I may try Finisterre soon. Great forum.
Please check out Zpacks ArcBlast pack 19oz suits me fine.
I am doing the Maximilian Way in Germany this year.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Done several thousand miles on many trails, though not the Camino, stories of bed bugs, snoring, no camping put me off.I may try Finisterre soon. Great forum.
Please check out Zpacks ArcBlast pack 19oz suits me fine.
I am doing the Maximilian Way in Germany this year.
The Zpacks is a good pack and it suits a lot of people. It is also a favorite of American thru-hikers on the Pacific Crest Trail and Appalachian Trail. Me... I just could never get 'used' to it; it always felt 'odd' on my back. It seemed comfortable overall, but during the gear test for Zpacks, every time I had it on I was constantly fiddling with it to see if I could tweak it just enough to make it disappear during long backpacking trips.

I was sorry I couldn't get used to it, because it is a decent pack.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Be sure that you spend time testing it out with the maximum weight you think you will ever carry in it to make sure it feels good to you. ULA has great videos which explains the adjustment process to their backpacks, which will be familiar to you, anyway, as it is similar to how one adjusts most every other pack.
OK...so I tried out the ULA OHM 2.0. There is a lot to like about the pack. The hip belt is super comfortable and supportive. Plenty of room for all my gear. .... But...it is too much pack for me, if that makes sense. I need something simpler. And I couldn't get it to fit just right.
The search continues.
Maybe the ULA CDT...
Or maybe the GG Gorilla or Mariposa. The weight of them for Small with Medium belt...is the same for both...which I couldn't understand. Why? The Mariposa is 20 liters more...but weighs the same?
The dimensions were not listed on the web site (unless I am just not seeing them). I also wonder how a small can fit so many torso sizes...how to dial it in?
I am a 17"...not sure what size.
Anyway...I did send an email ...so we'll see.
Does anyone know Gorilla and Mariposa both? What do you like, not like, about each?
I will find a pack that is just right, says baby bear...
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
OK...so I tried out the ULA OHM 2.0. There is a lot to like about the pack. The hip belt is super comfortable and supportive. Plenty of room for all my gear. .... But...it is too much pack for me, if that makes sense. I need something simpler. And I couldn't get it to fit just right.
The search continues.
Maybe the ULA CDT...
Or maybe the GG Gorilla or Mariposa. The weight of them for Small with Medium belt...is the same for both...which I couldn't understand. Why? The Mariposa is 20 liters more...but weighs the same?
The dimensions were not listed on the web site (unless I am just not seeing them). I also wonder how a small can fit so many torso sizes...how to dial it in?
I am a 17"...not sure what size.
Anyway...I did send an email ...so we'll see.
Does anyone know Gorilla and Mariposa both? What do you like, not like, about each?
I will find a pack that is just right, says baby bear...
I am happy to hear you are being diligent in deciding on a pack. It really is an individual fit-n-feel type of thing.

I understand about the Ohm, it didn't feel right to me when testing it. I have the Circuit, which I found more comfortable overall, but it is a bit heavier at 2.5 pounds total weight. I am contemplating taking it with me in October on Camino Ingles.

As a frameless pack, the CDT is a good pack as long as you have load weights below the recommended maximum. I actually met a German pilgrim near Leon that had the CDT (recognizing the pack, I struck up a conversation with him and ended up walking off and on together for a couple of days). He loved the pack.

I currently use the Mariposa with over a thousand miles on it; and I have worn the Gorilla, which is the pack my son uses. Both can be used as carry on baggage when flying.

1. The weight differential is due to fabric types and weights + hardware choices between the brands.

2. With a 17" torso you would fit the medium size of Gossamer Mariposa or Gorilla. There is some adjustment that can be done by moving the hipbelt up or down the back of the pack.

3. The Mariposa's main bag is about 35 liters, which is smaller than the Gorillas main bag. The Mariposa can extend it's collar/lid to add to the main bag's capacity by 20 liters, which is one reason it is considered the bigger of the two packs.

4. The Gorilla also uses some additional hardware and the lid closures are different. That is why the weight of the Mariposa is a few ounces lighter.

Jill, if I can be of any help, just send me a PM.
 

Delphinoula

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese da Costa 2018
Finisterre Muxía 2018
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia 2019
35 litre bag seems a little on the small side though? I'd like to see a 50/55 litre one...thanks for the heads up I'll have a look at thier range. God bless.
As smaller the bag as less stuff you carry. Thing about what you really need. Like for an old one like me less is best plus it needs to fit your torso well.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
I am happy to hear you are being diligent in deciding on a pack. It really is an individual fit-n-feel type of thing.

I understand about the Ohm, it didn't feel right to me when testing it. I have the Circuit, which I found more comfortable overall, but it is a bit heavier at 2.5 pounds total weight. I am contemplating taking it with me in October on Camino Ingles.

As a frameless pack, the CDT is a good pack as long as you have load weights below the recommended maximum. I actually met a German pilgrim near Leon that had the CDT (recognizing the pack, I struck up a conversation with him and ended up walking off and on together for a couple of days). He loved the pack.

I currently use the Mariposa with over a thousand miles on it; and I have worn the Gorilla, which is the pack my son uses. Both can be used as carry on baggage when flying.

1. The weight differential is due to fabric types and weights + hardware choices between the brands.

2. With a 17" torso you would fit the medium size of Gossamer Mariposa or Gorilla. There is some adjustment that can be done by moving the hipbelt up or down the back of the pack.

3. The Mariposa's main bag is about 35 liters, which is smaller than the Gorillas main bag. The Mariposa can extend it's collar/lid to add to the main bag's capacity by 20 liters, which is one reason it is considered the bigger of the two packs.

4. The Gorilla also uses some additional hardware and the lid closures are different. That is why the weight of the Mariposa is a few ounces lighter.

Jill, if I can be of any help, just send me a PM.
THANK YOU!
 

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