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Describing trail experiences accurately and responsibly: Terminology

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
.
I don’t know about you, but when it comes to describing trail experiences accurately and responsibly here, on the forum, I struggle with vocabulary. Although English is our common language, being a global community, it is easy sometimes to misinterpret what others have written. A single word can have a thousand nuances. It can mean different things to different people depending region, country and hemisphere and also depending on context.

What I’d like to know is, are there any standards for writing about trails ie. lists of technical terms which publishers of guide books such as Cicerone and trail magazines use ?

For the sake of accuracy and responsibility, do you think such a list would be helpful here, on the forum for us to refer to when describing our experiences ?

Some of the people visiting this forum have been published or have self-published trail guides and Camino experiences. How did they describe moments on the trail? Which sporting or technical terms, if any did they choose to use? Why?

Here is a list of words with links to sporting activities on Wikipedia. I referred to it the other day in another conversation here: Post #26 .

Climbing

Scrambling

Hiking

Rambling

Walking

Looking forward to your comments.
Regards

-Lovingkindness
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
2012 Lemovicensis + Francés;
2016 Podiensis + CdN + Fisterra;
2018 VdlP + Sanabrés + Muxia/Fisterra
Well, language is a tricky thing, especially if it’s not your mother tongue (as it is not for me).
But I wouldn’t over complicate it in a way that I should learn a set of technical terms in order to express myself correctly. Best practice for me will be: Keep it simple. Avoid saying that are difficult to understand for people who do not come from the Anglo Saxon cultural area.

¡Ultreia!
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
A few times
As a whole, the various popular Camino routes are 90% just plain walking. Nothing more. Maybe a wee bit of what would be termed as "scrambling" (for example stretch right after Foncabedon on the Frances) but otherwise just walking. Not even what would be termed as hiking (in a traditional sense), though I am sure many people come home from the Camino and tell everyone about their "hike" across Spain lol.
When describing my Camino experiences I always just say I "walked" from a point A to a point B on the Camino route.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
As a whole, the various popular Camino routes are 90% just plain walking. Nothing more. Maybe a wee bit of what would be termed as "scrambling" (for example stretch right after Foncabedon on the Frances) but otherwise just walking. Not even what would be termed as hiking (in a traditional sense)
I agree. It's a walk, a trek, not a "hike" to me.
There are a few places that can be a bit rough, especially in the rain, like the hill down to Roncesvalles in the rain which can be muddy and slippery (take the road) or the last bit into Zubiri (take the road), or the walk down from Perdon (just watch your feet). Otherwise, to me, it's pretty much straight walking.

As far as uphill goes, the walk up to Orisson from SJPP is very steep but can be walked the entire way on road - and many people, myself included, suggest breaking the stage from SJPP to Roncesvalles into two days because MOST pilgrims haven't trained enough to take it in a single day without injury. The short hike up to Perdon is the same. Slow and steady with lots of rests and MOST people have no problems. If a person is still not feeling in shape, it's an easy stage to break into two days. Lastly, the walk down into Aceba from Rabanal has a short, steep stage and then from Acebo to Molinaseca can be difficult depending on the weather, but again, a person can simply take the road. I can't think of any other places in the entire 6 weeks that are very difficult and I'm 68 (almost 69) and not in great shape myself.

Sorry if I hijacked this thread. Regarding standards, I think each person's experience can be very different.
 
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Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
As a whole, the various popular Camino routes are 90% just plain walking. Nothing more. Maybe a wee bit of what would be termed as "scrambling" (for example stretch right after Foncabedon on the Frances) but otherwise just walking. Not even what would be termed as hiking (in a traditional sense), though I am sure many people come home from the Camino and tell everyone about their "hike" across Spain lol.
When describing my Camino experiences I always just say I "walked" from a point A to a point B on the Camino route.
The descent from Sierra del Perdón was akin to scree-running 20 years ago and about the only place on the CF where I'd seriously consider ankle boots though even that has been worked over to "improve" it (I was going to say cleaned up but I understand it's still the largest open air toilet on the CF - as of 2019).
 
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Deleted member 73526

Guest
For some types of communication, precise definitions of terms are agreed to eliminate ambiguities and mis-communication:

In the shipping forecast, the timing of a particular weather event is critically important information. You can't have individual forecasters deciding their own conventions. For this reason, "imminent" means within six hours, and "soon" is in six to 12 hours from the time of the forecast.

However, beautiful concepts like the Cornish "Dreckly" would whither and die under such constraints. Applying strict standards to everyday conversation would be a straightjacket on our freedom of expression.

I guess the question of whether we need to agree on a set of standard definitions in this forum depends on whether you think of it as a source of mission critical advice or a fun place to hang out.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Year of past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
I understand your point but I honestly don’t think, even if we could all agree on terminology (lots of luck with that)😉😉😆), that this Forum is the vehicle to do that.

However, a picture is often worth a thousand words. The OP can look at the wonderful videos if they are unclear about the terrain for many routes.

There is already a plethora of visual information about many trails available. One can even watch speeded up videos by John Sikora for the : Camino Frances, Camino Ingles, Camino Portugues and Coastal, Via de la Plata (Sevilla to Salamanca) ! Mapped and all.

The full Video list is complied by David Tallan

This is a free and fantastic resource to help pilgrims sort out what terrain they will face and the Forum and the filmers should be congratulated
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
For the sake of accuracy and responsibility, do you think such a list would be helpful here, on the forum for us to refer to when describing our experiences ?
No.

And one of the Wikipedia links demonstrates to me why:

Hiking is a long, vigorous walk, usually on trails or footpaths in the countryside.​
"Hiking" is the preferred term in Canada and the United States; the term "walking" is used in these regions for shorter, particularly urban walks. In the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland, the word "walking" describes all forms of walking, whether it is a walk in the park or backpacking in the Alps. The word hiking is also often used in the UK, along with rambling (a slightly old-fashioned term), hillwalking, and fell walking (a term mostly used for hillwalking in northern England).​
Add to this that we have members with activities such as randonner, wandern, se promener, spazierengehen, wandelen, pilgern, to name but a very few, none of which can be translated with all their associations and implications into British or American English.

So let them continue to argue whether it's a hike, a very long walk, a trail, a pilgrimage, or whatever.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
And even if we used terms like "scrambling" or "requires some scrambling", the experienced mountain walker would not look up the precise meaning because she knows what it means, and the inexperienced future pilgrim who had never walked for a longer period of time in a day in his life would not look up the precise meaning either because he thinks he knows what the word means.
 
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Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
No.

And one of the Wikipedia links demonstrates to me why:

Hiking is a long, vigorous walk, usually on trails or footpaths in the countryside.​
"Hiking" is the preferred term in Canada and the United States; the term "walking" is used in these regions for shorter, particularly urban walks. In the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland, the word "walking" describes all forms of walking, whether it is a walk in the park or backpacking in the Alps. The word hiking is also often used in the UK, along with rambling (a slightly old-fashioned term), hillwalking, and fell walking (a term mostly used for hillwalking in northern England).​
Add to this that we have members with activities such as randonner, wandern, se promener, spazierengehen, wandelen, pilgern, to name but a very few, none of which can be translated with all their associations and implications into British or American English.

So let them continue to argue whether it's a hike, a very long walk, a trail, a pilgrimage, or whatever.
Maybe it was because I'd just had a pasta dish for dinner but spazierengehen made my mind segue to Spätzle and conjured up the joy of combining a favoured dish with a Walk in the Schwarzwald . . . . One for the Bucket-Liste!
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
A few times
The more I think about it the less I would want the Camino to be described in technical terms. I can honestly say I never looked at it technical in any way. Personally I think I would be missing out if I approached and walked it that way. If I want to do actual technical hiking and backpacking there are so many options available to me, and when I was younger I did do actual backpacking and hiking with full kit, food, water, stove etc. Also my time in the military naturally involved a technical approach to long hikes and time in the field. I am not out to recreate that.
I like the laid back, non technical sharing of experiences on it. All the goofy BS that can occur. Meeting characters on the Way. Whacky hospitaleros, too much wine at dinner, lumpy beds, dogs and cats and other animals etc.
 

Phoenix

Generic member
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
I like the laid back, non technical sharing of experiences on it. All the goofy BS that can occur. Meeting characters on the Way. Whacky hospitaleros, too much wine at dinner, lumpy beds, dogs and cats and other animals etc.
This.

When trying to tell friends or acquaintances about Camino, they say something like, "Oh, I couldn't do that." My usual reply describes walking, drinking café con leche, walking, meeting people from all over the world, maybe a section here or there that is like a hike, drinking a pint of cerveza appx 1/hr while walking, albergue life, dinner & meeting more people, world championship snoring at night, etc. then repeat. Some get it and some can't fathom Camino life.
 

Doughnut NZ

From Aotearoa New Zealand
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
I don’t know about you, but when it comes to describing trail experiences accurately and responsibly here, on the forum, I struggle with vocabulary. Although English is our common language, being a global community, it is easy sometimes to misinterpret what others have written. A single word can have a thousand nuances. It can mean different things to different people depending region, country and hemisphere and also depending on context.

What I’d like to know is, are there any standards for writing about trails ie. lists of technical terms which publishers of guide books such as Cicerone and trail magazines use ?

For the sake of accuracy and responsibility, do you think such a list would be helpful here, on the forum for us to refer to when describing our experiences ?

Some of the people visiting this forum have been published or have self-published trail guides and Camino experiences. How did they describe moments on the trail? Which sporting or technical terms, if any did they choose to use? Why?

Here is a list of words with links to sporting activities on Wikipedia. I referred to it the other day in another conversation here: Post #26 .

Climbing

Scrambling

Hiking

Rambling

Walking

Looking forward to your comments.
Regards

-Lovingkindness
Tramping
 

frida1

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances April 11-May 11 2014
Phoenix, I often get the opposite response. Coming from the Pacific Northwest, hiking usually involves ascents and descents of a few thousand feet in the Cascades, along with oodles of scenic mountain beauty. People can’t comprehend how “just walking” could be interesting or difficult. Of course, as the Camino gets better known, responses are different. A lot of people assume they can easily walk tens of miles per day if it’s rather smooth and flat, they just wouldn’t want to.
 
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Glamgrrl

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Travel318
Phoenix, I often get the opposite response. Coming from the Pacific Northwest, hiking usually involves ascents and descents of a few thousand feet in the Cascades, along with oodles of scenic mountain beauty. People can’t comprehend how “just walking” could be interesting or difficult. Of course, as the Camino gets better known, responses are different. A lot of people assume they can easily walk tens of miles per day if it’s rather smooth and flat, they just wouldn’t want to.
Same situation here. The best part of the Camino is that you don’t have to do “out and back”! I love the experience of walking to a new destination every day.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
I don’t know about you, but when it comes to describing trail experiences accurately and responsibly here, on the forum, I struggle with vocabulary. Although English is our common language, being a global community, it is easy sometimes to misinterpret what others have written. A single word can have a thousand nuances. It can mean different things to different people depending region, country and hemisphere and also depending on context.

What I’d like to know is, are there any standards for writing about trails ie. lists of technical terms which publishers of guide books such as Cicerone and trail magazines use ?

For the sake of accuracy and responsibility, do you think such a list would be helpful here, on the forum for us to refer to when describing our experiences ?

Some of the people visiting this forum have been published or have self-published trail guides and Camino experiences. How did they describe moments on the trail? Which sporting or technical terms, if any did they choose to use? Why?

Here is a list of words with links to sporting activities on Wikipedia. I referred to it the other day in another conversation here: Post #26 .

Climbing

Scrambling

Hiking

Rambling

Walking

Looking forward to your comments.
Regards

-Lovingkindness
I think the best way to avoid any confusion is to make everything simple.
I am a native American English Speaker. Different expressions and meanings for Americans, Brits, Aussies Irish and Kiwi English.
Scrambling is what you do with eggs
Rambling is what a person does who keeps talking and talking and either is boring you to sleep or not making sense.
Climbing is cliing up a ladder 🪜 or climbing up a Mount Everest or using it to say you are walking up a steep hill.
I have walked 5 different caminos and have climbed a total of about 45 seconds.
So I would say as others have said just say you are walking.
It was very wet and the cobblestones we’re slippery walk.
It was very long and hard uphill walk and I had to stop a few times to rest.
It was a very long and hard and steep downhill and has to use my polls If you do not know the word steep in English just say long and the road went strait down or something like that. Or use your translator.
Keep it simple as possible. We are not crossing the Sahara or over the Himalayas. Remember what I live by and what the Camino has taught me. Thinking too much is what got me nuts and walking the camino in the first place. Nothing good can come from it!!!!!’
 

Phoenix

Generic member
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Phoenix, I often get the opposite response. Coming from the Pacific Northwest, hiking usually involves ascents and descents of a few thousand feet in the Cascades, along with oodles of scenic mountain beauty. People can’t comprehend how “just walking” could be interesting or difficult. Of course, as the Camino gets better known, responses are different. A lot of people assume they can easily walk tens of miles per day if it’s rather smooth and flat, they just wouldn’t want to.
Living in the land of 14ers is probably similar. I've done my share of them, and no longer have much desire to do more unless I'm going with someone who hasn't been before and I can experience it through their eyes.

Perhaps some folks can't comprehend doing something more than a weekend excursion, while others might wonder why they would take an international flight to walk for weeks when they have such beauty in their own state. Then again, perhaps in conversations about it I should just lead with, "Hey, do you like to take a walk, drink great coffee/beer/wine, and meet people from all around the world?"
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Then again, perhaps in conversations about it I should just lead with, "Hey, do you like to take a walk, drink great coffee/beer/wine, and meet people from all around the world?"
Exactly. Because the Camino isn't a hiking expedition in the wilderness. It's not mountaineering. (no, not even in the Pyrenees) It's a journey across Spain (a civilized country) using your feet as transportation, rather than a train, bus or car.
 
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lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
.
Good morning to you all!

In Europe pilgrims walking to Santiago often set out from home.
...for some it means hiking through the wilderness, crossing mountains, paddling down rivers and across lakes, even sailing through high seas before reaching Spain;
...loaded with camping gear, walking/hiking/trekking/scrambling perhaps even climbing if they are really adventurous,
...in all weather and all seasons.

Just to say :)

*Caminos de Santiago de Compostella in Europe: Interactive map (incomplete)
*Saint James Ways: interactive map (incomplete)
*Peter Robbins, 'The Walking Pilgrim' had an excellent interactive map (2013). @ivar wrote about it here.


Carte-IGN-caminos.jpeg
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
Just to say
And these pilgrims in Europe who set out from home to go to Santiago, walking / hiking / trekking / scrambling perhaps even climbing, are doing this without following yellow arrows because there are none. Thank you for mentioning @Peter Robins. He did a fantastic job with his database and interactive maps. I contacted him once to get a clearer idea about one part of the trail I was planning to follow and he very kindly wrote back.

Reminiscing now ... 🤗
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
.
And these pilgrims in Europe who set out from home to go to Santiago, walking / hiking / trekking / scrambling perhaps even climbing, are doing this without following yellow arrows because there are none. Thank you for mentioning @Peter Robins. He did a fantastic job with his database and interactive maps. I contacted him once to get a clearer idea about one part of the trail I was planning to follow and he very kindly wrote back.

Reminiscing now ... 🤗
You're Welcome!
 
Year of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
Much later, after I had already walked from SJPP to Roncesvalles and beyond, I noticed comments on the forum where people described how steep it was to walk there.

I couldn't figure out what they meant. I didn't recall anything as steep there. Or maybe the very first steps on the broad road just after the city gate of SJPP when you were still walking at city pace and not yet at walking pace? Which gave me the idea to look up common definitions of 'steep' in the mountains. I found this in connection with avalanche warnings:
  • steep slopes: have more than 30 degrees,
  • very steep: steeper than 35 degrees,
  • extremely steep: over 40 degrees,
    extreme steep slopes refers to particularly unfavourable slopes in terms of inclination (over 40 degrees), terrain shape, proximity to ridges or ground roughness.
Tips for estimating:
  • 30 degrees and steeper: you make hairpin turns on the ascent.
  • rocky terrain has over 40 degrees.
I went through the elevation profile of the Route Napoleon in Google Earth. Guess what? ;)
 
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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
As long as it is not Australian bushwalking, it is OK by me.

Bushwalking - hot sun beating down relentlessly, pulling oneself on hands and feet over huge rocks, climbing up and down impossible slopes, cliff edges to fill one with terror - and all the while surrounded by hard scratchy plants that seem intent on tearing the skin and destroying clothing and packs. And that's on a good day!
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
And while we are at it I'll mention scree. Many of our mountainous trails in the USA have sections of scree which can be rather dangerous. Of course we do not start off walking from home.😉
Screenshot_20210613-061556~2.png
 

longwayhome

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJpdP to Santiago ( Sept-Oct 2018)
As long as it is not Australian bushwalking, it is OK by me.

Bushwalking - hot sun beating down relentlessly, pulling oneself on hands and feet over huge rocks, climbing up and down impossible slopes, cliff edges to fill one with terror - and all the while surrounded by hard scratchy plants that seem intent on tearing the skin and destroying clothing and packs. And that's on a good day!
Forgot to mention squinting at every stick to see if it moves and hisses and frequent encounters with wombat waste at nose level while crawling under giant tree trunks ..
 
Year of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
And while we are at it I'll mention scree. Many of our mountainous trails in the USA have sections of scree which can be rather dangerous. Of course we do not start off walking from home.😉
Good point. @Jeff Crawley mentioned earlier that the descent from the windmills at the Alto del Perdón just after Pamplona had scree-running potential. I used the technique, and I was wearing proper shoes, btw. I could tell that many of my fellow pilgrims were puzzled by seeing someone using this method 😀. Also, I was the fasted going down that hill.
 
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Dromengro

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
Much later, after I had already walked from SJPP to Roncesvalles and beyond, I noticed comments on the forum where people described how steep it was to walk there.
I couldn't figure out what they meant. I didn't recall anything as steep there.
I heard that I had to climb a steep pass in the Pyrenees.
I was expecting a steep rocky scramble with maybe a nice scree descent and was a bit disappointed and most confused as I stood on top of the col looking down towards Ronscesvalles wondering where the Pyrenees were!!


I'm Not a fan of the "new" terms like Hiking or Trekking which seem far too planned and organised for me. Rambling conjures up images of groups of scouts in shorts with large rucksacks and heavy boots or old folk in waterproofs and poles out for day trip.
I prefer the Scots term Stravaig or even maybe a Wee daunder if you're doing a short section like from Sarria
 
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Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Good point. @Jeff Crawley mentioned earlier that the descent from the windmills at the Alto del Perdón just after Pamplona had scree-running potential. I used the technique, and I was wearing proper shoes, btw. I could tell that many of my fellow pilgrims were puzzled by seeing someone using this method 😀. Also, I was the fasted going down that hill.
I have always preferred the downhills, skampering like a rabbit, although I think I am in a minority. I absolutely detest the uphills, but I've got to say it's when I take the most pictures...pause, aim and shoot.😉😅
 

mvanert

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
I don’t know about you, but when it comes to describing trail experiences accurately and responsibly here, on the forum, I struggle with vocabulary. Although English is our common language, being a global community, it is easy sometimes to misinterpret what others have written. A single word can have a thousand nuances. It can mean different things to different people depending region, country and hemisphere and also depending on context.

What I’d like to know is, are there any standards for writing about trails ie. lists of technical terms which publishers of guide books such as Cicerone and trail magazines use ?

For the sake of accuracy and responsibility, do you think such a list would be helpful here, on the forum for us to refer to when describing our experiences ?

Some of the people visiting this forum have been published or have self-published trail guides and Camino experiences. How did they describe moments on the trail? Which sporting or technical terms, if any did they choose to use? Why?

Here is a list of words with links to sporting activities on Wikipedia. I referred to it the other day in another conversation here: Post #26 .

Climbing

Scrambling

Hiking

Rambling

Walking

Looking forward to your comments.
Regards

-Lovingkindness

For me, this forum isn't about walking or anything technical regarding the physical, it is about the journey, the people, the person who is on camino, sharing experiences, sharing their lives with others, joy, sadness, love and grief. Yes, getting directions about some physical part of whichever path you're taking to Santiago is helpful, but I don't worry too much about accuracy of the terms you note.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
most confused as I stood on top of the col looking down towards Ronscesvalles wondering where the Pyrenees were!!
😀

That's why I came to the forum initially: trying to find out whether SJPP to the col is a 1,200 m climb or a 20 km walk, especially since I felt responsible for the person who was due to accompany me. I don't remember whether it was here or elsewhere that I learnt that it would be a 20 km walk.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
1989
Of course, for many experienced caminantes, what distinguishes the Camino is that the exterior journey is accompanied by an interior journey. Should not our technical vocabulary take that into account? Then we would have 50 different verbs just for walking on the meseta: one for moving forward while wrestling with memories from the past, another for moving forward while losing oneself in the endless skies and distant horizons, another for moving forward while being preoccupied with where the next village or bar might be, and so forth.

If we really want to describe our trail experiences accurately and responsibly.
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Camino Facebook groups are full of people asking if they will need special boots or other equipment for the "hike over the Pyrenees." I have started referring them to the first couple of minutes of this video so that they can see the "difficult" terrain. 😄
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Probably better call it "hill walk" in English or "Bergwanderung" in German.
I did some hikes in Ireland and England a few years ago. I recall some locals mentioning it was "fell walking".
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
This.

When trying to tell friends or acquaintances about Camino, they say something like, "Oh, I couldn't do that." My usual reply describes walking, drinking café con leche, walking, meeting people from all over the world, maybe a section here or there that is like a hike, drinking a pint of cerveza appx 1/hr while walking, albergue life, dinner & meeting more people, world championship snoring at night, etc. then repeat. Some get it and some can't fathom Camino life.
Like the way you describe it... however, I may have missed out on that pint of cerveza each hour... :>)
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
Forgot to mention squinting at every stick to see if it moves and hisses and frequent encounters with wombat waste at nose level while crawling under giant tree trunks ..
I laughed out loud at that.

When it comes to language though sometimes you actually experience a Camino. My husband asked me no end of questions about the Camino (I persuaded him to come along last time, and he was anxious) - but it wasn't until he walked it himself he understood what I meant. And theoretically we speak the same language.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
I did some hikes in Ireland and England a few years ago. I recall some locals mentioning it was "fell walking".
My impression is that "fell walking" is used by the English mainly when they live in fell walking countryside, and that they use "rambling"with the slight disdain or distant memories so aptly described by @Dromengro.

I am less familiar with current use of "fell walking" by the Irish. I've occasionally walked with a group set up and managed by Irish expats. They named their club "Hillwalking Club". I see now that there is even an All-Ireland Hillwalking Clubs Championship.

I conclude that "hillwalking" would accurately describe some of the terrain of the Camino Frances to people familiar with the term but this terrain is a minute part of all the land-based Ways of Saint James.

And we've not yet even started to tackle the terminology for the sea and waterways. The crossing from Blaye or through the Bay of Biscay / Golfe de Gascogne to name but two ... ☺️
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
2009
Well, language is a tricky thing, especially if it’s not your mother tongue (as it is not for me).
But I wouldn’t over complicate it in a way that I should learn a set of technical terms in order to express myself correctly. Best practice for me will be: Keep it simple. Avoid saying that are difficult to understand for people who do not come from the Anglo Saxon cultural area.

¡Ultreia!
Josephus, I totally agree. As a native English speaker, and professional, I abhor technical language. If one can’t express ones meaning in simple words of one syllable then Imho one does not understand the subject. The KISS principle makes total sense.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
The KISS principle makes total sense.
I had to look this up as I'd not heard of it before. I usually use simple words, but sometimes I think I use too many of them to get my point across. I often tend to "paint a picture" with words instead of giving the cliff notes.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
I had to look this up as I'd not heard of it before. I usually use simple words, but sometimes I think I use too many of them to get my point across. I often tend to "paint a picture" with words instead of giving the cliff notes.
I defined it further up! Although the last word I used isn't the usual word but I didn't want to use that...
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I defined it further up! Although the last word I used isn't the usual word but I didn't want to use that...
I didn't scroll back far enough. Either way it was nice for me to get an official dictionary definition/meaning.
 
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koknesis

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances June/July 2014
Camino Aragones August 2015
Camino Sanabres (Ourense-SdC) August 2015
VdlP 2017
Somehow late to the party :)
Obviously the Camino is just for a "walking" even though I can imagine some need for "scrambling" skills if the wine tasting has gone too far ...
On the other hand "wading" has been required several times though. Or should I say "fording"??
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
1989
Somehow late to the party :)
Obviously the Camino is just for a "walking" even though I can imagine some need for "scrambling" skills if the wine tasting has gone too far ...
On the other hand "wading" has been required several times though. Or should I say "fording"??
If the wine tasting went really too far you might say you "fell walking".
 
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