Search 60,048 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Camino de Santiago of the Canary Islands
The officially recognized Camino de Santiago on the Canary Islands!
2022 Camino Guides
The 2022 Camino guides will be coming out little by little, most of them by the end of 2021. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.

In praise of Motel Truckstops on the Camino

Past OR future Camino
Frances, Muxia-Fisterra,
Portuguese, Catalan,
I’m sure that the title of this piece will already have turned off the purists, who have already moved on to more esoteric subjects. But, give me two minutes and hear me out. First, remember that we are human beings who, from time to time, need a room to ourselves, private washing facilities, and space away from snoring 65 year olds like me. Secondly, dismiss any prejudice you have based on your experience in motorway service stations in US, UK or Germany.

I’m currently on the Mozarabe and VdlP, and three times in the last two weeks have used motel facilities I wouldn’t previously have given a second thought to. I’ll be explicit and sing their praises. Hostal Cesar in Acerejos, Hostal Kavanna in San Pedro de Merida and today, Hostal Asturias near Aldenueva de Camino. In each case, the facilities have been wonderful, the friendliness of the staff has been exemplary and the quality of the cuisine has been like a highly rated restaurant. And all this for a few pennies more than sharing a dormitory in an Albergue.

I’m not knocking Albergues, as they are our primary means of doing what we do. But sometimes they are full, closed, or not close enough in the case of the the longer-staged Caminos. The stage on VdlP from Carcaboso to Aldenueva is famously long with no intermediate facilities, and this provides a challenge even to experienced Camino walkers. Hostal Asturias will collect you from the Roman archeological site of Caparra, take you to their motel free of charge and, once inside, you would think that you were in a top hotel. But the cost of accommodation and amazing, truly amazing, food is hardly any different from staying in a Albergue Municipal. I have eaten like a king for €12. I have been treated like a lord, on a paupers pay.

Once every five days, adjust your principles, suppress your prejudice, and recognise your practical comfort needs. You won’t be disappointed. On the contrary, you will be very pleasantly surprised.
Sent from my iPhone
 
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Fine art photography from the Camino Ways.

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
I’m sure that the title of this piece will already have turned off the purists
Not I! I smiled with pleasure when I read the thread title.

Hostal Asturias is excellent.

I'd like to give a shout out to a couple of truck stops on the Camino Vasco/Bayona en the way to Burgos:
  • Hostal Hermanos Gutiérrez in the Area de servicio de la Brújula
  • Hostal Pancorbo in Pancorbo

 
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Don't ignore this great alternative to finding inexpensive and good accommodation.
And don’t forget the good food! I am going to have to put my thinking cap on to remember the huge number of good meals I have had in those truck stop hotel restaurants. Nothing gourmet, no Michelin stars, but inevitably a home cooked crowd-pleasing meal. I do have to say I have often wondered how those drivers fared after climbing back into their cab and driving on with a belly full of food, wine, and usually something strong to go with their coffee!
 

Bradypus

Migratory hermit
Past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
I do have to say I have often wondered how those drivers fared after climbing back into their cab and driving on with a belly full of food, wine, and usually something strong to go with their coffee!
I walked the Via de la Plata again earlier this year and ate in a lot of truck stop restaurants. It often struck me how much that has changed in recent years - the drivers and others who obviously had work to return to afterwards were almost all drinking water with their meals. Perhaps the law is being enforced more firmly these days? Or perhaps there is a different sense of personal responsibility? Very different from my early experiences in Spain.
 

rometimed

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
(SJPdP: 2015, MAY/JUNE2022!!! ) (Eng Way: 2015)
I’m sure that the title of this piece will already have turned off the purists, who have already moved on to more esoteric subjects. But, give me two minutes and hear me out. First, remember that we are human beings who, from time to time, need a room to ourselves, private washing facilities, and space away from snoring 65 year olds like me. Secondly, dismiss any prejudice you have based on your experience in motorway service stations in US, UK or Germany.

I’m currently on the Mozarabe and VdlP, and three times in the last two weeks have used motel facilities I wouldn’t previously have given a second thought to. I’ll be explicit and sing their praises. Hostal Cesar in Acerejos, Hostal Kavanna in San Pedro de Merida and today, Hostal Asturias near Aldenueva de Camino. In each case, the facilities have been wonderful, the friendliness of the staff has been exemplary and the quality of the cuisine has been like a highly rated restaurant. And all this for a few pennies more than sharing a dormitory in an Albergue.

I’m not knocking Albergues, as they are our primary means of doing what we do. But sometimes they are full, closed, or not close enough in the case of the the longer-staged Caminos. The stage on VdlP from Carcaboso to Aldenueva is famously long with no intermediate facilities, and this provides a challenge even to experienced Camino walkers. Hostal Asturias will collect you from the Roman archeological site of Caparra, take you to their motel free of charge and, once inside, you would think that you were in a top hotel. But the cost of accommodation and amazing, truly amazing, food is hardly any different from staying in a Albergue Municipal. I have eaten like a king for €12. I have been treated like a lord, on a paupers pay.

Once every five days, adjust your principles, suppress your prejudice, and recognise your practical comfort needs. You won’t be disappointed. On the contrary, you will be very pleasantly surprised.
Sent from my iPhone

This reminds me of a Trucker-style hotel we stayed at right near Santiago de Compostela which served us the most ludicrous G & Ts in mugs along with T bone steak dinners for probably a quarter the cost of doing so in North America.
 
Camino Cups
Browse our selection of Camino Cups on the forum store
Camino de Santiago of the Canary Islands
The officially recognized Camino de Santiago on the Canary Islands!

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Yes
We have also stayed at the Sony in Melide after merging with the CF from the Norte. great place to ease the impact of the atmosphere of the crowds after the peace of the Norte. I see it is now 50 euro on booking.
 

anamcara

Camino Walker
Past OR future Camino
2022 Chemin du Piémont 😎
I love an ‘alternative’ accommodation! Not a truck stop or motel story - but on our recent Chemin du Piemont, after most of the day visiting Lourdes, we wanted to walk on a little.

In the town of Saint Pe de Bugourre the only accommodation open was the Sports and Nature complex by the river. We rang a few hours before setting out from Lourdes and yes they had a place. Spotless twin room with own bathroom and Demi Pensione for a very reasonable price - shared with the 30 excited pre-teens (and their fabulous minders) from the Avignon Kayak club. It was théir last night - trophy night - fun and memorable. 😎
 
Last edited:
Camino Magnets
A collection of Camino Fridge Magnets
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
Past OR future Camino
Latest: Rota Vicentina '19; Portuguese '19.
On my 201
I walked the Via de la Plata again earlier this year and ate in a lot of truck stop restaurants. It often struck me how much that has changed in recent years - the drivers and others who obviously had work to return to afterwards were almost all drinking water with their meals. Perhaps the law is being enforced more firmly these days? Or perhaps there is a different sense of personal responsibility? Very different from my early experiences in Spain.
On my 2015 Camino Frances, I was surprised to see two men who were doing some work grading the gravel under the long bridge at Puente de O'rbigo stop for their lunch break; out came a bottle of wine as they rummaged in their bags. I remember it specifically because in the US I've never seen such a thing.
 

Via2010

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
06/07 & 12 Camino Francés, 08-10 Via de la Plata, 13/14 & 17 Camino Portugués, 18 Camino Primitivo
going back on the VdP or Camino Sanabrés I can recommend:

Restaurante Complejo Leo, 4 km before Monesterio (splitting the big stage and the next smaller one in two feasible ones)

Hostal Asturias

Hostal Juan-Manuel in Camarzana de la Tera (a good option as Sta. Marta de la Tera albergue was closed)
 

lunna

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
frances; lisboa-muxia; norte+bayonne; vdlp; le puy; voie d'arles+aragones; geneva to ales
I’m sure that the title of this piece will already have turned off the purists, who have already moved on to more esoteric subjects. But, give me two minutes and hear me out. First, remember that we are human beings who, from time to time, need a room to ourselves, private washing facilities, and space away from snoring 65 year olds like me. Secondly, dismiss any prejudice you have based on your experience in motorway service stations in US, UK or Germany.

I’m currently on the Mozarabe and VdlP, and three times in the last two weeks have used motel facilities I wouldn’t previously have given a second thought to. I’ll be explicit and sing their praises. Hostal Cesar in Acerejos, Hostal Kavanna in San Pedro de Merida and today, Hostal Asturias near Aldenueva de Camino. In each case, the facilities have been wonderful, the friendliness of the staff has been exemplary and the quality of the cuisine has been like a highly rated restaurant. And all this for a few pennies more than sharing a dormitory in an Albergue.

I’m not knocking Albergues, as they are our primary means of doing what we do. But sometimes they are full, closed, or not close enough in the case of the the longer-staged Caminos. The stage on VdlP from Carcaboso to Aldenueva is famously long with no intermediate facilities, and this provides a challenge even to experienced Camino walkers. Hostal Asturias will collect you from the Roman archeological site of Caparra, take you to their motel free of charge and, once inside, you would think that you were in a top hotel. But the cost of accommodation and amazing, truly amazing, food is hardly any different from staying in a Albergue Municipal. I have eaten like a king for €12. I have been treated like a lord, on a paupers pay.

Once every five days, adjust your principles, suppress your prejudice, and recognise your practical comfort needs. You won’t be disappointed. On the contrary, you will be very pleasantly surprised.
Sent from my iPhone
Then there are those godawful ones too, though… and I’ve experienced a few of those as well.
 

rnwinters

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances
Camino Portugese
I’m sure that the title of this piece will already have turned off the purists, who have already moved on to more esoteric subjects. But, give me two minutes and hear me out. First, remember that we are human beings who, from time to time, need a room to ourselves, private washing facilities, and space away from snoring 65 year olds like me. Secondly, dismiss any prejudice you have based on your experience in motorway service stations in US, UK or Germany.

I’m currently on the Mozarabe and VdlP, and three times in the last two weeks have used motel facilities I wouldn’t previously have given a second thought to. I’ll be explicit and sing their praises. Hostal Cesar in Acerejos, Hostal Kavanna in San Pedro de Merida and today, Hostal Asturias near Aldenueva de Camino. In each case, the facilities have been wonderful, the friendliness of the staff has been exemplary and the quality of the cuisine has been like a highly rated restaurant. And all this for a few pennies more than sharing a dormitory in an Albergue.

I’m not knocking Albergues, as they are our primary means of doing what we do. But sometimes they are full, closed, or not close enough in the case of the the longer-staged Caminos. The stage on VdlP from Carcaboso to Aldenueva is famously long with no intermediate facilities, and this provides a challenge even to experienced Camino walkers. Hostal Asturias will collect you from the Roman archeological site of Caparra, take you to their motel free of charge and, once inside, you would think that you were in a top hotel. But the cost of accommodation and amazing, truly amazing, food is hardly any different from staying in a Albergue Municipal. I have eaten like a king for €12. I have been treated like a lord, on a paupers pay.

Once every five days, adjust your principles, suppress your prejudice, and recognise your practical comfort needs. You won’t be disappointed. On the contrary, you will be very pleasantly surprised.
Sent from my iPhone
I beg to differ ... we stayed at Hotel Asturius just last week, not because we wanted to but we had to ... couldn't find anything else at the time. We thought it was way overpriced for what we got. I will admit that the restaurant was good but to compare it to a highly rated restaurant ... no, not at all. And, pennies a day and being treated like a Lord ... not even close. Believe me, one can find much better places, for less money and be welcomed by a friendlier staff. I am NOT anti-truck stop. I've been to many, but Asturius was definitely not a treat. Oh, did I mention that guests are locked out of the downstairs facilities until 7:30 in the morning ... only the emergency exit would allow egress.
 
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean

Richard Maynard

Rocinante
Past OR future Camino
VDLP April (2018) Inglés and Fisterra April (2019)
Norte April (2020)
I’m sure that the title of this piece will already have turned off the purists, who have already moved on to more esoteric subjects. But, give me two minutes and hear me out. First, remember that we are human beings who, from time to time, need a room to ourselves, private washing facilities, and space away from snoring 65 year olds like me. Secondly, dismiss any prejudice you have based on your experience in motorway service stations in US, UK or Germany.

I’m currently on the Mozarabe and VdlP, and three times in the last two weeks have used motel facilities I wouldn’t previously have given a second thought to. I’ll be explicit and sing their praises. Hostal Cesar in Acerejos, Hostal Kavanna in San Pedro de Merida and today, Hostal Asturias near Aldenueva de Camino. In each case, the facilities have been wonderful, the friendliness of the staff has been exemplary and the quality of the cuisine has been like a highly rated restaurant. And all this for a few pennies more than sharing a dormitory in an Albergue.

I’m not knocking Albergues, as they are our primary means of doing what we do. But sometimes they are full, closed, or not close enough in the case of the the longer-staged Caminos. The stage on VdlP from Carcaboso to Aldenueva is famously long with no intermediate facilities, and this provides a challenge even to experienced Camino walkers. Hostal Asturias will collect you from the Roman archeological site of Caparra, take you to their motel free of charge and, once inside, you would think that you were in a top hotel. But the cost of accommodation and amazing, truly amazing, food is hardly any different from staying in a Albergue Municipal. I have eaten like a king for €12. I have been treated like a lord, on a paupers pay.

Once every five days, adjust your principles, suppress your prejudice, and recognise your practical comfort needs. You won’t be disappointed. On the contrary, you will be very pleasantly surprised.
Sent from my iPhone
I too stayed at Hostal Asturias and was similarly impressed. Proprietor was friendly and accommodating, picked me up from the Roman ruins as with you and I also had all my washing done overnight for a reasonable cost.

I am on the Levante at the moment and the scarcity of albergues and the length of the stages makes these truck stop facilities even more welcome
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés, Oct 2020
On my 201

On my 2015 Camino Frances, I was surprised to see two men who were doing some work grading the gravel under the long bridge at Puente de O'rbigo stop for their lunch break; out came a bottle of wine as they rummaged in their bags. I remember it specifically because in the US I've never seen such a thing.
In France it is common for workmen to stop for a proper meal at lunchtime. We’ve seen workmen set up a table in the back of their van, add a table cloth, China crockery, bottle of wine and sit down to a full meal.
 
Past OR future Camino
Latest: Rota Vicentina '19; Portuguese '19.
In France it is common for workmen to stop for a proper meal at lunchtime. We’ve seen workmen set up a table in the back of their van, add a table cloth, China crockery, bottle of wine and sit down to a full meal.
I had no problem seeing it; in fact I was quite amused in a good way.😀
 
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
Past OR future Camino
Frances x5, Portuguese VdlP12, Sanabres, Aragones, Norte,Salvador,Primitivo, VdlP 17,Madrid18Norte
I’m sure that the title of this piece will already have turned off the purists, who have already moved on to more esoteric subjects. But, give me two minutes and hear me out. First, remember that we are human beings who, from time to time, need a room to ourselves, private washing facilities, and space away from snoring 65 year olds like me. Secondly, dismiss any prejudice you have based on your experience in motorway service stations in US, UK or Germany.

I’m currently on the Mozarabe and VdlP, and three times in the last two weeks have used motel facilities I wouldn’t previously have given a second thought to. I’ll be explicit and sing their praises. Hostal Cesar in Acerejos, Hostal Kavanna in San Pedro de Merida and today, Hostal Asturias near Aldenueva de Camino. In each case, the facilities have been wonderful, the friendliness of the staff has been exemplary and the quality of the cuisine has been like a highly rated restaurant. And all this for a few pennies more than sharing a dormitory in an Albergue.

I’m not knocking Albergues, as they are our primary means of doing what we do. But sometimes they are full, closed, or not close enough in the case of the the longer-staged Caminos. The stage on VdlP from Carcaboso to Aldenueva is famously long with no intermediate facilities, and this provides a challenge even to experienced Camino walkers. Hostal Asturias will collect you from the Roman archeological site of Caparra, take you to their motel free of charge and, once inside, you would think that you were in a top hotel. But the cost of accommodation and amazing, truly amazing, food is hardly any different from staying in a Albergue Municipal. I have eaten like a king for €12. I have been treated like a lord, on a paupers pay.

Once every five days, adjust your principles, suppress your prejudice, and recognise your practical comfort needs. You won’t be disappointed. On the contrary, you will be very pleasantly surprised.
Sent from my iPhone
I will be staying in hostel Asturias in two days time . I hope the Caparra visitor centre is open .
 

Leadell

Canadian Company of PIlgrims
Past OR future Camino
Via Francigena (planned, 2023)
Having just recently walked the Camino Mozarabe and Camino Invierno, I have to agree that the truckstop hotels/hostals can be a blessing on some of the less-travelled routes. I also want to give a shout-out to Repsol gas stations....sometimes on these more obscure routes it's difficult to find a place that will sell you something to eat, but Repsol almost always has a tienda or supermercado attached with prepared meals (for truckers and long-distance drivers, one assumes). The other dirty little secret we discovered was that Repsol usually carries small cans of Starbucks coffee drinks, which you can stash in your pack in the morning and get your mid-morning coffee fix when there's not a village with a bar on the long morning's walk!
 

hieudovan

DoVanHieu
Past OR future Camino
2021
I'm glad to know of this option. I have a beginner's type of question. I know of truck stops in the U.S. and they're easily identifiable. How is a truck-stop hotel identified in Spain or Portugal? Thanks.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
I also want to give a shout-out to Repsol gas stations
Yes, definitely!
How is a truck-stop hotel identified in Spain or Portugal?
They are pretty obvious. Usually at some rest-area or highway intersection, there will be a Repsol station with store, likely some other service/garage buildings, a restaurant and big Hostal sign. I'm attaching photos from the Camino Vasco -
  1. Repsol at the edge of Agurain. See the fresh baguette strapped to my daughter's backpack after we stocked up for the day.
  2. Hostal Pancorbo in the mountain setting
  3. Truck stop area and Hostal Pancorbo from the other side
  4. Hostal Gutierrez near Burgos.
  5. This is an example of a place that is not a truck stop hostal/restaurant.
[As @peregrina2000 suggested in post #11 above, you want to be aware that there are other establishments here and there. They usually look quite quiet and discreet, but there are clues such as the words "amor" and "pecado" or suggestive images in the signage. See the last photo below, taken on the day out of Cañaveral on the VDLP.]

It was fun looking through my photos to find these examples!
 

Attachments

  • 20191011_090432.jpg
    20191011_090432.jpg
    134 KB · Views: 29
  • 20191014_163126.jpg
    20191014_163126.jpg
    124.4 KB · Views: 26
  • 20191014_150520.jpg
    20191014_150520.jpg
    104.5 KB · Views: 24
  • 20191016_133550.jpg
    20191016_133550.jpg
    222.4 KB · Views: 26
  • 20170403_103727.jpg
    20170403_103727.jpg
    868.2 KB · Views: 28

Flog

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022
Yes, many truck stops on the old N Roads traditionally catered for all needs:
A place to rest up, eat, sleep and.. well, other entertainment for lonely long distance drivers I guess.

These days the autopista network (that often runs parallel) takes most of the heavy traffic and many of these place appear to be in decline, generally. At least that is my impression.

I've come across a few of these truckstops where the way crosses a national road on remote stretches such as to be found on the Lana and VDLP. Food is generally hearty and plentiful. I did stay in one place on the Lana, where accommodation was quite limited anyway, but it was pretty soulless as I recall..
 
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.
Camino Jewellery
A selection of Camino Jewellery

frjuliangreen

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Inglés (2018)
Camino Portugués (2019)
Vía de la Plata/Camino Sanabrés (2020)
I’m sure that the title of this piece will already have turned off the purists, who have already moved on to more esoteric subjects. But, give me two minutes and hear me out. First, remember that we are human beings who, from time to time, need a room to ourselves, private washing facilities, and space away from snoring 65 year olds like me. Secondly, dismiss any prejudice you have based on your experience in motorway service stations in US, UK or Germany.

I’m currently on the Mozarabe and VdlP, and three times in the last two weeks have used motel facilities I wouldn’t previously have given a second thought to. I’ll be explicit and sing their praises. Hostal Cesar in Acerejos, Hostal Kavanna in San Pedro de Merida and today, Hostal Asturias near Aldenueva de Camino. In each case, the facilities have been wonderful, the friendliness of the staff has been exemplary and the quality of the cuisine has been like a highly rated restaurant. And all this for a few pennies more than sharing a dormitory in an Albergue.

I’m not knocking Albergues, as they are our primary means of doing what we do. But sometimes they are full, closed, or not close enough in the case of the the longer-staged Caminos. The stage on VdlP from Carcaboso to Aldenueva is famously long with no intermediate facilities, and this provides a challenge even to experienced Camino walkers. Hostal Asturias will collect you from the Roman archeological site of Caparra, take you to their motel free of charge and, once inside, you would think that you were in a top hotel. But the cost of accommodation and amazing, truly amazing, food is hardly any different from staying in a Albergue Municipal. I have eaten like a king for €12. I have been treated like a lord, on a paupers pay.

Once every five days, adjust your principles, suppress your prejudice, and recognise your practical comfort needs. You won’t be disappointed. On the contrary, you will be very pleasantly surprised.
Sent from my iPhone
There's a great one ahead of you at Camarzana de Tera. I absolutely agree. Sometimes can be really good value. But just think how many of these places have closed on the Nacional since the building of the motorways. A lot of the ones that remain are just about holding on
 

Anita Rigoni

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2016 Frances, 2017 Via Francigena - Lucca to Rome, 2019 Camino Del Norte and Via Francesco
I’m sure that the title of this piece will already have turned off the purists, who have already moved on to more esoteric subjects. But, give me two minutes and hear me out. First, remember that we are human beings who, from time to time, need a room to ourselves, private washing facilities, and space away from snoring 65 year olds like me. Secondly, dismiss any prejudice you have based on your experience in motorway service stations in US, UK or Germany.

I’m currently on the Mozarabe and VdlP, and three times in the last two weeks have used motel facilities I wouldn’t previously have given a second thought to. I’ll be explicit and sing their praises. Hostal Cesar in Acerejos, Hostal Kavanna in San Pedro de Merida and today, Hostal Asturias near Aldenueva de Camino. In each case, the facilities have been wonderful, the friendliness of the staff has been exemplary and the quality of the cuisine has been like a highly rated restaurant. And all this for a few pennies more than sharing a dormitory in an Albergue.

I’m not knocking Albergues, as they are our primary means of doing what we do. But sometimes they are full, closed, or not close enough in the case of the the longer-staged Caminos. The stage on VdlP from Carcaboso to Aldenueva is famously long with no intermediate facilities, and this provides a challenge even to experienced Camino walkers. Hostal Asturias will collect you from the Roman archeological site of Caparra, take you to their motel free of charge and, once inside, you would think that you were in a top hotel. But the cost of accommodation and amazing, truly amazing, food is hardly any different from staying in a Albergue Municipal. I have eaten like a king for €12. I have been treated like a lord, on a paupers pay.

Once every five days, adjust your principles, suppress your prejudice, and recognise your practical comfort needs. You won’t be disappointed. On the contrary, you will be very pleasantly surprised.
Sent from my iPhone
Thanks for the info. I am currently in Monesterio and find in many of the are bergs in the next few stages to be fully booked when I call. As a loan female Traveler I am concerned about finding accommodation for the night. Any tips and suggestions of truckstops between here and Santiago would be very much appreciated. Also any tips on how to get through the long stages via bus or taxi as my knee will not let me do more than 20 km a day.
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Perhaps this pilgrim.es Spanish link for etapa5 and those for the following etapes will be helpful for you.


Furthermore on Google maps if you link the from/to points , ie in etapa 5 Monesterio and Fuente de Cantos, and hit the transport symbol the local bus lines will be cited.
 
Last edited:
Past OR future Camino
Frances, Muxia-Fisterra,
Portuguese, Catalan,
I often look at Trip Advisor reviews, and am astonished that some people give a 5 star review while others give 1 star. I was collected free of charge from Caparra (a taxi would have cost €15), my room with private bathroom facilities was €22.5, the evening three course meal of bbq chicken with a whole bottle of wine was €10, the staff were friendly, engaging and entertaining. I’m totally shocked that we have had such completely diverse experiences. The ride, the room, the meal and the wine would have cost me over €120 in England.
 
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Best lightweight guides
Best lightweight guides for before and after your Camino, just 1.4 oz (40 grams)!

SabineP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
I often look at Trip Advisor reviews, and am astonished that some people give a 5 star review while others give 1 star. I was collected free of charge from Caparra (a taxi would have cost €15), my room with private bathroom facilities was €22.5, the evening three course meal of bbq chicken with a whole bottle of wine was €10, the staff were friendly, engaging and entertaining. I’m totally shocked that we have had such completely diverse experiences. The ride, the room, the meal and the wine would have cost me over €120 in England.


Most probably those 1 star reviewers are people who prefer a sterile and soulless all inclusive hotel ( and all you can eat buffet... ) somewhere at a sandy beach where one cocktail costs double as much as your bottle of wine.

Glad you enjoyed it! And what a service with that free ride.
 
Last edited:

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
The people at Hostal Asturias take a real interest in the pilgrims. They give clear and helpful directions for people to return to the Camino near Caparra, or to pick it up as it crosses the highway. They charge for a ride back to Caparra in the morning, but a reasonable raite.

Most probably those 1 star reviewers are people who prefer a sterile and soulless all inclusive hotel
Or they turn up their noses as this modern(ish) version of the roadside inns where travelers have stayed for centuries.
 

ginniek

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
frances 2017
Actually.....I have used the "truck stop hotels" on multiple camino routes. I have used them on main roads and sometimes on back highways where there was nothing else available. I have never been disappointed.

Don't ignore this great alternative to finding inexpensive and good accommodation.
And if you think they're good in Spain, try the ones in France sometime. Really nice rooms and ensuite baths, clever, inexpensive decor, etc. And then the food and the wine. A few years ago I was doing my own cassoulet trail along the Canal du Midi (only went from Toulouse to Carcassonne, so I need to finish), and I would put their offerings up against restaurants at good hotels any day.
 
Past OR future Camino
Frances, Muxia-Fisterra,
Portuguese, Catalan,
The people at Hostal Asturias take a real interest in the pilgrims. They give clear and helpful directions for people to return to the Camino near Caparra, or to pick it up as it crosses the highway. They charge for a ride back to Caparra in the morning, but a reasonable raite.


Or they turn up their noses as this modern(ish) version of the roadside inns where travelers have stayed for centuries.
I beg to differ ... we stayed at Hotel Asturius just last week, not because we wanted to but we had to ... couldn't find anything else at the time. We thought it was way overpriced for what we got. I will admit that the restaurant was good but to compare it to a highly rated restaurant ... no, not at all. And, pennies a day and being treated like a Lord ... not even close. Believe me, one can find much better places, for less money and be welcomed by a friendlier staff. I am NOT anti-truck stop. I've been to many, but Asturius was definitely not a treat. Oh, did I mention that guests are locked out of the downstairs facilities until 7:30 in the morning ... only the emergency exit would allow egress.
I often look at Trip Advisor reviews, and am astonished that some people give a 5 star review while others give 1 star. I was collected free of charge from Caparra (a taxi would have cost €15), my room with private bathroom facilities was €22.5, the evening three course meal of bbq chicken with a whole bottle of wine was €10, the staff were friendly, engaging and entertaining. I’m totally shocked that we have had such completely diverse experiences. The ride, the room, the meal and the wine would have cost me over €120 in England.
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés, Oct 2020
And if you think they're good in Spain, try the ones in France sometime. Really nice rooms and ensuite baths, clever, inexpensive decor, etc. And then the food and the wine. A few years ago I was doing my own cassoulet trail along the Canal du Midi (only went from Toulouse to Carcassonne, so I need to finish), and I would put their offerings up against restaurants at good hotels any day.
We often eat at the routiers in France, the truckers stops. Our local one can seat nearly 200 and pre Covid, it was often just about full on Thursday and Friday €13.80 for four courses, coffee and a bottle of wine 🍷 or cider inc. definitely not haute cuisine but just right for when you are tired and hungry. 200 truckers would not be stopping there to eat, if it wasn’t good!
 
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop
Best lightweight guides
Best lightweight guides for before and after your Camino, just 1.4 oz (40 grams)!

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
We often eat at the routiers in France, the truckers stops. Our local one can seat nearly 200 and pre Covid, it was often just about full on Thursday and Friday €13.80 for four courses, coffee and a bottle of wine 🍷 or cider inc. definitely not haute cuisine but just right for when you are tired and hungry. 200 truckers would not be stopping there to eat, if it wasn’t good!
You are so right. To find a good hearty meal look for the distinctive blue/red Routiers disk. See more info here
 

frjuliangreen

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Inglés (2018)
Camino Portugués (2019)
Vía de la Plata/Camino Sanabrés (2020)
Thanks for the info. I am currently in Monesterio and find in many of the are bergs in the next few stages to be fully booked when I call. As a loan female Traveler I am concerned about finding accommodation for the night. Any tips and suggestions of truckstops between here and Santiago would be very much appreciated. Also any tips on how to get through the long stages via bus or taxi as my knee will not let me do more than 20 km a day.
The long stretch after Caparra - I got a taxi to pick me up at Ventaquemada and take me to Plasencia and back again the next day. The problem might be the Embalse de Alcántara where the albergue is closed according to Gronze which means a 32km stretch. Maybe a similar approach would be possible.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
This thread reminds me of our pre-Camino days when we pulled up at a truck stop for a light mid-day meal. The owner asked if we would like a knife and fork with our beef bocadillos, which we declined. However when they arrived we decided that biting through a 1" steak was not maybe a good idea so accepted the cutlery. Beautiful meat, tender and cooked just right. Sadly, even if travelling by car, we have no idea now exactly where it was but it would not be far off the Norte....
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Past OR future Camino
Many, various, and continuing.
Sorry to disappoint the OP, but none of the "purists" will take umbrage with a truck stop. Purists will sleep anywhere they can, whatever the trail presents them with. "Purists" object to the package tours, the hop from one twee B&B to the next, the van meeting up with the group for a picnic under a carefully selected oak tree... the curated, cossetted Comfort Camino Lite where truck stops and graveyards, greasy fries and aching bones are not to be seen.
 
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.
Past OR future Camino
Next up 2022?
I'd like to give a shout out to a couple of truck stops on the Camino Vasco/Bayona en the way to Burgos:
  • Hostal Hermanos Gutiérrez in the Area de servicio de la Brújula
  • Hostal Pancorbo in Pancorbo
@Cclearly, you beat me to it.
Exactly what I was going to say - the experience in both places was really good. And Hostal Hermanos Gutiérrez saved our butts when the albergue in Monasterio de Rodillas was closed (it was Tuesday, and everything in town was shut).

The other thing is as others have said, the food is usually pretty good in these places. Truckers eat!
 

Flog

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022
Sorry to disappoint the OP, but none of the "purists" will take umbrage with a truck stop. Purists will sleep anywhere they can, whatever the trail presents them with. "Purists" object to the package tours, the hop from one twee B&B to the next, the van meeting up with the group for a picnic under a carefully selected oak tree... the curated, cossetted Comfort Camino Lite where truck stops and graveyards, greasy fries and aching bones are not to be seen.

Rebekah, I smiled at your description..
because it conjured up the image of just such a group I happened across. About 10 of them, half my age, on the central way out of Ponte de Lima a few years ago. I couldn't figure out at first how I'd passed them out a couple of times only to find them all ahead of me an hour later, until one of the group told me they were being dropped by minibus at various points along the way and the driver would go on ahead and wait for them at arranged locations, they even had little maps and matching sachels and everything.. a one day express/select camino. Well why not, I thought.. camino is for all.

Arriving later at Alto da Portela panting, my clothes stuck to me with sweat, I saw a neat little table set up with energy bars, drinks and fruit. Assuming it was a regular mobile vendor, I went over and pointed to a couple of items and asked, how much? The young woman says, a little awkwardly: Oh I'm sorry, this stuff is not for pilgrims, it's for our group! and points to the minibus with some logo on the side, then I notice it on her baseball cap too: Camino Adventures or whatever.

Not for pilgrims? On top of a mountain? Don't be silly! I somehow shamed her into giving me my share anyway, and for free, and made my way down to Rubiaes with renewed energy and admittedly, some smugness..
 
Past OR future Camino
Frances, Muxia-Fisterra,
Portuguese, Catalan,
The long stretch after Caparra - I got a taxi to pick me up at Ventaquemada and take me to Plasencia and back again the next day. The problem might be the Embalse de Alcántara where the albergue is closed according to Gronze which means a 32km stretch. Maybe a similar approach would be possible.
I was SO looking forward to stopping at the Albergue at Embalse de Alcantara, and was shocked to see that it was closed. I walked the extra to Canaveral and found a wonderful private hostal there, but it’s all about managing expectations. Having done a very long walk and thinking I had come to the end, I really didn’t want to do another 10 kms more. A truck stop would have been very welcome.
 
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store

Daddyfrog

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Norte (2018)
We stopped at Mar on the Norte on a very stormy night - loudest thunder I've ever heard! The nearest place to stock up and eat that night was a service station shop and restaurant. We were pleasantly surprised by the range of goods in the shop and the quality of our meals. And it saved us a really long walk in the rain!
 

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 105 ratings
Downloads
15,619
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
8,268
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,961
Updated

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

Top