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Hoka Shoe Owners: Speedgoat 5 or the Bondi 8?

The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
last shoe question ever. :D

I am going to go try both on but before I do, just curious what your thoughts were on both!
The information that will probably make your decision for you, assuming you're leaning toward the Bondi: Does the Bondi have Megagrip soles like the Speedgoat? Not all Hoka shoes do.

I will never walk without my Speedgoats again, they don't slip on wet pavement AT ALL and it feels like walking on marshmallows, but with no lack of support for the foot. If I will be on me feet all day, even around my hometown, I wear my Speedgoat shoes.

Of course, if you will never encounter wet marble on a rainy day on the trail, nor wet asphalt-paved downhill paths on a rainy day), nor need to walk on wet sidewalks in a place where people throw water on the sidewalk (Israel), well, then it doesn't matter if you have the nonslip soles.

Buen camino
 
The information that will probably make your decision for you, assuming you're leaning toward the Bondi: Does the Bondi have Megagrip soles like the Speedgoat? Not all Hoka shoes do.

I will never walk without my Speedgoats again, they don't slip on wet pavement AT ALL and it feels like walking on marshmallows, but with no lack of support for the foot. If I will be on me feet all day, even around my hometown, I wear my Speedgoat shoes.

Of course, if you will never encounter wet marble on a rainy day on the trail, nor wet asphalt-paved downhill paths on a rainy day), nor need to walk on wet sidewalks in a place where people throw water on the sidewalk (Israel), well, then it doesn't matter if you have the nonslip soles.

Buen camino
Speedgoats have been my favorite so far. Haven't worn the Bondi's. They have more cushion so that's probably one factor. I'll double check about the megagrip soles. Good point.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
The information that will probably make your decision for you, assuming you're leaning toward the Bondi: Does the Bondi have Megagrip soles like the Speedgoat? Not all Hoka shoes do.

I will never walk without my Speedgoats again, they don't slip on wet pavement AT ALL and it feels like walking on marshmallows, but with no lack of support for the foot. If I will be on me feet all day, even around my hometown, I wear my Speedgoat shoes.

Of course, if you will never encounter wet marble on a rainy day on the trail, nor wet asphalt-paved downhill paths on a rainy day), nor need to walk on wet sidewalks in a place where people throw water on the sidewalk (Israel), well, then it doesn't matter if you have the nonslip soles.

Buen camino
Okay i think you're right. I think I'll stick with the Speedgoats due to the Megagrip soles. It doesn't look like the Bondis have it
 
I have tried Speedgoat, brilliant shoes, my only concern is the more grip you have, the less traction and durability, and for a long camino, you might need to get new shoes before reaching Santiago (that is how quickly the lugs can disappear).
There is this new trend to give grip and more grip above traction, but that means it is hard to get more than 400-500 miles of usage.
 
Got 500 km out of my speedgoats. Supriced me. Not good. The 500 km were fantastic.
Changed to Altra Olympus 4 with Wibram sole. Have walked up till today 600 km and they are still good.
 
Prepare for your next Camino on California's Santa Catalina Island, Oct 27 to Nov 2
Got 500 km out of my speedgoats. Supriced me. Not good. The 500 km were fantastic.
Changed to Altra Olympus 4 with Wibram sole. Have walked up till today 600 km and they are still good.
I have some Altras but the Hokas feel better on my feet. It's all personal preference of course.
 
The wide toebox is my best friend :) but of cource its personal
 
last shoe question ever. :D

I am going to go try both on but before I do, just curious what your thoughts were on both!
I tried them both last Spring. Didn't quite feel right, so I tried the Stinson 6--the most comfortable, blister free shoe I have ever worn. I did 700 miles on them this past summer on the Camino. Wide anti-blister toe box , and great cushioning, which was good for both hard surfaces and rocky terrain. No rock plate but with 37mm cushioning, it was effectively a rock plate.
 
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I've worn Bondi 6s and 7s. The soles are pretty smooth, and will slip on a variety of surfaces. When i took the 7s on high desert trails, I had to be careful . If you're concerned about trail footing, use the Speedgoats. And watch the upper foot area below the toes. Thats the widest part of my feet, and the 7s were tight after a lot of roadwork.

Buen Camino
 
I’ve worn the 3 mentioned.
Hoka Bondi …great for comfort. . Soft as clouds but didn’t feel as stable and sole didn’t give me confidence with slipping. Although wide toe box - the soft top came adrift from the bottom section at the side where I have a slight bulge. They looked new still but no way to fix that problem.

Altras. Best for toe space / very roomy and comfy in that regard but not a lot of cushioning and too flat for me (zero drop). I couldn’t get used to zero drop while training and my calves ached — so they never made it to a camino with me.

Speedgoats. Firm ., secure .. good grip sole . Not as soft as Hokas but more stable. They were still comfy tho -
I’d choose them again.

None of them save you from tripping tho…😉….
Buen camino.
 
Last edited:
what season and route/how far are you walking? It would also be nice to have responses include this information.
I always wear Hokas but in the rainy season I wear a boot. In my low cut ones the foam in the heel feel apart when it got wet and I got a terrible heel blister…. Only one on 9 Caminos. We had to duck tape the heel and I hobbled along. So I think season and distance are important in choosing footwear.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I've used the Hoka Stinson 4 (CF Sept/Oct 2018), 5 (CP Sept/Oct 2021) and 6 (San Salvador/Primitivo May 2022) and they've been amazing. The 6 is far more cushy than the 5. The lugs did wear down, but I continued to use them without any issue. Nice wide toe box. Super thick soles were great for walking in rain and mud without it creeping up and into the shoe. Discovered Injiji toe socks on this last Camino and I no longer need to paper tape/vaseline my feet each morning. Just bought another pair of 6's for my planned return in May 2023!
 
I’ve worn the 3 mentioned.
Hoka Bondi …great for comfort. . Soft as clouds but didn’t feel as stable and sole didn’t give me confidence with slipping. Although wide toe box - the soft top came adrift from the bottom section at the side where I have a slight bulge. They looked new still but no way to fix that problem.

Altras. Best for toe space / very roomy and comfy in that regard but not a lot of cushioning and too flat for me (zero drop). I couldn’t get used to it in training and my calves ached — so they never made it to a camino with me.

Speedgoats. Firm ., secure .. good grip sole . Not as soft as Hokas but more stable. They were still comfy tho -
I’d choose them again.

Non of them save you from tripping 😉….
Buen camino.
Sorry for this slight hijacking of thread but @OzAnnie I've been thinking of you. How are you recovering?
 
I can’t recommend Speedgoat’ highly enough. Completed the Frances plus a few extra km at the end end of October this year (approx 1,000 km) without an issue of any kind. No slips on wet or uneven terrain and zero blisters. I did size up by almost a full size so there was plenty of room at the toe. I’m glad I did - no black toe nails…. And did I mention- no blisters.🥰

The shoes were toast by the end, but they got me through.
Not that you’ve asled, but I’d also recommend a pair of crocs for your shower/evening shoes. They are ugly for sure, but super comfy and really light. They are bulky, but just strap them to the outside of your pack and you’re good to go…..and you don’t have to dig into your pack when you reach your Albergue or want to give your feet a rest part way through your day.😊
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
I can’t recommend Speedgoat’ highly enough. Completed the Frances plus a few extra km at the end end of October this year (approx 1,000 km) without an issue of any kind. No slips on wet or uneven terrain and zero blisters. I did size up by almost a full size so there was plenty of room at the toe. I’m glad I did - no black toe nails…. And did I mention- no blisters.🥰

The shoes were toast by the end, but they got me through.
Not that you’ve asled, but I’d also recommend a pair of crocs for your shower/evening shoes. They are ugly for sure, but super comfy and really light. They are bulky, but just strap them to the outside of your pack and you’re good to go…..and you don’t have to dig into your pack when you reach your Albergue or want to give your feet a rest part way through your day.😊
I have a pair of croc sandals that err nice enough for eveningwear and shower shoes.
 
I wore the Stinson ATR last year on my camino from Cadiz to Santiago.....almost 1300 kilometres. They were totally thrashed by the end, but got me through. They are my go to for all hiking. I have worn hiking boots for my first camino, and my feet were unhappy. My second, I switched between boots and Hoka Challenger ATR. My third, I went with just the Hoka Stinson, and it was the best decision. They don't last as long, but for me the comfort is far more important. If I was to do another camino, I would take two pairs and alternate daily. The Hoka recovery slides are amazing for your down time as well.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
last shoe question ever. :D

I am going to go try both on but before I do, just curious what your thoughts were on both!
I wore Hokas on an AT hike and my feet and ankles wouldn’t forgive me. I walked the Camino in ‘21 and a trail friend started in Hokas and his feet hurt so badly that he bought new shoes and tossed the Hokas. Maybe rethinking your shoe choice will be a good idea.
 
what season and route/how far are you walking? It would also be nice to have responses include this information.
I always wear Hokas but in the rainy season I wear a boot. In my low cut ones the foam in the heel feel apart when it got wet and I got a terrible heel blister…. Only one on 9 Caminos. We had to duck tape the heel and I hobbled along. So I think season and distance are important in choosing footwear.
June 2023 CF from SJPDP
 
I wore Hokas on an AT hike and my feet and ankles wouldn’t forgive me. I walked the Camino in ‘21 and a trail friend started in Hokas and his feet hurt so badly that he bought new shoes and tossed the Hokas. Maybe rethinking your shoe choice will be a good idea.
Nah I have worn them. They feel great to me. Just more interested in Bondis feedback
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I wore the HOKA Speedgoat V5 on my 2022 San Salvador and Primitivo Caminos.They were great…right combination of comfort and grip with Vibram sole. Will for sure wear them again on future Caminos and likely on Coast to Coast walk in England in 2023.

I also wear HOKA Bondi V8 for all my city walking…very comfortable on hard surfaces and have worn the various Bondi versions for a few years.

Yes these shoes may not last as long as others however for me the trade off comfort vs cost is worth it.

Guy
 
I tried them both last Spring. Didn't quite feel right, so I tried the Stinson 6--the most comfortable, blister free shoe I have ever worn. I did 700 miles on them this past summer on the Camino. Wide anti-blister toe box , and great cushioning, which was good for both hard surfaces and rocky terrain. No rock plate but with 37mm cushioning, it was effectively a rock plate.
I too use the Stinsons and feel they are the best shoes I have ever written, hands down
 
I have worn hookers on five Caminos, and found them to be very comfortable. I wish I knew which models I wore that I was least. Satisfied with, I found that some did not dry at all, especially if they had a very thick tongue. I hope this helps.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I wore Hoka Kahas on my Camino Frances—they are mid height, waterproof, and had a wider toe than the other Hokas I tried. Loved them, but I did get a few blisters—wish I had known about the Injini toe socks. My choice was between the Hokas and the Altras and I SO wish there was a shoe with the toe box of the Altras and the cloud-like-feeling sole of the Hokas.

Buen Camino!
 
Wore Speedgoat 4 GTX for first 150 miles of VF in June 2022. When a series of rainstorms hit, the shoes turned out to be NOT good at keeping my feet dry. Blisters followed. Shoes didn't dry well overnight. Gave them to a hostel keeper after a quick detour to Paris to purchase Salomon Ultra X4... no more blisters for the next 400 miles when I stopped at the base of the Alps (Martigny). Next year, new Salomons and on to Rome.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I've worn Hoka Challengers and Speedgoats on different Caminos but have come to prefer the Speedgoats in a wide and half size larger than my every day (average width) shoes.
 
June 2023 CF from SJPDP
Lower chance of having lots of rain so that’s good. It’s seems that with all shoes that people wear them differently. I would guess there are a lot of factors; weight, pronation…..
Some of my Hoka friends get through a Camino on one pair, but for others they are toast. I haven’t personally worn the speedboat but I have a friend who swears by them. I’m a Stinson girl… we all have different feet/needs and each style meets those differently. I would definitely test a pair while training on all types of surfaces and see how they hold up over time for you.
 
I have tried Speedgoat, brilliant shoes, my only concern is the more grip you have, the less traction and durability, and for a long camino, you might need to get new shoes before reaching Santiago (that is how quickly the lugs can disappear).
There is this new trend to give grip and more grip above traction, but that means it is hard to get more than 400-500 miles of usage.
I'm wondering what you mean by "grip" and "traction". You seem to see them as having very different (and perhaps opposing) meanings - "the more grip you have, the less traction". When I tend to read them, I assume the meanings are equivalent, friction with the ground and the opposite of slipping and sliding on a smooth or slippery surface.
 
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The vibram sole of the Speedgoats will last much longer than non-vibram in my experience, and I have got at least 800 km out of every pair I have worn. They seem to grip well on wet and slippy surfaces and are very stable, supportive and durable.
 
Speedgoats have been my favorite so far. Haven't worn the Bondi's. They have more cushion so that's probably one factor. I'll double check about the megagrip soles. Good point.
I recently completed the San Salvador and the Primitivo in BONDI 7…..zero slippage despite mud, wet rocks, wet leaves. I was surprised. I dislike that each Bondi version is getting wider. Not sure I’ll buy version 8 or go to another model.
 
I too use the Stinsons and feel they are the best shoes I have ever written, hands down
Stinsons are $170 dollars. Are they like an upgraded Speedgoat? Insane price for a crosstrainer

My experience with the Speedgoat was that the outside was weak. After a time it felt like my foot was rolling outward / everting.

Brooks Caldera 5 feels more stable to me
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
last shoe question ever. :D

I am going to go try both on but before I do, just curious what your thoughts were on both!
Hoka Stinsons for the win. Just through out my Speegoats and am going back to Sinsons. The Speedgoats started falling apart within a week, especially the inside lining of the tongue. They also had abysmal grip on wet surfaces and wet dirt and have very little structural stability. I really can't believe how people say they have good wet grip. The Stinson's have more cushion, better offload performance, and a bit more structure for bridging across cobblestones etc...
 
Stinsons are $170 dollars. Are they like an upgraded Speedgoat? Insane price for a crosstrainer

My experience with the Speedgoat was that the outside was weak. After a time it felt like my foot was rolling outward / everting.

Brooks Caldera 5 feels more stable to me
Stinson's are not upgraded Speedgoats and they aren't cross trainers. They are trail runners - closer to a hiking shoe with massive cushion.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Ok but hear me out - Speedgoats are ALSO trail runners. What is the difference?
Having worn both, I'd say the Speedgoats are more like lightweight road shoes with vibram soles. They are more suited to flat, groomed surfaces. Very little stability and a bit narrow in the toe box. Stinson's are more robust on the bottom end, wider outsoles for stability and to help prevent rolling your ankles on challenging bits of trail, huge amounts of absorbing cushion material to negate the effects of rocks, twigs etc. Their toebox is much bigger and more similar to what Altra does but without the zero drop. They are more go anywhere tanks. I mean Hoka sells like 4 or 5 different models of shoes labeled "Trailrunners". They are all different in their capabilities.
 
Hi allll!
I have an issue and i need help please: I hope this isn't to ambiguous a question to answer?
Which HOKA has the best wet grip! (this i know is personal opinion; a bit like ask the audience on "Who wants to be a millionaire" but a general consensus nonetheless.)
I wore Hoka Stinson ATR6's for my Camino last year; I've brought another pair since then and wear them every day as so comfy!
But here is my one concern; they are awful in the wet.
(No grip; they act and even sound like a wet squeaky sponge on a windscreen they just go from under you.)
This wasn't a major issue last year as only one days rain out of 27 and that was on tarmac and trail; no mud and only one stretch of rocky slabs i remember that was really slippery .
I start the Frances next May which is daunting to say the least; but i want to stick with Hoka as have tried so many brands (brought a few as well) and the Hoka's win hands down for comfort over long distance.
THE ABOVE IS MY POST FROM AUGUST
Re-tired said Hoka Stinsons for the win. Just through out my Speegoats and am going back to Sinsons. The Speedgoats started falling apart within a week, especially the inside lining of the tongue. They also had abysmal grip on wet surfaces and wet dirt and have very little structural stability. I really can't believe how people say they have good wet grip. The Stinson's have more cushion, better offload performance, and a bit more structure for bridging across cobblestones etc...
Well here's another thread about Hoka's!
My post above started a thread i listened to the comments and I was defo going to try the Speedgoats cos most were positive in favour of them !

But i love my Stinsons (ATR6) hate to say it but brought my 3rd pair three weeks ago; my concern was the wet grip and nothing else so so comfy ! (24 miles in a day)
As my France's starts in May i have been already thinking about sticking with the Stinson's ; i put them on when i get up till bed (wear the old pair as slippers indoors)
I suppose I could carry a set of Yak Tracks for extra wet grip(might be the answer)🤣!
Perhaps we should steer the discussion towards the meaning of life we might get a more difinative answer ha!ha!
Woody
EDIT Don't know why my monica kept popping up in the post
 
Well here's another thread about Hoka's!
My post above started a thread i listened to the comments and I was defo going to try the Speedgoats cos most were positive in favour of them !

But i love my Stinsons (ATR6) hate to say it but brought my 3rd pair three weeks ago; my concern was the wet grip and nothing else so so comfy ! (24 miles in a day)
As my France's starts in May i have been already thinking about sticking with the Stinson's ; i put them on when i get up till bed (wear the old pair as slippers indoors)
I suppose I could carry a set of Yak Tracks for extra wet grip(might be the answer)🤣!
Perhaps we should steer the discussion towards the meaning of life we might get a more difinative answer ha!ha!
Woody
EDIT Don't know why my monica kept popping up in the post
I found neither model to be great for wet traction. Given that, I'm going back to Stinsons. The other benefits outweigh the drawbacks.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
The information that will probably make your decision for you, assuming you're leaning toward the Bondi: Does the Bondi have Megagrip soles like the Speedgoat? Not all Hoka shoes do.

I will never walk without my Speedgoats again, they don't slip on wet pavement AT ALL and it feels like walking on marshmallows, but with no lack of support for the foot. If I will be on me feet all day, even around my hometown, I wear my Speedgoat shoes.

Of course, if you will never encounter wet marble on a rainy day on the trail, nor wet asphalt-paved downhill paths on a rainy day), nor need to walk on wet sidewalks in a place where people throw water on the sidewalk (Israel), well, then it doesn't matter if you have the nonslip soles.

Buen camino
I agree Speedgoats, performed well for me this year
 
Wore Speedgoat 4 GTX for first 150 miles of VF in June 2022. When a series of rainstorms hit, the shoes turned out to be NOT good at keeping my feet dry. Blisters followed. Shoes didn't dry well overnight. Gave them to a hostel keeper after a quick detour to Paris to purchase Salomon Ultra X4... no more blisters for the next 400 miles when I stopped at the base of the Alps (Martigny). Next year, new Salomons and on to Rome.
It is true that they're not water-resistant on top. I felt like they do dry fast--did you stuff newspaper in to help them?--but down to the nubbin, YMMV covers it all.

Buen Camino, fellow peregrino
 
Stinsons are $170 dollars. Are they like an upgraded Speedgoat? Insane price for a crosstrainer

My experience with the Speedgoat was that the outside was weak. After a time it felt like my foot was rolling outward / everting.

Brooks Caldera 5 feels more stable to me
I paid pretty much that same price for my Speedgoats. Yes, it's expensive. My DH went for the Wide size and love, love, loves them. I kept the same width. I noticed that the Speedgoat 4 had a wider toe box than the 3. After walking the Salvador and the Primitivo, we both noticed signs of strain on the uppers. We still wear them for neighborhood walking. I have never felt my foot roll out (supinate) with the Speedgoats. As opposed to other shoes I have worn. I actually feel it fighting against my ankle's attempt to roll out sometimes. For me that's a good thing. YMMV. Going to buy a new pair before we walk another Camino route, God willing, this coming spring. If the crick don't rise, as they say!

Buen camino, fellow peregrino
 
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Hoka Stinsons for the win. Just through out my Speegoats and am going back to Sinsons. The Speedgoats started falling apart within a week, especially the inside lining of the tongue. They also had abysmal grip on wet surfaces and wet dirt and have very little structural stability. I really can't believe how people say they have good wet grip. The Stinson's have more cushion, better offload performance, and a bit more structure for bridging across cobblestones etc...
Are you sure we're talking aboput the same shoe? Because nothing you said matched my experience with the Speedgoat.
 
I'm wondering what you mean by "grip" and "traction". You seem to see them as having very different (and perhaps opposing) meanings - "the more grip you have, the less traction". When I tend to read them, I assume the meanings are equivalent, friction with the ground and the opposite of slipping and sliding on a smooth or slippery surface.
I see what you mean... without grip, forget about traction! Traction basically depends on the lugs and the way they are arranged in the sole, whereas grip depends most on the material; softer materials give better grip, but they wear very fast, so you lose lugs and, therefore, traction is worse.

That is how I understand it, at least
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I wore Speedgoats this year. They are initially super comfortable and springy, however after long distances I developed blisters between big toes and on the ends of little toes on both feet. Also the soles of my feet felt pinched and sore. I was miserable between Leon and Santiago. Spent a long tie choosing these and got them fitted properly, taking a generous sizing but I think the toe box is too narrow. Back home I run in these with no problems, but walking day in, day out with a pack caused issues.

I also think they made my feet look like clown's feet. Think I'm going to go back to Salomons next trip.
 
last shoe question ever. :D

I am going to go try both on but before I do, just curious what your thoughts were on both!
last shoe question ever. :D

I am going to go try both on but before I do, just curious what your thoughts were on both!
Bondis have more cushioning. However, if it's cushioning that you are after, give the Hoka Sky Kahas a try... they are my all-time favs for long walks. I believe that you can buy them in high or low cut.
 
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I wore Speedgoats this year. They are initially super comfortable and springy, however after long distances I developed blisters between big toes and on the ends of little toes on both feet. Also the soles of my feet felt pinched and sore. I was miserable between Leon and Santiago. Spent a long tie choosing these and got them fitted properly, taking a generous sizing but I think the toe box is too narrow. Back home I run in these with no problems, but walking day in, day out with a pack caused issues.

I also think they made my feet look like clown's feet. Think I'm going to go back to Salomons next trip.
The toe box on the latest iteration of the Speedgoats is narrower. As your feet expand during a whole day walk, this would explain your issue. Some of the other Hokas have wider toe boxes.
 
Haven't tried the Bondi but I love the Speedgoats. I also enjoy my Altras but the zero drop sometimes makes me feel like I am walking uphill while on flat surfaces and feel like I am trudging along.

I will have to try the Stinsons, but it's amazing that some people say they are great on wet surfaces and concrete while others say they are horrible on wet surfaces and concrete.

My Speedgoats don't slip on those surfaces, yet I see some people say it's quite an issue for them.

The only advice I can give on footwear is never-- NEVER-- choose a shoe for a long hike or walk without putting in the time and plenty of distance with that exact model (including year of release).

Will it cost you money to go through the process of figuring it out? Yes. But there is probably nothing more important for your Camino or other long hike/walk than figuring this out. Get it wrong and it could ruin things for you. And then you might spend plenty of money trying to figure it out while in Spain etc, anyway. (Almost everyone reading already knows this, but just saying..)
 
Haven't purchased any yet....but I tried on the Speedgoat 5, the Stinson ( whatever the latest model is), and the Challenger ATRs today. All of them have a thicker sole than the Clifton 8s. None of them were as comfortable as my Hoka hiking boots, but those are starting to separate at the uppers.

Speedgoat 5s definitely have a more pointed toe than the others and a thinner tongue and heel construction.

Challenger ATRs were thicker construction and had a nice narrow lug pattern for better traction (similar to the lugs on the Speedgoats), but without changing the lacing, my relatively narrow heels kept slipping. That's a no go for me.

Stinsons have a box pattern ( rather than grippy lugs) on the bottom, but I like their construction, wider toe/ forefoot box, and lack of heel slip.

Provided for your information.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
last shoe question ever. :D

I am going to go try both on but before I do, just curious what your thoughts were on both!
I loved my Speedgoats. I used them for a Camino walk from Tri Castella to Santiagio. They were great for this relative flat section of mixed surfaces. My Bondis are more supportive (and more restrictive feeling on my feet). My foot would not have enjoyed the Bondis on the Camino. I tend to pull out my Bondis for 2-5 mile walks where I know it will be 100% flat asphalt or sidewalk.

Conversely, my Altra Lone Peaks are not comfortable on long stretches of flat pavement and are better on soft varied terrain.

Basically, the speed goats handle both for me. Two benefits of the speed goats, the don't require as much breaking in as other shoes and the dried very quickly overnight on the one day I got them soaked on my Camino. An anonymous angel stuffed them full of newspaper when I had set them out to dry.
 
last shoe question ever. :D

I am going to go try both on but before I do, just curious what your thoughts were on both!
First, go by the one that fits you best. I don't know about the Bondis. But Speedgoat's Vibram soles were great on the Primitivo/Hospitales in Sept. 22 - it was a mostly dry hike, so I can't speak to how they would have done on muddy mush.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
A wide toe-box is everyone's best friend. But it's a tough sell.
I have no regrets about getting Hokas in WIDE. I do have rather wide feet - but unless you're really narrow, the WIDE model allows your feet to swell. Do practice on hills!
 
Not much to add on this subject. I started my first CF in 2013 with solid Meindl mountain boots that nearly killed me. Lesson learned, heavy and sturdy boots are not suitable for long-distance Caminos. I replaced them halfway with very light Mizuno runners, which were OK but didn't give me enough support. On the next CF, I used carefully selected Addidas, which started burning so hot on the soles of my feet after about 10 km that I had to keep pausing every further km.
Finally, I discovered the Speedgoat 3, which were very exotic in my country at the time. With them, my third Camino was like walking on cloud 9. Unfortunately, they barely lasted the distance before deteriorating; which didn't stop me from subsequently buying 2 more pairs of SG4s, both of which lasted about 1000 km each. There was a slight problem with the second pair I bought online: although they were the same size and spec - even the same colors - they were definitely much larger, but after a painless exchange for a smaller pair I was very happy. In fact, I stopped wearing other shoes in "normal life" as well, which led me to buy a pair of less flashy SG 4 CNY in black. For my 6th CF in 2022, I used a pair of SG 5s in my original size, which felt a bit tight at first (!) but have worked out great, so far the best I've had.
Conclusion:
1. since more stores in my country carry Hokas these days, I prefer to try the size there, although I could save about 15-20% online.
2. the grip of the Vibram Megagrip sole is very reliable.
3. I fitted all my Speedgoats with Superfeet insoles, as the original ones from Hoka's are a bit too flimsy for me; expensive, but - for me - the ideal footwear experience on and off the Caminos, which can only be enhanced with the Wright two-layer socks. This combination is so comfortable that my feet just crave them; I've never had to take along a second pair of loafers for "post-hike" time after a stage.

Disclaimer: Wearing Speedgoats for the first time feels a bit odd, somehow detached from the ground; the soles are thick and I needed to adapt my walking style to avoid stumbling at first. It takes a while to get used and I can understand that some people will not.
 
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Not much to add on this subject. I started my first CF in 2013 with solid Meindl mountain boots that nearly killed me. Lesson learned, heavy and sturdy boots are not suitable for long-distance Caminos. I replaced them halfway with very light Mizuno runners, which were OK but didn't give me enough support. On the next CF, I used carefully selected Addidas, which started burning so hot on the soles of my feet after about 10 km that I had to keep pausing every further km.
Finally, I discovered the Speedgoat 3, which were very exotic in my country at the time. With them, my third Camino was like walking on cloud 9. Unfortunately, they barely lasted the distance before deteriorating; which didn't stop me from subsequently buying 2 more pairs of SG4s, both of which lasted about 1000 km each. There was a slight problem with the second pair I bought online: although they were the same size and spec - even the same colors - they were definitely much larger, but after a painless exchange for a smaller pair I was very happy. In fact, I stopped wearing other shoes in "normal life" as well, which led me to buy a pair of less flashy SG 4 CNY in black. For my 6th CF in 2022, I used a pair of SP 5s in my original size, which felt a bit tight at first (!) but have worked out great, so far the best I've had.
Conclusion:
1. since more stores in my country carry Hokas these days, I prefer to try the size there, although I could save about 15-20% online.
2. the grip of the Vibram Megagrip sole is very reliable.
3. I fitted all my Speedgoats with Superfeet insoles, as the original ones from Hoka's are a bit too flimsy for me; expensive, but - for me - the ideal footwear experience on and off the Caminos, which can only be enhanced with the Wright two-layer socks. This combination is so comfortable that my feet just crave them; I've never had to take along a second pair of loafers for "post-hike" time after a stage.

Disclaimer: Wearing Speedgoats for the first time feels a bit odd, somehow detached from the ground; the soles are thick and I needed to adapt my walking style to avoid stumbling at first. It takes a while to get used and I can understand that some people will not.
I totally agree with you👣I wore SG4 for Sept/Oct CF and promptly bought 2 more pairs of the same for future Caminos on my return home!! And I don’t want to take them off either😆
I wore Injinji liner toe socks and Lightfeet socks over and my feet thanked me every day of 38 days straight walking 👣👣
 
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For my 6th CF in 2022, I used a pair of SP 5s in my original size, which felt a bit tight at first (!) but have worked out great, so far the best I've had.
Is 'SP' a typo or did you switch to another shoe?
 
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I totally lied about my last shoe conversation haha. I wore the Speedgoat 5s for a few days and returned them thinking the wide would be fine. I still decided I didn't like the toe box so I'm searching for some Altra Olympus now. I liked everything about the Lone Peaks but the thickness of the tread. LOL I guess I'll get it right at some point!
 
I totally lied about my last shoe conversation haha. I wore the Speedgoat 5s for a few days and returned them thinking the wide would be fine. I still decided I didn't like the toe box so I'm searching for some Altra Olympus now. I liked everything about the Lone Peaks but the thickness of the tread. LOL I guess I'll get it right at some point!
Did they narrow the toebox from SG 4 to SG 5 ??
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
I bought both the Altra Olympus 4 and the Hoka Stinson 6 for last summer's camino, after trying and returning a bunch of other wide trail shoes. I wore the Olympus in 2016 and the Timp in 2018. The Stinson 6 was far and away the most comfortable of any trail shoe I have tried. Cushioning equal to the Bondi but a more roomy toe box.
 
The speedgoat 5 comes to more of a point at the toe than the Stinson or challenger...or even Clifton 8. Having never been tempted by a no drop shoe, I can't answer for Altras
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
last shoe question ever. :D

I am going to go try both on but before I do, just curious what your thoughts were on both!
I used Speedgoat with the vibration soles. No slip on wet surfaces.

Good Luck!

Gene
 
My predicament is actually Speedgoat 5 or the brand new Challenger 7? Both feel good on my feet but the thought of making the wrong decision with which ones to go with is majorly stressing me out.
 
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It's hard for anyone to advise on shoes.
We all have different needs and likes.

I tried Speedgoats and didn't like them.
Not nearly enough cushioning.
I wouldn't have lasted one day in them.
Same with Altra Lone Peaks.

But I'm 65, and we lose the natural cushioning in our feet with age.
I'm also a bit overweight and that causes further issues.

So I'm trying the Stinsons this time.
Trialling two slightly different sizes and which ever ones win, will take a new pair on Camino.

I've "had it up to here" with shoes. :rolleyes:
Having trialled 4 different shoes over the last year.

Just wish my knees could still cope with the weight of my boots. :oops:

Good luck with your shoe selection! :)
 
It's hard for anyone to advise on shoes.
We all have different needs and likes.

I tried Speedgoats and didn't like them.
Not nearly enough cushioning.
I wouldn't have lasted one day in them.
Same with Altra Lone Peaks.

But I'm 65, and we lose the natural cushioning in our feet with age.
I'm also a bit overweight and that causes further issues.

So I'm trying the Stinsons this time.
Trialling two slightly different sizes and which ever ones win, will take a new pair on Camino.

I've "had it up to here" with shoes. :rolleyes:
Having trialled 4 different shoes over the last year.

Just wish my knees could still cope with the weight of my boots. :oops:

Good luck with your shoe selection! :)
The Stinson is much roomier than the Speedgoat and they are so comfortable.
Speedgoats agree with my feet and I prefer the sole to the Stinson.
You might find the Hoka Toa GTX boots are wide enough too and although they are not as cushioned as the Stinson, still very comfy.
My partner wore them on the CF for 38 days straight walking without any problem.
Such an individual decision 👣🤨
 
I tried Speedgoats and didn't like them.
Not nearly enough cushioning.
Just shows how differently human feet and shoes interact. For almost all my life, I struggled with finding the right shoes; (all shoes) every time I bought a new pair, I went through the same 3 cycles:
  • 1st third pain and discomfort,
  • 2nd third fitting is OK,
  • 3rd third comfortable but the shoes start falling apart.
Until I discovered the Speedgoat, which eliminated the first third altogether.
The cushioning of my Speedgoats (5) is just at the acceptable limit for me, I would not want to have more. At times and especially on flat asphalt, I feel that there is too much of a good thing, to the point that my steps become unstable. I have tried other Hoka models, but they never matched.
I don't think that a shoe can be perfect in all circumstances and weighing all the positive points, the characteristics of the Speedgoat make it the perfect shoe for me. In fact. not only on the Camino but in everyday life; I have chucked away all other footwear.
However, Robo's post shows that what is perfect for one may be a disaster for the other, so there is no substitute for thorough testing.


PS for prospective buyers of HOKA Speedgoat: I have not noticed any differences in wearing SG 3, SG 4, and SG 5; If you want to save money, purchase the previous model on sale at substantial discounts.
 
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A selection of Camino Jewellery
So I'm trying the Stinsons this time.
Trialling two slightly different sizes and which ever ones win, will take a new pair on Camino.

Hi Robo!
I have tried to find a better shoe for comfort but can't.
Initially they feel a bit weird because of the stack height felt my balance was way off with the first pair so i gave up on them but after trialing 5 other brands went back to the Stinson.
When i t comes to cushioning and comfort for me the Stinson ATR 6 are the best i have found; but slippy on wet cobbles and things like metal man hole covers but if you know that just be a bit more careful!
But on normal surfaces they are fine i love them i don't wear anything else now for daily wear ;as even my old brand hiking boots that i have brought for about 15 years (very comfy boots) feel like wearing diving boots they seem so heavy!

I asked on another thread about the best Hoka for wet grip and i was initially swayed by opinion because Speedgoats were favoured by many;until those that had tried both Stinson and Speedgoat suggested they both had had similar wet weather issues!

So i am sticking with the Stinson for the comfort value!
Just brought two more pairs as they are on offer in Hoka's UK sale with £45 off!
The new ATR7 is supposedly going on sale for around £170 very very expensive!
Hope you finally find the right shoe.
Woody
Just read Pepi's post and agree with his last comment!
 
My predicament is actually Speedgoat 5 or the brand new Challenger 7? Both feel good on my feet but the thought of making the wrong decision with which ones to go with is majorly stressing me out.
What a coincidence! I have used both of these shoes in the past for both walking and running. I like the wide width to make room for my sorry toes, but I put in a regular width SuperFeet green insole to tighten up the slop in the heel area for my otherwise fairly normal feet.

I ordered both models in December and am alternating between the two to see which one to use on my Camino next month. To be honest, it's about a tie. Both, to me, seem to have a larger amount of play in the heel than the previous models, but it's acceptable if I lace carefully. The Speedgoat has a less cushioned tongue, but a grippier and hopefully more durable sole than the Challenger. I did manage to get the Challenger in a more subdued black as opposed to the usual neon Hoka colors I had to settle for in the Speedgoat, but after a bit of time on the trail, they both end up looking a bit more neutral brown/gray anyway, so not a big deal there.

In the end, I might just take the Speedgoats because I tried the Challenger 6 last year so I can compare how they fare on the Camino, not just around town.

Good luck and Buen Camino!
 
Funny thing about me posting this but after finally getting to a really nice shoe store, I ended up getting a pair of Brooks haha.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Hi Robo!
I have tried to find a better shoe for comfort but can't.
Initially they feel a bit weird because of the stack height felt my balance was way off with the first pair so i gave up on them but after trialing 5 other brands went back to the Stinson.
When i t comes to cushioning and comfort for me the Stinson ATR 6 are the best i have found; but slippy on wet cobbles and things like metal man hole covers but if you know that just be a bit more careful!
But on normal surfaces they are fine i love them i don't wear anything else now for daily wear ;as even my old brand hiking boots that i have brought for about 15 years (very comfy boots) feel like wearing diving boots they seem so heavy!

I asked on another thread about the best Hoka for wet grip and i was initially swayed by opinion because Speedgoats were favoured by many;until those that had tried both Stinson and Speedgoat suggested they both had had similar wet weather issues!

So i am sticking with the Stinson for the comfort value!
Just brought two more pairs as they are on offer in Hoka's UK sale with £45 off!
The new ATR7 is supposedly going on sale for around £170 very very expensive!
Hope you finally find the right shoe.
Woody
Just read Pepi's post and agree with his last comment!
Where are they discounted brother ? Hoka US website is still 170, LOL
 
So i am sticking with the Stinson for the comfort value!
Just brought two more pairs as they are on offer in Hoka's UK sale with £45 off!
NOT QUITE £45 off !!

Stinson ATR6​

Original Price £140 Now £97.99
So not much good to you in USA
Woody
 
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So i am sticking with the Stinson for the comfort value!
Just brought two more pairs as they are on offer in Hoka's UK sale with £45 off!
NOT QUITE £45 off !!

Stinson ATR6​

Original Price £140 Now £97.99
So not much good to you in USA
Woody

Good idea! I'll but a couple more pairs once I've made the final selection.

As we all know with gear........
Next year the designs change.
Sizing can change.
Quality changes (often worse)
And the whole trial and selection process has to start again. :rolleyes:

I basically use the exact same Camino gear that I started with 8 years ago.

Though one of my hiking pants is now repair upon repair (they are not made anymore) :oops:
 
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Good idea! I'll but a couple more pairs once I've made the final selection.

As we all know with gear........
Next year the designs change.
Sizing can change.
Quality changes (often worse)
And the whole trial and selection process has to start again. :rolleyes:

I basically use the exact same Camino gear that I started with 8 years ago.

Though one of my hiking pants is now repair upon repair (they are not made anymore) :oops:
Good luck and buen Camino
 
My predicament is actually Speedgoat 5 or the brand new Challenger 7? Both feel good on my feet but the thought of making the wrong decision with which ones to go with is majorly stressing me out.
I've worn Challengers 3/4/5 or Speedgoat 2/3/4 for training and on various Caminos. The Speedgoats grip the ground a bit more than the Challengers but it isn't a huge difference. Similar cushioning on both models. Whichever pair I have that is the newest gets to go on my next Camino.

If you have both models, try one on your left foot, and the other model on your right, to really compare them.
 
Good idea! I'll but a couple more pairs once I've made the final selection.

As we all know with gear........
Next year the designs change.
Sizing can change.
Quality changes (often worse)
And the whole trial and selection process has to start again. :rolleyes:

I basically use the exact same Camino gear that I started with 8 years ago.

Though one of my hiking pants is now repair upon repair (they are not made anymore) :oops:
That’s why I bought 2 new Pairs of Speedgoat 4 on special after completing CF late last year. My Mum always said ‘ when you’re on a good thing, stick to it’
👣👣
 
Prepare for your next Camino on California's Santa Catalina Island, Oct 27 to Nov 2
That’s why I bought 2 new Pairs of Speedgoat 4 on special after completing CF late last year. My Mum always said ‘ when you’re on a good thing, stick to it’
👣👣

I'll be ordering more!

Long session with my podiatrist today.
We're going with the Stinsons and getting new orthotics made.
 
but it's acceptable if I lace carefully
This is something that doesn't seem to get enough mention when we discuss the fit of different kinds of shoes - how much it is affected by how you lace them.

When I was a kid, there was one way to lace shoes: criss-cross up from the front towards the back. When I got older, I discovered there was another way, that I would see with fancier shoes when they were presented in the ship, where the laces look like a series of horizontal lines rather than Xes. But I've since discovered sites and videos that show 50 or more ways to lace your shoes, depending on just where you want them to be snugger or more giving. These can have a significant impact on how your shoes fit. I have several pairs of trail runners and hiking shoes, of different brands, and each is now laced differently to make that particular shoe fit best.

Something to look into.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I'll be ordering more!

Long session with my podiatrist today.
We're going with the Stinsons and getting new orthotics made.
Stinsons are pretty good. I don't like the color choices. But previously I went with Brooks Calderas and months later my Achilles tendinosis issues came back. Not sure why, maybe it was the switch from Speedgoats to Calderas.

With the narrowing of the Speedgoat 5's toe box, I went ahead with the Stinsons when i chose Hoka again. They have a rounded toe box but also a padded tongue. The tongue of the Speedgoats was so flat that some folks complained about it cutting into the top of their foot.

I haven't done any hardcore hiking in Stinsons yet so we will see how they do I guess

Also the new Caldera from Brooks is really uncomfortable on my foot, so the changes they made didn't gel with me. And I don't bother with any of those zero drop brands because they say zero drop shoes can stress the Achilles tendon.
 
Regarding the Stinson ATR6's and because this will be my first pair of Hoka's, some say get a half size larger and some a full size so what would be your sizing opinion if using a pair of standard every day cotton socks?
Not that I'd be wearing cotton socks, but so I can gauge my options.

Thanks.
 
I buy my Speedgoats always 1 size larger when doing the purchase online.
But for your first purchase, I highly recommend a physical shop,
  • try them on at the end of the day, preferably after a long walk, and with the same socks.
  • Ask to try the shoes with a pair of SuperFeet insoles replacing the original ones from Hoka. SuperFeet soles are not cheap but after the first 100K walking, you'll know why.
  • Walk around in the shop and observe if there are any pressure points; if everything is comfortable but not too loose, you've got it right! (Hoka's don't expand much with wear, btw)
Buen Camino
 
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  • Ask to try the shoes with a pair of SuperFeet insoles replacing the original ones from Hoka. SuperFeet soles are not cheap but after the first 100K walking, you'll know why.
I think insoles are as much of an individual choice as the shoes themselves. SuperFeet insoles gave me blisters all around both heel edges.
 
Thanks to you both.
Outdoor and running shops in my part of the UK only stock the dedicated running shoes from Hoka.
Insoles I'm aware of but I've taken note of that brand.

I've now ordered them. Many thanks.
 
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I plan to begin walking the CF later this month, but have encountered an unexpected problem. I ordinarily wear a size 11 shoe, but went ahead and purchased a pair of Hoka Stinson ATR 6 in a size 12, because my feet need a wide toe bed.

For the past six weeks I have worn Injinji sock liners beneath Darn Tough Merino wool socks. As the date of departure approached, I began walking longer distances and wearing a full pack and suddenly developed a blister on the pinkie of one foot, but with no blisters on the opposite foot.

I originally chose Stinsons because of the wide toe bed, but the blistered pinkie suggests that even a size 12 is too narrow. Stinsons apparently are not available in wide sizes. I am interested in hearing from others before taking a long drive back to my local REI store to try on a pair of size 13 Stinsons. Would a size 13 be significantly wider than a size 12? I thought about buying a pair of Altra Olympus 5's, but am reluctant to experiment because I am so close to beginning my Camino, and because I have no prior experience wearing shoes with a zero heel-to-toe drop. I would greatly appreciate any suggestions.
 
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I plan to begin walking the CF later this month, but have encountered an unexpected problem. I ordinarily wear a size 11 shoe, but went ahead and purchased a pair of Hoka Stinson ATR 6 in a size 12, because my feet need a wide toe bed.

For the past six weeks I have worn Injinji sock liners beneath Darn Tough Merino wool socks. As the date of departure approached, I began walking longer distances and wearing a full pack and suddenly developed a blister on the pinkie of one foot, but with no blisters on the opposite foot.

I originally chose Stinsons because of the wide toe bed, but the blistered pinkie suggests that even a size 12 is too narrow.
Hi spinnaker!
I have worn nothing else but Stinson ATR6 since my Portuguese in 2021 they are now my everyday walking shoe at home(expensive but i walk 50 to 60 miles a week on pavements and tarmac).

Every other boot or shoe i own feels like bricks on my feet!!!
I like you am a UK size 11 but wear 12's in the Stinsons

Do you actually have wide feet? (i don't)

And what temperatures are you walking in? (I found my feet felt overheated by the two pairs of tight socks)
Is it the right foot you have the blister on; i am on my 5th pair and i think for some quirk in foot shape or the shoe i always put a little bit of Leukotape P on the outside of my right little toe just in case.

Everybody's feet are different so my mumblings might not work for you at all!
The fact the blister has appeared after six weeks of walking might mean it's not the shoe.
Are the toe socks able to move or bunch up a little inside the Darn tough?

I followed the advice of many on here for the Portuguese with regard to protecting my feet!

Vasaline, liner socks and Darn toughs ! (i find Injinji socks feel weird)

Well the temps were between 21 and 27 C and my feet cooked even though the Stinsons are non waterproof and breathable i got a blister.
At home i always wear one pair of socks Darn Toughs and put Leukotape on the back of my heels and the little toe!
No further issues ever. (if you do put this on, be careful when removing it's sticky enough to tear skin)
I haven't ever had a blister walking at home.


You can also try what i do; i always wear my socks inside out!!! as there are always little lumps/threads in the corners of the sock or across the tops of your toes which can cause a blister on a walk.
Buen Camino
Woody
 
Prepare for your next Camino on California's Santa Catalina Island, Oct 27 to Nov 2
Hi spinnaker!
I have worn nothing else but Stinson ATR6 since my Portuguese in 2021 they are now my everyday walking shoe at home(expensive but i walk 50 to 60 miles a week on pavements and tarmac).

Every other boot or shoe i own feels like bricks on my feet!!!
I like you am a UK size 11 but wear 12's in the Stinsons

Do you actually have wide feet? (i don't)

And what temperatures are you walking in? (I found my feet felt overheated by the two pairs of tight socks)
Is it the right foot you have the blister on; i am on my 5th pair and i think for some quirk in foot shape or the shoe i always put a little bit of Leukotape P on the outside of my right little toe just in case.

Everybody's feet are different so my mumblings might not work for you at all!
The fact the blister has appeared after six weeks of walking might mean it's not the shoe.
Are the toe socks able to move or bunch up a little inside the Darn tough?

I followed the advice of many on here for the Portuguese with regard to protecting my feet!

Vasaline, liner socks and Darn toughs ! (i find Injinji socks feel weird)

Well the temps were between 21 and 27 C and my feet cooked even though the Stinsons are non waterproof and breathable i got a blister.
At home i always wear one pair of socks Darn Toughs and put Leukotape on the back of my heels and the little toe!
No further issues ever. (if you do put this on, be careful when removing it's sticky enough to tear skin)
I haven't ever had a blister walking at home.


You can also try what i do; i always wear my socks inside out!!! as there are always little lumps/threads in the corners of the sock or across the tops of your toes which can cause a blister on a walk.
Buen Camino
Woody
Thank you Woody. Our circumstance are very similar. It is warm for this time of year here in N. Texas, around 27C, and I wear 5-toe Injinji sock liners on my wide feet; the Injinjis do not bunch up when worn under my Darn Tough socks. I used petroleum jelly for several weeks, but found that petroleum jelly has no particular impact on my feet other than creating a nuisance to clean up afterwards.

As noted, there was no issue until I started carrying a full pack and extending the distances of each walk. The weight of the pack exerts greater downward pressure on the toes, causing the toes to splay out, which, when combined with the warm temperatures and marginally adequate width of the toe bed explains the blister that developed on the underside and inner side of one pinky toe. Going forward, I will experiment by wearing a Compeed cushion around the blistered toe, and have ordered some Leukotape as a precautionary measure for any similar issues that may arise.

I appreciate your prompt feedback and look forward to any additional words of wisdom from folks in this forum.
 
I've worn Bondi 6s and 7s. The soles are pretty smooth, and will slip on a variety of surfaces. When i took the 7s on high desert trails, I had to be careful . If you're concerned about trail footing, use the Speedgoats. And watch the upper foot area below the toes. Thats the widest part of my feet, and the 7s were tight after a lot of roadwork.

Buen Camino
I've walked with the Bondi 8 and they were perfect for me. Needed good shoes for a knee with several ACl surgeries. Found them comfortable and good grip.
 

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