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Is this powered USB hub setup safe?

HBS60

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
August 2024 (planned)
I’ve been stressing about charging my devices, so just want to make sure. I have this 4port Powered USB hub which I’m connecting to an adapter to fit European (at least Spain, since I know it worked there, it not sure if it’s different in France) outlets. If it says input 100-240 v, it should be OK right? I’m less certain whether the Hertz or Amps make a difference. Most important item is my iPhone (I’m actually planning to buy a new one, I would hate to fry it). I also have some assorted stuff like a gimbal, Bluetooth headphones, etc). I was originally planning to bring a power bank but that’s too heavy. I’m still on the fence about my Kindle. Not sure what to do about my cPAP machine because it needs it separate power supply and it doesn’t use USB. It turns out I might have nose surgery before my trip, as I have significant obstructions that might be causing my sleep apnea, so I would gratefully ditch the machine if surgery takes care of the problem.
Does this setup look ok for both Spain and France?
 

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I have one like this. It is not powered. Can plug in my CPAP and also use it to charge my phone, but I don't have an Iphone. Do you need 4 ports? Can you just charge two things at a time?
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Edit: I looked on Amazon and the same company also has a similar adapter with a plug for Iphone chargers.
 
I have one like this. It is not powered. Can plug in my CPAP and also use it to charge my phone, but I don't have an Iphone. Do you need 4 ports? Can you just charge two things at a time?
View attachment 168430
I already had the 4 port hub as I was using it at home for things like USB microphones, recording equipment, etc, and it seemed like a great substitute for the heavy power bank. I do have a few gadgets, but it’s worth considering. Is this on Amazon? I’ll check into it, thanks!
 
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100 to 240 VAC 50 to 60 Hz covers power "normal power" in just about all of the world including Spain. Have you tried using this hub to recharge your phone? You might find that it charges rather slowly or not at all from a device that is deisgned primarily to be a hub, not a charger.
 
You're gonna 'over-stress' yourself with all the stuff you are stressing about!
Any reasonably modern adaptor now-a-days has a built in voltage converters. I brought one from US and just happen to hit a European charger on sale at some mall on the outskirts of Burgos (it had 2 USB ports) so I grabbed it as well.
In any case - I was plugging my Android Samsung Galaxy in one and alternating between my small power bank\pack, whatever you want to call it, and my hearing aid devices charge case. All these came from US and nothing got fried.
Leave the Kindle at home. Immerse yourself into THE CAMINO and its Experience. Chances are your Bluetooth earbuds will not discharge completely in one day as to require full charge every day (see my note above on alternating). Push comes to shove - don't listen to the music a day or two; nothing "bad" will happen to you - I can assure you of that....
 
I have one like this. It is not powered. Can plug in my CPAP and also use it to charge my phone, but I don't have an Iphone. Do you need 4 ports? Can you just charge two things at a time?
View attachment 168430
Edit: I looked on Amazon and the same company also has a similar adapter with a plug for Iphone chargers.
Yes, they are available on Amazon.
 
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Thanks! I actually just found this one that has 2 USB-A ports, a USB port, several power inlets (whatever they are called), and ordered it.
The Camino provides good feedback and advice, and I’m not even there!
Thanks!
 

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A selection of Camino Jewellery
@HBS60, going back to the post that started this, I cannot see the CE mark certifying that it complies with the EU electrical safety requirements. The photo you have shared more recently don't show the compliance markings at all, so it isn't possible to say much about its compliance with any nation's electrical safety requirements.
 
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@HBS60, going back to the post that started this, I cannot see the CE mark certifying that it complies with the EU electrical safety requirements. The photo you have shared more recently don't show the compliance markings at all, so it isn't possible to say much about its compliance with any nation's electrical safety requirements.
Argh. I’ve never paid much attention to those CE marks, not understanding what they mean. I don’t know if it makes a difference that this adapter is not a voltage converter. I went to their website and they don’t say either. It’s already ordered, so I’ll look in the packaging to see if there’s any info (I don’t expect to find any). Worst case scenario I suppose I could buy one locally when I get there, since I’m not the only visitor that has needed one…
 
I don’t know if it makes a difference that this adapter is not a voltage converter.
Actually, it is converting mains voltages to the nominal 5V for the USB ports. If it is configured as a power supply, it might have a slightly higher voltage available on the USB-C port.
 
I assume the black power supply in the photos for the initial post is the one for your CPAP? The thing to look at is the INPUT.

Yours says 110-240V which means it's OK with a simple adapter (which is almost certainly what you purchased) anywhere in the world.

You don't need one that converts the voltage - the power supply is doing that already.
 
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Yours says 110-240V which means it's OK with a simple adapter (which is almost certainly what you purchased) anywhere in the world.
It might be compatible with different voltages, but it is not a simple adaptor, and it doesn't have electrical safety compliance markings for the EC nor Australia. It only appears to have an FCC compliance marking, indicating it will meet the requirements for use in the US, and can be sold there. It may not meet the requirements elsewhere.
If you use the adapter/transformer in your pictures, here is a link with information about its compatibility in Europe.
I couldn't see the EC compliance marking in any of the images, and there is no statement on the page linked here about the product's electrical safety compliance in any country. The only marking I could easily detect on the product shown in the product listing was the FCC mark, indicating that it could be sold in the USA. I couldn't see an Australian RCM which would indicate that it could be sold in Australia.

I am sure that I am not the only person to have bought an adaptor like this when travelling or online that don't fully comply with the electrical safety regulations in my own country, and continue to use these products when I return to Australia. That is a risk that I take, but I do that at least knowing that there are risks involved.
 
100 to 240 VAC 50 to 60 Hz covers power "normal power" in just about all of the world including Spain. Have you tried using this hub to recharge your phone? You might find that it charges rather slowly or not at all from a device that is deisgned primarily to be a hub, not a charger.
I think this is the most important point.
 
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It only appears to have an FCC compliance marking, indicating it will meet the requirements for use in the US, and can be sold there.
FYI, the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) logo on a product does not certify that a product meets any safety requirements. It means that the product will produce minimal electromagnetic interference.

The introduction to Wikipedia's article on the FCC mark says:

The FCC logo or the FCC mark is a voluntary mark employed on electronic products manufactured or sold in the United States which indicates that the electromagnetic radiation from the device is below the limits specified by the Federal Communications Commission and the manufacturer has followed the requirements of the Supplier's Declaration of Conformity authorization procedures.
 
Any plug, whether it is a simple plug that attaches to a device cable (think table lamp) or one that can be plugged into a foreign socket and then allows your own plug to be plugged in is a simple thing.
Take it apart and you will see that it is merely some pieces of solid copper or brass, which allows the circuit/s to be made.

There is only one thing to be aware of that can cause a problem - the load that goes through it - how much power is drawn off from the power supply because if it is too much it will cause heat in the adapter and possibly then fire.

Properly wired domestic electrical circuits in a building are built to take multiple loads of 13 amps - but only up to 13 amps from each socket. 13 amps in EU voltage is (Edited by me) 3120 Watts (3.12 Kilowatts!) - unless someone takes their own large kettle or two bar electric heater I would be amazed if any pilgrim could carry anything that can draw anywhere near that power so none of us should have any concerns - it is the power drawn through, not how many things are connected.

With adapter plugs that contain USB ports the situation is slightly different in that there is a separated internal device that reduces the 240v to 5v and at certain ampages. Old models at maybe just 1amp output, newer models (from companies aware of fast charging and so on) at 3amps.

So - buy a plug adapter that can take your home plug and that has USB ports but only if guaranteed to be properly made, a good brand, complete with kite and/or CE marks and with USB ports that output the modern 3amps.
 
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So - buy a plug adapter that can take your home plug and that has USB ports but only if guaranteed to be properly made, a good brand, complete with kite and/or CE marks and with USB ports that output the modern 3amps.
No , you need a CE marking on it.
By them in Europe and not from China and Taiwan.
Just sayin.
Hi HBS60
If you use the adapter/transformer in your pictures, here is a link with information about its compatibility in Europe.

Thanks to all. I saw the Tessan page but it says nothing (that I can find) about meeting CE standards. If the reviews are to be believed, it should be OK, but that’s just an if, who knows whom/what to trust?
If I must buy one when I get to Spain, where can I buy one? I don’t expect to find a Best Buy, Target, Walmart, etc, I’m not familiar with Spain stores. I’ll be spending my first night at Albergue Plaza Catedral in Pamplona en route to SJPDP, anything within walking distance?
Thanks for all the help!
 
Thanks to all. I saw the Tessan page but it says nothing (that I can find) about meeting CE standards. If the reviews are to be believed, it should be OK, but that’s just an if, who knows whom/what to trust?
If I must buy one when I get to Spain, where can I buy one? I don’t expect to find a Best Buy, Target, Walmart, etc, I’m not familiar with Spain stores. I’ll be spending my first night at Albergue Plaza Catedral in Pamplona en route to SJPDP, anything within walking distance?
Thanks for all the help!

A CE mark merely shows that the device is to EU standards and therefore can be sold in the EU.

One can buy adapters in any hypermarket - the problem I once had in buying in Spain is that they were almost exclusively EU adapters to use abroad, so you may need to bring one with you. Don't get concerned about marks really, just buy a reputable name product.
 
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Any small retail store will have them. Lots of members referred to chino shops. The store owners do understand "travel adaptor". I got one in Puente la Reina when mine got accidentally wet and all USB ports shortened out (the only thing i was able to use after it dried out was the actual plug - i.e. if i plugged something into it). In Burgos I spent some time in the Mall (for the lack of better description); was on the outskirts of the city and we were waiting for the Decathlon to open.... anyways there was a European adapter with no plug but 2 USBs on sale for like €4.00 and for that price I snatched it (probably should've gotten 2). So the opportunities abound. No worries ;)
 
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Any small retail store will have them. Lots of members referred to chino shops. The store owners do understand "travel adaptor". I got one in Puente la Reina when mine got accidentally wet and all USB ports shortened out (the only thing i was able to use after it dried out was the actual plug - i.e. if i plugged something into it). In Burgos I spent some time in the Mall (for the lack of better description); was on the outskirts of the city and we were waiting for the Decathlon to open.... anyways there was a European adapter with no plug but 2 USBs on sale for like €4.00 and for that price I snatched it (probably should've gotten 2). So the opportunities abound. No worries ;)

I didn't find that at all, not for a EU plug adapter with a foreign socket to plug into. In those shops there were plenty of adapters to use outside Spain but none for foreign use inside Spain - eventually I found one in a huge Al Campo hypermarket.
A simple EU plug with usb sockets is another matter, they are everywhere, but that is not what the poster is looking for.
 
The power output of the unit is 5 volts* 2.5 amps, giving 12.5 watts.

The charging power for new iPhones is 20 watts.

Along with your CPAP etc your power required exceeds the unit.

I have a good worldwide mains adapter and the original charger for the phone. You should do that for your new phone.

I assume the CPAP comes with it's own charger. I would also take that.

Wait till you get to Spain and seek out the fereteria or Chinese shop and get the adapters that they recommend.

An often overlooked problem can be the lack of mains outlets, or overcrowded by other users. In this case a multi mains adapter allows more users to plug in their chargers. That may be useful for you.
 
Any plug, whether it is a simple plug that attaches to a device cable (think table lamp) or one that can be plugged into a foreign socket and then allows your own plug to be plugged in is a simple thing.
Take it apart and you will see that it is merely some pieces of solid copper or brass, which allows the circuit/s to be made.

There is only one thing to be aware of that can cause a problem - the load that goes through it - how much power is drawn off from the power supply because if it is too much it will cause heat in the adapter and possibly then fire.

Properly wired domestic electrical circuits in a building are built to take multiple loads of 13 amps - but only up to 13 amps from each socket. 13 amps in EU voltage is 1560 Watts (1.56 KiloWatts!) - unless someone takes their own large kettle or two bar electric heater I would be amazed if any pilgrim could carry anything that can draw anywhere near that power so none of us should have any concerns - it is the power drawn through, not how many things are connected.

With adapter plugs that contain USB ports the situation is slightly different in that there is a separated internal device that reduces the 240v to 5v and at certain ampages. Old models at maybe just 1amp output, newer models (from companies aware of fast charging and so on) at 3amps.

So - buy a plug adapter that can take your home plug and that has USB ports but only if guaranteed to be properly made, a good brand, complete with kite and/or CE marks and with USB ports that output the modern 3amps.
13 amps at European voltage is more like 3,000 watts. When I worked in UK theatres we used 10 amp lighting circuits, which amounts to about 2,500 watts, but it depends on the exact voltage. It used to be 250v at one time in the UK but now 240v, I think.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
13 amps at European voltage is more like 3,000 watts. When I worked in UK theatres we used 10 amp lighting circuits, which amounts to about 2,500 watts, but it depends on the exact voltage. It used to be 250v at one time in the UK but now 240v, I think.
13 amps at 240 volts is indeed 3120w - my only defense here is I must have been tired when I wrote mine!! Will edit it.
 
The power output of the unit is 5 volts* 2.5 amps, giving 12.5 watts.

The charging power for new iPhones is 20 watts.

Along with your CPAP etc your power required exceeds the unit.

I have a good worldwide mains adapter and the original charger for the phone. You should do that for your new phone.

I assume the CPAP comes with it's own charger. I would also take that.

Wait till you get to Spain and seek out the fereteria or Chinese shop and get the adapters that they recommend.

An often overlooked problem can be the lack of mains outlets, or overcrowded by other users. In this case a multi mains adapter allows more users to plug in their chargers. That may be useful for you.

Photos seem to show that his cpap machine is mains plug, which is separate from USB circuits in those adapters.
 
The picture is not of my cPAP, but of the powered USB plug. I’m attaching pics of the USB hub with its plug attached to the adapter, also of the brick of my Resvent cPAP machine (it has the CE logo), then I have pics of the new Tessan adapter I just got, I think I could connect the USB hub plug (two-pronged) to the Tessan, but it might be redundant since the Tessan does have usb slots. I hope this makes sense…
 

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Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
I have one like this. It is not powered. Can plug in my CPAP and also use it to charge my phone, but I don't have an Iphone. Do you need 4 ports? Can you just charge two things at a time?
That is powered, but it is not a “hub.” A hub supports data transfer; your device provides only power. I see that it provides a USA style outlet, but (warning) it does not look big enough to contain a voltage transformer! If my suspicion is correct, plugging a north American appliance into it will damage the appliance and probably the adapter. Someone else posted a picture of a similar device that acxtually had that warning on the front of it.
 
I didn't find that at all, not for a EU plug adapter with a foreign socket to plug into. In those shops there were plenty of adapters to use outside Spain but none for foreign use inside Spain - eventually I found one in a huge Al Campo hypermarket.
I’ve seen converters and adapters of that type ()and all others!) in almost every airport in two dozen countries.
 
That is powered, but it is not a “hub.” A hub supports data transfer; your device provides only power. I see that it provides a USA style outlet, but (warning) it does not look big enough to contain a voltage transformer! If my suspicion is correct, plugging a north American appliance into it will damage the appliance and probably the adapter. Someone else posted a picture of a similar device that acxtually had that warning on the front of it.
I only use it for my CPAP which is set for the voltage difference. I never take appliances requiring a transformer.

I don't need it to transfer data, only to charge my phone.

I am a simple kind of person with little powered tech.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I’m getting a bit confused here, so I want to make sure i get this right.
I’ll forget about the hub of my original question, and if I understand correctly, the Tessan adapter should be sufficient as it has a 3 prong socket for my cPAP machine (whose brick voltage states 100-240V, meaning I just need an adapter so I can plug it into a Spain plug). It also has two USB-A and one USB-C ports, so I can plug my iPhone to it since their outputs are 5V, correct? No voltage conversion is needed with either the cPAP or the USB devices like iPhones. I think I would need a voltage converter if I was plugging some other single voltage (ie, 110 V) device, which is not the case. I hope I got this right, if not, let me know.
Thanks!
ETA: I just noticed my cPAP brick reads 100-240V, but the Tessan rating is 100-250V, is this difference a big deal?
Thanks!
 
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I’m getting a bit confused here, so I want to make sure i get this right.
I’ll forget about the hub of my original question, and if I understand correctly, the Tessan adapter should be sufficient as it has a 3 prong socket for my cPAP machine (whose brick voltage states 100-240V, meaning I just need an adapter so I can plug it into a Spain plug). It also has two USB-A and one USB-C ports, so I can plug my iPhone to it since their outputs are 5V, correct? No voltage conversion is needed with either the cPAP or the USB devices like iPhones. I think I would need a voltage converter if I was plugging some other single voltage (ie, 110 V) device, which is not the case. I hope I got this right, if not, let me know.
Thanks!
ETA: I just noticed my cPAP brick reads 100-240V, but the Tessan rating is 100-250V, is this difference a big deal?
Thanks!
This looks like a good solution. You will be able to plug your CPAP power supply directly into the Tessan adaptor, and to charge your phone, etc from one of the USB ports. The voltage difference that the different devices can accommodate is not an issue here.
 
This looks like a good solution. You will be able to plug your CPAP power supply directly into the Tessan adaptor, and to charge your phone, etc from one of the USB ports. The voltage difference that the different devices can accommodate is not an issue here.
Thanks! Much appreciated!
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Properly wired domestic electrical circuits in a building are built to take multiple loads of 13 amps - but only up to 13 amps from each socket.
A minor point, but this appears to reflect UK practice. In Spain, the Type F outlet is rated to 16A. Some sources suggest a Type C might be as little as 2.5A, others suggest that it can be used up to 16A. UK practice also includes installing a ring main in domestic buildings, which drives the use of individually fuzed plugs. I have only ever seen these in the UK. Certainly the Type C and Type F plugs used in Europe, US and Australian plugs are not individually fuzed. Circuits in these countries are protected at the consumer control unit (aka fuze box).

I don't think any of this actually affects the advice @David has offered, I am merely clarifying that the Spanish system differs in some respects from the UK.
 
Yes, the whole spur (rather than ring main) will be fused centrally at 16A, which means you can draw 16A at one socket, but certainly not at every socket at the same time. Most appliances will not draw 16A, though, certainly not a phone charger.
 
A minor point, but this appears to reflect UK practice. In Spain, the Type F outlet is rated to 16A. Some sources suggest a Type C might be as little as 2.5A, others suggest that it can be used up to 16A. UK practice also includes installing a ring main in domestic buildings, which drives the use of individually fuzed plugs. I have only ever seen these in the UK. Certainly the Type C and Type F plugs used in Europe, US and Australian plugs are not individually fuzed. Circuits in these countries are protected at the consumer control unit (aka fuze box).

I don't think any of this actually affects the advice @David has offered, I am merely clarifying that the Spanish system differs in some respects from the UK.

Yes, I was being Anlgo-centric. Rather than the rings we have in the UK in Spain they wire independent radials to the main fuse board. So in theory each socket has their own cable and own fuse. Cabling is the same - 2.5mm - the fuse on the fuse board should be 16amps.
13amps drawn on a socket is safe.
For lesser sockets, such as shavers and so on the ampage should be marked - they are made for lower draw.
 
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