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DSLR-camera on the camino

Uracca

New Member
I want to take my DSLR camera with me when I leave for the camino next year. But I'm still not sure where to leave it during the walk. In my backpack is not really an option, because then I have to take the backpack of every time I want to shoot a picture. I do have a LowePro Toploader bag, which I think I can expand with a belt, but I don't think it's comfortable to wear with my backpack, because of all the straps coming together on my waist. I don't feel a lot for taking my compact camera. Does anyone have tips on this, or has anyone here took their SLR with them on the Camino. How did you transport your camera? Thanks!
 

Sagalouts

RIP 2015
Hi Uracca
in my opinion a small digital is enough,the light is so good in Spain it made even me look half good,plus its about the eye and not the equipment,
having said that the piece of equipment in my pack that was the most heavy was the battery charger,another time i would check out the solar chargers.
I love my photography but sometimes just breath it all in-trust me you will remember.
Ian
 

renegadepilgrim

Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler
Camino(s) past & future
2010: Camino Frances, 2011: Santo Domingo de la Calzada (Hospitalera), 2012: Camino Portuguese from Porto, 2015: Camino Norte
Are you planning to also take a few lenses are just one? Perhaps your pack has the ability to lash the camera to the back or maybe on the waist belt? I'm debating on taking mine. Probably going to splurge for a decent point and shoot, like a Canon G10 or something and leave my Nikon D90 at home (or possibly having it shipped to Ivar's so I can use it on the rest of my round the world trip). I like to take photos and don't mind carrying the extra weight if I can take pictures.

Anyone else brought their DSLR on the camino? I'm curious as well.
 

jeff001

Active Member
Another argument for not taking the DSLR is the security issue. The more expensive the "stuff" you have with you the more concerned you have to be with someone taking it.
 

renegadepilgrim

Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler
Camino(s) past & future
2010: Camino Frances, 2011: Santo Domingo de la Calzada (Hospitalera), 2012: Camino Portuguese from Porto, 2015: Camino Norte
jeff001 said:
Another argument for not taking the DSLR is the security issue. The more expensive the "stuff" you have with you the more concerned you have to be with someone taking it.

This is true, but say you have a way to secure it...or, what if you don't care if it gets stolen? A DSLR is going to be an extra 2 lbs of weight with one lens, at least, plus the battery charger, etc. I'm not so much concerned about it getting stolen as I am about the extra weight, which is why I've been considering getting a nice point and shoot, it would be smaller, weigh less, take decent pictures. I'm curious if people have traveled the camino with a DSLR and what their experience has been.
 

johnie99

New Member
I would say that walking for more than a week with a DSLR would be a pain, and a total pain in winter. We've just spent a week in the Picos de Europa with a DSLR and an old compact. Cleaning and keeping lens dry requires lots of patience. My OH carried it around his neck/shoulder, to the front, in its proper camera bag, which also had a rain cover and then inside his waterproof jacket. Apart from looking pregnant, he wasn't bothered. Expect the camera to get battered also. 6 weeks on the camino has its toll !! Cleaning a lens properly in the rain is impossible. On the camino you will need to have it on you all the time, otherwise it might go for a walk and decide not to return! - very high probability IMO.

Leave the battery charger at home (if ur camera takes normal batteries), use Energiser Lithium ones. They are not rechargeable and last a long time. On the camino last year, I needed first change in week 5. I take lots of photos!! We also find that the DSLR is more energy efficient than the compact. So just take an extra set of batteries and no hastle with charging.

John.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
I have a nice padded chest mounted camera case with a flip top and four secure straps. I've used it skiing, climbing, and carried it with a pack on a 20 day trek in Nepal. Works great if you really want the SLR, but on the Caminos, I use a pocket camera, perhaps one a bit more sophisticated than a point and shoot, but really small nonetheless.
 

TerryB

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte/Primitivo (April/May) 2009: Norte/Primitivo (parts) (April/May) 2010: Inglés (May) 2011: Primitivo (April/May) 2012: Norte / Camino de La Reina (April/May) 2013: Camino del Mar / Inglés (May/June) 2015
I have now a 'slide show' which I have shown in church using a computer and projector. The quality, while not in the expert range is very acceptable and all the pics were taken on a tiny fujifilm camera. I carried it clipped to my rucksack strap so I only had to open the case and take the pic. I came back with 630 pictures which bring back many memories.
In contrast our daughter and partner carry 8 kilos of camera and equipment on their photo expeditions. just depends what you want I guess!!

Walk well and safely
Tio Tel
 

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sturla-pilgrim

New Member
I brought my professional video camera (and other video equipment) on my pilgrimage in 2007. I had it in my backpack (on the top), and took it out whenever I needed it. For the weight, I guess it was a bit too much (had almost 25 kg in my backpack), but on the other hand it helped me to take it easy and to really enjoy the pilgrimage (as I had to stop often, for a break, or to get my camera in order to film things and my meetings on the Camino).

My equipment was back then valued to about 12000 Euro. And the funny thing, or actually, great thing(!), is that I always just left it in my backpack by my bed (or mattress) in the hostel I slept at. During my almost 8 weeks of walk, I never had any problem with this, nothing was stolen, and I felt comfortable leaving it in the albergues...

So my tip is: If your really like to take photos, go for the best camera you have! You will maybe think it weights a bit too much during the walk, but you will definitely not regret it afterwards...
 

Uracca

New Member
I've been thinking about it a lot the last few days. And I think I'm just gonna take my DSLR with me on the camino. I took it last year to Costa Rica and never felt uncomfortable having it with me the whole day. The only thing I have to find out is wether to take my two lenses (I have a 18-55 and a 55-200 lens) or buying a new Tamron 18-200 lens, I took me quite some time last vacation to change lenses everytime. That means saving up my money from now on....but it's worth.
Thanks for everyones advice!
 

Caminando

Veteran Member
Pics are nice. I like them too.

But you can also break the mould, get out of your comfort zone - and don't take any camera at all. It all depends on how attached you are to memories.

Just a thought.

:arrow:
 

renegadepilgrim

Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler
Camino(s) past & future
2010: Camino Frances, 2011: Santo Domingo de la Calzada (Hospitalera), 2012: Camino Portuguese from Porto, 2015: Camino Norte
I've come to the conclusion I will get myself a Canon G10 or G11, leave the DSLR at home and have it shipped to me in Santiago so I can use it for the rest of my trip around the world. I use my DSLR mostly for concert photography so I have a 50mm prime that is usually on it. My zoom is the kit lens and not very good, so I would have to save up for a better zoom and I find that money would be better spent on the actual trip.

My memory is not so good sometimes (due to a head injury three years ago), so I like to have pictures to help me remember.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
My Olympus Stylus 1200 at 12 megapixels yields photos nearly as good as my Olympus E-20N SLR, and it fits in my shirt pocket (though I use a padded case).
 
Uracca

I went through similar debates with myself when I was planning my trip. In the end, I could not leave my D60 behind. I took only one lens, 18-55, as I presumed it would mainly be landscape pics I will be taking. I carried it slung across my shoulder, without its case. I was able to hold it with my right hand, support it with my left elbow, and shot. Loved it.

On rainy days, it was a bit of a challenge. Initially I had put the camera into the backpack but found so many instances where I had wanted to photograph that I ended up carrying it slung over my shoulders,still. I had a rain poncho. The camera was snug beneath the poncho :). I took the additional precaution of placing the camera (with the strap sticking out) in a plastic bag.

It did get battered. Got home, sent it in for servicing, changed a couple of parts, and it is as good as new.

It was lot of weight to carry, if you ask me, but no regrets.

I had a very small backpack which I use after walks each day. I carry my camera in that bag. The only time the camera was unattended was when I was in the shower and when I was asleep.

Enjoy. Buen Camino.
Rebecca
 

Uracca

New Member
Everyone thanks again for your tips about the DSLR. My final conclusion is I'm gonna take it with me. I'm taking at least my 50mm lens with me, and maybe maybe my 55-200mm for some detailed pics (but maybe I'll just leave it at home, because the pics I'll be making on the way will be mainly landscapes. I don't worry that much about the weight, the body is 700 gr and the 50mm weighs about 115 gr. So less than a kilo. I think I can live with that.
 

kstaylor

Member
Some backpacks include a daypack which can be clipped on in front, hanging from the front attached to the shoulder straps. The Eagle Creek Thrive 90L does this. That could be a good place for a DSLR and extra lens plus other stuff one may want immediate access to while walking and without needing to remove the backpack.

I've been looking at these options carefully as I'm a confirmed photography addict and will find it difficult to get my photography equipment weight down to 10kg. :) I'll be starting on the Caminho Portuguese -- from Porto -- in mid-April, but only planning on 15-25km/day with many full day breaks.

K Taylor
http://www.arovingvision.com
kst@arovingvision.com
 

Lemonkid

Member
I'm having the same internal debate. So far I've brought it hiking in the mountaintops of Huangshan, I have a feeling I'll probably bring it.
 

kstaylor

Member
Lemonkid said:
I'm having the same internal debate. So far I've brought it hiking in the mountaintops of Huangshan, I have a feeling I'll probably bring it.

I guess that is the difference between a photography addict like myself and most people -- you have an interal debate over whether to bring the DSLR and my internal debate is over a backup camera body, tripod, and a few specialty lenses. :D

Kit
http://www.arovingvision.com
kst@arovingvision.com
 

mrbillyto

Member
I took my DSLR (Canon T1I) on my Camino in Sep 09 with no regrets. i wanted the camera to be accessible so tried all sorts of getups and bags. On one of my older camera bags that you wear around your waste, it had 2 independent side pouches for lenses that velcroed over the main strap. I ended up using one of these pouches to go over the waist strap on my backpack. I wore the camera like normal...strap around my neck and camera hanging in front but the actual lens on the camera was sitting in the pouch I had on my waist strap so there was no weight from the camera on my neck. It worked like a charm. It wasn't that great on rainy days and there was one day that was really misty so I just covered it with a handkerchief to keep the mist from settling on the camera (it was really misty that day). I had a spare battery with the battery charger and a 18-55 and a 75-300 lens.
In my opinion, if you want to take your DSLR, figure out a way to get the weight off your neck and secured in front so it doesn't sway back and forth and you will be fine. As for security, I never had a problem...it became a part of something I carried all the time. I would arrive in some town for a cafe con leche and the backpack and pole would stay outside the bar but the camera would always be put back on around my neck. No regrets here...it was worth the extra weight and minor inconvenience but that was my Camino.
Bill
 

Lemonkid

Member
Yeah it's a tough call. I don't really want to spend the extra money to buy a 2nd camera, also I'm doing quite a bit of travelling after the Camino for which I'd like to have the camera. I'll probably end up bringing it.
 

renegadepilgrim

Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler
Camino(s) past & future
2010: Camino Frances, 2011: Santo Domingo de la Calzada (Hospitalera), 2012: Camino Portuguese from Porto, 2015: Camino Norte
I'm in the same boat....traveling another three months after the camino. I have decided to buy a Canon G10 or G11 and if halfway through the camino I decide I want my DSLR, then I will have it ready to go in a package and have my sister send it to me to Santiago for the remainder of my trip. I just really don't want to pack around a lot of stuff. I'm doing good so far with keeping my pack light.
 

ion

New Member
Wow, life is funny, as well unpredictable...
Picture this, I've always known, I need the best gear I could Afford, in order to save the memories, of my Camino, but as I will be going thru the Camino Frances, there’s no way I will take my Nikons D700 28-300mm lens, ( Even though, I know I will miss them a LOT, ). THEY FEEL LIKE A BAZOOKA!!!!!! Literally, who on his/hers, right mind even consider walking for a month, with a Bazooka???
Besides, Rambo, and Braddock!!!

Now I am on the same ordeal I was 1 year ago, (WHAT CAMERA SHOULD I TAKE TO THE CAMINO? )

WOW. I feel like, just going with the cheapest Point and shoot i can buy with 50 bucks.

But deep inside, I know, I would never do it, now I am on In between,

Leica X1 ( Pricie )
Leica Vlux 30 ( not so sure )
Fuji ( x 100 _ love this one ) .
Anyone took any of these gears to the Camino ???
Any other suggestions ???
:shock:
 

Sharni

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: April/May 2011
Camino Norte/Vadiniense/Frances: April/May 2013
Camino Frances: April/May 2016
I was happy with my Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ10 and I got many compliments on the quality of my photos.
 

ion

New Member
Sharni, can you post any of your photos ? I was thinking about your camera as well, just wondering how it perform.,i never owned a Lumix Before ... Thanks.
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
I am currently doing a digital photography night school course run by a professional photographer. When he traveled in Europe he decided he didn't want to take his bulky Nikon and he took a Lumix. There are cameras in all brands that can give you features beyond the basic, without being quite as complex and bulky as a DSLR. (Sometimes these are called pro-sumer cameras.) Perhaps if you prioritise the features you want and go visit a good camera shop, you might be surprised at the range of quite compact but powerful cameras that are around.

For me, I know that when I am traveling and staying in places like hostels and albergues where power points are limited, I want to take a camera that can just take AA batteries. This rules out quite a few models of camera, but it is a compromise I would rather make to avoid hassle trying to recharge batteries.
Margaret
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
KiwiNomad06 said:
....................
For me, I know that when I am traveling and staying in places like hostels and albergues where power points are limited, I want to take a camera that can just take AA batteries. This rules out quite a few models of camera, but it is a compromise I would rather make to avoid hassle trying to recharge batteries.
Margaret
As Margaret says charging a camera could be a problem, it isn't like a phone that can be kept switched off to conserve power. We too use cameras (Fuji Finepix) that take AA batteries (2) and always carry a spare set. Nothing so frustrating as having a good shot lined up and the battery failing.
 

Sharni

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: April/May 2011
Camino Norte/Vadiniense/Frances: April/May 2013
Camino Frances: April/May 2016
I have 2 batteries for my Lumix and didn't have any issue with getting them recharged but each Camino will be different :) Each battery lasted about 4 -5 days and I took many photos each day (1200 in 33 days and 43 videos) and I also viewed them most nights, if you didn't do that I believe the battery would last longer I tried to upload a photo I took of some roses out the front of the Albergue we stayed at in Portomarin but it wouldn't work - I will try to find out how to do it.
 

Portia1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2009, Portuguese 2012
Frances 2016, (Frances 2019)
I took an extra charged Lumix battery and took LOTS of pictures. Unfortunately that camera fell out of my pack on the bridge into Hospital del Orbigo and despite lots of effort, I never got it back. Over 600 photos on that camera on the first battery. I put up lots of signs, talked with fellow pilgrims and alberques--all I really wanted was the media card from it (though I really did like that camera!). I purchased another camera in Astorga--the requirement being that it take the same media cards I already owned as they do not come with them. It used regular AA batteries. Regular batteries slow down the picture taking process--there is significant lag between picture taking--at least it felt significant after you are used to rechargeables.

As far as getting photos from the camera to the computer--I took along an inexpensive usb/media stick--found in Office Depot for $9. I kept it in the baggie with my extra battery and media cards. You put the media card in one end and the USB end in the USB port of the computer and access the photos from there--so you have to get the right stick for your media card.

I did purchase another Lumix as I really like the picture quality. Unfortunately (wouldn't you know!!) the newer model doesn't take the same battery as the one I lost so now I have an orphan battery. I am taking this camera on my camino this fall--but will chain it to my pack!!
 

countrycasita

New Member
I had the same worries about DSLR withdrawal symptoms but decided that 3kg or so of camera and lenses was way too heavy and I bought a Canon G12 point and shoot. This has a very good reputation as a camera which professionals use as a small pocketable alternative to their big DSLR. I bought two extra (non canon) batteries which lasted well, and I was happy with the quality of my shots. I only did the first part of the Camino (to Logrono) and am returning in September to complete it but you can see some of my shots on flickr (http://www.flickr.com/photos/countrycasita)
Paul
 
I walked Pamplona to Logroño in September last year and brought a DSLR with me. A Nikon D90 with the 18-105mm kit lens, to be exact. And I was very glad I took it with me as I got some great shots with it. But, I also didn't carry all my gear on my back, I sent some ahead. Otherwise I'm not sure I could have justified the weight. The camera and lens weigh nearly 1,3kg, which is a lot if you try to go by the 10% of your body weight rule.

Personally though, I'd bring a DSLR again.
Here's a link to some of my images, for those who are interested; my Camino Set on Flickr.


Hilda
 

sternenstrasse

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP-SdC (11-12/2009)
In the winter of 2009 I walked the Camino from StJPdP to Santiago with only a Canon G7 plus 2 extra batteries and a battery loader. I think that this camera took decent pictures but it could have been a bit smaller and lighter, though. I used to pack the camera in a zipper freezer bag (humidity protection!) and carried it in one of the pockets of my pants so that I was able to instantly grab my camera and take pictures without taking my backpack off. Also, I took a portable three-fold connector plug with me to be able to let someone else load his phone and/or camera while mine was loading; not all albergues are equiped with enough power outlets.

If I would walk the Camino again, I would do it the same, but maybe take an even lighter camera with me!
 

renegadepilgrim

Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler
Camino(s) past & future
2010: Camino Frances, 2011: Santo Domingo de la Calzada (Hospitalera), 2012: Camino Portuguese from Porto, 2015: Camino Norte
My next Camino in 2012(and this fall 2011 when I serve as a hospitalera), I plan to take a micro 4/3 camera I bought. It's an Olympus PEN EPL-1 and I LOVE IT!!! It's way better than my Canon G10 (I hear the G12s do better in low light) and it takes amazing pictures. I've been using it for travel back home and I love it so much. You can also buy lenses for it, and it can use different brand lenses with an adapter. My plan is to have a prime and a zoom and call it good. Weighs less than a DSLR and takes great pics.
 

Pieces

Veteran Member
I had absolutely no doubt when deciding wether or not to bring my Nikon D90 on the camino. It was a definit no-go, and weight wasn't the main reason.

Usually when I bring my camera I get so caught up in chasing the perfect picture that it takes focus from just being in and feeling a place. So i brought no camera except what was in my cell phone (crappy camera btw) the pictures suffered, but they are good enough as reminders, and the main point: My focus on the camino was, not on taking pictures, but on the way, just as I had intended.

I may get a better phone for next time but in the meantime I am planning a Photo expedition to New York in the fall, and I will definitely stop by BH to stock up on gear too :p
 

Bikeguy

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to SJPP via velo, June 2010
I would recommend taking a quality compact camera (and these are quite inexpensive now) rather than the DSLR. You are much more likely to quickly and easily take a photo with the compact in situations where it may seem too much trouble to dig out and fire up the DSLR. On my cycle tour from Le Puy to SJPP I had a compact (in my handlebar bag or pocket) and was able to capture many more 'moments' than my companion who had his DSLR buries deep and protection in his pannier. than said he did get some great shots when time and comditions allowed. Just my two cents worth.
Enjoy your camino!
 

daesdaemar

Camino-holic
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles - twice
I have a Nikon D80 and cannot imagine having taken it on the Camino. I was constantly taking pictures and I never would have been able to have the weight or bulkiness of it in my hands or around my neck.
Instead, I took my wife's Canon Elph. It took great pictures and was a pleasure to use. I was able to use it on a moment's notice to catch that "great" picture.
 

John14

New Member
I agree with Pieces. Having a DSLR will just make you stop and try to find the perfect shot. You'll waste a lot of time with that. The best is to just take a regular digital camera. With those you can just point and shoot as your walking and not care if it looks great or not. Lots of them now can give the good focus effect that comes with a DSLR. The DSLR also isn't worth because of its weight, obviously. One thing you guys should think about is just bringing an iPhone or smart phone. They take great photos and you can email them when you have wifi or if you use 3G. I had mine on my trip and it was really worth it.
 

Irlan

New Member
I had once my D90 + 35 f/1.8 on the Camino.
I carried them with a Lowepro Nova shoulder bag (a good little shoulder bag, with rain cover).
That worked and I'm happy with the pictures ...

However, my last time on the Camino I took only a little compact camera "point and shoot", a Lumix LX5. It's only about 200 gr (the D90 was around 1kg) and I'm happy with the pictures too.

I mean, I know that It's not the same quality of image, not the same dynamic range or depth of view. But a little point and shoot camera is a good way to take more pictures, more discretely, so I took more pictures of the others Pilgrims, more pictures walking etc ...

At home I have lot of photography staff, but I though that, may be, the spirit of the Camino was to try to do more or better with less items. It was like a little challenge, like those photographers who had covered a wedding with the camera of their cell phone. ;)

I know it's easyer to say than to do, but the most important is not the type of camera, it's the eye of the photographer, it's to shoot at the good moment (what Cartier Bresson called the "instant décisif"), to work the compositions etc ...
 

jirit

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
On my first camino I took my wife's small Panasonic camera which takes some great photos.
It was a light weight DSLR camera and relative easy to use.

However when we did the Via Francigena and later when I returned to Spain this past May and June to do the camino once again I took my trusty Nikon D70. Yes it is heavy but it works and works well for me and found I took better photos with it.

I carried the D70 in a waist belt fanny pack, almost anyway I went. I did consider using a standard camera bag but as you are experiencing they sometimes are more of a pain than a convenience. The fanny pack fits around my waist and it makes it easy to pull out the camera when I want to take some photos.

Obviously I also decided to go with one telescoping lens that could cover a wide range of situations, to keep this simple

You can see the photos I took from most recent camino here:
https://picasaweb.google.com/1094336834 ... ntiago2011

And from the Via Francigena in Italy here:
http://photo.net/photodb/presentation?p ... _id=513098

In one or two of the photos you can see the camera and the fanny pack I was using.
 

sprawls

New Member
I carried both my DSLR and compact cameras on the trail. The DSLR I clipped to my backpack or anywhere else where it was going to be readily accessible without being annoying (you don't want it bashing into your body with every step!) and the compact sat in it's bag which the chest strap of my backpack loops through. I carry two cameras so I have both lens types readily available - no stuffing around with removing bags and refitting lenses. I had no problem carrying both cameras or with security.
Oh, I did not take chargers - I made sure all 4 batteries were fully charged before I set off. They lasted me the 33 days I was away for.
 

moranbh

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012
Bring your camera!! I took Cannon DSLR and I can't imagine walking without it. I've attached it to the front of my backpack using the waist straps and it was available and easy to use. If you like taking picture, don't think about it - just take it! it is a bit heavy, but worth it on every step of the way. Just consider more time walking as you won't be able to stop every minute to take a picture :)
Buen Camino!!
 

Vlui

New Member
I read many post in different topics regarding safety. If I'm right all valuables should be put into the sleeping bag during the night. In case of small things: cash, passport, credit card there is no problem, but where to put the dslr? How to shower with a SLR?
 

Ella_leah

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2013)
Although I am yet to do my Camino, I have done quite a lot of tramping/hinking in New Zealand and some in Australia. I recently completed 9 days of a very difficult muddy and slippery walk around Stewart Island in NZ. My husband and I are both very keen photographers and have quite a lot of camera equipment - actually heaps!

Over the years we have debated over what camera equipment to take on each tramp we do. I have finally reached a point that I have exactly the equipment that works for me. I have a Canon Mark III 5D and an f4 24 - 105mm P lens. Depending on how long I am walking for I will usually take and extra battery with me (fully charged - I once missed this vital step and was devastated when we reached the top of the mountain and went to take the victory shot!).

I carry my camera in an old Lowepro TZL1 camera case. I have the shoulder strap across my body, but take the weight of the camera by attaching it to my waist belt. This works extremely well for me. The camera sits on your waist positioned between your legs so that when you are scarmbling it is not hitting your legs. In light rain this still works, but in drenching rain it goes into the pack. It is easy to access and I often don't even do it up all the way when the walking is easy and the shots abound.

My husband had tried a waterproof dry bag case that you can also get a chest harness for (which will also work for the Lowepro). He didn't hate it, but on this walk he decided to take a point and shoot instead (we were walking for 9 days with all our food, cookers, fuel, pots and pans and quite a lot of safety and first aid gear - it's a very remote walk) because of the weight. To be honest he was disappointed in the shots that he got in comparison to mine. Although I was packing 23kgs I still didn't regret taking it! I was the one that got the shot of the Kiwi (the bird type!) in the bush!

I should also say that I did slip a couple of times and once it was upside down in a gully. Although the camera did hit something it was fine! :)

I would never walk without mine, but I do have to point out however that we know what we are doing with our DSLRs and we have good quality (pro) lenses as well. A lot depends on the lens and if you are thinking of just taking the standard lens from a camera kit, there might not be anything in it for you. Also if you don't take it off the Auto setting then I would say save the weight and take a point and shoot.

Like anything it is personal choice - it took me a while to work out the best lens, but the f4 24 - 105 gives me the best balance while still being a great lens. It is also lighter than the 24 - 70!!

In terms of other bits that you need I have it down to the following - 1 cleaning cloth, 1 spare battery, 2 spare cards (my camera takes 2 cards) and I throw in a lip balm to have easy access during the day!

Like everything it all comes down to personal objectives - personally at least 60% of why I tramp is to take photos! If a photo from an Iphone will do it for you - then go for it!
 

Glenn Curry

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2012) (2013)
I walked with my Sony Alpha 200 last year with 2 lenses and battery charger. When weighing my pack, I included these items and still managed to keep the total weight just below 10 kilos. While walking each day, I kept the camera around my neck ready for use.

Someone here has said it's about the eye, not the camera. This is simply wrong. Taking excellent pictures on the Camino is easy. The route is so relentlessly beautiful, you can't fail! However, depending on the quality of the prints (or files) you want when you get home, a small little pocket digital is NOT going to give the same results as a DSLR.

It's not about the eye, it's about what you want when you are done. If you want Facebook ready photos, then take a little pocket camera. Hell, just use your iPhone and upload them immediately. If you want something you can blowup and frame, or just a high quality photograph, you'll need better.

I never felt my camera equipment, or any of my stuff for that matter, was at risk of being stolen. Simply because I had a little bag big enough for my wallet, passport, lens - the important stuff - and carried my camera with me. Most evenings you will be in lovely villages or towns and will want to snap a few photos.

As always, let common sense dictate how you store and manage your belongings.

But in my experience, a DSLR camera was not a hinderance at all. I didn't have to stop to get the perfect shot, the perfect shots made themselves apparent and thus I would stop for 2 to 5 seconds, point, frame, click. Hell, some of my photos were taken while I was still moving. If the shutter speed and memory card speed is fast enough, this is possible. Also, my battery was never at 100% charge and plugging it in for 15 or 20 minutes every few days kept me going to whole way.

It really comes down to what you consider to be a quality photograph and how committed you are to getting it. Do you just want portable memories, or do you want more?
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
I walked Pamplona to Logroño in September last year and brought a DSLR with me. A Nikon D90 with the 18-105mm kit lens, to be exact. And I was very glad I took it with me as I got some great shots with it. But, I also didn't carry all my gear on my back, I sent some ahead. Otherwise I'm not sure I could have justified the weight. The camera and lens weigh nearly 1,3kg, which is a lot if you try to go by the 10% of your body weight rule.

Personally though, I'd bring a DSLR again.
Here's a link to some of my images, for those who are interested; my Camino Set on Flickr.


Hilda
Really enjoyed seeing your photo's on Flicr - very good
 

m108

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011-2016
sometimes you look through the lens makes it even more present, sometimes this is separate from the "here and now" and not see things that are not in the lens. For me there is no comparison between DSLR and compact camera. DSLR is definitely a class apart. I've decided that it does not take, because I knew that Will be to much for me too stop, preparing, cleaning, care, weight ..... so I was enough camera on the cell phone. I was satisfied. It was enaght to shere my memories with friends and to enjoy myself in memories. I know that I once went with a view to shooting be my central preoccupation in Camino - then it will be with me my DSLR!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Well, I think it all depends on what you want/can do etc., as (in part) @m108 emphasized. I carried (and will this year) my Ol'Canon EOS300D with 2 lenses (f3,5, 18-55mm & f4,5, 90-300mm). Several reasons for that:
- I do not believe in "buybuybuybuybuybuy" if the old stuff is still working and doing just great,
- I d0 have a great photo pack which I carry in front. It's kind of combo hip&neck pack, which means that it's mainly attached to me around my waist, but has also a strap that goes around my neck to even the weight,
- in that case I have 2 separate compartments. In right one I'm carrying my zoom lens and in the left one there's always 0'75l plastic bottle filled with water so I don't have to stop for drink (well, I admit, I do - but that's for a beer...).

I think it's actually kind of Aarn Backpack philosophy, but for much less expenses ;)

K1


PS (Also I still can't imagine me taking photos looking at the back of that "smart gadget", I can't see anything :D, old school photographer I guess...)
 
So I haven't read this whole thread, so I am sorry if I repeat that which has already been said. My advice is simply that using a DLSR on the camino will be more of a hinderance. I am a photographer, qualified in Multimedia. I love my camera, and I would never usually use a compact camera. I am not boasting my skill, I am merely letting you know that Photography is very important to me, so my advice does not come lightly. However you really need to consider the size and weight of the camera, and the lens that you are bringing. Are you bringing a low weight 1100d, or a professional body? Are you bringing one lens, with a long zoom range? This will surely not provide you with the quality of various smaller lens, but of course then you have more bulk and weight. If you are going to compromise quality then bringing a compact should be more than enough, especially since most compacts come with a lot more control over settings than they use too.

As you said, how would your carry your gear? In your ruck, would mean you need to take the ruck off every time you want to shoot, and it also means that leaving your ruck sitting down outside a bar or café is risky business. Carrying an extra case for your gear can get in your way?

Bringing an DSLR doesn't just mean the camera; it means bringing lens, extra batteries, a battery charger, extra cards, Lens/sensor cleaning cloths/sprays/kits. Maybe even a tripod?

Of course it completely depends on your reason for the camino, but for me, as a photographer, I think a DSLR would have hampered my enjoyment. I walked the camino, and then returned to various locations a year later for photographic purposes. I know this sounds very negative, and in the end you must decide for yourself, it is merely my two cents worth. I hope whatever you do, that you have a fantastic journey.

EDIT: If you do bring it, check out https://www.lenstag.com I am not affiliated to this website in anyway, but I think it is brilliant.

Chris
 

IvorL

New Member
I want to take my DSLR camera with me when I leave for the camino next year. But I'm still not sure where to leave it during the walk. In my backpack is not really an option, because then I have to take the backpack of every time I want to shoot a picture. I do have a LowePro Toploader bag, which I think I can expand with a belt, but I don't think it's comfortable to wear with my backpack, because of all the straps coming together on my waist. I don't feel a lot for taking my compact camera. Does anyone have tips on this, or has anyone here took their SLR with them on the Camino. How did you transport your camera? Thanks!
While many folks have, I decided against carrying a dSLR and I am glad that I did. I carried a Panasonic ZS8 P&S which was ideal because it was always ready on my pack belt and small enough to stow in my small bag when off trail and in the shower, etc. The image quality was certainly good enough. A dSLR would have added too much weight, would have been too difficult to conceal, and too easy to steal, in my opinion.
 

HeidiAnn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, June 2015
Thank you for bumping up this thread. I've been see-sawing back and forth on this issue. I'm not sure that I am any clearer on what I am going to do, but I do appreciate the new perspectives. I can imagine going without a phone on the Camino much more easily than I can imagine going without my DSLR. The weight, though. And the potential for theft. Gah! I do have a year to decide. That's good, right?
 

Karma_m

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
sept "2013"
Hi all, I compromised and took my Olympus OM-D camera with one smaller zoom lens. It is not as big and bulky as my bigger DSLR but takes comparable photos. I also had the AARN back pack system so I carried it in one of my front pouches making it really easy to pull out and shoot... which I did constantly....Can't imagine not taking a camera!
 

NicoZ

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
It's like anything else you need to decide what you want. What you're willing to compromise on.

There are small DSLRs. You can stick a small prime on them and the total weight might be less then a water bottle. Will that not be enough for you? Are you going birding?
 

HeidiAnn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, June 2015
It's like anything else you need to decide what you want. What you're willing to compromise on.

There are small DSLRs. You can stick a small prime on them and the total weight might be less then a water bottle. Will that not be enough for you? Are you going birding?

I'm not sure if this was addressed to anyone in particular or not, but no birding for me. :) The small DSLR looks like an ideal solution, but affording to go on the Camino itself once the time comes is something of leap of faith for me. A new camera is not in the budget at this time. I was thinking of just taking the 18--55mm kit lens, and if I feel I can spare the weight, the 50 mm prime. I have a lower end, older DSLR, so it is not nearly as heavy as many higher end cameras. This thread has given me some good options for how to carry it conveniently. Still unclear on how to shower with it, though. :D
 

marylynn

Ontario Canada
Camino(s) past & future
2011-2019 CF, Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 HærvejenDK
So I haven't read this whole thread, so I am sorry if I repeat that which has already been said. My advice is simply that using a DLSR on the camino will be more of a hinderance. I am a photographer, qualified in Multimedia. I love my camera, and I would never usually use a compact camera. I am not boasting my skill, I am merely letting you know that Photography is very important to me, so my advice does not come lightly. However you really need to consider the size and weight of the camera, and the lens that you are bringing. Are you bringing a low weight 1100d, or a professional body? Are you bringing one lens, with a long zoom range? This will surely not provide you with the quality of various smaller lens, but of course then you have more bulk and weight. If you are going to compromise quality then bringing a compact should be more than enough, especially since most compacts come with a lot more control over settings than they use too.

As you said, how would your carry your gear? In your ruck, would mean you need to take the ruck off every time you want to shoot, and it also means that leaving your ruck sitting down outside a bar or café is risky business. Carrying an extra case for your gear can get in your way?

Bringing an DSLR doesn't just mean the camera; it means bringing lens, extra batteries, a battery charger, extra cards, Lens/sensor cleaning cloths/sprays/kits. Maybe even a tripod?

Of course it completely depends on your reason for the camino, but for me, as a photographer, I think a DSLR would have hampered my enjoyment. I walked the camino, and then returned to various locations a year later for photographic purposes. I know this sounds very negative, and in the end you must decide for yourself, it is merely my two cents worth. I hope whatever you do, that you have a fantastic journey.

EDIT: If you do bring it, check out https://www.lenstag.com I am not affiliated to this website in anyway, but I think it is brilliant.

Chris
I totally agree. I left my DSLR+lenses at home and was more than happy with my Canon G11 and even happier the following year with my G12, which fit nicely close at hand in my jacket pocket when I walked in the fall, and in a fanny pack when I walked in warm weather. I agree that a DSLR will be a big hindrance to the whole experience. Some inexpensive compact cameras these days can perform quite impressively and allow you to stay 'in' the Camino instead of spending time juggling a camera and equipment. You will have fun, no matter what!
 

jeffnd

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2014
I was going to bring DSLR, but I got a really good deal on the discontinued Canon EOS M. My only complaint is that when it rained, I had to have it packed away and couldn't use it. I wish I had brought one of those cheap waterproof point and shoots along too.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I'm looking seriously at the Olympus TG-3 which comes out this June. It is waterproof, freezeproof, and shockproof (within limits), has great GPS, WiFi, iOS/Android integration, takes additional lenses, etc. All at 247 grams. Not DSLR, but ideal for my (lack of) photography skills and for the camino.

http://www.getolympus.com/us/en/digitalcameras/tough/tg-3.html
 

drvnsmiln

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP - SdC '14
SdC - Fin-Muxia. '14
Sarria - SdC '14
VdlP '17
Levante '19
Portugues '19
Yes, after a lot of research, I am seriously considering the TG 3 as well. I am a professional photographer and normally shoot with the Canon 5D mk II. But, (and the decision is killing me) this is my PILGRIMAGE not a photo expedition. Although photography allows me to express my gratitude and share my wonder of Creation with others, I feel that the Camino is more personal and I want to be more inward focused rather on thinking about my heavy gear. That said, it is, for me, a VERY hard decision to make. (It has crossed my mind to return to the Camino another time just to photograph - but this first time is for me.)
 

jrm

Active Member
Though I have not walked the camino, i feel like I am in the midst of planning one. I absolutely love using my DSLR when I travel. I've lugged them all across the US and all across the world. I once took a trip where I brought my older DSLR as well as a point and shoot. Once home, I realized that of the two cameras I carried, I would have gladly left the point and shoot (a quite nice, fully manual one) at home. I found that I actually missed having my nicer DSLR and lens with me and would have rather lugged that than than my older/lighterbody. So, as I plan forward, I really think that for me, bringing along my 6D and one lens is the answer. I think with the 6D and a light lens (say a cheap 28mm 1.8), the combined weight is still under a kilo. As much as I love my trusty 24-70... I feel that might push the weight over the top, but maybe still. But, the idea is one body, two batteries, one lens. I'm planning on using one of these (https://peakdesignltd.com/store/capturepro) to keep it accessible. If it rains, I guess I'll just put in in the backpack, though I've shot the 6d in less than ideal conditions.

The benefits I think about when judging whether or not to carry the 6D is that I think the camino will likely be a once in a lifetime event for me. I thoroughly enjoy looking back at my travels, and I'd want to document my journey as well as possible, and with as high a quality as I can do so. I often make travel films as well, so having the capabilities of the 6D is a bonus. The fact that it can geotag my photos is also a bonus. Also, the wifi feature means I can easily connect to it with my iphone and share pictures that way. So, in short, I think I'll carry mine. Hopefully I can back up the pictures (jpeg) in case the camera grows feet and I lose access to my RAW files along the way. But I've regretted not traveling with my DSLR before.. and I'd certainly not want to regret this trip. I see it as a tool to enhance my pilgrimage. To each his own, and i may be singing a different tune one of these days. But this is where my reasoning lies now at least.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Professional photographers front balance pockets from Aarn packs. There are also camera pockets for those who don't need long lens
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Yes! Lol.... No connection whatsoever. Except as a customer. I just came across this thread and knew about the photographic pockets from the Aarn website. Thought someone might find it useful. I just use an iPhone. But years ago my daughter, who was doing a Masters in Photography, took her big camera and lenses on Camino. We finished up with very few photos because it was such a pain to get the camera out.
 

CaptBuddy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2012, again Fall 2014.
Lots of good advice here.

I carried a DSLR and am happy I did. Because I was able to shoot RAW format images for processing later. I have some gorgeous shots. The camera, charger and extra batteries did add weight, but nothing uncomfortable.
If you take images in jpg, then a good point and shot will do fine.
For our next Camino in Sept./Oct. this year, I've bought a Sony A6000 which shoots jpg, RAW and HD video. Camera, lens, batteries (2) and small charger are less than half the weight of the DSLR and gear I used in 2012.

My advice on sending something from the US to Santiago; DON'T!
We sent boxes of clothes and gear ahead to my cousin in Santander, and Spanish Customs would not release them (a common procedure to get you to pay import fees). If you take the 'bigger' camera with you and mail it within Spain, you should be fine.
Buen Camino.
 

dustylee

Member
I completely understand your wish to take a camera that takes photos that you really like: I think it is hard for people who are not photographers to understand how much they add to a trip for those of us who are very connected to photography. On both of my former Caminos I did take my SLR (& was very happy with the quality of the pictures) & I used crampon clips to hook the carrying case to my front straps so that it was both protected & very available. This year I bought a small Leica which takes great photos (although probably not as good in low light) & I am thinking that I will still carry it in the case in my front (for the same reasons you mentioned: a pain to have to get it out every time you want to make a picture). Everyone needs to walk the Camino in the way that it is most meaningful for them: I love taking photos & keeping a blog & think it would lessen the experience for me if I did not do those things. Others prefer to have no electronics. There is no RIGHT way to do this: so follow what you know best about yourself & find a way to take the camera you want. Buen Camino!
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
I left the DSLR at home and took a Canon SX150is. It has a 14.1 mp sensor, 12x zoom, has PASM controls, takes HD video, and uses AA batteries so I never worried about finding an outlet for charging (Tip: take AA lithium batteries -- they last many times longer than alkalines, but are hard to find along the Camino, so take spares from home). I carried it in a small pouch attached to the waist belt of my fanny pack rather than to my backpack -- that way it was always with me if I left my backpack in the albergue while sightseeing. Yes, I gave up the ability to acquire RAW captures and the small sensor meant sacrificing depth of field flexibility and dynamic range, but I seldom took the time to walk around looking for just the right angle or wait for the perfect light -- I just composed the best I could, tried to be mindful of the light, and shot away. Perhaps the results were not worthy of display in a gallery, but they told the story of our Camino. After all, it wasn't a photo expedition, it was a pilgrimage.

But I can relate to photo enthusiasts who feel like they'd like something more elaborate or "better" than a compact camera. Perhaps a good compromise would be a mirrorless micro 4/3 camera with interchangeable lenses. Since returning from our Camino last fall, I picked up a basic Olympus E-PM2 with two lenses (12-42mm and 40-150mm) for less than $400. It's tiny -- the body is actually smaller and lighter than a Canon G-series compact or the SX150 that I took on the Camino, although the lenses do add to the overall bulk. While the jury is still out on a final recommendation, so far I have been generally pleased with it. This camera and lens format might be an ideal solution for at least semi-serious photography when carrying a big DSLR kit with multiple lenses is not practical.
 

Rambler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
I left the DSLR at home and took a Canon SX150is. It has a 14.1 mp sensor, 12x zoom, has PASM controls, takes HD video, and uses AA batteries so I never worried about finding an outlet for charging (Tip: take AA lithium batteries -- they last many times longer than alkalines, but are hard to find along the Camino, so take spares from home). I carried it in a small pouch attached to the waist belt of my fanny pack rather than to my backpack -- that way it was always with me if I left my backpack in the albergue while sightseeing. Yes, I gave up the ability to acquire RAW captures and the small sensor meant sacrificing depth of field flexibility and dynamic range, but I seldom took the time to walk around looking for just the right angle or wait for the perfect light -- I just composed the best I could, tried to be mindful of the light, and shot away. Perhaps the results were not worthy of display in a gallery, but they told the story of our Camino. After all, it wasn't a photo expedition, it was a pilgrimage.

But I can relate to photo enthusiasts who feel like they'd like something more elaborate or "better" than a compact camera. Perhaps a good compromise would be a mirrorless micro 4/3 camera with interchangeable lenses. Since returning from our Camino last fall, I picked up a basic Olympus E-PM2 with two lenses (12-42mm and 40-150mm) for less than $400. It's tiny -- the body is actually smaller and lighter than a Canon G-series compact or the SX150 that I took on the Camino, although the lenses do add to the overall bulk. While the jury is still out on a final recommendation, so far I have been generally pleased with it. This camera and lens format might be an ideal solution for at least semi-serious photography when carrying a big DSLR kit with multiple lenses is not practical.
Carp:
I am planning to take the Canon also. If it had a viewfinder, I think it would be perfect. Any secrets to maximizing the life on the batteries? I also just looked at the Olympus 4/3 with a pancake lens, but was not ready to spend that much money. I will be interested in hearing your opinion on the camera. Pleas give a review.
Rambler
 

Bajaracer

Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
If you want to bring your DSLR, I'd say ditch other items in your pack to offset the weight of a DSLR and accessories, there was one pilgrim who sacrificed other items in her pack so she could carry her Macbook Air 13" (she was writing a book).
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
Carp:
I am planning to take the Canon also. If it had a viewfinder, I think it would be perfect. Any secrets to maximizing the life on the batteries? I also just looked at the Olympus 4/3 with a pancake lens, but was not ready to spend that much money. I will be interested in hearing your opinion on the camera. Pleas give a review.
Rambler
Hi Rambler,
The only secret I know for maximizing the batteries is to use the lithiums. If you have a viewfinder, you can turn off the LCD, but the SX150 doesn't have an OVF. Two sets of Energizer Ultimate lithiums (4 batteries) lasted me from St Jean to Leon; after that I had to start using regular alkalines and it seemed like I was changing them every second or third day. I don't know if the alkalines I grt here (Energizer, Rayovac) are better quality than the Panasonics and Eroskis I was buying in Spain after that or what, but they just weren't giving me the life I expected. Regarding the Oly 4/3, I'd opt for the 12-42mm lens rather than the pancake just to get the range. With the 2x crop factor that gives 24-84mm equivalent. I assume you're talking about the 17/2.8 pancake, which would certainly give you a more compact package and better low-light performance for interiors, but personally I'd go for for the flexibility of the zoom. For low-light, I usually brace the camera (or use a lightweight gorillapod) and use the 2-second timer. On a package like mine, I'd be tempted to leave the 40-150 at home; however, it's nice to have the long focal length to get things like details on some of the cathedrals. I'll be taking the Oly on an upcoming trip where it will be my walk-around camera, so I'll have an opportunity to give it a pretty good workout. If I decide to really invest in the 4/3 format, I'd be sure to get something with an electronic viewfinder -- the E-PM2 doesn't have one and I miss it.
Buen Camino,
Jim
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
My advice is to go really small instead of bringing the big camera. It can/might inflict on your personal comfort and your own process. I found myself in two minds every time I wanted to take a picture. I had it in a pouch just in front of me, and sometimes I simply let it go. And I am such a sucker for any good picture that need to be taken....If your are in the photographer mood, you are an observer. And I felt such a participant, living and breathing the whole trip with my daily crises and physical ups and downs that I simply waited till I was sationary to bring out my precious camera...
I brought a small Fujifim x10 and even that I found too bulky and just in the way....
Niels
 

Melensdad

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 SJPdP to Santiago, Finisterre. Hadrian's Way, 2015. Sections of the AT + National & State Park trails.
Everyone thanks again for your tips about the DSLR. My final conclusion is I'm gonna take it with me. I'm taking at least my 50mm lens with me, and maybe maybe my 55-200mm for some detailed pics (but maybe I'll just leave it at home, because the pics I'll be making on the way will be mainly landscapes. I don't worry that much about the weight, the body is 700 gr and the 50mm weighs about 115 gr. So less than a kilo. I think I can live with that.
Get a PEAK DESIGNS Capture Camera Clip.

I've posted about it and used mine on a hike up Pilot Mountain in North Carolina and then again across England following the Hadrian's Wall National Trail. Never even noticed the camera getting in the way but at the same time it was so handy I could grab it off the mount and snap photos that I would have otherwise missed if I had used a camera bag/case. Its also very strong/very secure. Claims to hold 200#, can't prove that, but I can say that I never felt my camera ever came/felt loose, ever flopped around, or ever bothered me.

Another member here has the same mount, used it on his Camino and posted up photos.

What I will say is that the clip was so handy that I could so easily grab and shoot a photo, then replace the camera into the mount that it never got in the way of a conversation I was having, never required me to stop and fiddle around (as I would have to do with a zippered case), and once you get the hang of it you can keep walking while you grab the camera, shoot the photo and replace the camera! I could even do it with my trekking poles still on wrists!!!

I was able to shoot many more photos because of the system, all without it really getting into the way of the walking/hiking, or without it disrupting conversations.

Here is my thread on it, I've had mine 2 months and am a firm believer. ==> https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ding-camera-to-pack-straps.32263/#post-308088 If you scroll through the thread you will see that i posted some detailed photos of the mount, mounted on my pack, with my camera attached.

Here is another thread with some observations and photos (not by me) >>> https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/back-a-few-pictures.33915/#post-308329
 
Last edited:

pjacobi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015, St. Jean Pied de Port to Burgos
2016, Burgos to Ponferrada
2017, Ponferrada to Atlantic Ocean
I prefer the Canon G series compact cameras because they support full manual control and can write JPG and/or Raw files.

-Paul
 

Patrick2by4

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016
With the advent of mirrorless cameras, you can get DSLR quality in a lighter package. I have a full frame Nikon d800 with a 24-70 lense. Great setup if I am willing to carry 4.2 lbs. The mirrorless cropped sensor Sony a6300 with 16-50 lens (24-75 when converted) weighs less than 13 oz. with great picture quality (although not leader of the pack quality of the d800). But to save 3lbs of weight, I am willing to make the sacrifice. The Sony actually has much better video quality though, a real selling point for me.
 

Melensdad

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 SJPdP to Santiago, Finisterre. Hadrian's Way, 2015. Sections of the AT + National & State Park trails.
With the advent of mirrorless cameras, you can get DSLR quality in a lighter package. I have a full frame Nikon d800 with a 24-70 lense. Great setup if I am willing to carry 4.2 lbs. The mirrorless cropped sensor Sony a6300 with 16-50 lens (24-75 when converted) weighs less than 13 oz. with great picture quality (although not leader of the pack quality of the d800). But to save 3lbs of weight, I am willing to make the sacrifice. The Sony actually has much better video quality though, a real selling point for me.
I use a Mirrorless Panasonic Lumix GX-1 with interchangeable lenses.

The mirrorless cameras are pretty amazing in that they provide superior image quality, and yet retain the compact size & light weight, that is essential for lightweight hiking.
 

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When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 56 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 200 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 329 24.9%
  • June

    Votes: 96 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 24 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.0%
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    Votes: 381 28.8%
  • October

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  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%

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