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My Camino de Invierno (July 2014)

2020 Camino Guides

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!

Hi, all

After finishing Camino de Madrid and a few days on CF from Sahagun to Ponferrada in June it's my plan to continue on Camino de Invierno.

I'll come to Ponferrada on 11th July (that may vary up to 2-3 days) and will start Invierno next day. I think I'll stay in municipal albergue in Ponferrada.

My planned stages are:
- Day01: Borrenes (23km) (or maybe Las Medulas??? Don't know yet.)
- Day02: Sobradelo (26km)
- Day03: A Rua (23km)
- Day04: Quiroga (28km)
- Day05: A Pobra de... (24km)
- maybe a non-walking day in Monforte de Lemos or just a shorter stage from A Pobra... and starting late next day to Castrotane
- Day06: Castrotane (23km)
- Day07: Chantada (23km)
- Day08: Rodeiro (25km)
- Day09: A Laxe (27km)
- Day10: Ponte Ulla (28km)
- Day11: Santiago de Compostela (22km) - 22nd-25th July

That's the plan but I won't hold back to change it. Altogether with CdM, CF and Fisterra/Muxia I have 5 days in reserve. I calculated the stages as shown partly because of the distances (to be as similar as possible from day to day) and also on availability of albergues and other infrastructure in villages.

To be able to post comments about the route etc. I'll buy one of those smart gadgets. Well, THAT will be a real challenge for me, an IT idiot :D

If someone of you have any comments it will be much appreciated. And if someone plan to walk in the same time PM me or say Hi to a 43yo male with eye glasses, moustaches and short beard. I'll carry red-white-silver-black backpack with two forum badges on my back and black hip photo pack in front (see the picture attached).


Have a nice day! I will sure do ;)
1583-Bostjan on Praza do Obradoiro (Santiago de Compostela, 22.06.2011).jpg
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, KinkyOne,
Creative stage planning! You've obviously done a lot of work here.

When I walked the Invierno in 2011, Ramon in Rua, who is president of the association I think, gave me a copy of the guide in Spanish that is shown on the front page of their website. http://caminodeinvierno.es It's only in Spanish, but it was helpful, though I think I would have made it fine with just the CSJ online guide.

Looking at the Spanish guide with your stages in mind, I see there are reported to be two hotels in Pobra de Brollon, the As Vinas and the Avenida. I was surprised that a town that size would have that kind of offering. They also mention Penelope's albergue in Castrorane. But I don't see anything in Sobradelo -- have you found a place to stay there?

Susanna and I are likely to be on the Invierno at about the same time as you, or maybe a day or so ahead. So maybe we'll run into each other at some point.

Buen camino, Laurie (and p.s., I walked the same Camino de Madrid - Invierno combination as you are planning in 2011 and it is a great combination of Castilla and Leon on the plains followed by leafy green Galicia).
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hi, Laurie,

I got some info about accommodation in caminka's list: http://camino-medieval.webs.com/accommodationlists.htm Albergue in Sobradelo was planned to open in 2013 so will have to check that out and think of consequences later ;)

Nice to have you and Susanna ahead for really fresh info :) I've also looked at the Spanish guide you are referring to because I really had to combine more sources to get the whole picture of Invierno.

Maybe we see each other on the way. Ultreia!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Laurie,

I got some info about accommodation in caminka's list: http://camino-medieval.webs.com/accommodationlists.htm Albergue in Sobradelo was planned to open in 2013 so will have to check that out and think of consequences later ;)

Nice to have you and Susanna ahead for really fresh info :) I've also looked at the Spanish guide you are referring to because I really had to combine more sources to get the whole picture of Invierno.

Maybe we see each other on the way. Ultreia!
Hi, again,
This list of accommodations says there is accommodation in the polideportivo in Sobradelo, but I haven't seen anything more specific. http://www.xacobeo.fr/ZE3.01.Inv.s.pdf I am virtually certain there is no albergue there. Good luck and buen camino.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hi, again,
This list of accommodations says there is accommodation in the polideportivo in Sobradelo, but I haven't seen anything more specific. http://www.xacobeo.fr/ZE3.01.Inv.s.pdf I am virtually certain there is no albergue there. Good luck and buen camino.
In Sobradelo there is also possibility of alojamiente en polideportivo, so maybe I'll try that :)
Thanks for the list, very useful and short.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I'm also planning to walk the Invierno this summer and have been looking around for updated information. I just saw that there is now a second Spanish language guide.

http://www.lavozdegalicia.es/noticia/lemos/2014/02/05/nueva-guia-camino-invierno-presentara-sabado-ourense/0003_201402M5C2992.htm

It is availble on their website http://www.turcamino.es/guía-camino-de-invierno

20 euros plus shipping.

From the description it sounds like it's got a lot of supplemental information, and its 204 pages with color photos may mean that it's heavy, but it is hot off the presses and would probably have a lot of good stuff inside.

I would order a copy if it weren't so dang hard and expensive to do electronic bank transfers from the US.

Buen camino, Laurie
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
@peregrina2000
Wow, that really have to be some very heavy guide. I spotted author's name (Aida Menendez Lorenzo) somewhere during my search. Obviously a Mrs. that is really into Invierno :)
Thanks for sharing, Laurie!
 

Regina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to walk the Camino de Santiago July 6th 2014.
KinkyOne,

I plan on going on my first Camino around the same time you are atarting yours. I plan on arriving in Santiago de Compostela on (or around) July 24th for the feast day of St. James. This will be a huge festival day for the city! I was wondering if you would enjoy the company of a new pilgrim on the Camino? If so, we can Skype about it to meet each other before the Camino.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
KinkyOne,

I plan on going on my first Camino around the same time you are atarting yours. I plan on arriving in Santiago de Compostela on (or around) July 24th for the feast day of St. James. This will be a huge festival day for the city! I was wondering if you would enjoy the company of a new pilgrim on the Camino? If so, we can Skype about it to meet each other before the Camino.
Hi, @Regina :)

Any company would be nice since I'll be on Camino de Madrid and de Invierno where there most likely I'll be walking all by myself. Which is not a problem per se, but in the afternoon/evening... Actually I'm kind of worried to be in SdC exactly during the Saint's day (TOO much crowd), but I'll be there around that date.

So, where are you starting from? And when? If we could meet it would be nice. Especially if you're planing to go further on to Muxia/Fisterra.

Ultreia!
 

Regina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to walk the Camino de Santiago July 6th 2014.
@KinkyOne ,

I am also a little worried to be in SdC on that date but it will be an experience complete with festivity and fireworks. However, I do not plan on going any further to Muxia. The plan is to start at Borrenes and making it by July 24th around July 11-12th (depends on when I can get a cheaper flight ticket). Since this is my first Camino, honestly I do not want to walk the beginning alone. Would you mind if we started the pilgrimage together? Depending on if our days work together. However, I will probably go on my schedule to make it by July 24th.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
@KinkyOne ,

I am also a little worried to be in SdC on that date but it will be an experience complete with festivity and fireworks. However, I do not plan on going any further to Muxia. The plan is to start at Borrenes and making it by July 24th around July 11-12th (depends on when I can get a cheaper flight ticket). Since this is my first Camino, honestly I do not want to walk the beginning alone. Would you mind if we started the pilgrimage together? Depending on if our days work together. However, I will probably go on my schedule to make it by July 24th.
I guess there's a lot of chance to meet in Ponferrada around 11th, maybe 12th or even 13th because I can allow myself two more days at this stage with no problem (with only 3 days left in reserve if that's 12th). But of course I can adapt my pace a bit ;) My planned stages from Ponferrada to SdC are 11 days if that's OK with you. I can send you the list via e-mail if you wish so.

Maybe I should point out that I'll be on a budget. Of course it's easier to take private accommodation for double room, but I'm a snorer :eek:, most of the nights I've been told. But you never know :)

If you want to contact me: bostjan.masera@gmail.com

Nice to hear from you!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hola!


After walking Camino de Madrid (Madrid-Sahagun, 371,54kms) and part of CF (Sahagun-Ponferrada, 176,39kms) this year in end June/July (you can read and see all about it in these two threads:
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/finally-my-camino-de-madrid-june-2014.25354/
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/my-walk-from-sahagun-to-ponferrada-july-2014.29092/)
I've continued my walk on Camino de Invierno from Ponferrada to Santiago de Compostela (309,99kms) and from there to Muxia and Fisterra. Most information on the route I've got from @Rebekah Scott CSJ booklet, @caminka list of acommodations, @peregrina2000 blog as well as from these web sites:
- http://mundicamino.com/rutas.cfm?id=66
- http://caminodeinvierno.es/etapas-itinerario-alojamiento-predicción-meteorológica/
- http://www.suicammini.com/file/Guida.del.camino.de.Invierno.pdf
and of course on this forum ;)

In upcoming day-by-day posts I will use distances recorded by Endomondo GPS from distinctive points like Plaza Mayor, Iglesia, Bar, Albergue etc. and from there on, because I don't find distances measured roughly from end of one village to the entrance of the second village really accurate. GPS tracks will be added for each stage/day in .gpx file with some interesting or informative photos. At least I hope you'll find them this way ;)

Overall the route is surprisingly well marked, better than Camino de Madrid where it was sufficient enough though. Invierno is very very VERY up&down route ;) so I wouldn't recommend it to first timers or at least they should have some training in mountain hiking with full gear beforehand. On 310kms of lenght it has 10.676mts of ascents and 11.349mts of descends. Tough cookie because some of the stages could be quite long with a lot of altitude gain just like more known stretches over Col de Lapoeder, Cruz de Ferro or O'Cebreiro. Especially if you're on budget and looking for albergues, punto acogida etc.

Sometimes the nature is really stunning and reminded me very much of our Karst region. I've found the people along the route unbelievably nice and helpful, very similar to those on Camino de Madrid. I have only met three pilgrims the same day in Puente de Domingo Florez and some more from A Laxe to SdC because of those that came from Via de la Plata. And that was it. But with such nice locals that wasn't a problem :) If you have any more questions or need additional info I might not included in these posts, please ask.

Hope you'll enjoy.

Ultreia!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
DAY 26 (Thu, 17.07.2014)
PONFERRADA – PRIARANZA DEL BIERZO (11,83kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

I've started quite late. First I checked my gear really thoroughly and found no traces of bedbugs and no new bites appeared (about that read last post in my CF thread, link is in previous post here). I bought some food and plastic bags and at noon I was finally ready to leave Ponferrada. It's easy to find start of Camino de Invierno. CSJ booklet has it covered well. I started my Endomondo at cruceiro (info stand right there, but was closed) and went in direction of Puente Mascaron over Rio Boeza (photos802&804) where I met few pilgrims coming to the city via Castro.

After the bridge turn right and that's it, the way to Toral de Merayo is marked and you can not get lost. After first 3kms along Rio Boeza ascent starts and views over Ponferrada and the valley (photo806) would be really beautiful in clearer, less humid air. Soon vineyards appeared and after km6 I descended to Toral de Merayo (7kms from cruceiro in Ponferrada) (photos807-810).

Before the bridge is the first bar and on the Plaza the second one, but its name is not Bar Mariluz anymore, it's something else and I didn't remember it. There's a wi-fi signal (bar itself didn't have one) in Plaza but is very weak and useless if sitting in front of the bar. Nice people there and tapas which were at least three times bigger than usual. Haven't seen the bakery but there's a pasteleria near the church on the way from the Plaza (photo811). On the way out of the village is Meson Alondra and soon after left turn and right steeply uphill through vineyards and orchards (photo813) nice view back.

Immediately after reaching the top of the hill view over Villalibre de la Jurisdiccion and Priaranza del Bierzo opened (photo814 – in next post). Although my original plan was to go as far as Borrenes I decided to stop in Priaranza because bedbugs bites started appearing again, mostly on my elbows and something has to be done. Since I didn't know where local Polideportivo where I could sleep is, I continued to the first bar in Priaranza which is on the other end of the village. From Meral de Torayo to very cozy Bar Taberna »El Sitio de mi Recreo« is exactly 5kms. There I phoned the Ayuntamiento but nobody answered. Owners, nice young couple, gave me mobile number of alcalde Jose (682-591-483) and although he didn't speak any English I understood that he would send someone to take care of me. And after half an hour her secretary Nuria (647-993-963) came with a car and told me that Polideportivo isn't really polideportivo, but more Centro Social and is at the entrance to the village. Auch, 1,5kms back but after only 12kms that day it was easy. At first she was surprised when I politely refused offered transport with big smile and words that it would be »como un crimen«, but I think she understood that ;)

Centro social is actually at the spot where you cross N-536 a few meters before sign for the end of Villalibre (photos817&819), that's 3,5kms from Toral de Merayo. Nothing much there, no shower but the toilets are clean and ample space in large gym/classroom/showroom. Nuria put off the alarm and wrote a notice for ladies that came later in the evening who and what I am. She also left me her mobile number if I would need anything. First I went 1,5kms along the N-536 to find pharmacy which was closed, so was the other bar on upper main street, but a small tienda & tabaccos was opened.

After return I undressed myself and soaked everything in boiling hot water with lots of soap, washed myself with wet towel and put on fresh clothes that were tightly wraped in plastic bags. The itching and new bites immediately stopped and after hanging wet clothes on late afternoon sun I began enjoying (photos818,820&822 – in next post). I also decided to sleep on the porch of Centro Social not to bring bedbugs in the sport hall. Since I already had some experience with local ladies doing evening aerobics (in Cercedilla's polideportivo) I wasn't surprised when six of them came for pilates. Actually I was a surprise and main event for them with a lot of questioning and giggling because I was sitting there in my spare underwear ;)
 

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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
DAY 27 (Fri, 18.07.2014)
PRIARANZA DEL BIERZO – LAS MEDULAS (20,08kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

It was quite humid night but I've slept very good nevertheless. Washed clothes were wet again so I hanged them to my backpack and at 9AM I left the key in the buson and went on… I took the Camino as it goes through the village and started GPS at the end of the village where I stopped it the day before. First the way goes up on the dirt track (photo823) but soon you come to tarmac N-536. A lot of bitching that day from my side. First on account of CSJ guide. For example – it's not 200mts from Priaranza to Mirador de Santalla, it's 1,5kms!!! Come one… 7 times more!!! (photos825&826)

In Santalla there was nothing really worth to see apart from Calle Chaos (photo827) ;). Well maybe there is, but surely it is not on the Camino itself. After the village there is a nice church in the middle of nowhere (photos829&830). And after that – oh my…. – suffer. More than 240mts of ascent to Villavieja (photos831,837&838) where is … nothing really. Info was that there should've been an Albergue but I've seen only Casa Rural without any contact info. It's 7kms from Priaranza to Villavieja.

From that »god forgotten« but beautiful village the Camino is very enjoyable for 1,3kms to Castillo de Cornatel (photos840,841,843&844 – in next post). One of the most beautiful stretches of the Invierno! Too bad that I came there when it was closed. And also it was quite windy so I put some dry clothes on and ate two apples. Some people came up there when I was enjoying the view over Borrenes (photo845 – in next post) and again I was »the clown« :cool:

But, BUT, I went mad when descending to Borrenes on tarmac (!!!) and realised that I've done 240mts uphill and 180mts down the hill. On asphalt!!! WTF???!!! I remember posts on this forum from a member asking (himself as an engineer) how come those Caminos are routed so illogical. That was exactly my thoughts. Nobody would persuade me that mentioned up&down Camino stretch was in any time in the history used by pilgrims as such. It seems to me like somebody from some Association said »Let's have/make a Camino of our own. What do you think where it should go?« Damn… :mad:

So, if you want to save yourself 240mts of uphill on dirt and 180mts downhill on tarmac simply go along N-536 (well, tarmac again, I guess) and you'll save 4kms (=at least 2h) and a lot of your boots and feet. OK, I'll calm down :rolleyes: It's 5,1kms from Villavieja to Borrenes with nice main plaza where pharmacy, market, medic, fuente, ayuntamiento, post-office and bar are situated (photo846 - in next post).

That 8kms to Las Medulas is, although uphill most of the time, very nice walk. Very soon remains of the Roman mines are visible (photo848 – in next post). There is about 2kms detour on gravel track on the right which is very welcoming to give soles a little break from the tarmac but entering the village of Las Medulas is on asphalt again.

When I came to Las Medulas I stopped by the Tourist Office (there's one more in the village) and met very cooperative girl (speaking only Spanish!). She told me that in the Hotel Las Medulas across the street is also Albergue San Simon (I've seen the commercial panels for that too), but it's kind of hoax – 25€ for a bed in a dormitory… She smiled and I walked to the center of the village (photos850,851,853&854) where the only market I've seen, as »Productos Artesanos«, is by the ancient lavadora.

I was kind of pissed off the whole day on account of many things but especially those illogical up/down-hills and of course bedbug bites. So I went to Casa Soccoro (first street left from lavadora, first right and again first left into the frontyard – marked as Camino to Las Medulas Park, mobile: 987-422-858). I've got a room of my own with a balcony (all shitted by birds) for 25€. Damn… But again all my clothes were washed and I sprayed all the rest.

What else to say about that day…
 

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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
DAY 28 (Sat, 19.07.2014)
LAS MEDULAS – PUENTE DE DOMINGO FLOREZ (10,13kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

Rain started to fall in the evening and it was nice sitting on the balcony half naked with chorizo, queso y vino tinto. But it kept falling all through the night and in the morning it was still pouring… At 10:30AM it has stopped so I moved on (photo855). I was still itching like washing my stuff all over again helped nada :mad:

At least the Camino to Puente de Domingo Florez was nicely marked and on gravel paths (photos856&857). I've met father with two sons in a jeep going up the road and they were waving with big grins. Put a smile on my face! The descend is not as tough as some on CF are and in no time I was in center of the village. There was kind of a fiesta and market on the streets, they were cooking pulpo etc. But after five minutes the sky went dark and rain started again. I squeezed myself under the porch of nearby house and watched the traders put their stuff in vans in a hurry (photos859&860).

After a while rain stopped and I've found pharmacy (bought Neosayomol Cream for 8€ - don't, it's not helping!), ATM and market (bought another two repellents). Rain started to fall again and next door to the market was a bar where I had a beer when two Spanish pilgrims came. Those were the only pilgrims I've met all the way to A Laxe ;)

1,3kms from city center (straight on the Avenida de Ourense on left) is Hostal La Torre, next to the Repsol gasolinera (photos861&862). Their staff was unbelievably nice and they let me wash all my clothes for 0€. Nice receptionist lady also gave me their T-shirt so I wasn't naked all the time waiting for my clothes to dry :D The price for single room was 26€, but they do have pilgrims discount and I've paid 20€ for the room with shower (no WC). When I was waiting for my clothes to dry I sprayed the rest of my gear with repellent and took some mirror pictures of bedbug bites on my back and arms (photos863&865). By that time I've counted over 100 of them!

Hostal La Torrre has WI-FI and I've got a hint from my friend what medicines to buy to fight bedbugs. Will do that tomorrow I've decided. Later I went down for Menu del Dia which wasn't anything special but very tasty. Alltogether I can only recommend stay in Hostal La Torre, but be aware that sometimes they might have wedding party at the weekends ;)
 

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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
DAY 29 (Sun, 20.07.2014)
PUENTE DE DOMINGO FLOREZ – XAGOAZA (26,77kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

It was already 9AM when I woke up. I guess I was actually psychologically so tired because of those bedbug issue that I really needed more than usual 5 hours of sleep. The rest of my clothes and sleeping bag were dry and I packed them in black plastic bags again. Soon after the rain ceased to fall and I was off at 10:30AM. It's easy to find the way because it's well marked and also CSJ guide is adequate on that. Maybe there are some diferencies in distances which I will mention in this post, but there is one (maybe typo) mistake – the third option out of Puente de D.F. which I took is official Camino and runs all the time (that is beyond railroad underpass!) to the right of the railroad and Rio Sil. Camino never runs between them (photos866&868).

CSJ guide has 3,8kms to Pumares, Association has 6kms and my Endomondo tracked 5,5kms to village fuente where I've made a short stop for late breakfast. 1,7kms later I came to Nogueiras which isn't exactly (ghost) »town«, it consists of four abandoned and ruined houses (photo869). I guess I have had a lot of luck that Camino drained itself very quickly and therefore almost no mud on the track (photo870). Almost around the bend is the town of Sobradelo (photos871-873). Maybe there is a bit tricky spot when entering the town, but where an arrow is missing at fuente on the right just proceed straight (don't turn left downhill) and if you won't have half an hour of torrential rain at this exact spot you'll see Bar Mar straight ahead. Camino at this point goes at righthand fork. The distance from Nogueiras is 4,3kms.

Owner of Bar Mar is Manuel Angel Martinez Ramos (988-335-106) and was so kind that I could easily put him into the »Camino Angels« group. He told me that albergue on this address is a very long term project of his, but he could offer overnight stay for 4 persons if called at least one day ahead just to be able to clean up his apartment :) Also he made me a favour and called from his phone to Casa Ignacio in O Barco (988-326-005) but that number wasn't right one. Next call was to Meson Leira, which isn't on Rua Suares 47 and number 988-322-103 is no longer accurate. He got the right number and address, but both I've forgot to write down since they were full. Price for pilgrims is 10€/person which is great. So I knew I would have to go to Xagoaza albergue instead.

The day before a friend of mine with some medical knowledge (she was on CF some weeks prior to that) suggested what I should buy to get rid of bedbugs and ease the itching. I told Manuel about my issue and after two beers he came with info that in O Barco there is a pharmacy opened on Sunday. True angel! We parted with a hug…

I was a little late so I didn't descend to the river instead I did took a photo of medieval bridge (photo875). Camino after Sobradelo mainly runs on tarmac but there's enough grassy shoulder and 2,9kms later I was in Entoma. I've found a beautiful Roman bridge and new resting spot there (photos876&879). Also the village bar was opened and I was able to buy cigarettes. On exit I missed the arrow and suddenly I found myself on tarmac OU-0801. Immediatelly I knew what happened but I proceeded on it and 1,3kms later Camino came from the steep gravel road on my right (at this spot: photo881 – in next post).

When I came to O Barco I stopped GPS recorder and cross the river to Viloira where the opened pharmacy was. I bought Loratadina Sandoz 10mg pills (which is antihistaminic) and Cuatroderm crema 30g cream (for easing the itching). I was so happy to finally get something that will be of some help that I was even able at all to take some photos of grass in the river and some nice houses (photos884,886,888&889 – in next post). From Bar in Entoma to Plaza Mayor in O Barco is 5,2kms (photo890 – in next post).

There I've made a short stop in the cafeteria and phoned hospitalera Gloria in Xagoaza (639-921-679) and she said she'd be waiting for me. I also took the first pill for bedbugs and hoped it will help. From Plaza Mayor I went along the promenade with scallop shells and arrows on iron fence by the river. On the opposite side of the promenade (photos891&892 – in next post) after small wooden footbridge with two freshly painted arrows Camino continues along the river. If you want to go furter on to Vilamartin or A Rua that's the way to go, but if you want to sleep at albergue in Xagoaza you have a problem. At Plaza Mayor I turned left by the river but instead I should have taken the first street to the right which is Rua Doutor Perez Lista and later become Av.Eulogio Fernandez. It's a 2kms almost straight stretch to Repsol gasolinera and church of San Tirso. When I suspected that I was actually going away from San Tirso I've asked two kind ladies and they showed me the direction. I've found my way to gasolinera through maze of backstreets and added 2,5kms to daily distance o_O

From gasolinera the way to Xagoaza is marked and after right turn at Iglesia de San Tirso there's another 1,9kms straight slog on steep tarmac road. I would guess that the distance from Plaza Mayor to albergue is approx.4kms, so another hour of walking. And when I came completely wasted I said »Nunca mas«, but Gloria just grined and added that everybody said that at first. Few moments later I knew exactly what she meant. This albergue is really a gem and if there's a short stage behind you that's the perfect place to enjoy the rest of the day in silence and quietness. But do carry food and drinks because after gasolinera there's no place to buy anything. Albergue has two dormitories with 5 bunks each (20 places), large dining room with fireplace, two PCs and WI-FI, completely furnished kitchen with stove, oven, fridge and washing machine and the bathrooms with toilets are plenty and clean. Also there's a lot of outside space (photos896-902 – in separate post). The price is 6€ and in the morning nobody will throw you out, you just leave the key in the mailbox ;)

I did my laundry all over again and sprayed all the rest gear because I've counted almost 200 bites already, cooked myself rich meaty dinner and enjoyed reading long into the night in front of the albergue.
 

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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!

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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
DAY 30 (Mon, 21.07.2014)
XAGOAZA – A RUA (15,96kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

I knew this will be quite short stage so I didn't make much effort to leave early. Instead I enjoyed the morning on the porch and watched the trees on opposite hill getting colour in the morning sun. It was 11AM when I finally departed. Not a nice walk down the hill on tarmac with stiff knees and cold muscles for 1,7kms and 160mts altitude. Auch! At church of San Tirso I haven't found any markers for Camino whatsoever but also didn't want to go back to promenade in A Rua so I went right along the N-120 now to my right.

1,8kms later I came to a roundabout where marked Camino joined from the left (photos905&906). From that point 300mts further on the righthand side is Hiper Gadis, opened all days 09:30-22:00. I bought some things and made a short break. Village of Arcos is 1,5kms further still on a tarmac road. There the arrows disappeared. Maybe I've missed the crucial one but as I continued straight on when crossing N-120 again the arrows reappeared. 2,5kms later on a disused tarmac side road I came to Vilamartin (approx.5kms from Hiper Gadis) (photos907,910&911). Although the Camino goes through sport park it is still on tarmac. My feet were almost burning and I stopped for two cold beers in a bar at the city swimming pool. I put my boots off and forgot about the visit of the town which center is about half a kilometer from Rio Sil and sport park.

Camino to A Rua de Valdeorras and a bit later A Rua (Albergue Casa da Solaina) runs for another 6,5kms on tarmac which means that the whole days stretch was on tarmac – brutal!!! But views at Rio Sil and some pine trees with their scent made it easier (photos912&914-916). From the point where the last photo was taken is almost exactly 3kms to private albergue. Both ways, for private and municipal (sport hall) albergues, are well signposted, but I went to the right off the main road. No real need for that unless you want to get off busy main street. On this »detour« there's nothing really interesting to see but the direction to Casa da Solaina is perfectly marked and there's no way you can get lost. But if you do continue on main street you can pick up arrows to Casa da Solaina at Ayuntamiento which would be on your left. Turn right there and soon you'll be on small plaza in front of the Church of Fatima (photo919&920 – in next post). Camino runs on the street to the left while the way to albergue is by church left wall, again clearly marked. It's a part of A Rua with small and old houses and so is Albergue (photos924-926 – in next post).

When I first came there everything was closed so I've made a phone call but nobody answered and I descended to the bar in front of Ayuntamiento. Itching started again and I've counted over 200 bites. I was thinking to myself if Asuncion, the hospitalera, wouldn't know what to do I was to go to the nearest hospital and ask for some sort of quarantine or something similar. But since my will and selfcontrol is quite strong in crisis situations I did never scratch a single bite with my fingernails, only with fingertips, so I was spared of infection or even blood poisoning. Soon Asuncion returned call and an hour later she drove with her mother Manuela from Ponferrada. Immediately, right there on the street, I told her about the bedbugs. She asked me a few short questions and said that we would be able to solve the problem.

By the time I returned to the albergue she had already made some preparation. In the patio (photos927-929) I've made a pile of all my clothes, my sleeping bag, castro cap, even cloth kind of sock for my smart phone and finally stripped myself completely naked. Asuncion searched for a bathrobe but she didn't find anything more suitable for me than her mother's silky one (photo931) :confused::rolleyes::D We have had some good laughs, especially her mother when she saw me from the stairs above… Everything then went into washing machine (for the 4th or 5th time in last week!) at 90 degrees C and again I sprayed all the rest.

Later Asun gave me this NosaGel (gel higienizante hidroalcoholico con aloe vera), which supposedly smell nasty to those creatures, talked to me some more, did a few of her shamanic things and in the evening told me that most probably either I got water poisoned or it is a fierce body reaction on just a few bedbug bites (because there are still some traces of syphilis in my blood which goes in my paternal family branch from a member that had syphilis in the time of WW1???). So I guess all my clothes washing was in vain... Well, whatever the reason was, in those days I would literary do anything to stop this. We have had nice late cold dinner prepared by her mother Manuela and talked some more about Camino(s), life, love, philosophy, history, current financial and moral situation in EU etc. She told me that the last peregrino before me was @econodan with his wife and I've told her about @caminka (she lives in the same city as I do) and later even phoned her so they could've had a few minutes of chatting. Really nice evening!

I was sleeping in my own room with three beds and there were another room with kingsize bed and bathroom (shower & WC) attached. Next day later in the morning my stuff was dry and I finally got out of Manuela's bathrobe ;) Good Asun didn't know my nickname... No new bites during the night and considerably less itching. Asun gave me small bottle of homeopathic medicine full with small white balls and I had to take three per day for next month. Also she asked me if I allow her to do one other thing. I agreed and she had put me in the jin-jang circle made of differently coloured stones on the floor of her patio. She had burned some sort of fragrances on a small tray, walked around me, smoked my armpits, my head and crotch with those fragrances and talking something I didn't understand. Hm, well… I don't know what in later days really helped me, either official drugs or her shaman medicine, but it worked and I was sooo happy for that. And especially I was happy because of her attitude in helping me. That's really unforgettable. And she with her mother are another persons on my Camino Angels list!!! Muchisimas gracias, Asun y Manuela!

I have spent that non-walking day really on easy. Few beers in a bar with tripled tapas (waitress was on Camino also last year), yummy, just getting lost in the streets, reading,… And in El Arbol market across the street of Ayuntamiento I have met Gloria, hospitalera from Xagoaza, because she works there. Upon her hint I've bought chorizo that was sooo good I wish it would be in front of me right now :cool: The evening went by very quickly and I fell asleep calmed down and kind of sure that my issues were over.
 

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Theatregal

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
So far...
2012 ~ 2019
DAY 30 (Mon, 21.07.2014)
XAGOAZA – A RUA (15,96kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

I knew this will be quite short stage so I didn't make much effort to leave early. Instead I enjoyed the morning on the porch and watched the trees on opposite hill getting colour in the morning sun. It was 11AM when I finally departed. Not a nice walk down the hill on tarmac with stiff knees and cold muscles for 1,7kms and 160mts altitude. Auch! At church of San Tirso I haven't found any markers for Ca:D:Dmino whatsoever but also didn't want to go back to promenade in A Rua so I went right along the N-120 now to my right.

1,8kms later I came to a roundabout where marked Camino joined from the left (photos905&906). From that point 300mts further on the righthand side is Hiper Gadis, opened all days 09:30-22:00. I bought some things and made a short break. Village of Arcos is 1,5kms further still on a tarmac road. There the arrows disappeared. Maybe I've missed the crucial one but as I continued straight on when crossing N-120 again the arrows reappeared. 2,5kms later on a disused tarmac side road I came to Vilamartin (approx.5kms from Hiper Gadis) (photos907,910&911). Although the Camino goes through sport park it is still on tarmac. My feet were almost burning and I stopped for two cold beers in a bar at the city swimming pool. I put my boots off and forgot about the visit of the town which center is about half a kilometer from Rio Sil and sport park.

Camino to A Rua de Valdeorras and a bit later A Rua (Albergue Casa da Solaina) runs for another 6,5kms on tarmac which means that the whole days stretch was on tarmac – brutal!!! But views at Rio Sil and some pine trees with their scent made it easier (photos912&914-916). From the point where the last photo was taken is almost exactly 3kms to private albergue. Both ways, for private and municipal (sport hall) albergues, are well signposted, but I went to the right off the main road. No real need for that unless you want to get off busy main street. On this »detour« there's nothing really interesting to see but the direction to Casa da Solaina is perfectly marked and there's no way you can get lost. But if you do continue on main street you can pick up arrows to Casa da Solaina at Ayuntamiento which would be on your left. Turn right there and soon you'll be on small plaza in front of the Church of Fatima (photo919&920 – in next post). Camino runs on the street to the left while the way to albergue is by church left wall, again clearly marked. It's a part of A Rua with small and old houses and so is Albergue (photos924-926 – in next post).

When I first came there everything was closed so I've made a phone call but nobody answered and I descended to the bar in front of Ayuntamiento. Itching started again and I've counted over 200 bites. I was thinking to myself if Asuncion, the hospitalera, wouldn't know what to do I was to go to the nearest hospital and ask for some sort of quarantine or something similar. But since my will and selfcontrol is quite strong in crisis situations I did never scratch a single bite with my fingernails, only with fingertips, so I was spared of infection or even blood poisoning. Soon Asuncion returned call and an hour later she drove with her mother Manuela from Ponferrada. Immediately, right there on the street, I told her about the bedbugs. She asked me a few short questions and said that we would be able to solve the problem.

By the time I returned to the albergue she had already made some preparation. In the patio (photos927-929) I've made a pile of all my clothes, my sleeping bag, castro cap, even cloth kind of sock for my smart phone and finally stripped myself completely naked. Asuncion searched for a bathrobe but she didn't find anything more suitable for me than her mother's silky one (photo931) :confused::rolleyes::D We have had some good laughs, especially her mother when she saw me from the stairs above… Everything then went into washing machine (for the 4th or 5th time in last week!) at 90 degrees C and again I sprayed all the rest.

Later Asun gave me this NosaGel (gel higienizante hidroalcoholico con aloe vera), which supposedly smell nasty to those creatures, talked to me some more, did a few of her shamanic things and in the evening told me that most probably either I got water poisoned or it is a fierce body reaction on just a few bedbug bites (because there are still some traces of syphilis in my blood which goes in my paternal family branch from a member that had syphilis in the time of WW1???). So I guess all my clothes washing was in vain... Well, whatever the reason was, in those days I would literary do anything to stop this. We have had nice late cold dinner prepared by her mother Manuela and talked some more about Camino(s), life, love, philosophy, history, current financial and moral situation in EU etc. She told me that the last peregrino before me was @econodan with his wife and I've told her about @caminka (she lives in the same city as I do) and later even phoned her so they could've had a few minutes of chatting. Really nice evening!

I was sleeping in my own room with three beds and there were another room with kingsize bed and bathroom (shower & WC) attached. Next day later in the morning my stuff was dry and I finally got out of Manuela's bathrobe ;) Good Asun didn't know my nickname... No new bites during the night and considerably less itching. Asun gave me small bottle of homeopathic medicine full with small white balls and I had to take three per day for next month. Also she asked me if I allow her to do one other thing. I agreed and she had put me in the jin-jang circle made of differently coloured stones on the floor of her patio. She had burned some sort of fragrances on a small tray, walked around me, smoked my armpits, my head and crotch with those fragrances and talking something I didn't understand. Hm, well… I don't know what in later days really helped me, either official drugs or her shaman medicine, but it worked and I was sooo happy for that. And especially I was happy because of her attitude in helping me. That's really unforgettable. And she with her mother are another persons on my Camino Angels list!!! Muchisimas gracias, Asun y Manuela!

I have spent that non-walking day really on easy. Few beers in a bar with tripled tapas (waitress was on Camino also last year), yummy, just getting lost in the streets, reading,… And in El Arbol market across the street of Ayuntamiento I have met Gloria, hospitalera from Xagoaza, because she works there. Upon her hint I've bought chorizo that was sooo good I wish it would be in front of me right now :cool: The evening went by very quickly and I fell asleep calmed down and kind of sure that my issues were over.
What an incredible (and healing) experience with Asuncion and Manuela! Truly Camino Angels. ...did they let you keep the bathrobe ? :D
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
What an incredible (and healing) experience with Asuncion and Manuela! Truly Camino Angels. ...did they let you keep the bathrobe ? :D
Hahahaha, it's easy to have fun now although I have to admit that I've been also amused by it :D:p:cool:
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, KinkyOne,
I also had a special experience with Asunción and her mom. They are really great Camino angels as you say. We did a little arrow painting in the early afternoon, in the company of Ramón, who is president of a local Invierno association (I don´t know the details but there seem to be two "competing" Invierno associations, as you can see at http://caminodeinvierno.es/ and http://caminodeinvierno.com/ Ramón and Asunción are associated with the first group, which is the one that has published the guidebook). Then Asún took me up to a high place with a small Romanesque church, three villagers, and beautiful gardens and lots of cows grazing. There was also a big rock that we had to stand on because of its special features/powers. For me, the stunning view was the highlight of that rock, but I may be just too pedestrian to appreciate the other powers it has. Then back to town to chat, and to eat Manuela´s home cooked meal.

I´ve told this story a couple of times already on the forum, but you´ve brought back so many memories that I´ll tell it again. Manuela was a cook for a French minister (of Economics???) for many years in Paris. The two places she has lived in her life are Paris and A Rúa. Quite a contrast. One of the things she told me made such a powerful impression I have never forgotten it. She told me that she has a little garden near the house, but it involves some climbing, and Asún has told her to stop going there. She told me she goes every day, rain or shine, and that when she puts her hands in the earth, she feels the power of the universe coursing through her veins and it makes her feel vitally alive. And that the day that she can´t make it to her garden is the day she will die. She is an amazing woman.

Later that night, Asún took me into her treatment room with lots of little jars of colored liquids. I am a skeptic when it comes to this kind of New Age stuff, but I hope I was respectful and attentive. But I don´t dismiss the possibility that one of her liquids worked magic on you and your bites!

Thanks for triggering all of these memories -- now I´m thinking I am definitely going to head back to the Invierno next year. A plan is hatching -- Ruta del Ebro, Castellano Aragones, and Lana from Tortosa to Burgos, then hop a train to Ponferrada to go back to Peñalba and then onto the Invierno. Way too early for me to be planning Camino 2015 -- got to get to work! Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. like theatregal, I love the bathrobe, it does wonders for you. :)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hi, KinkyOne,
I also had a special experience with Asunción and her mom. They are really great Camino angels as you say. We did a little arrow painting in the early afternoon, in the company of Ramón, who is president of a local Invierno association (I don´t know the details but there seem to be two "competing" Invierno associations, as you can see at http://caminodeinvierno.es/ and http://caminodeinvierno.com/ Ramón and Asunción are associated with the first group, which is the one that has published the guidebook). Then Asún took me up to a high place with a small Romanesque church, three villagers, and beautiful gardens and lots of cows grazing. There was also a big rock that we had to stand on because of its special features/powers. For me, the stunning view was the highlight of that rock, but I may be just too pedestrian to appreciate the other powers it has. Then back to town to chat, and to eat Manuela´s home cooked meal.

I´ve told this story a couple of times already on the forum, but you´ve brought back so many memories that I´ll tell it again. Manuela was a cook for a French minister (of Economics???) for many years in Paris. The two places she has lived in her life are Paris and A Rúa. Quite a contrast. One of the things she told me made such a powerful impression I have never forgotten it. She told me that she has a little garden near the house, but it involves some climbing, and Asún has told her to stop going there. She told me she goes every day, rain or shine, and that when she puts her hands in the earth, she feels the power of the universe coursing through her veins and it makes her feel vitally alive. And that the day that she can´t make it to her garden is the day she will die. She is an amazing woman.

Later that night, Asún took me into her treatment room with lots of little jars of colored liquids. I am a skeptic when it comes to this kind of New Age stuff, but I hope I was respectful and attentive. But I don´t dismiss the possibility that one of her liquids worked magic on you and your bites!

Thanks for triggering all of these memories -- now I´m thinking I am definitely going to head back to the Invierno next year. A plan is hatching -- Ruta del Ebro, Castellano Aragones, and Lana from Tortosa to Burgos, then hop a train to Ponferrada to go back to Peñalba and then onto the Invierno. Way too early for me to be planning Camino 2015 -- got to get to work! Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. like theatregal, I love the bathrobe, it does wonders for you. :)
Well..., Laurie, yes, ...I mean..., how should I say, ahm..., that silk bathrobe..., you know, ehm... :D

I do remember parts of your story with Asun and Manuela when doing research about Invierno almost one year ago. I'm so sorry I haven't take any Manuela's pics, but she's very much in my memory for example when we were hanging my washed clothes together. She was talking and talking and talking and I didn't really understand most of it, but we've got along just fine :) And her constant bitching about I don't know what to Asun and vice versa. They both were so "sharp" at it and when they took a look at me we all laughed ;)

Nice, nice memories!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
DAY 31 (Wed, 23.07.2014)
A RUA - QUIROGA (29,36kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

I was awake at 07:30 that day which could easily be the record on my Camino this year. But I've felt strong, new, clean. Asun was leaving for the radio station where she hosts radio show dedicated to Camino(s) and I've paid her for all of her services. I don't remember the exact number (medicine included), but one night stay in her casa was 11€. Worth it!

From albergue I went back to Church of Fatima and up the street. Slightly uphill and soon beautiful views emerged (photo932). Now I can tell that this stage was one of the nicest of them all on Camino de Invierno. Steady uphill, but only 160mts altogether on almost 30kms stretch with exquisite vistas. Not to mention that again I was all by myself on the way… I've seen some unusual stone mounds (photos934&936), painted in colours that I've recognized. On this Camino I was wearing my »castro cap« with the flag of the International Brigades from Spanish Civil War sewn on its front (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Brigades). I know that these colours are used also in Catalunya, but a few kilometers later it became clearly to me, that Gallegos have similar independencia tendencies as Catalans, when I've crossed the border from province of Lugo to Orense (photos937&938).

After 7.9kms of walking on tarmac (CSJ has it right!!!) with beautiful views, I came to Albaredos and there the wooden signs with distances started and names changed from Castillano to Gallego: Camino de Invierno – Camiño de Inverno (photos940,941&943). After a short chat in quite good English with the lady owner of the dog in one of the photos, I've made a short stop at local lavadora at the end of the village on the right. The water there is so sweet, I still can't believe it! I mean it really had a flavour. Usually tap water hasn't whereas bottled water has something that couldn't be called flavour. In my opinion - disgusting :eek: Well, water at this lavadora (not from the basin though, but from the tap) was really exceptional and I drink water in our Alps all the time!!!

From Albaredos you face almost 200mts descend in 2kms (CSJ has typo here – mention ascent instead of descend!). My Endomondo didn't worked on this short stretch, but the Camino is so nicely marked that you won't have any problems at all. In Montefurado there is nothing much apart from Church of St.Michael and some very nice ruined and abandoned houses which I've already seen restored :D (photos945,946&948 – in next post).

After Montefurado there's 140mts ascent to Hermidon and beyond it dirt path changes again into tarmac (photo950&952 – in next post). But the views are just spectacular especially when after 9.6kms (10,8kms on wooden sign!!!) you are approaching Bendillo through mixed pine&eucalyptus forests (photos953-955 – in next post). It was so hot that day that I explained it to my family I've felt like being in a sauna – very hot, a looot of sweat and nice pine+eucalyptus scents ;) But most of the path is on tarmac!

In Bendillo I've stopped again in the shade of village lavadora which is at entrance sharp left down the stairs immediately after the »bridge«. And that water was sweet as well. Or was I dehydrated, hahaha? But I wasn't! At exit from Bendillo there's a church with nice shady area at the back (photo956 – in next post). Don't forget that there is 2,7kms long (190mts alt.) descend to Soldon, so do a favour to your muscles and warm them up if the break was long. On that descend there just might be one of the most beautiful views on all Invierno. I was so sorry I haven't had wider lenses on my camera (photo957 – in next post). When you come down to the LU-933 you can just cross it and descend further down to Soldon. If you stay on the right hand side of the road than you'll pass the village.

When I descended to Soldon, which is quite nice little village by the Sil river, I've stopped for a cold beer at a point of river inlet on the far end of the village (photo959-962 – in second next post). Very nice spot and very sexy waitress offered me a ride to Quiroga :p No need to say that it would be »como un crimen« for me. Come on, KinkyOne…?! OK, OK, I mean that for taking a car ride :cool:

After Soldon I've stayed on LU-933 which is on the left hand side of N-120 for 5kms (through Sequeiros, went by the bar I'm sure David Lynch would choose it for a film set and skipped up&down Camino to Castillo above Torres Novais) (photos964,965&968 – in second next post) and went through underpass, turned left and straight on for 2,1kms later I was at municipal albergue in Quiroga (photo970 – in second next post).

There was nobody at the albergue and the doors were shut so I've phoned hospitalera which came in 10 minutes. The price was 10€, but that was for a single room with en-suite bathroom with shower!!! Except for one wardrobe and a bed there wasn't any other furniture in that room so I took one chair from the large dinning room downstairs and use it as a table. First mercado is only 30mts further on the left side of the main street, panaderia is almost across the street, tabaccos a little bit further on the right and swimming pool visible when coming to the town. I could've stayed in this town for another day easy although it hasn't the same good vibe as some other pueblos.

And yes, Municipal albergue in Quiroga does have free WI-FI and sello as well (that's for CSJ guide ;)). Also sorry for so many photos attached but I believe that this stage which runs most of the time high above the Rio Sil valley well deserves it.
 

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Last edited:

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
KinkyOne, Did you go up to that castle in photo #968? I remember that the CSJ guide was unclear about this, and I wrote some detailed instructions, because the camino definitely goes up there, and then down through a lovely green grass path, which then takes you to the hamlet of Casbedro, and then you hit the road into Quiroga, the LU-933, which is actually the road you left Rua on.

And I agree, that walk above the Sil is gorgeous, as are your pictures! Buen camino, Laurie
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
KinkyOne, Did you go up to that castle in photo #968? I remember that the CSJ guide was unclear about this, and I wrote some detailed instructions, because the camino definitely goes up there, and then down through a lovely green grass path, which then takes you to the hamlet of Casbedro, and then you hit the road into Quiroga, the LU-933, which is actually the road you left Rua on.

And I agree, that walk above the Sil is gorgeous, as are your pictures! Buen camino, Laurie
Hola, Laurie,
I too understand from CSJ that Camino goes up to that castle but also mention possibility to get to Quiroga by the road so I stayed on LU-933 and skipped the castle. I don't remember where exactly the turn for the castle was but I do recall that it was there for sure. By that point I already knew it would be around 30kms stage with a lot of it on tarmac and my never completely healed blister from the first day on Madrid began to send warnings. Although I put off my boots every time I've made a pause it was a little bit too much on that very hot day so I just pushed on towards Quiroga, under the N-120 and to albergue.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
DAY 32 (Thu, 24.07.2014)
QUIROGA – A POBRA DE BROLLON (27,44kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

Although albergue was packed with children I slept well and sound even in the morning as they weren't loud at all. Before departure I phoned Ayuntamiento in A Pobra to ask if there is a possibility of sleeping in Polideportivo but they said it isn't possible because »jefe« was out of town. I guess it was more about St.James Day and they simply didn't want to deal with this peregrino. So I called Hostal As Viñas and made reservation. The owner wanted to know a lot of things about me like where I come from, my age etc. and I was really curious what will happen once getting there :)

Finding way out of town is very easy, just stay on the main street and at the end of town arrows will reappear. CSJ guide warns not to cross the river to Ribas de Sil and San Clodio since there arent's any boatmen or ferries anymore, so I stayed on LU-933. I discovered that 1km later there's second bridge where marked Camino returns on this side of the river. I guess it is merely 200mts longer if you follow Camino through San Clodio.

After 4,3kms and crossing N-120 at the derelict restaurant uphill on tarmac begins. The village of Nocedo is left hand below the Camino. 3,2kms later (7,5kms from albergue) Camino turns sharp right onto wide dirt path. CSJ has mistake here that Camino veers left!!! 2,5kms later (1km after crossing tarmac LU-P-5005) is the highest point of this stage, you gain 340mts of altitude from the river (km11 from Albergue). I haven't met a soul the whole way up and it was a lovely walk. There's slight descend and short ascent to Ermita Los Remedios (photos973&974). Camino is clearly marked all the way. At this point CSJ guide again has some inaccuracies: »This timber-cutter path descends to the Carballo de Lor area, and rises slghtly to the Ermita de los Remedios…« - 5 lines before that quote we were (in the guide) already at Ermita (7,2kms from sharp right turn from tarmac onto dirt path), it's true that there is short descend and ascent to Ermita, but Carballo de Lor is a village which is over the hill and 1,3kms past the Ermita. I found my way easily but info in the guide is a bit confused.

From Carballo de Lor there is a bit more than 2kms descend to Barxa de Lor (photo975). I was quite tired by that time so I followed CSJ advice about detour (left immediately after the bridge) to Bar/Restaurant on LU-933 and under N-120 viaduct. Very friendly and shady. From the bridge marked Camino is going very steep uphill through the village, past the farm (photo979) and a bit less steep (4kms and 200mts of altitude gain from Barxa) to the plateau where I first felt that I'm really in Galicia with its pastures, forests, fields, meadows… (photos981,982&985). Beautiful 3kms to Castroncelos in complete solitude.

Vilarmao is a village only 1km from Castroncelos. As I remember and also wrote in my diary I took middle at the fork immediately after the village (CSJ has it left) and descend to A Pobra with municipal »swimming pool« on Rio Saa (photos988&990). If you want to stay at Hostal As Viñas turn left when you reach Rua Central (Camino towards Monforte turns right) and just keep straight on it, cross the river and soon you'll see hostal on left side of the street. There are at least two shops, a bank, two pharmacies, several bars and restaurants, bakery, tobacco & lottery etc. Nice village, especially by the river.

The owner and his wife were already waiting for me a bit worried because I was one hour late. Nevertheless I was greeted with few words in Serbo-Croatian language and later discovered that the owner, which is Portugues, excaped his country under Salazar's threat of sending him to Angola as a soldier. He went to Paris (where he met his wife from A Pobra), worked in ironworks with lots of ex-Yugoslavs and later returned to A Pobra to open this Hostal.

He took me to the room with en-suite bathroom on the first floor and with a view to the back (very quiet). I can say that this was the nicest (hotel-like) room on my whole Camino. The price was 25€ with breakfast. I washed my clothes, checked the bites (no new bites :)), went to the shop and enjoyed the afternoon by the river. In the evening I sat with the owner for three hours in the garden, drinking beer and homemade orujo blanco, talking about virtually everything. So nice ending of this beautiful day and Camino stretch itself.
 

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Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
[QUOTE="nd started GPS at the end of the village where I stopped it the day before. First the way goes up on the dirt track (photo823) but soon you come to tarmac N-536. A lot of bitching that day from my side. First on account of CSJ guide. For example – it's not 200mts from Priaranza to Mirador de Santalla, it's 1,5kms!!! Come one… 7 times more!!! (photos825&826)

[/QUOTE]


My apologies about the bad distance measure in the CSJ guide. I relied on GPS readings done by another pilgrim for that first-day stretch (I personally walked to Las Medulas from Penalba de Santiago -- the single toughest day of pilgrim walking I ever did!)
Also, as I recall the CSJ guide warns that the climb up to Cornatel is long and might not be worth the effort, that you can cut around the bottom of the hill and save some shoe-leather...
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Very nice job so far, KinkyOne. Thanks for sharing all the photos and commentary.

You will be happy to know I have gone out of the CSJ guide-writing business. I am sure they would welcome a fully updated and perfected guide to this path. Go for it.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
[QUOTE="nd started GPS at the end of the village where I stopped it the day before. First the way goes up on the dirt track (photo823) but soon you come to tarmac N-536. A lot of bitching that day from my side. First on account of CSJ guide. For example – it's not 200mts from Priaranza to Mirador de Santalla, it's 1,5kms!!! Come one… 7 times more!!! (photos825&826)

My apologies about the bad distance measure in the CSJ guide. I relied on GPS readings done by another pilgrim for that first-day stretch (I personally walked to Las Medulas from Penalba de Santiago -- the single toughest day of pilgrim walking I ever did!)
Also, as I recall the CSJ guide warns that the climb up to Cornatel is long and might not be worth the effort, that you can cut around the bottom of the hill and save some shoe-leather...[/QUOTE]

No need for apologies, Rebekah. I've had a lot of other problems (infection because of bedbugs) and misleading info only added, they weren't the only cause for my cursing :)
Climb to Cornatel is a bit tough but the nature is awesome, therefore I would recommend future pilgrims to listen to their daily mood and decide about visiting Cornatel regarding to it.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Very nice job so far, KinkyOne. Thanks for sharing all the photos and commentary.

You will be happy to know I have gone out of the CSJ guide-writing business. I am sure they would welcome a fully updated and perfected guide to this path. Go for it.
Thank you!
I haven't had much time to write in last two weeks that's why my postings stopped. But I did it because of fellow walkers not because someone at CSJ would like it. Of course those comments are public domain already and could be put in next editions of guides (same goes for Camino de Madrid).
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Very nice job so far, KinkyOne. Thanks for sharing all the photos and commentary.

You will be happy to know I have gone out of the CSJ guide-writing business. I am sure they would welcome a fully updated and perfected guide to this path. Go for it.
Well deserved retirement, Reb. You have been the trailblazer on many formerly "obscure" Caminos, and I for one wouldn´t have been able to walk the Salvador, the Vadiniense, nor the Invierno without your guides. Mil gracias.

So, it seems that some of the rest of us should step up to help out. I hope to walk the Invierno again in the near future, so I will be happy to coordinate revisions, additions, corrections. Right now I´m working on a guide to the Camino Olvidado, but as soon as that is done, I can turn to this in bits and pieces.

As these Caminos get more pilgrims, the need for the guides decreases, I think. For instance, I wouldn´t have been able to walk the Salvador without Reb´s online guide when I first walked it in 2008 or 9. But with all the marking and online support, from Ender´s guide and all the other online information, it may be that the Salvador CSJ guide has outlived its raison d´etre. I walked it a second time two years ago, and I don´t think I had any guide with me at all.

But back to the topic at hand -- I think there´s no doubt that the Invierno can still use a nice online English guide, so stay tuned to this forum for updates to the CSJ guide. And if anyone else wants to help out, just holler.

Buen camino, Laurie
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
DAY 32 (Tue, 24.07.2014)
QUIROGA – A POBRA DE BROLLON (27,44kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

Although albergue was packed with children I slept well and sound even in the morning as they weren't loud at all. Before departure I phoned Ayuntamiento in A Pobra to ask if there is a possibility of sleeping in Polideportivo but they said it isn't possible because »jefe« was out of town. I guess it was more about St.James Day and they simply didn't want to deal with this peregrino. So I called Hostal As Viñas and made reservation. The owner wanted to know a lot of things about me like where I come from, my age etc. and I was really curious what will happen once getting there :)

Finding way out of town is very easy, just stay on the main street and at the end of town arrows will reappear. CSJ guide warns not to cross the river to Ribas de Sil and San Clodio since there arent's any boatmen or ferries anymore, so I stayed on LU-933. I discovered that 1km later there's second bridge where marked Camino returns on this side of the river. I guess it is merely 200mts longer if you follow Camino through San Clodio.

After 4,3kms and crossing N-120 at the derelict restaurant uphill on tarmac begins. The village of Nocedo is left hand below the Camino. 3,2kms later (7,5kms from albergue) Camino turns sharp right onto wide dirt path. CSJ has mistake here that Camino veers left!!! 2,5kms later (1km after crossing tarmac LU-P-5005) is the highest point of this stage, you gain 340mts of altitude from the river (km11 from Albergue). I haven't met a soul the whole way up and it was a lovely walk. There's slight descend and short ascent to Ermita Los Remedios (photos973&974). Camino is clearly marked all the way. At this point CSJ guide again has some inaccuracies: »This timber-cutter path descends to the Carballo de Lor area, and rises slghtly to the Ermita de los Remedios…« - 5 lines before that quote we were (in the guide) already at Ermita (7,2kms from sharp right turn from tarmac onto dirt path), it's true that there is short descend and ascent to Ermita, but Carballo de Lor is a village which is over the hill and 1,3kms past the Ermita. I found my way easily but info in the guide is a bit confused.

From Carballo de Lor there is a bit more than 2kms descend to Barxa de Lor (photo975). I was quite tired by that time so I followed CSJ advice about detour (left immediately after the bridge) to Bar/Restaurant on LU-933 and under N-120 viaduct. Very friendly and shady. From the bridge marked Camino is going very steep uphill through the village, past the farm (photo979) and a bit less steep (4kms and 200mts of altitude gain from Barxa) to the plateau where I first felt that I'm really in Galicia with its pastures, forests, fields, meadows… (photos981,982&985). Beautiful 3kms to Castroncelos in complete solitude.

Vilarmao is a village only 1km from Castroncelos. As I remember and also wrote in my diary I took middle at the fork immediately after the village (CSJ has it left) and descend to A Pobra with municipal »swimming pool« on Rio Saa (photos988&990). If you want to stay at Hostal As Viñas turn left when you reach Rua Central (Camino towards Monforte turns right) and just keep straight on it, cross the river and soon you'll see hostal on left side of the street. There are at least two shops, a bank, two pharmacies, several bars and restaurants, bakery, tobacco & lottery etc. Nice village, especially by the river.

The owner and his wife were already waiting for me a bit worried because I was one hour late. Nevertheless I was greeted with few words in Serbo-Croatian language and later discovered that the owner, which is Portugues, excaped his country under Salazar's threat of sending him to Angola as a soldier. He went to Paris (where he met his wife from A Pobra), worked in ironworks with lots of ex-Yugoslavs and later returned to A Pobra to open this Hostal.

He took me to the room with en-suite bathroom on the first floor and with a view to the back (very quiet). I can say that this was the nicest (hotel-like) room on my whole Camino. The price was 25€ with breakfast. I washed my clothes, checked the bites (no new bites :)), went to the shop and enjoyed the afternoon by the river. In the evening I sat with the owner for three hours in the garden, drinking beer and homemade orujo blanco, talking about virtually everything. So nice ending of this beautiful day and Camino stretch itself.
Hey, Kinky,
You can't leave us stranded in A Pobra!!!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hey, Kinky,
You can't leave us stranded in A Pobra!!!
:D:D:D
I won't Laurie, don't worry. I was so busy in last weeks and even out of town for some days. As soon as I find some spare time I'll continue.
Have a nice day!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I have printed out Kinky´s comments and am starting to incorporate them into the existing version of the so-called CSJ guide. If there are others who have walked this Camino recently and have comments to make, please send them my way. We need as much collaboration as possible to keep this guide up to date. Kinky, can´t wait to hear the rest of your story. Isn´t it annoying how work gets in the way of more important things like the Camino? ;)

Buen camino, Laurie
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I have printed out Kinky´s comments and am starting to incorporate them into the existing version of the so-called CSJ guide. If there are others who have walked this Camino recently and have comments to make, please send them my way. We need as much collaboration as possible to keep this guide up to date. Kinky, can´t wait to hear the rest of your story. Isn´t it annoying how work gets in the way of more important things like the Camino? ;)

Buen camino, Laurie
Here we go again, Laurie ;)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
DAY 33 (Fri, 25.07.2014)
A POBRA DE BROLLON - CASTROTAÑE (27,11kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

I woke up late, at 9AM and felt really fresh with no more itching from bedbug bites :) Much to owners surprise I didn't feel to eat breakfast as it was a bit early for me, so he said I don't have to pay for last two beers and orujos from last evening. Nice. I forgot to mention that here I drank the cheapest tap beer on my whole Camino – 1,80€ for half a litre (second place went to Cuenca de Campos on Camino de Madrid at 1,90€). As I retraced back to the middle of the village pulpo stands were already heating water (photo992) and I remembered from yesterdays phone chat with Penelope at El Piso in Castrotañe that on this day shops are closed. I looked forward to the end of today stage because it won't be so long with cutting in (almost) half the stretch from Monforte de Lemos to Chantada.

Camino is well marked all the way to Monforte and one couldn't get lost. After 3kms you cross the LU-652 at Cereixa and 1km later after Rairos very nice uphill through forest began (photo995). Because it was non-working day I met quite a lot of joggers, hikers and bikers and I was quite an event for them when resting by the path. Descend to Reigada (photo996) with view of Monforte in the distance is also lovely and if I remember correctly there is a fountain a little bit before that descend. Before Reigada there is a canal but I had no problem crossing it because the water was low.

From A Pobra to Reigada (no facilities of any kind there) is exactly 9kms and a bit less than 6kms from Reigada to Puente Romano in Monforte. Way is well marked with monastery on the hill on your right all the time (photo997) but not really nice though. In CSJ guide there is a remark to go left after crossing the railway tracks but that is incorrect. When I reached the tracks in Monforte I was on Rua Arousa and they were to my right. After maybe 200mts I crossed them to the right and just kept going straight on through historical part of town (keep slightly to the right, photo1000). About 1,5kms later I was at Puente Romano although I don't really remember any arrows. Altogether it was easy-peasy to find my way.

Almost everything was shut down and close to the Puente Romano I found opened bar, drank few cold beers, ate some tapas and continued over the bridge (photos1001,1003,1006-07). I turned left and went straight on instead of turning right immediately into first street (Rua Alberedos). CSJ is very correct here, you'll see old town hall to your right at that point and there is a small plaza in front of it. From here on it's easy to find way. But all the way to Pazo de Reguengo and Castrotañe it's on asphalt for 12kms with very scarce gravel shoulder and nothing much to see along the way. Tough on my feet and mind :eek:

Approximately 8kms from Monforte you'll see a church and cemetery to your right (parking lot on left) and after this point uphill on LU-P-3204 to Reguengo is almost constant (120mts gain). From Monforte onwards there is no shops or bars but if you run out of water I'm sure villagers will help you. A little bit after entrance to Pazo de Reguengo (photo1008 – in next post) I saw arrow pointing left into the bushes but the path was flooded and I also remembered @econodan posts about getting a little bit lost after that point. Therefore I decided to follow LU-P-4112 for a few hundred meters uphill and turned sharp left at the first house. There are also arrows here and I guess they are older than those lower down the road pointing left. There is No trespassing sign on the first house but very nice man showed me the way through his property to the little hamlet of Castrotañe. He told me that this is also the Camino, but there's no authority to clear overgrown path. And indeed it was, overgrown with bushes with torns and partly flooded.

In Castrotañe there are only few buildings and two families living there. To be exact there is one family and Penelope Anderton who is near finish in renovating a complex of several buildings in her home and holiday apartments. She was already waiting for me with cold six-pack of beer and wide smile. So welcoming and warm feeling to meet somebody like this English lady in the middle of nowhere. She told me that the two bedroom apartment in the basement of El Piso house (she lives on first floor) is not really finished but as a pilgrim I didn't had such a feeling. Large dinning and living room with TV and fireplace, kitchen with big fridge, stove with oven, two microondas and even a washing machine, two bedrooms (4 beds) and large bathroom with shower (photos1010-13 – in next post) was all that I could have wished for. All was impeccably clean! And of course there's also wi-fi.

We spent almost whole delightful afternoon talking in cozy patio. She told me that Camino is running left from Pazo de Reguengo and through the hamlet uphill. It was cleared some weeks ago but she too had heard that it was overgrown again. In her opinion it was the best to retrace to asphalt LU-P-4112 and walk maybe 1km more to Piñeiro the next day instead of challenging and time consuming wading through bushes. After she retreated upstairs I was left to enjoy the quiet evening by myself (photos1014,1016,1018,1021-22 – in next post).

I don't remember how many beds altogether there are at Penelope's complex, but for further info you can contact her here:
penelope@galiciaholidayrentals.com or pandertonswann@gmail.com
and via phone:
677-120-321 or 982-171-632.

I paid (only) 15€ for such a comfort and warm attitude was donativo, I guess ;)

Thank you, Penelope!
 

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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks, KinkyOne,
Put in as much tedious detail as you can remember, I am culling things from these posts to add to the new version of the guide. Not totally selfless, since I am planning to be back there in 2015. ;) Thanks!

Buen camno, Laurie
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Thanks, KinkyOne,
Put in as much tedious detail as you can remember, I am culling things from these posts to add to the new version of the guide. Not totally selfless, since I am planning to be back there in 2015. ;) Thanks!

Buen camno, Laurie
Hola, Laurie!
I heard that you and Penelope are in contact now :) That's nice.
Regarding details for the stretch you want to shed some light in I'm afraid I won't be of much help as you'll see from my next post. Sorry...
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
DAY 34 (Sat, 26.07.2014)
CASTROTAÑE - CHANTADA (27,33kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

The day before Penelope told me that she had to go to yoga class this morning and well rehearsed routine of leaving the keys in the mailbox applied once again :D I took my time to wake up »properly« and set off very late, at 10:30AM. Yesterday I was so busy with putting aside all those branches with thorns when coming from San Lourenzo to Castrotañe that I haven't even noticed nice view at Pazo de Reguengo (photo1024). I did what Penelope advised me and retraced to LU-P-4112 on the pasture below the overgrown path. I took the asphalt road to Piñeiro instead of official Camino which was, as I was told, overgrown and difficult to orientate. I guess I've made 1,5-2kms more on asphalt road. In Piñeiro I remember I saw arrow pointing right from the tarmac road through the short field and later into the woods but I stayed on the tarmac. Here I'm a bit confused with CSJ guide which mentions that Camino goes through Escairon, which is at least 3kms NE from ideal line… Anyway, after 5kms I came to nice resting area at the beginning of Galegos (fountain was dry, but houses are in the near). More to the end of Galegos, at the crossroads, I saw some 800-1000m2 large estate with three partly ruined buildings for sale (photos1025-27) and immediately began to dream about either albergue or »just« living there not knowing the price, of course ;)

Few hundred meters along the trail I was given very curious look from local cow (photo1028), I guess that was because I wasn't really on the official Camino… But soon I came to Camiño Grande and saw mojon on my right side where Camino comes to the village. That was approximately on 6,5kms from Castrotañe. Only half a kilometer later entering A Barxa kind of a coincidence happened. I've seen so many waymarks on one spot (photo1029) only before Portomarin when crossing over Rio Mino. And it's the same river I was going to cross that same day at Belesar :p

You can't get the adequate picture of that painfully steep descend to Belesar when right bank of Rio Mino comes to sight at Montecelo (photo1030). And even when warned about that descend the church of San Pelagio in Diamondi put my worries (because of my bad knees) aside (photos1033-34). It's only a short detour from Camino but well worth a visit although it was closed and under some construction on that day. Close by is also a wooden bench and a shelter to rest for awhile before very steep but short descend to Belesar (2,5kms, photos1037-43 – in next post). That was one hot day and when I came to the river I could surely drank ice cold beer or two (photo1044 – in next post), but when I approached Marina Restaurant it was packed with perfumed and nicely dressed people during their Saturday late lunch and I decided to push on. Simply wasn't my league :D But be aware that no facilities as bars/restaurants or shops are on the Camino until this point. And do refill your water bottles at this point because…

Oh what a torture ;) On the other side of Rio Mino the Camino runs mainly on former Roman road which is now path through vineyards and pastures. I really hate those Roman engineers which have made those roads like slalom curve instead of giant slalom curve that day. I've had the impression that sometimes the path was almost vertical that's why after 1,5kms I decided to follow the asphalt LU-P-1804. I'm sure that I was walking much faster even if making a kilometer or two more that way. There are at least two bodegas on the way up but both were closed at that time. In Rubias I stopped to rest a little in the shade on the plaza in front of charming church (photo1048 – in next post).

Some 3,5kms later I came to suburbs of Chantada. It is all the way on the tarmac, but with not much traffic and also nothing much to see. In Chantada (photos1049-53 – in next post) I was planning to sleep in local Polideportivo, but of course, nobody answered my calls on Saturday so I decided to find Pension Yoel (on Rua General Franco 16 which is now renamed to Avenida de Lugo with the same number). I was the only guest and got a single room with shared bathroom for 12€. The only window was looking to the inner yard which was actually 4x4mts light shaft…, yeah well… I've made a notice in my diary that single room with bathroom was 25€. It was a bit annoying that the landlady insisted to ring the bell after returning to the pension instead of simply gave the key to the front door. There is a wi-fi signal in the house though. I didn't have much energy to wander through the city and I just went to nearby supermercado (2 more very close + everything a pilgrim might need), sat in the park, drank few beers and later made myself dry dinner in my room.

Altogether the stage from A Pobra to Chantada is a strange mix of beautiful walks through Galician countryside and odd stretches through villages with farms that follow each other endlessly. I might just add that finding the way from Castrotane to Chantada (true - in my case mostly on asphalt roads) wasn't difficult at all, quite good markings, some common sense, few local people here and there and it's easy.
 

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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks, Kinky, it's good to know there's an obvious roadside alternative to the Pineiro - Camino Grande part. I have seen on a blog from this section that there seem to be a lot more arrows in those fields, so maybe I'll give it a go again next year if I make it back to the Invierno.

Chantada was not my favorite stop, but maybe because I made the mistake of staying in what has to be the dirtiest pension I've ever slept in! Gamullo, I think it was called. Lucky you to avoid it. I did have great meal, though, in that bar under the arcades.

Thanks for the comment about Escairon, I'll have to do some double checking, since I have no memory of whether I walked through it. The Spanish guide says at A Barxa, go on to Rendal, thn cross the road that goes to Escairon and take the LU-P-5807 to Fion and then through all those litle towns to Diamondi. So I think you're right about not going through Escairon. I'm not sure if Reb may have gone that way because of a Casa Rural where she stayed, perhaps.

The Spanish guide says that from Fion you go through Vilaravides, Vilatinosa, Sobrado, Cerdeiro, A Vendanova, Outeiro, Montecelo, and finally Diamondi. I remember a seemingly endless stream of hamlets but I didn't write down any names, does any of that ring a bell to you? Thanks, buen camino, Laurie
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Thanks for the comment about Escairon, I'll have to do some double checking, since I have no memory of whether I walked through it. The Spanish guide says at A Barxa, go on to Rendal, thn cross the road that goes to Escairon and take the LU-P-5807 to Fion and then through all those litle towns to Diamondi. So I think you're right about not going through Escairon. I'm not sure if Reb may have gone that way because of a Casa Rural where she stayed, perhaps.
Thanks, Laurie. If you look at my picture no.1029 with road signs that's exactly the road to the right that goes to Escairon. Among those signs on the right side you can see a mojon and should keep straight on.


The Spanish guide says that from Fion you go through Vilaravides, Vilatinosa, Sobrado, Cerdeiro, A Vendanova, Outeiro, Montecelo, and finally Diamondi. I remember a seemingly endless stream of hamlets but I didn't write down any names, does any of that ring a bell to you? Thanks, buen camino, Laurie
Spanish guide is correct of course. Try to download my .gpx file and you'll be able to see exactly where I walked, but I'm sure that I've missed only the part of official Camino from Pineiro to Camino Grande. To be more exact - I remember Camino joining the road I was walking from the right at the end of Galegos which is just a couple of hundred meters before Camino Grande.
It would be nice to know if that stretch is cleared so you wouldn't have to walk all those kilometers on tarmac because Castrotane - Chantada has a lot of it anyway. But it is nice walk though and rarely a car passed by.

Ultreia!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks, Laurie. If you look at my picture no.1029 with road signs that's exactly the road to the right that goes to Escairon. Among those signs on the right side you can see a mojon and should keep straight on.

Spanish guide is correct of course. Try to download my .gpx file and you'll be able to see exactly where I walked, but I'm sure that I've missed only the part of official Camino from Pineiro to Camino Grande. To be more exact - I remember Camino joining the road I was walking from the right at the end of Galegos which is just a couple of hundred meters before Camino Grande.
It would be nice to know if that stretch is cleared so you wouldn't have to walk all those kilometers on tarmac because Castrotane - Chantada has a lot of it anyway. But it is nice walk though and rarely a car passed by.

Ultreia!
Thanks,Kinky,
Is the picture at A Barxa? or further on in Rendal? Is the number on that highway sign, LU-P-5807? I am struggling to combine your comments with what Rebekah has written in the CSJ guide, and my memory from walking isn´t helping me out too much. For instance, do you know if this picture is where the turn-off to Torre Vilarinho is? (Is that sign in your picture, pointing to the left for Turismo Rural possibly for the Torre Vilarinho?)

Here´s a draft based on your comments that might still have a few towns out of place. If you´ve got any memory about this, let me know where I have messed up. This section will come right after my description of the on-road alternative to Camiño Grande and a description of the overgrown off-road option.

If you are lucky, you will be able to take the oak and chestnut lined path into Camiño Grande, but the road option is clear and there is virtually no traffic.


From there, continue on country roads to A Barxa, then to Rendal. At a crossroads where there is a turn-off for Escairón to the right (you don´t take it), take the LU-P-5807 to Fion. This is kilometer ZERO of the LU-P-5807. (??????????) At this point (?????????) there is an option to take a 500 meters detour to another Casa Rural, the Torre Vilarino. Recommended as a good option with Camino-friendly staff and hearty dinners figured into the room price. Also would be a good lunch or coffee break for pilgrims doing the entire Monforte-Chantada stage.


From Fion the on-road Camino passes through a number of small hamlets – Vilaravides, Vilatinosa, Sobrado, Cerdeiro, A Vendanova, Outeiro, Montecelo, and finally Diamondi.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Thanks,Kinky,
Is the picture at A Barxa? or further on in Rendal? Is the number on that highway sign, LU-P-5807? I am struggling to combine your comments with what Rebekah has written in the CSJ guide, and my memory from walking isn´t helping me out too much. For instance, do you know if this picture is where the turn-off to Torre Vilarinho is? (Is that sign in your picture, pointing to the left for Turismo Rural possibly for the Torre Vilarinho?)

Here´s a draft based on your comments that might still have a few towns out of place. If you´ve got any memory about this, let me know where I have messed up. This section will come right after my description of the on-road alternative to Camiño Grande and a description of the overgrown off-road option.

If you are lucky, you will be able to take the oak and chestnut lined path into Camiño Grande, but the road option is clear and there is virtually no traffic.


From there, continue on country roads to A Barxa, then to Rendal. At a crossroads where there is a turn-off for Escairón to the right (you don´t take it), take the LU-P-5807 to Fion. This is kilometer ZERO of the LU-P-5807. (??????????) At this point (?????????) there is an option to take a 500 meters detour to another Casa Rural, the Torre Vilarino. Recommended as a good option with Camino-friendly staff and hearty dinners figured into the room price. Also would be a good lunch or coffee break for pilgrims doing the entire Monforte-Chantada stage.


From Fion the on-road Camino passes through a number of small hamlets – Vilaravides, Vilatinosa, Sobrado, Cerdeiro, A Vendanova, Outeiro, Montecelo, and finally Diamondi.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
This is how it is:
I went from Castrotane back to San Lourenzo and from there on LU-P-4112 through A Regueira, A Airoa, Cobreiro, Pineiro, A Xesteira, A Ermida and Galegos (5,5kms). After Galegos you can see Camino Grande on the right side (to the East) and 1km later tarmac road from C.Grande joins from the right. That's maybe 200mts from the photo no. 1029.

The houses that you see behind the road signs on the photo no.1029 is already A Barxa and that point is indeed KM 0 of LU-P-5807 (6,5kms from Castrotane). The Signs on the photo follows like this (from left to right & higher to lower):
1.) (pointing left) Turismo Rural, Zona de descanso, Menu del peregrino a 400mts
2.) (pointing right) Escairon
3.) (pointing left) Ferreira
4.) (pointing left) 0,4 Ecomuseo de Aixeriz
5.) on the post is yellow arrow pointing ahead
6.) Vedado de Caza
7.) (pointing left) Ferreira 4
8.) (pointing ahead) Diomondi - so it is not DiAmondi
9.) (pointing left) Torre de Vilarino a 400 Mts. - so in combination with sign no.1 you have an answer about the restaurant ;)
on the right side of the road:
10.) LU-P-5807 km 0
11.) (pointing right) Escairon
12.) (pointing ahead) Diomondi
13.) mojon
14.) (pointing ahead) A Cova, Igxa Romanica, s.XII
15.) Concello de O Savinao:
(pointing ahead) Fontela
(pointing right) Escairon
(pointing left) Ferreira.

Hope that helps and answers your questions :)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Oh, I forgot this.
From A Barxa I was walking through Fion, Fontela, Vilaravides, Vilatinosa, A Madredauga, Sobrado, O Cerdeiro, A Vendanova, Outeiro and Montecelo (approx.8km on LU-P-5807).
Than a short detour to Diomondi, back to "bus stop" which is actually a shelter for pilgrims and through A Portela down to Belesar.

Many of these villages are actually only a house or two, but the Spanish guide has them in right order. If you want to see my walk more exactly you can register at Endomondo and ask Bostjan Masera for invitation. This way you'll have access to my whole track day-by-day.

I still don't understand Rebekah's remarks on Escairon. The thing is that it is over the CG-21, LU-617 & LU-533 which connects Monforte and Chantada further up to the North???
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, KinkyOne,
This has been so very helpful. I have always found the names of places and the signage in Galicia as two extremely frustrating challenges for any pilgrim. At one point I knew the difference between the parroquia and the village and the hamlet and the municipio, but I am now totally uncertain about what any sign in Galicia means. Picture 1029 is a beautiful illustration of the craziness! As is your comment that you went through SEVEN hamlets in a matter of 5 and a half kms!!!

Onwards from Chantada, I think the end of the Invierno is near. Muchísimas gracias, Laurie
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
DAY 34 (Sat, 26.07.2014)
CASTROTAÑE - CHANTADA (27,33kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154
so I decided to find Pension Yoel (on Rua General Franco 16 which is now renamed to Avenida de Lugo with the same number). I was the only guest and got a single room with shared bathroom for 12€. The only window was looking to the inner yard which was actually 4x4mts light shaft…, yeah well… I've made a notice in my diary that single room with bathroom was 25€. It was a bit annoying that the landlady insisted to ring the bell after returning to the pension instead of simply gave the key to the front door. There is a wi-fi signal in the house though. I didn't have much energy to wander through the city and I just went to nearby supermercado (2 more very close + everything a pilgrim might need), sat in the park, drank few beers and later made myself dry dinner in my room.

Altogether the stage from A Pobra to Chantada is a strange mix of beautiful walks through Galician countryside and odd stretches through villages with farms that follow each other endlessly. I might just add that finding the way from Castrotane to Chantada (true - in my case mostly on asphalt roads) wasn't difficult at all, quite good markings, some common sense, few local people here and there and it's easy.
One more little question, KinkyOne. Do you recommend Pension Yoel? You don't say anything bad, but are you more thumbs up or thumbs down on this place? Since the Gamullo is so bad, some people would probably be willing to spend the money at the hotel, but if the Yoel is fine, that would clearly be a more economical alternative. Thanks! Laurie
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Oh, I forgot this.
From A Barxa I was walking through Fion, Fontela, Vilaravides, Vilatinosa, A Madredauga, Sobrado, O Cerdeiro, A Vendanova, Outeiro and Montecelo (approx.8km on LU-P-5807).
Than a short detour to Diomondi, back to "bus stop" which is actually a shelter for pilgrims and through A Portela down to Belesar.
Using google earth (I'm having trouble getting onto Endomondo, but I'll keep trying), I have managed to follow the path on the LU-P-5807 tp Diomondi (thanks for the spelling correction, ;)) and the codos of Belesar. For a minute I was totally confused to see that there is a village named Piñeiro a short distance to the east of Montecelo, so I thought you were walking in circles, but then realized that it is ANOTHER Piñeiro. Who puts the same name on two villages within a few kms of each other?????? :mad:

And is it possible there´s another Galegos, too???
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
One more little question, KinkyOne. Do you recommend Pension Yoel? You don't say anything bad, but are you more thumbs up or thumbs down on this place? Since the Gamullo is so bad, some people would probably be willing to spend the money at the hotel, but if the Yoel is fine, that would clearly be a more economical alternative. Thanks! Laurie
Well, Yoel is so much outdated that I had an impression to be in late 70's or 80's :D which was acually just fine with me. It was clean, in the center of the city, with shops, restaurants etc. all around and very quiet (mostly because it was empty I guess).
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Using google earth (I'm having trouble getting onto Endomondo, but I'll keep trying), I have managed to follow the path on the LU-P-5807 tp Diomondi (thanks for the spelling correction, ;)) and the codos of Belesar. For a minute I was totally confused to see that there is a village named Piñeiro a short distance to the east of Montecelo, so I thought you were walking in circles, but then realized that it is ANOTHER Piñeiro. Who puts the same name on two villages within a few kms of each other?????? :mad:

And is it possible there´s another Galegos, too???
:D I don't believe I could do such a mistake to walk in circles unless in very thick fog, but I'm not surprised by repeating village names. For example, I'm sure that Pineiro comes from "pine(s)" and could also be a family name. In case of only a few houses that have "village" name most probably it comes from family name that lived there sometimes even for centuries. Lots of such names in Slovenia too, mostly coming from geological forms, animals, vegetation (trees, herbs etc.) or occupation, so I wasn't really surprised with that in Spain, but it could get a bit confusing :)
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Kinky, I know you wouldn't walk in circles -- That's the kind of thing only someone like me would do!

Somewhere in your posts I saw the following data point, which I have written down, but now just want to check. You wrote that there were ascents totalling 10,676 meters and descents 11,349 meters. I walked the Invierno in 10 days and can't believe that averaged 1,000 m up and 1,000 m down every day. Is that really how much up and down there is? (just want to be sure, since I'm going to put it in the guide, which is coming along very nicely, by the way!).

Mil gracias, Laurie
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
DAY 35 (Sun, 27.07.2014)
CHANTADA - RODEIRO (30,86kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

I woke up in a beautiful misty Sunday morning. Although the bed was a little bit too soft for my taste I've slept well. People were gathering in front of cafes and I had no problem finding the way out of town. CSJ guide warns about mojon pointing in wrong direction but I haven't seen it, there's enough yellow arrows all the way. Maybe after 1km I left suburbs behind (photo1054). For almost 6kms (from the center of Chantada) Camino runs alongside CG-22 and then turns sharp left at Boan and 1km later in A Lucenza sharp right. Soon the morning mist has gone and Monte Faro came to sight (photo1055). 1,5km after A Lucenza is Vilaseco (km8,1) and the same distance later I came to Penasillas (photos1056-57). There is now welcoming Taberna do Peto to the right after the church, opened on Sundays, with wi-fi and they do bocadillos ;)

These 9,7kms were amongst the most enjoyable on the Invierno, but the gem was yet to come. I fully agree with CSJ guide that this stage is »long, hard and lovely«. Well, maybe not so hard, although you gain 600mts in 16,5kms, but for sure it is lovely. And long ;) After Penasillas steeper climb begins (photo1058) and you'll need water for approximately 2 hours of walking (6,5kms). CSJ has it that there's a spring by the monolith approx.half way up (photo1061 – you can see mojon with yellow arrow by the road left from monument) but I haven't seen any nor was I looking for it.

After this 3kms remains to the highest point of this stage. Marked Camino runs on tarmac, but there is a gravel shortcut as I see now on Google Maps. It would shorten way up a bit, but it's much steeper as it runs quite straight uphill. Soon I was in a forest (photo1062) and made a break at shady rest place with cold spring and water basin. That was only the first half of this day stage so I decided not to climb up to the church. If you want to go the long way to the church then take a tarmac road to the left at rest area, otherwise continue on the road and you'll see The Way of the Cross to your left (photo1063). If you're not interested in any of these you can just go right from the water basin and through the forest for some 20mts and you'll be on Camino again. Keep right (photo1064 – left is tarmac descend to Rodeiro) and the windmills will be on your left hand side.

To the east you can enjoy the views in direction of Chantada (photos1065-66 – in next post) but it can be brutally hot under the summer sun so do take some water at the resting area. A bit more than 6kms later (CSJ has 3kms???!!!) you cross the highway and 450mts later (photo1067 – in next post) turn left and descend on scrumble path to Vilanova for approx.2kms. The Camino is then winding through fields and few small villages (photos1068-71 – in next post). There was a bit of confusion when I was walking because of some road construction but I found my way without problems. I stopped for a beer and tapas in friendly Meson in Leboro (big yellow house at Y intersection, wi-fi, low prices, nice patio with hammock etc.) and 2kms later I came to Rodeiro (photo1072 – in next post).

Easily I found Hospedaxe O Guerra which was closed and nobody answered my telephone calls, so I went up the street to the other side of town and got a splendid room (20€) with large bathroom in Hostal Carpinteiras (TV & wi-fi). I'm a bit sorry now that I have no photos, but I think that this room was the best deal on whole Invierno. The owners were extremely friendly and very sorry that their kitchen was closed on Sunday. I had some chorizo, queso y pan, so I just had to bought myself a bottle of vino de casa and enjoy the evening on the balcony (photos1073-74 – in next post).
 

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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hi, Kinky, I know you wouldn't walk in circles -- That's the kind of thing only someone like me would do!

Somewhere in your posts I saw the following data point, which I have written down, but now just want to check. You wrote that there were ascents totalling 10,676 meters and descents 11,349 meters. I walked the Invierno in 10 days and can't believe that averaged 1,000 m up and 1,000 m down every day. Is that really how much up and down there is? (just want to be sure, since I'm going to put it in the guide, which is coming along very nicely, by the way!).

Mil gracias, Laurie
That's a tough one, Laurie. I don't know whether to believe GPS data or not because the signal isn't maximum all the time. For example - GPS shows that from Fisterra municipal albergue to the lighthouse and few meters below it's 3,66kms with total ascent of 213mts and total descend of 137mts. When I look at the altitude line in the GPS graph it is going up & down all the time (more up of course) so I guess the data could be correct. I'm more suspicious on the data about maximum (186mts) and minimum (56mts) altitude. These 56mts couldn't be real, because municipal albergue is maybe at the most 20mts above the sea level...
Maybe a forum member with more experience in GPS devices would have know the answer.
 

sulu

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ronces-SdC (03-04/10);Oporto-SdC (10/2011); VdlP via Portugal 03/04 2012/2013;Part Invierno 2012; Toulouse to Sarrance 2012; Ingles to Muxia June 2013 Cami Catala and Aragones 2014; El Salvador & Primitivo 2014; Camino de Madrid 2016; Levante 2015,2017
Hi, KinkyOne,
This has been so very helpful. I have always found the names of places and the signage in Galicia as two extremely frustrating challenges for any pilgrim. At one point I knew the difference between the parroquia and the village and the hamlet and the municipio, but I am now totally uncertain about what any sign in Galicia means. Picture 1029 is a beautiful illustration of the craziness! As is your comment that you went through SEVEN hamlets in a matter of 5 and a half kms!!!

Onwards from Chantada, I think the end of the Invierno is near. Muchísimas gracias, Laurie
I think that what adds to the problem is that; little villages don't have street names so even in very small villages different parts of the village have different names. My village is tiny and no one uses the names now but they used to exist, it's probably helpful in places where most of the villagers are related and names keep recurring, you can add the name of their corner of the village. So you get; the council, the parish (if it is different), the village and the clump of houses!!
 

sulu

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ronces-SdC (03-04/10);Oporto-SdC (10/2011); VdlP via Portugal 03/04 2012/2013;Part Invierno 2012; Toulouse to Sarrance 2012; Ingles to Muxia June 2013 Cami Catala and Aragones 2014; El Salvador & Primitivo 2014; Camino de Madrid 2016; Levante 2015,2017
@KinkyOne - thanks for this. I haven't read your Madrid bit yet but, hopefully, I'll be following your tracks next October :)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
@KinkyOne - thanks for this. I haven't read your Madrid bit yet but, hopefully, I'll be following your tracks next October :)
Thank YOU, Sue!!!
Camino de Madrid is wonderful, go for it while there is still some peace ;)

I'm sorry we didn't meet, but there's always another time...

Ultreia!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
DAY 36 (Mon, 28.07.2014)
RODEIRO – A LAXE (24,95kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

Although I usually sleep very well and sound this was by far the most enjoyable night. I guess I was really tired from the yesterday stage. Weather prognosis was good (photo1075) and I knew that today walk will be shorter because I chose to walk by PO-533 so I took my time in the morning and started quite late, at 10:30. From Hostal Carpinteiras (I forgot to mention that you can pay with credit card and they have wi-fi) I descended to the city center. Shops and restaurants were opened, in front of some were stands already preparing pulpo and on the exit on the left side is a small tienda/Tabaccos and gas station on the right hand side. So there's plenty of options for breakfast or buying something for later.

I decided to follow PO-533 partly on behalf of CSJ guide which kind of warns that regular Camino to Lalin is zig-zaging a lot and is substantially longer. I also knew that most probably I was going to meet a bunch of pilgrims coming from Via de la Plata in A Laxe albergue and didn't know at that time how will I cope with that after such solitude on Invierno :eek:

My GPS recorded 17,3kms from Rodeiro to Lalin. This walk is nothing special but still offers some nice views. There wasn't really a lot of traffic and mostly you can walk on the side road used by farmers. On km7 on left side is a fertilizers factory and across the road is Bar A Rocha (photos1076-77) which offers Menu del Dia. I've seen many workers and truckers went in there so I guess the food must be good and not expensive. I didn't stopped there though. 3kms later in Mel do Saldoiro (or is it Albarellos???) is A Taberna do Tais (photos1080&82). On km11,5 in Rodelas I found an aluminium bus shelter and finally allow myself some rest in the shade.

Finding way into Lalin is easy, just follow the main road and soon you'll be at Praza da Igrexa. The main street behind the church which you'll cross has Dia market to the right and Gadis to the left (if I remember the names and directions correctly) along with other shops, bars and restaurants. Before continuing I made longer stop in the shady park by the church (photos1084&86-87) and treated myself with large self-made jamon bocadillo and few cold beers.

Getting out of Lalin could sound tricky but it isn't. Just proceed down the Rua Colon from the church, across the Praza da Torre with monument on the right (photo1088 – in next post), down Praza do Concello and Rua do Regueiriño with children playground and two basketball courts (photo1089 – in next post) and you'll come to Parque Fluvial which has two paths with small stream between them (photos1090-91 – in next post). The left one is gravel and the one on the right is concrete. I took the first one. After a bit more than 2,5kms Camino crosses a small bridge and concrete path, ascents a little through wood, turns right at the church and left into first street. When you come to N-640 cross it and turn left, after Pulperia go right uphill through small village and straight on behind industrial compound. 1km later Camino descend to N-640 which is also N-525 and runs along it through Poligono for approximately 1,5kms. I saw a bar in Poligono but probably there are some more. Pass the roundabout and proceed on the right side of the AP-53, go under it to the left and you'll be at the A Laxe municipal albergue (photo1092 – in next post) in no time.

There were already about 20 pilgrims and it was a bit of a shock for me. I've met Marina from Switzerland that day, on her fifth Camino with a 16 years old French boy in a program like oikoten or similar. We crossed our paths few times all the way to Fisterra. The albergue is indeed well designed as CSJ has it but it seems to me like it is unfinished because of it's large concrete surfaces and that gave me very cold feeling. The price is 6€, you also get disposable sheet, it has 28 places with additional 4 for disabled, kitchen is large, so is the patio, bathrooms are clean and showers are plenty, no wi-fi but two vending machines. CSJ has it wrong that the restaurant is across the road. Well, it is, but some 300mts uphill through the village and across the N-525 further up the road on the left. I haven't tried their food but some pilgrims did and they've told me it was OK. They have wi-fi and nice patio with small prefabricated swimming pool.
 

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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!

bimblingalong

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2010 SJPP-Belorado / 2012 SJPP- Finisterre / 2014 Santander- Lugo (Norte/Primitivo), Ponferrada-Chantada- Invierno, SdC-Muxia.....
( August 2015 C Portuguese from Valenca)
Hi, KinkyOne,
I also had a special experience with Asunción and her mom. They are really great Camino angels as you say. We did a little arrow painting in the early afternoon, in the company of Ramón, who is president of a local Invierno association (I don´t know the details but there seem to be two "competing" Invierno associations, as you can see at http://caminodeinvierno.es/ and http://caminodeinvierno.com/ Ramón and Asunción are associated with the first group, which is the one that has published the guidebook). Then Asún took me up to a high place with a small Romanesque church, three villagers, and beautiful gardens and lots of cows grazing. There was also a big rock that we had to stand on because of its special features/powers. For me, the stunning view was the highlight of that rock, but I may be just too pedestrian to appreciate the other powers it has. Then back to town to chat, and to eat Manuela´s home cooked meal.

I´ve told this story a couple of times already on the forum, but you´ve brought back so many memories that I´ll tell it again. Manuela was a cook for a French minister (of Economics???) for many years in Paris. The two places she has lived in her life are Paris and A Rúa. Quite a contrast. One of the things she told me made such a powerful impression I have never forgotten it. She told me that she has a little garden near the house, but it involves some climbing, and Asún has told her to stop going there. She told me she goes every day, rain or shine, and that when she puts her hands in the earth, she feels the power of the universe coursing through her veins and it makes her feel vitally alive. And that the day that she can´t make it to her garden is the day she will die. She is an amazing woman.

Later that night, Asún took me into her treatment room with lots of little jars of colored liquids. I am a skeptic when it comes to this kind of New Age stuff, but I hope I was respectful and attentive. But I don´t dismiss the possibility that one of her liquids worked magic on you and your bites!

Thanks for triggering all of these memories -- now I´m thinking I am definitely going to head back to the Invierno next year. A plan is hatching -- Ruta del Ebro, Castellano Aragones, and Lana from Tortosa to Burgos, then hop a train to Ponferrada to go back to Peñalba and then onto the Invierno. Way too early for me to be planning Camino 2015 -- got to get to work! Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. like theatregal, I love the bathrobe, it does wonders for you. :)
Wow!!!....reading both your posts has assured me of the oft quoted Camino mantra that when help is needed the way provides & provide it did in absolutely perfect timing...the route over the Hospitales on the Primitivo way took it's toll on me physically...bruised knee tendons etc...but the pure solitude of the Invierno ( only one brief meeting with a fellow pilgrim just coming into Borrenes ).....& the resulting emotional meltdown found me at Asun's door with barely the energy to converse...but her amazing perception, kindness & homeopathic/ naturopathic knowledge was administered over the next 2 days to rebalance & restore me enough to continue.....I wasn't fortunate enough to meet Manuela but am eternally grateful for Asun's care & concern...a special place & person, can't wait to return & repay the favour someday..
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Wow!!!....reading both your posts has assured me of the oft quoted Camino mantra that when help is needed the way provides & provide it did in absolutely perfect timing...the route over the Hospitales on the Primitivo way took it's toll on me physically...bruised knee tendons etc...but the pure solitude of the Invierno ( only one brief meeting with a fellow pilgrim just coming into Borrenes ).....& the resulting emotional meltdown found me at Asun's door with barely the energy to converse...but her amazing perception, kindness & homeopathic/ naturopathic knowledge was administered over the next 2 days to rebalance & restore me enough to continue.....I wasn't fortunate enough to meet Manuela but am eternally grateful for Asun's care & concern...a special place & person, can't wait to return & repay the favour someday..
I don't mean to derail this thread, but I am not familiar with the term "naturopathic." Does this have something to do with the many colored jars of oil that Asún has in her therapy room? I will update the guide to reflect this! Thanks.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Wow!!!....reading both your posts has assured me of the oft quoted Camino mantra that when help is needed the way provides & provide it did in absolutely perfect timing...the route over the Hospitales on the Primitivo way took it's toll on me physically...bruised knee tendons etc...but the pure solitude of the Invierno ( only one brief meeting with a fellow pilgrim just coming into Borrenes ).....& the resulting emotional meltdown found me at Asun's door with barely the energy to converse...but her amazing perception, kindness & homeopathic/ naturopathic knowledge was administered over the next 2 days to rebalance & restore me enough to continue.....I wasn't fortunate enough to meet Manuela but am eternally grateful for Asun's care & concern...a special place & person, can't wait to return & repay the favour someday..
It's nice to hear that Asun made same impression on somebody else :)

Maybe you can help @peregrina2000 with your comments on improving Camino de Invierno guide-book since your memories are fresh.

Ultreia!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I don't mean to derail this thread, but I am not familiar with the term "naturopathic." Does this have something to do with the many colored jars of oil that Asún has in her therapy room? I will update the guide to reflect this! Thanks.
I guess so, Laurie. Here's part of my post about experience with Asun's medicine:
"Also she asked me if I allow her to do one other thing. I agreed and she had put me in the jin-jang circle made of differently coloured stones on the floor of her patio. She had burned some sort of fragrances on a small tray, walked around me, smoked my armpits, my head and crotch with those fragrances and talking something I didn't understand. Hm, well… I don't know what in later days really helped me, either official drugs or her shaman medicine, but it worked and I was sooo happy for that."

;)
 

bimblingalong

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2010 SJPP-Belorado / 2012 SJPP- Finisterre / 2014 Santander- Lugo (Norte/Primitivo), Ponferrada-Chantada- Invierno, SdC-Muxia.....
( August 2015 C Portuguese from Valenca)
Sorry to confuse with my post....I am studying Naturopathy & Asun's approach to healing with her combination of foods, medicine, homeopathic remedies, along with with the amazing Reiki session & our conversation based on Eastern medicine resonated with me & my study...all helped fix me up for my last 2 days walking until I admitted defeat in Chantada!!
 

bimblingalong

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2010 SJPP-Belorado / 2012 SJPP- Finisterre / 2014 Santander- Lugo (Norte/Primitivo), Ponferrada-Chantada- Invierno, SdC-Muxia.....
( August 2015 C Portuguese from Valenca)
It's nice to hear that Asun made same impression on somebody else :)

Maybe you can help @peregrina2000 with your comments on improving Camino de Invierno guide-book since your memories are fresh.

Ultreia!
Have sent my little notes across to Laurie, thanks for your updates & photos too...all good info ready for next year's walk!!;-)
 

freescot

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
La Plata (2010) Portuguese from Coimbra(2010) Levante (2011) La Lana (2013) Francés from Roncevalles to Molinasaca then the Camino de Invierno (2014)
It's nice to hear that Asun made same impression on somebody else :)

Maybe you can help @peregrina2000 with your comments on improving Camino de Invierno guide-book since your memories are fresh.

Ultreia!
I, too, would add that Asun is a wonder. For me, she is a priestess: which is what we should have rather than women priests. She heals with rituals, minerals and oils but most of all Love.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I, too, would add that Asun is a wonder. For me, she is a priestess: which is what we should have rather than women priests. She heals with rituals, minerals and oils but most of all Love.
True @freescot . Agree completely!!! :)
I guess you have met her. What was your experience?

Ultreia!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I, too, would add that Asun is a wonder. For me, she is a priestess: which is what we should have rather than women priests. She heals with rituals, minerals and oils but most of all Love.
Hi, Freescot, In my rush to sink my claws into another potential contributor to the Camino Invierno guide, I neglected to ask if you'd care to share your general impressions and experiences with us. This is such an untraveled camino that I think many are kind of scared away from it. I'd love to hear how it went for you. Buen camino, Laurie
 

freescot

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
La Plata (2010) Portuguese from Coimbra(2010) Levante (2011) La Lana (2013) Francés from Roncevalles to Molinasaca then the Camino de Invierno (2014)
Hi, Freescot, In my rush to sink my claws into another potential contributor to the Camino Invierno guide, I neglected to ask if you'd care to share your general impressions and experiences with us. This is such an untraveled camino that I think many are kind of scared away from it. I'd love to hear how it went for you. Buen camino, Laurie
For me, Laurie, it is the Camino in which I felt most immersed in Galicia, almost literally, with the two great descents into its bowels where the Sil and the Minho take away the waters from the North. I spoke with more local people than I had on the Francés or the Portuguese. One afternoon just before arriving in Rodeiro I was delighted to see the little shop open in Rio. I was soaked to the skin and had gone in for comfort more than a desire to buy anything. There was a kitchen on my left with an elderly woman cooking but she was not aware that I had come in. There was absolutely nothing in the shop that I wanted: I was just happy to be out of the rain, dripping in her hallway. In the end I said hello and she came out of her kitchen looking me up and down. Out of politeness I asked if she had any dark chocolate, which she didn't have but offered me a large bar of milk chocolate which I accepted. When I tried to pay she refused absolutely to take anything, then a customer came in and she said, "This is a pilgrim on his way to Santiago." The next morning, on leaving Rodeiro, the driver of a passing car slammed on his brakes, jumped out and came running over to me. Even though I was walking under a small umbrella he handed me a huge one telling me I needed something much better. "Take it, it's a gift. Buen camino." Not much further on one of the delivery vans which bring bread to the remote areas had stopped outside a house and the farmer in his blue overalls beckoned to me. "You'd like some warm bread, I'm sure." He turned to the baker and said, "Give him a loaf." "Eat it now", he ordered, which I duly began to do as he payed the baker.
There was also the woman who ran El Guerro where I had stayed that very night. She walks with her friends every morning and told me after breakfast that she would walk the first part with me. Her determination to do so only lasted a dozen metres or so before she realised how slow I am, especially as I start off in the morning. After a couple of kilometres I realised that I had dropped a glove while taking some photos and decided not to return - downhill - for it, determining to find a cheap pair in Lalin. About 3 kms out of Rodeiro I saw this lady with her friends walking at a good pace towards me. We greeted each other and I gave her my glove saying "If you find the other one give them to a needy pilgrim." We parted and some time later, needing a pee, I glanced behind but the coast was not clear. There she was in the distance running back towards me but far enough away to relieve myself before she got near. She gave me back a complete pair of gloves: she must have added 2 km to her morning outing just for that. That all happened in less than 24 hours. Then there was Manuel the owner of the bar in Sobradelo, Asun, of course and the wonderful family in the Mesón on the hill up from Belesar.
As for the route: I found it hard, tougher than the Ruta de La Lana, but I'm more than a year older and very arthritic. It is beautiful and on my return I took the morning train from Santiago to Irun which retraces the camino almost exactly just to drink in, once again, the landscape of rivers and steep gorges, green lush valleys, smokey aldeas and lingering mists: is is a feast.
I would add that the warnings about provisions are much less necessary at the end of October. On all the long stretches without bars or shops there was an abundance of fruit:, figs, apples, pears, berries, grapes and madroños, all hanging on abandoned plants and trees or fallen on the verge.
I could go on and on because I feel so steeped in Galician autumn still - and, yes, the smells of the oak and the jara and the water of the rivers, ..............
But it was a challenge - summed up by my thoughts as I took this photo on my first day on the Camino de Invierno "At least I don'thave to climb all the way up there..........."
P1100034.jpg
but, yes, ..all the way.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
For me, Laurie, it is the Camino in which I felt most immersed in Galicia, almost literally, with the two great descents into its bowels where the Sil and the Minho take away the waters from the North. I spoke with more local people than I had on the Francés or the Portuguese. One afternoon just before arriving in Rodeiro I was delighted to see the little shop open in Rio. I was soaked to the skin and had gone in for comfort more than a desire to buy anything. There was a kitchen on my left with an elderly woman cooking but she was not aware that I had come in. There was absolutely nothing in the shop that I wanted: I was just happy to be out of the rain, dripping in her hallway. In the end I said hello and she came out of her kitchen looking me up and down. Out of politeness I asked if she had any dark chocolate, which she didn't have but offered me a large bar of milk chocolate which I accepted. When I tried to pay she refused absolutely to take anything, then a customer came in and she said, "This is a pilgrim on his way to Santiago." The next morning, on leaving Rodeiro, the driver of a passing car slammed on his brakes, jumped out and came running over to me. Even though I was walking under a small umbrella he handed me a huge one telling me I needed something much better. "Take it, it's a gift. Buen camino." Not much further on one of the delivery vans which bring bread to the remote areas had stopped outside a house and the farmer in his blue overalls beckoned to me. "You'd like some warm bread, I'm sure." He turned to the baker and said, "Give him a loaf." "Eat it now", he ordered, which I duly began to do as he payed the baker.
There was also the woman who ran El Guerro where I had stayed that very night. She walks with her friends every morning and told me after breakfast that she would walk the first part with me. Her determination to do so only lasted a dozen metres or so before she realised how slow I am, especially as I start off in the morning. After a couple of kilometres I realised that I had dropped a glove while taking some photos and decided not to return - downhill - for it, determining to find a cheap pair in Lalin. About 3 kms out of Rodeiro I saw this lady with her friends walking at a good pace towards me. We greeted each other and I gave her my glove saying "If you find the other one give them to a needy pilgrim." We parted and some time later, needing a pee, I glanced behind but the coast was not clear. There she was in the distance running back towards me but far enough away to relieve myself before she got near. She gave me back a complete pair of gloves: she must have added 2 km to her morning outing just for that. That all happened in less than 24 hours. Then there was Manuel the owner of the bar in Sobradelo, Asun, of course and the wonderful family in the Mesón on the hill up from Belesar.
As for the route: I found it hard, tougher than the Ruta de La Lana, but I'm more than a year older and very arthritic. It is beautiful and on my return I took the morning train from Santiago to Irun which retraces the camino almost exactly just to drink in, once again, the landscape of rivers and steep gorges, green lush valleys, smokey aldeas and lingering mists: is is a feast.
I would add that the warnings about provisions are much less necessary at the end of October. On all the long stretches without bars or shops there was an abundance of fruit:, figs, apples, pears, berries, grapes and madroños, all hanging on abandoned plants and trees or fallen on the verge.
I could go on and on because I feel so steeped in Galician autumn still - and, yes, the smells of the oak and the jara and the water of the rivers, ..............
But it was a challenge - summed up by my thoughts as I took this photo on my first day on the Camino de Invierno "At least I don'thave to climb all the way up there..........."
View attachment 14831
but, yes, ..all the way.
Wow, what a great post, freescot. You really capture the essence of this camino. I had many experiences like this, too, and Kinky and econodan have described similar ones of their own. Not to disparage or dismiss the beauty and joy of any other camino, but I think it's impossible to find that kind of contact with the "locals" on the more traveled ones. You may not find other pilgrims on the invierno, but you will find a lot of good substitutes!
Thanks for taking so much time to share this with us all. Buen camino, Laurie
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
For me, Laurie, it is the Camino in which I felt most immersed in Galicia, almost literally, with the two great descents into its bowels where the Sil and the Minho take away the waters from the North. I spoke with more local people than I had on the Francés or the Portuguese. One afternoon just before arriving in Rodeiro I was delighted to see the little shop open in Rio. I was soaked to the skin and had gone in for comfort more than a desire to buy anything. There was a kitchen on my left with an elderly woman cooking but she was not aware that I had come in. There was absolutely nothing in the shop that I wanted: I was just happy to be out of the rain, dripping in her hallway. In the end I said hello and she came out of her kitchen looking me up and down. Out of politeness I asked if she had any dark chocolate, which she didn't have but offered me a large bar of milk chocolate which I accepted. When I tried to pay she refused absolutely to take anything, then a customer came in and she said, "This is a pilgrim on his way to Santiago." The next morning, on leaving Rodeiro, the driver of a passing car slammed on his brakes, jumped out and came running over to me. Even though I was walking under a small umbrella he handed me a huge one telling me I needed something much better. "Take it, it's a gift. Buen camino." Not much further on one of the delivery vans which bring bread to the remote areas had stopped outside a house and the farmer in his blue overalls beckoned to me. "You'd like some warm bread, I'm sure." He turned to the baker and said, "Give him a loaf." "Eat it now", he ordered, which I duly began to do as he payed the baker.
There was also the woman who ran El Guerro where I had stayed that very night. She walks with her friends every morning and told me after breakfast that she would walk the first part with me. Her determination to do so only lasted a dozen metres or so before she realised how slow I am, especially as I start off in the morning. After a couple of kilometres I realised that I had dropped a glove while taking some photos and decided not to return - downhill - for it, determining to find a cheap pair in Lalin. About 3 kms out of Rodeiro I saw this lady with her friends walking at a good pace towards me. We greeted each other and I gave her my glove saying "If you find the other one give them to a needy pilgrim." We parted and some time later, needing a pee, I glanced behind but the coast was not clear. There she was in the distance running back towards me but far enough away to relieve myself before she got near. She gave me back a complete pair of gloves: she must have added 2 km to her morning outing just for that. That all happened in less than 24 hours. Then there was Manuel the owner of the bar in Sobradelo, Asun, of course and the wonderful family in the Mesón on the hill up from Belesar.
As for the route: I found it hard, tougher than the Ruta de La Lana, but I'm more than a year older and very arthritic. It is beautiful and on my return I took the morning train from Santiago to Irun which retraces the camino almost exactly just to drink in, once again, the landscape of rivers and steep gorges, green lush valleys, smokey aldeas and lingering mists: is is a feast.
I would add that the warnings about provisions are much less necessary at the end of October. On all the long stretches without bars or shops there was an abundance of fruit:, figs, apples, pears, berries, grapes and madroños, all hanging on abandoned plants and trees or fallen on the verge.
I could go on and on because I feel so steeped in Galician autumn still - and, yes, the smells of the oak and the jara and the water of the rivers, ..............
But it was a challenge - summed up by my thoughts as I took this photo on my first day on the Camino de Invierno "At least I don'thave to climb all the way up there..........."
View attachment 14831
but, yes, ..all the way.
Many times writing posts in this thread I was kind of frustrated to write in my not-native language and therefore not able to say what I really experienced on Invierno. So, thank you @freescot for posting this! And as Laurie wrote you've captured it all!

Ultreia!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Wow, what a great post, freescot. You really capture the essence of this camino. I had many experiences like this, too, and Kinky and econodan have described similar ones of their own. Not to disparage or dismiss the beauty and joy of any other camino, but I think it's impossible to find that kind of contact with the "locals" on the more traveled ones. You may not find other pilgrims on the invierno, but you will find a lot of good substitutes!
Thanks for taking so much time to share this with us all. Buen camino, Laurie
Ditto, Laurie!
Less traveled Caminos are much more rewarding in terms of "angels" and beautiful experiences with local people. Same on de Madrid and de Invierno. So fulfilling!

K1
 

Theatregal

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
So far...
2012 ~ 2019
For me, Laurie, it is the Camino in which I felt most immersed in Galicia, almost literally, with the two great descents into its bowels where the Sil and the Minho take away the waters from the North. I spoke with more local people than I had on the Francés or the Portuguese. One afternoon just before arriving in Rodeiro I was delighted to see the little shop open in Rio. I was soaked to the skin and had gone in for comfort more than a desire to buy anything. There was a kitchen on my left with an elderly woman cooking but she was not aware that I had come in. There was absolutely nothing in the shop that I wanted: I was just happy to be out of the rain, dripping in her hallway. In the end I said hello and she came out of her kitchen looking me up and down. Out of politeness I asked if she had any dark chocolate, which she didn't have but offered me a large bar of milk chocolate which I accepted. When I tried to pay she refused absolutely to take anything, then a customer came in and she said, "This is a pilgrim on his way to Santiago." The next morning, on leaving Rodeiro, the driver of a passing car slammed on his brakes, jumped out and came running over to me. Even though I was walking under a small umbrella he handed me a huge one telling me I needed something much better. "Take it, it's a gift. Buen camino." Not much further on one of the delivery vans which bring bread to the remote areas had stopped outside a house and the farmer in his blue overalls beckoned to me. "You'd like some warm bread, I'm sure." He turned to the baker and said, "Give him a loaf." "Eat it now", he ordered, which I duly began to do as he payed the baker.
There was also the woman who ran El Guerro where I had stayed that very night. She walks with her friends every morning and told me after breakfast that she would walk the first part with me. Her determination to do so only lasted a dozen metres or so before she realised how slow I am, especially as I start off in the morning. After a couple of kilometres I realised that I had dropped a glove while taking some photos and decided not to return - downhill - for it, determining to find a cheap pair in Lalin. About 3 kms out of Rodeiro I saw this lady with her friends walking at a good pace towards me. We greeted each other and I gave her my glove saying "If you find the other one give them to a needy pilgrim." We parted and some time later, needing a pee, I glanced behind but the coast was not clear. There she was in the distance running back towards me but far enough away to relieve myself before she got near. She gave me back a complete pair of gloves: she must have added 2 km to her morning outing just for that. That all happened in less than 24 hours. Then there was Manuel the owner of the bar in Sobradelo, Asun, of course and the wonderful family in the Mesón on the hill up from Belesar.
As for the route: I found it hard, tougher than the Ruta de La Lana, but I'm more than a year older and very arthritic. It is beautiful and on my return I took the morning train from Santiago to Irun which retraces the camino almost exactly just to drink in, once again, the landscape of rivers and steep gorges, green lush valleys, smokey aldeas and lingering mists: is is a feast.
I would add that the warnings about provisions are much less necessary at the end of October. On all the long stretches without bars or shops there was an abundance of fruit:, figs, apples, pears, berries, grapes and madroños, all hanging on abandoned plants and trees or fallen on the verge.
I could go on and on because I feel so steeped in Galician autumn still - and, yes, the smells of the oak and the jara and the water of the rivers, ..............
But it was a challenge - summed up by my thoughts as I took this photo on my first day on the Camino de Invierno "At least I don'thave to climb all the way up there..........."
View attachment 14831
but, yes, ..all the way.
So great to read your wonderful post Freescot. Thank you!
 

freescot

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
La Plata (2010) Portuguese from Coimbra(2010) Levante (2011) La Lana (2013) Francés from Roncevalles to Molinasaca then the Camino de Invierno (2014)
Many times writing posts in this thread I was kind of frustrated to write in my not-native language and therefore not able to say what I really experienced on Invierno. So, thank you @freescot for posting this! And as Laurie wrote you've captured it all!

Ultreia!
I wish I'd been able to read your own account which is so comprehenive - and very clearly written!! - before I set off - but maybe I'd have stayed on the Francés if I'd known the amount of upa and downs on the Invierno.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
... but maybe I'd have stayed on the Francés if I'd known the amount of upa and downs on the Invierno.
So freescot, I'm curious -- How did you decide to walk the Invierno? It sounds like it might have been a spur of the moment decision in Ponferrada. In my experience, the hospitaleros in the Ponferrada albergue do their best to discourage pilgrims from walking it, and the tourist office was also equally unhelpful. Buen camino, Laurie
 

freescot

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
La Plata (2010) Portuguese from Coimbra(2010) Levante (2011) La Lana (2013) Francés from Roncevalles to Molinasaca then the Camino de Invierno (2014)
So freescot, I'm curious -- How did you decide to walk the Invierno? It sounds like it might have been a spur of the moment decision in Ponferrada. In my experience, the hospitaleros in the Ponferrada albergue do their best to discourage pilgrims from walking it, and the tourist office was also equally unhelpful. Buen camino, Laurie
Laurie, I didn't go to Ponferrada but deviated at the bridge from the Francés directly on to the Camino de Invierno. It was my first Camino Francés from Roncevalles. Last year I had joined it in Burgos and in 2010, on my first Camino, I joined it from the Via de La Plata in Astorga. So, having already walked from Ponferrada twice and hoping for a bit of peace and quiet, I sought information and, as you say in your guide, the glossy tourist info I picked up in the private albergue in Molinaseca skimmed over the details. It had been on my mind for a few days before Molinaseca and I had taken, on my camera, 6 screen shots from a computer I borrowed to serve as my guide. It was not quite a last minute decision but then I only decided to do this Camino on the evening of Wed. 1st October and was walking from Roncevalles on Friday 3rd at 6.30 am. This is an advantage of living in Spain. That was more last minute. Not well planned and my rucksack had two swimming trunks and two groundsheets while I left home with no footwear other than my very used, old and cheap sandals.
 

bimblingalong

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2010 SJPP-Belorado / 2012 SJPP- Finisterre / 2014 Santander- Lugo (Norte/Primitivo), Ponferrada-Chantada- Invierno, SdC-Muxia.....
( August 2015 C Portuguese from Valenca)
Ditto, Laurie!
Less traveled Caminos are much more rewarding in terms of "angels" and beautiful experiences with local people. Same on de Madrid and de Invierno. So fulfilling!

K1
I will second that wholeheartedly.....probably the most enjoyable time walking for me, made especially magical because of the local contact & random acts of kindness that happened...I learnt a great deal on the Invierno & hope to walk it again this year....thank you SOOO much for the lovely post freescot...I have convinced a couple of our West Australian Camino group to try "turning left" at Ponferrada for an unforgettable walk into SdC!!:)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I will second that wholeheartedly.....probably the most enjoyable time walking for me, made especially magical because of the local contact & random acts of kindness that happened...I learnt a great deal on the Invierno & hope to walk it again this year....thank you SOOO much for the lovely post freescot...I have convinced a couple of our West Australian Camino group to try "turning left" at Ponferrada for an unforgettable walk into SdC!!:)
Invierno is harder for the longer stages and less (pilgrim) acommodation opportunities but you are rewarded with other things though. I imagine it would be hard to leave Camino family after so many kilometers walked together for most pilgrims but your friends will walk as a group so I guess that won't be such an issue.

If you will walk Invierno again this year please keep us posted.

Ultreia!
 

Maya Amanecer 2015

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2015, Camino de Madrid and Camino Frances, Camino Fisterra
April 2016, Camino Portugues, Camino Muxia, Little Fox House Retreat
DAY 36 (Mon, 28.07.2014)
RODEIRO – A LAXE (24,95kms)

https://www.endomondo.com/workouts/user/16690154

Photos for previous post...
Hello K1!

I am new to the forum and I have been reading your wonderful posts from last summer, but I can't find what happens to you after Day 36 (Mon, 28.7.2014)! Am I missing them somewhere?
I would really like to know what happens to you from that day on.........

Thanks
MA
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hello K1!

I am new to the forum and I have been reading your wonderful posts from last summer, but I can't find what happens to you after Day 36 (Mon, 28.7.2014)! Am I missing them somewhere?
I would really like to know what happens to you from that day on.........

Thanks
MA
I´m sure Kinky will tell you, but to end the suspense, what happens is that the Invierno joins up with the Camino Sanabrés at the albergue in A Laxe and from there you just follow that route into Santiago, through Bandeira, Silleda, Outeiro and finally Santiago. It may be that he didn´t put those days on the Invierno thread since he had technically left the Invierno!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hello K1!

I am new to the forum and I have been reading your wonderful posts from last summer, but I can't find what happens to you after Day 36 (Mon, 28.7.2014)! Am I missing them somewhere?
I would really like to know what happens to you from that day on.........

Thanks
MA
Thank you very much Maya for your nice response!

The reason I didn't continue with my posts while once on Sanabres at A Laxe is (as @peregrina2000 mentioned) of purely technical reasons - I have changed my computer and since then I can't post any material/file to the forum. The other reason is my laziness of course. I could've sorted that out months ago ... but I do need help from some of my IT friends since I'm quite an idiot regarding those things. I'll try to do it ASAP :)

BTW -welcome to the forum! Ultreia!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
@Maya Amanecer
Apart from that I just might to wait for this years Camino de Levante when I'll be walking stretch from A Laxe to Santiago (and further on to Muxia/Fisterra) once again. But I do want to finish what I've started though ;)

Have a nice day!
 

Maya Amanecer 2015

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2015, Camino de Madrid and Camino Frances, Camino Fisterra
April 2016, Camino Portugues, Camino Muxia, Little Fox House Retreat
Thanks K1 for your response. But you did make it to Santiago? If I remember correctly, you had a deadline and it would have been a shame if
you made it that far and didn't get to Santiago....... Your descriptions are great and I believe they are helping me decide on my plan for a camino
in a few weeks!
 

Maya Amanecer 2015

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2015, Camino de Madrid and Camino Frances, Camino Fisterra
April 2016, Camino Portugues, Camino Muxia, Little Fox House Retreat
And a question K1? I prefer to not walk on tarmac and I wonder if you can tell me your overall impression of Invierno?, because I think I
read that you walked much more on tarmac on its early part.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
And a question K1? I prefer to not walk on tarmac and I wonder if you can tell me your overall impression of Invierno?, because I think I
read that you walked much more on tarmac on its early part.
I did make it to Santiago and even to Muxia & Fisterra. Unfortunatelly in Negreira I woke up with swollen knee and couldn't really walk that day because I was limping around very slowly. Because of my deadline (return flight, mistake I won't repeat this year ;)) I took the only bus on that rainy day to Muxia and next day got a hitch-hike to Cee in 5 minutes. After a few hours of additional rest on the beach I've made it to albergue in/past Corcubion and next day I managed to walk slowly the whole distance to Cabo Finisterre. So all in all I've missed about 50kms (which I've already walked in 2011) and was kind of sad but I never know when my bad knees will refuse to work properly :)

When I look back at Invierno on tarmac issue today I don't really remember that there are much of it, about the same as on Frances I'd say but when I was walking I thought there would be much less. I thought if this is less walked camino it is also more rural but that was purely my mistake. In addition I choosed tarmac over overgrown official camino some times. Again my decision. But often there are grassy or gravel shoulders so it's not really that much pain in the ass.

You're thinking of Invierno in a few weeks? Any exact date yet?
 

Maya Amanecer 2015

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2015, Camino de Madrid and Camino Frances, Camino Fisterra
April 2016, Camino Portugues, Camino Muxia, Little Fox House Retreat
I´m sure Kinky will tell you, but to end the suspense, what happens is that the Invierno joins up with the Camino Sanabrés at the albergue in A Laxe and from there you just follow that route into Santiago, through Bandeira, Silleda, Outeiro and finally Santiago. It may be that he didn´t put those days on the Invierno thread since he had technically left the Invierno!
I did make it to Santiago and even to Muxia & Fisterra. Unfortunatelly in Negreira I woke up with swollen knee and couldn't really walk that day because I was limping around very slowly. Because of my deadline (return flight, mistake I won't repeat this year ;)) I took the only bus on that rainy day to Muxia and next day got a hitch-hike to Cee in 5 minutes. After a few hours of additional rest on the beach I've made it to albergue in/past Corcubion and next day I managed to walk slowly the whole distance to Cabo Finisterre. So all in all I've missed about 50kms (which I've already walked in 2011) and was kind of sad but I never know when my bad knees will refuse to work properly :)

When I look back at Invierno on tarmac issue today I don't really remember that there are much of it, about the same as on Frances I'd say but when I was walking I thought there would be much less. I thought if this is less walked camino it is also more rural but that was purely my mistake. In addition I choosed tarmac over overgrown official camino some times. Again my decision. But often there are grassy or gravel shoulders so it's not really that much pain in the ass.

You're thinking of Invierno in a few weeks? Any exact date yet?
 

Maya Amanecer 2015

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2015, Camino de Madrid and Camino Frances, Camino Fisterra
April 2016, Camino Portugues, Camino Muxia, Little Fox House Retreat
Yes, I arrive in Madrid on April 16, which is the only certain plan. From there I will take the CdM, but my specifics aren't clear yet. I booked my flight earlier that I had originally planned , and now am feeling somewhat unprepared.

I'm glad you finished your camino last summer. I was so interested in your thread, that I felt like someone ripped the last pages out of my novel and in my mind you were lost in A Lux....... I am not sure I will walk the Invierno, though, since this is my first camino. However, if there are lots of people on CdF, I may change my mind......

MA
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Yes, I arrive in Madrid on April 16, which is the only certain plan. From there I will take the CdM, but my specifics aren't clear yet. I booked my flight earlier that I had originally planned , and now am feeling somewhat unprepared.

I'm glad you finished your camino last summer. I was so interested in your thread, that I felt likese someo the lane rippedst pag out of my novel and in my mind you were lost in A Lux....... I am not sure I will walk the Invierno, though, since this is my first camino. However, if there are lots of people on CdF, I may change my mind......

MA
Oh, Maya, that's so nice and cute from you "...I felt like someone ripped the last pages out of my novel and in my mind you were lost...". Maybe even more for me, non-native English speaker :)

So you just might do the same as I did last year, @peregrina2000 two years ago and I'm quite sure some more forum members. That's nice, I'll have a feeling that I'm walking it again somehow ;) You will have a lot of solitude already on CdM and after that CF will shock you a bit. At this time of year the numbers are already rising but it still isn't the peak season. So maybe you'll get some Camino family (I even didn't long for one) and continue on CF. In any case I'll be home until June 6th when departing for Levante and if you would need any help about those routes feel free to contact me.

Have a nice day!
 

Maya Amanecer 2015

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2015, Camino de Madrid and Camino Frances, Camino Fisterra
April 2016, Camino Portugues, Camino Muxia, Little Fox House Retreat
I´m sure Kinky will tell you, but to end the suspense, what happens is that the Invierno joins up with the Camino Sanabrés at the albergue in A Laxe and from there you just follow that route into Santiago, through Bandeira, Silleda, Outeiro and finally Santiago. It may be that he didn´t put those days on the Invierno thread since he had technically left the Invierno!
Thanks!
 

Maya Amanecer 2015

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2015, Camino de Madrid and Camino Frances, Camino Fisterra
April 2016, Camino Portugues, Camino Muxia, Little Fox House Retreat
Oh, Maya, that's so nice and cute from you "...I felt like someone ripped the last pages out of my novel and in my mind you were lost...". Maybe even more for me, non-native English speaker :)

So you just might do the same as I did last year, @peregrina2000 two years ago and I'm quite sure some more forum members. That's nice, I'll have a feeling that I'm walking it again somehow ;) You will have a lot of solitude already on CdM and after that CF will shock you a bit. At this time of year the numbers are already rising but it still isn't the peak season. So maybe you'll get some Camino family (I even didn't long for one) and continue on CF. In any case I'll be home until June 6th when departing for Levante and if you would need any help about those routes feel free to contact me.

Have a nice day!

Thanks, K1! I already have questions for you about how to contact a hostel owner on the CdM by phone. I will attempt to figure out how to send you a private message.

Wow! Levante! Que Bravo! I hope you will take notes as you go and write about it in a forum. Our paths may cross this summer, since I will be back in Madrid by mid-June. Best wishes as you plan your trip, you seem to be excellent at planning AND completing your goals!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Las Medulas Park, mobile: 987-422-858). I've got a room of my own with a balcony (all shitted by birds) for 25€. Damn… But again all my clothes were washed and I sprayed all the rest.
Kinky, what is Las Médulas Park? Did you see a sign in a window in a house near the church saying rooms were available? (just trying to get some ideas about accommodations there). Thanks, Laurie
 

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