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The big map o the Caminos de Santiago

les autres - camino 4 disabled info wanted please

#1
Hi, firstly I would like to say that I love the French for 'disabled', being 'les autres', 'the others'. It sounds exclusive but with a little imagination it is actually inclusive..." we are all others, but some are more others than others".

I am a left leg above-knee amputee who is determined to do the 500, or in my case 1000!(1 leg x 500 miles=1000miles) I have been fretting about not being able to travel the required daily distance between hostels and have been planning to take a tent in case I have to stop midway. Obviously the extra weight I would carry would be something I could do without.

Can anyone tell me whether, in their experience or otherwise, I need to worry about this too much? I can walk up to 10 miles in a day but would not fancy my chances of repeating it without a day's rest. My preferred daily maximum would be around 6 miles.

Where are the places that I will struggle to find accomodation within a 6 mile walk? What is the maximum distance between accomodation? If i know where they are and how long they are I would be able to prepare myself.

Many, Many Thanks, Mark
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#2
Hello Mark,
You 'les autres' never fail to amaze me! You go for it!!
If you can read Spainsh - or do a bit of Babelfish translatin - you will find a downladable guide for the camino Frances for people with disabilities here (I think it is based on walking 8km per day - well under your estimation.)

http://www.ibermutuamur.es/camino_santi ... nicial.htm

The guide was written by people with different physical, or sensory handicaps.
Ibermutuar (who has published it) is a workers' collective composed of professionals that tend to safety on the job, accidents at work, etc., The guide contains information about accessibility and other matters of interest to pilgrims with physical handicaps, including albergues and restaurants with special facilities. The guide covers the French Way and focuses on those sections that may pose particular difficulties. It also contains suggested stages of 8 kilometers per day, with information about albergues and other resting or sleeping facilities.
Three pilgrims who traversed the French Way on wheelchairs participated directly in the preparation of the guide which, at present, is only available in Spanish, but which is being translated into French and German.
The guide was sponsored, and funded by the Caixa Galicia (a bank), the ONCE foundation ("once" means eleven in Spanish which is a foundation for the assitance of those who are blind), and the Fenosa Union.
For a text only version go here:
http://www.ibermutuamur.es/camino_santi ... nsejos.htm
Good luck!
 
#3
Wow, fantastic! you are a doll but you're not so silly! Thanks.

My Spanish is not good enough to comprehend what you have found for me, but I do have Spanish speaking friends who might be able to help? Babel Fish I will try.

It's people like you who make the thing seem not so much of a dream! Thanks again, Mark
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#4
You are welcome.
I am partial to Marks, especially 'others' because I am the mother of another 'other' and my 'other' is also Mark!
Most guides are out of date even before they come off the presses so I'm not sure that this one is any different.
Pilgrim hug,
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#6
Mark, you asked about the terrain and distances between accommodation.
I'm not sure if the guide for people with disabilites leads you away from the more remote pilgrim paths but here is a synopsis of the terrain from the website of the CSJ - with a few of my own observations thrown in. For accommodation, I downloaded the plan page from the godesalco.com website that has the distances between all the towns and villages and have it as a word doc - if you would like a copy please mail me and I will send it to you.


If you start from St Jean Pied-de-Port, the very first day involves a very steep climb climb of 1,200 metres, then a short, sharp descent to Roncesvalles which many find more strenuous than the ascent.
If you start from Roncesvalles, it's an undulating, mostly downhill, walk for 2 days to Pamplona. It can be lethal if muddy so watch for the weather forecast.
After Pamplona you climb to the Alto de Perdon, a little bugger of a hill with a steep, river-boulder strewn descent on the other side.
Thereafter it certainly isn't flat - I guess I'd call it undulating - till Belorado, after which you climb the Montes de Oca (an hour's climb, then a plateau) to San Juan de Ortega before dropping again to Burgos.
The meseta which follows is a pretty level plateau at about 800 metres, and takes about a week to cross - two weeks if you cover 10km per day. The mountains of León take you up to 1,400 metres over 2 - 4 days, then very steeply down to the Bierzo plain. The path down to el Acebo and Molinaseca is mostly shale and this, too can be strenuous walking.
2 days later you have the Cebreiro range, again reaching 1,400 metres, and climbed in one day - or two if you chose. But neither of these is as bad as the day from St Jean, because you start higher up. However, the path is mainly rocks which can be difficult if you are unsteady - especially on the downhills.
After Cebreiro it's generally downhill all the way to Santiago, but that doesn't mean that there are no more climbs ! Its pretty much a roller coaster of short sharp ups and steep downs all the way to Santiago.
Remember too that for many people going downhill is worse than climbing. The descents mentioned are steeper than the preceding climbs. Some guides are for walkers and cyclists eg: Practical Guide for Pilgrims - Millán Bravo Lozana - and if the paths are not recommended for cyclists, you'll know that they are rutted or rocky and in that case it would be better to follow the alternative, cyclist's route. (Which many pilgrims do - especially those pulling or pushing carts or those with injuries.)
 
#7
Thanks again sillydoll and thanks jeff001.

The Godesalco site is great, but unfortunately does not include SJPP to Roncesvalles. Although sillydoll gives some info on this I would like a bit more. I really don't want to miss SJPP to Roncesvalles although sometimes I think I should? Bit of a catch 22 as I like the idea of a really tough start and want to see in real life what I have only seen in pictures, but I don't want to do myself any damage if it is a really tough stage?

I think I will start a new thread on SJPP to Roncesvalles and a new thread on pulling/pushing carts as mentioned by sillydoll.

Thanks, Mark

PS - read your blog sillydoll and am setting up my own - will let you know soon!
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#8
Do you have a prosthesis and do you walk with the aid of crutches? If you have a decent prosthesis, you should be able to walk from St Jean to Roncesvalles. (My Mark's hero is Douglas Bader - because he could play golf off a 5 handicap. South Africans are sports carzy!)

I would make two recommendations.

1) To give yourself the best chance of doing it without injury send your backpack on to Roncesvalles using Caroline's Express Burricot at: apcaroline@hotmail.com She will lend you a day pack to carry your water, food etc.
Or, Jacotrans - http://www.jacotrans.com/ingles/iquienes.htm :
2) The first 8 - 10km are the most strenuous so stop after the 8km mark at Orisson. Book a bed ahead - http://www.refuge-orisson.com/

The downhill bit to Roncesvalles is very steep so use two trekking poles or crutches on that section.

So, now all you need to do is add two days to your godesalco.com plan and you will have a full itinerary! (Unless, of course, you change your mind and decide to walk to Finisterre as well!)

Hugs,
 

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