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Search 69,459 Camino Questions

Need help deciding to bring or not to bring

NinaCamina

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
May 8 - June 21.
Frances + Salvador + Primitivo
I'm asking because I CAN live without these.

I'll keep it short; should I bring...?

Sleeping liner - (don't albergues have at least one sheet? for me that will be enough)
Kindle + Kindle charger
Earphones + charger (my phone only takes bluetooth earphones)
power bank (I love taking pictures and videos and I will rely heavily on my phone for the camino app, and well everything, I really don't want to end up without battery mid walk or when trying to find accommodation)
hair brush ? (my hair is thick and long, don't want to end up with dreadlocks by the end of my 45 day camino)
travel towel, vs rayon sarong (the second has more uses, pretty much same size and weight, still have to try how they compare in the drying time)
Apple Watch ?
head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am

trekking poles (this one I'm more on the yes side)
water bladder (more on the yes side, I'm not a water drinker, so having a bottle all the way up to my backpack will prevent me from drinking often)
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

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Hi Nina, my 2c worth.
Take the kindle. Always nice to chill out for an hour or two reading before bed ot when doing your washing.
Take the smartwatch. Always nice to see how far you have come and your heart rate etc.
Take the trekking poles. Your knees will thank you.
Take the hair brush.
Take the sarong. I'm a male however I find travel towels rather inefficient. A sarong may be better.
Take the head lamp. You will need it in the albergues even if not on the road.

Leave the earphones. enjoy the surrounding sounds.
Leave the power bank. Just take a usb charger for your phone and kindle.
Leave the water bladder. Unless you are on a remote camino there will be plenty pf places to fill a bottle on the way.
Leave the liner and take a lightweight sleeping bag. Some albergues are very cold and many don't have blankets.


Buen Camino!
 
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You need something to sleep in. Unless you are staying in private rooms take at least a liner. I was cold in June last year with my liner and used my poncho as a blanket.

Edit: I think you will feel exposed without any kind of sleep sack in a room of strangers. You also need a way to protect your valuables.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Sleeping liner - (don't albergues have at least one sheet? for me that will be enough)
See my response to your other post:

Many albergues only offer a disposable bottom sheet and pillowcase made of a very thin nonwoven fabric. I'm sure that some people sleep right on top of that, but it's never appealed to me.

You can buy a liner at Decathlon for a very low price.

 
  • Headlamp: No need for outdoors, however inside an albergue could become handy during night;
  • Water Bladder: Not recommended. Plenty of water sources along the way to just refill bottle(s). Water bladder requires more intensive cleaning due to all the parts, and if such intensive cleaning is not performed there is a risk of harmful bacteria accumulation because of the bladder. Bladders are very nitpicky, yet they do their job when there are long stretches of distance without foreseeable water sources. For Camino, bottle is enough.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
Water Bladder: Not recommended. Plenty of water sources along the way to just refill bottle(s). Water bladder requires more intensive cleaning due to all the parts, and if such intensive cleaning is not performed there is a risk of harmful bacteria accumulation because of the bladder.
Not true. So long as you are always adding fresh clean water and nothing else, you don't need to do any intensive cleaning while you are on the trail.
I cleaned mine zero times last year during my 40+ days on the Camino.
 
Take the kindle. Always nice to chill out for an hour or two reading before bed ot when doing your washing.
Take the smartwatch. Always nice to see how far you have come and your heart rate etc.
Personally I would leave them behind as it seems your phone can perform the functions of both of them. Less weight, fewer devices to charge.
 
I did take, and use, a power bank. I take tons of pictures, and stay in touch with my family during the walk, and that eats a considerable amount of battery from the phone.
I walked 5-7 hours per day, and used two or three apps to guide me on the trail and help me make decisions. Running out of battery would have represented a problem for me, and having to spend time in some inn charging the phone would have delayed me considerably.
I found other things unnecessary, but the power bank was not one of them.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
I'm asking because I CAN live without these.

I'll keep it short; should I bring...?

Sleeping liner - (don't albergues have at least one sheet? for me that will be enough)
Kindle + Kindle charger
Earphones + charger (my phone only takes bluetooth earphones)
power bank (I love taking pictures and videos and I will rely heavily on my phone for the camino app, and well everything, I really don't want to end up without battery mid walk or when trying to find accommodation)
hair brush ? (my hair is thick and long, don't want to end up with dreadlocks by the end of my 45 day camino)
travel towel, vs rayon sarong (the second has more uses, pretty much same size and weight, still have to try how they compare in the drying time)
Apple Watch ?
head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am

trekking poles (this one I'm more on the yes side)
water bladder (more on the yes side, I'm not a water drinker, so having a bottle all the way up to my backpack will prevent me from drinking often)

Albergues provide paper bottom sheets and pillowcases. Some private accommodation provide linen including duvets but otherwise you’ll need a liner or sleeping bag

Kindle - totally an individual choice. Seems excess weight to me, personally. Can use kindle reader on your phone?

Power bank - definitely. I take a super small and light one, no bigger than my phone. Ditto, charger, otherwise no charging!

Earphones - I take mine, only tend to use them travelling to and from the Camino, rather than during

Brush - for sure, take as small and light a one as possible

Travel towel - personally yes vs sarong

Apple watch - leave behind, phone can perform same functions. And if there are some it can’t, download a relevant app

Head torch - I always have one with me, out of habit. But that’s me.

Poles - personally yes. I don’t use them most of the time but they’re there, tucked on the side of my pack

Water bladder - I’m more of a water bottles person, but you know your own preference
 
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I love it how everyone has such different notions of what’s “essential” for them.
I used my Apple Watch AND my phone heavily. Both of them.
Likewise, I had never used walking poles before I started El Camino, but boy - I’m never taking to a trail ever again without them!
Once I figured out how to use them correctly (a lot of people just kind of swing them around and go tick-tick-tick - uselessly), they made a HUGE difference for me. Considerably reduced the effort on steep climbs, saved ny knees on steep descents, and saved me many times from a messy spill on wet, muddy, slippery stretches.
Anyway, looks like the rule of thumb is to leave behind anything you are quite confident you can live without. Everyone’s essentials are evidently different.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Hi Nina!
I wouldn't take a kindle you defo don't need it! (just use the app)
My phone does every thing it does and better; atm i have 12 novels from Google Play books (voice actors read the aloud; Kindle reader is a monotonous robot)
On Kindle app Sandy Brown's Frances Guide and Village To Village Guide.

For me personally i would defo take Poles and headlight (78 grams phone flashlight not enough for me)
Earbuds (wired so don't lose them) my phone cable fits them so Charges fine.
 
Hi Nina. These are my personal views - not fact, not necessarily right or correct, just from my viewpoint.

Sleeping liner: - ? something to sleep in - liner, lightweight bag (you don't say when you are going so don't know climate for you). In the UK Trail do a fleece envelope liner that opens fully, under 500gms and they claim gives same warmth as a 2 season bag.
Kindle + Kindle charger: - no. Use your phone
Earphones + charger: - no - switch off gadgets, hear the Camino (or take wired ones for your phone?).
power bank: ? keep a track of your usage at home taking pics to see if you get more or less than a day. At many refugios power sockets are at a premium so if taking a wall charger you could take a multiple so others could also plug in from the same socket - like this -
s-l960.jpg

Also, a small USB solar panel is good - pin it to rucksack, charges slowly but you are walking for hours, really useful.
I use this one - I don't think is actually 10W but works very well, so many others on Ebay are rubbish.
solar.jpg

hair brush: No idea - comb for African heritage hair? Made for pulling through tight curls. Is that lighter?
travel towel, vs rayon sarong: ? Both? Female users seem to rave about sarongs and I can see why; elegant, multiple uses from cool comfort in the evenings to modesty in refugios, I have seen one worn as a draped head cover in super hot weather and they are light and pack small. I can't bear travel towels, they seem to stick to my skin, so I carry an old worn thin regular smallish towel - but that is me.
Apple Watch: Why? No, really, why?
head lamp: Not usually necessary unless walking in the dark, your phone has a torch - but it is really bright! what about one of those super-tiny key ring torches 'just in case'? You can cover it with your hand so only shows a tiny glimmer, doesn't wake sleeping pilgrims.
trekking poles: A pair? Nooooooooooooooooo ghastly things - but do take one pole or staff to give you tripod stability on steep descents and ascents.
water bladder: Nooooooooo ghastly things - it isn't a star wars hi tech route march .. with bladder you don't stop to drink, can't water a dying plant or give some to a dog or share with someone thirsty. With a bottle you stop, look at the view, take pack off, wriggle toes, pour it over your head, enjoy.

So - there my views - in the end do take what you decide to take, just remember - pack what you need, not what you think you may need.

Buen Camino!
 
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Sleeping liner - (don't albergues have at least one sheet? for me that will be enough)
Bring.
Kindle + Kindle charger
Not needed, talk to your fellow pilgrims. Way more interesting!
Earphones + charger (my phone only takes bluetooth earphones)
power bank (I love taking pictures and videos and I will rely heavily on my phone for the camino app, and well
Bring. Needed my powerbank twice, once for a fellow walker and once to recharge my camera battery.
hair brush ? (my hair is thick and long, don't want to end up with dreadlocks by the end of my 45 day camino)
I had a foldable Minibrush that worked well for me.
travel towel, vs rayon sarong (the second has more uses, pretty much same size and weight, still have to try how they compare in the drying time)
Had microfiber terry towels (like the ones used by hairdressers). Cheap and fast drying.
Apple Watch ?
If you want to keep track on your walk, bring.
head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am
If you are walking in mid summer, you will be likely to walk very early to avoid the heat. Bring, it's just 50gr.
trekking poles (this one I'm more on the yes side)
Didn't bring mine (didn't want to check in luggage), but are helpful.
water bladder (more on the yes side, I'm not a water drinker, so having a bottle all the way up to my backpack will prevent me from drinking often)
I was happy with the 2 single use 500ml PET-waterbottles I bought in Bayonne. They were good until SdC.

HTH
Roland
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

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I did take, and use, a power bank. I take tons of pictures, and stay in touch with my family during the walk, and that eats a considerable amount of battery from the phone.
I walked 5-7 hours per day, and used two or three apps to guide me on the trail and help me make decisions. Running out of battery would have represented a problem for me, and having to spend time in some inn charging the phone would have delayed me considerably.
I found other things unnecessary, but the power bank was not one of them.
100% agree about the powerbank. The photo opportunities were amazing and I also used the Strava app.
 
Yes, just to stress a point about the usefulness of a power bank. You want to use your phone for taking photos or videos? It’s going to make inroads into that battery during the day’s walk (unless you have a newish battery, maybe)
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
Personally I would leave them behind as it seems your phone can perform the functions of both of them. Less weight, fewer devices to charge.
Yes, it is a weight saving. However from a purely personal POV I don't like reading on my phone or taking it out to check the time. Kindle and watch for me and I can live with the extra weight.
 
I'm asking because I CAN live without these.

I'll keep it short; should I bring...?

Sleeping liner - (don't albergues have at least one sheet? for me that will be enough)
Kindle + Kindle charger
Earphones + charger (my phone only takes bluetooth earphones)
power bank (I love taking pictures and videos and I will rely heavily on my phone for the camino app, and well everything, I really don't want to end up without battery mid walk or when trying to find accommodation)
hair brush ? (my hair is thick and long, don't want to end up with dreadlocks by the end of my 45 day camino)
travel towel, vs rayon sarong (the second has more uses, pretty much same size and weight, still have to try how they compare in the drying time)
Apple Watch ?
head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am

trekking poles (this one I'm more on the yes side)
water bladder (more on the yes side, I'm not a water drinker, so having a bottle all the way up to my backpack will prevent me from drinking often)
My two cents:

Sleeping liner – take a liner at minimum – I always have done on my Caminos which are usually May/June. Municipal Albergues give you a bottom sheet for the mattress only. If you sleep cold, take a light sleeping bag instead – I don’t bother as the liner is fine in summertime for me.
Kindle + Kindle charger – nope – I’ve the Kindle App on my phone so read on that if I want to – not worth the weight to me and I never end up reading as much as I think I am going to on my Caminos.
Earphones + charger (my phone only takes bluetooth earphones) – No, unless you need earphones for sleep or for map directions – I’m not taking mine.
power bank - I do but want to get a lighter one for my next Camino (Primitivo in June). My nightmare is not having a charged phone. Light powerbank allows me to charge as I walk. You can also leave the powerbank charging in your Albergue and go ou in the evening/afternoon with your phone it give more options.
hair brush ? Definitely – I see it as an essential part of my toiletries/self care items – others may not but if you can find a light one I would for sure.

travel towel, vs rayon sarong - not sure as I’ve only ever usd a travel towel – however one thing I really insist on is a ‘full size’ towel I can wrap around myself – many bring tiny travel towels – in this instance I would take the sarong as it provides more coverage and as you say can be used for other purposes, the Camino dream item! 😊
Apple Watch ? – I don’t do Apple but I have a Fitbit as I like knowing how many kms/steps I’ve walked and how many hours I’ve walked. I’m sure Apple watches can do far me things, probably makes you a coffee in the morning (joke) so it would depend on how much I needed/wanted those things. That said, I like to have a wearble watch so I don’t have to keep looking at my phone for the time.
head lamp... I'm going in summer - I haven’t take one so far and never felt the need – I won’t this time either. I’ve occasionally used the torch on my phone if an Albergue is really dark but mostly haven’t needed – to me it is an inessential bit of kit.
trekking poles - yes I use them but I buy or find at the start of my Camino. I don’t bring them with me on the flight as I want to carry on my pack.
water bladder - not for me – I don’t really get that extra weight, the cleaning, the fitting it into the pack etc. A small bottle can be refilled with less ‘faff’.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I'm asking because I CAN live without these.

I'll keep it short; should I bring...?

Sleeping liner - (don't albergues have at least one sheet? for me that will be enough)
Kindle + Kindle charger
Earphones + charger (my phone only takes bluetooth earphones)
power bank (I love taking pictures and videos and I will rely heavily on my phone for the camino app, and well everything, I really don't want to end up without battery mid walk or when trying to find accommodation)
hair brush ? (my hair is thick and long, don't want to end up with dreadlocks by the end of my 45 day camino)
travel towel, vs rayon sarong (the second has more uses, pretty much same size and weight, still have to try how they compare in the drying time)
Apple Watch ?
head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am

trekking poles (this one I'm more on the yes side)
water bladder (more on the yes side, I'm not a water drinker, so having a bottle all the way up to my backpack will prevent me from drinking often)
My opinions:
Yes to the liner
No to the Kindle - I've done it and had NO time to read - can't you get your book on your phone?
Earphones - yes if you plan on listening to music in albergues
Hair brush - yes - find a smaller, lighter one?
Sarong if they weight the same. More useful
Apple Watch - I wouldn't personally - you'll just have to babysit it
head lamp - just know a lot of people (me included) HATE to have those danged things shone in our eyes in the albergue. Just wait until sunrise to walk?
Trekking poles - you don't need them and if you do , pick them up there
water bladder - I like COLD water and on the CF, you can find water in every village. I take a bottle.
 
oh my god! This community is giving me so much energy and I haven't started!
Thank you ALL so so much for your input!! You make it way easier for me now!

YES Bringing:
Sleeping liner - Will buy one at decathlon once I get to France.
power bank - I just can't risk it.
hair brush -
Rayon sarong - I will do a drying test soon just to compare with microfiber travel towel.
trekking poles - I will start with one, and if needed at some point, I can buy another one.

NOT bringing:
Kindle - Not taking it, using my phone if I so desperately need too read.
Earphones - Not taking them
Apple Watch - using strava app instead, or some other.
Head lamp - only if I find a cheaper one

Still indecisive : Water bladder.
I can go days without drinking water; so I definitely will dread taking down my pack for drinking some (my side pockets are not useful, water bottles fall out); but it IS an expensive item that I do not own.

I sincerely thank you and appreciate everyone's time :)
buen camino!
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Kindle App on phone does that same thing.
Power bank only take if is is the side of a double thick credit card and gives your phone a full charge. Tiny but does the job if required.
Torch- I Carry one but rarely use it. As an ex mountain rescuer they are invaluable as safety gear. Make sure it is small, light and preferably only used 1x AA battery. It is not just to see by but to be seen/ found
 
Torch- I Carry one but rarely use it. As an ex mountain rescuer they are invaluable as safety gear. Make sure it is small, light and preferably only used 1x AA battery. It is not just to see by but to be seen/ found
Interesting view!! thanks! I will consider it :)
 
A couple of other things…

If you do pick up a pole, and then during your Camino you decide you want a second, check out your albergue accommodation along the way. People inevitably leave behind things, often deliberately from a desire to shed weight in their packs. And that includes poles. Worth asking the host.


Re water, something I’ve taken to doing has been to carry a small 330l bottle in my trouser/shorts/fleece/jacket. I keep that topped up from a 750ml bottle in my pack’s side pocket, and refill that from taps and fountains along the way. It’s the only way I can guarantee I’m taking on enough water, as I’m not keen on water bladders. Of course, when I know I’ve got a very long stretch between water sources, I have a 600ml bottle in my pack too.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
oh my god! This community is giving me so much energy and I haven't started!
Thank you ALL so so much for your input!! You make it way easier for me now!

YES Bringing:
Sleeping liner - Will buy one at decathlon once I get to France.
power bank - I just can't risk it.
hair brush -
Rayon sarong - I will do a drying test soon just to compare with microfiber travel towel.
trekking poles - I will start with one, and if needed at some point, I can buy another one.

NOT bringing:
Kindle - Not taking it, using my phone if I so desperately need too read.
Earphones - Not taking them
Apple Watch - using strava app instead, or some other.
Head lamp - only if I find a cheaper one

Still indecisive : Water bladder.
I can go days without drinking water; so I definitely will dread taking down my pack for drinking some (my side pockets are not useful, water bottles fall out); but it IS an expensive item that I do not own.

I sincerely thank you and appreciate everyone's time :)
buen camino!
I just carry a smaller water bottle clipped on the front of my pack with a Chums water bottle holder. I carry a second one in my water bottle packet and switch them out when one is empty. I only use plastic water bottles that I purchase once and refill and reuse until they start leaking. Some people are against the plastic water bottles (single use) and prefer a metal one, but I often lose my bottle so prefer to go with something that I can easily replace. My experience with the military style camelback is that is starts to leak and then my stuff in my backpack is wet or I am wet. I also don't like straws in my drinks so the whole tube thing with the bite valve is kind of gross to me personally.

You will find what works for you though.
 
I'll keep it short; should I bring...?

Lots of great suggestions and insights here, so I’ll refrain from weighing in on packing choices myself (though I’m pro-sleep sack, power bank, earphones, Apple Watch, and travel towel; anti-sleeping bag, Kindle, water bladder, and headlamp; and neutral on hair brush and trekking poles, if anyone was wondering :) )

Based on what I learned during my first Camino, the only question I ask myself now is whether something I’m packing is a “just in case” item, or something I know I’m going to use every day. If it’s the former, I leave it at home, knowing I can always buy or borrow it along the way if I need to. As a result, my kit will be ca. 7.5 kg (including the weight of my pack itself and 1 L water) for my upcoming CP, as opposed to more than 10 kg all in for my CF in 2022.
 
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Head lamp - only if I find a cheaper one
Try Decathlon and try to find a headlamp with a red LED. Very much appreciated in dark dorms.
I found mine in a surplus store for under 10€.
I can go days without drinking water; so I definitely will dread taking down my pack for drinking some (my side pockets are not useful, water bottles fall out); but it IS an expensive item that I do not own.
 
I prefer to drink cold water too, but if it's a hot day the water will warm up regardless of how you carry it. I think that it warms up faster in a bottle in an outside pocket.
I am not sure about an outside pocket but I carry mine in my Macabi skirt pocket and it stays cold.
Every time I've used a bladder, the water is lukewarm 🤢🤮
 
Head lamp - only if I find a cheaper one

One more thought: In general, I think items that serve multiple functions are always better than single-function ones. A phone can easily take the place of a headlamp for finding one's way around dark dorms - there are even apps that use screen brightness to create a red lamp effect (search for NightVision Light app if you're using an iPhone). There is also a very handy flashlight feature built into the Apple Watch OS, which is another reason my watch is always part of my basic kit. And I find a light on my phone or watch is easier to control in a dark dorm than a lamp affixed to my head, thus minimizing the chance that the light is going to annoy my fellow pilgrims who are still trying to sleep.
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
I wouldn’t take your Kindle. I took mine on my first camino better never read. I was either doing my “camino chores”, socializing, eating. And if I really wanted to enjoy a story I would listen to an audiobook, which I would fall asleep to. For this ofcourse you need earphones.
Earphones are also a great universal “leave me alone” sign which I appreciated a lot for those moments that I wanted to be by myself. And music really helped energize me when I was getting tired.

Take the sheet. The albergues will sometimes offer a blanket but almost never sheets.

I would take both a towel and a sarong. Used my sarong a lot (pillowcase, skirt, scarf, privacy screen under bunk bed, etc). If you want to safe weight you can get a small towel.

Yes to the headlamp aswell: great for when people are sleeping but you need to move around/find something. There are great ultralight options.

Yes take the powerbank. I like having my phone with me while I sleep (silent alarm, audiobook at night, catch up on stuff) and I’ll charge my powerbank at the charging area which isn’t always very close by.

I think I would take all on your list except for the Kindle and the smartwatch. Your phone can track how far you walk, Strava for example. It will also have a stepcounter probably. A smartwatch is just another thing you have to charge.
 
We use tiny map reading squeeze lights on a key chain (bought it at a National Parks gift shop in the stargazing section) for the albergue. I did use a headlamp this winter to walk when it did not get light until between 8:30 and 9 a.m. but only for outside the albergue. Also used flashers on my backpack for walking in the dark. You won't need anything like that in the summer months though.
 
Personally, I'd skip the headlamp - you can use your phone to check for the stuff you forgot under your bunk, or to light your way to the loo at night.
Just don’t be that A..H…. who turns his phone light on brite and then spends 3x as long with one hand fumbling to pack up in the dark while waving the searchlight all over waking and blinding others. Much better IMHO to carry a 1 or 2 ounce headlamp with dimmable red and white lights. And you may well leave in the dark a few times
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Just don’t be that A..H…. who turns his phone light on brite and then spends 3x as long with one hand fumbling to pack up in the dark while waving the searchlight all over waking and blinding others. Much better IMHO to carry a 1 or 2 ounce headlamp with dimmable red and white lights. And you may well leave in the dark a few times
I just throw everything on top of my bag or liner, gather it up and carry the whole thing out of the bunk room in one fell swoop to pack in the common room. I can't pack my CPAP up the night before so this ends up being the best way for me to make a quick exit with the least amount of noise and with very little light. Just quick look with the red light around and under the bunk is needed.
 
I'm asking because I CAN live without these.

I'll keep it short; should I bring...?

Sleeping liner - (don't albergues have at least one sheet? for me that will be enough)
Kindle + Kindle charger
Earphones + charger (my phone only takes bluetooth earphones)
power bank (I love taking pictures and videos and I will rely heavily on my phone for the camino app, and well everything, I really don't want to end up without battery mid walk or when trying to find accommodation)
hair brush ? (my hair is thick and long, don't want to end up with dreadlocks by the end of my 45 day camino)
travel towel, vs rayon sarong (the second has more uses, pretty much same size and weight, still have to try how they compare in the drying time)
Apple Watch ?
head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am

trekking poles (this one I'm more on the yes side)
water bladder (more on the yes side, I'm not a water drinker, so having a bottle all the way up to my backpack will prevent me from drinking often)
My advice--lighten your load as much as you can if you are carrying the backpack yourself.
1. It can get cold
I'm asking because I CAN live without these.

I'll keep it short; should I bring...?

Sleeping liner - (don't albergues have at least one sheet? for me that will be enough)
Kindle + Kindle charger
Earphones + charger (my phone only takes bluetooth earphones)
power bank (I love taking pictures and videos and I will rely heavily on my phone for the camino app, and well everything, I really don't want to end up without battery mid walk or when trying to find accommodation)
hair brush ? (my hair is thick and long, don't want to end up with dreadlocks by the end of my 45 day camino)
travel towel, vs rayon sarong (the second has more uses, pretty much same size and weight, still have to try how they compare in the drying time)
Apple Watch ?
head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am

trekking poles (this one I'm more on the yes side)
water bladder (more on the yes side, I'm not a water drinker, so having a bottle all the way up to my backpack will prevent me from drinking often)
My advice:
1. It does get cold sometimes during the summer but if you have the ability to layer (ex: leggings then pants +/- rain pants) then liner only.
2. Leave the kindle if from the US and can get a library card then download audiobooks (or readable books). I already have a Spotify app, so I always can get music. And I have Netflix, so I can get movies.
3. Take whatever watch you are used to. You won't be carrying it on your back.
4. Take whatever water device you want--and the lightest.
5. It sounds like your power bank is a must for what you want to do. Hopefully it is not too heavy. Definitely ear phones. I don't use Bluetooth while walking as I likely would lose wifi. For me, sometimes in the afternoon I something (music, audiobook) besides just the scenery!!
6. Some people use poles--and some people don't . I am 67y/o but only want them for steep descents on loose ground, like shale. I start the Portuguese tomorrow without poles, but will buy some later if I want to.
7. I also have long hair but it's not only a brush you need, but also conditioner!! I have started cutting off 3 to 4 inches before each Camino. To use less conditioner, you may want to try to put your hair in a ponytail and only wash the scalp area so that you won't need conditioner.
 
As far as water bottle or bladder, I’m bringing a water bottle adapter. It provides the benefits of both. You carry a water bottle in the side pocket of your pack where it’s easy to access, and you have a drinking tube so you can drink water anytime you want without having to fumble around with a water bottle in your pack.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00W9O2Q0W?tag=casaivar02-20
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
I'm asking because I CAN live without these.

I'll keep it short; should I bring...?

Sleeping liner - (don't albergues have at least one sheet? for me that will be enough)
Kindle + Kindle charger
Earphones + charger (my phone only takes bluetooth earphones)
power bank (I love taking pictures and videos and I will rely heavily on my phone for the camino app, and well everything, I really don't want to end up without battery mid walk or when trying to find accommodation)
hair brush ? (my hair is thick and long, don't want to end up with dreadlocks by the end of my 45 day camino)
travel towel, vs rayon sarong (the second has more uses, pretty much same size and weight, still have to try how they compare in the drying time)
Apple Watch ?
head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am

trekking poles (this one I'm more on the yes side)
water bladder (more on the yes side, I'm not a water drinker, so having a bottle all the way up to my backpack will prevent me from drinking often)
In general, the advice you are likely to receive is if you can live without them, don't take them. Less weight is a religion to some. I'm not as religious as some. Sometimes, it is worth the extra weight for something that will add a lot of value to your Camino. But what is worth it to some people is not worth it to others.

Let's take a couple of examples. Earphones and charger. This got so divisive we had to close a thread. Some people love using their earphones, and will use them while they walk to give themselves an extra boost. Some hate them and they are a complete waste of weight to those folk. Some like them for relaxing in the evening. Or the Kindle. Some of us love to read. Some are not quite so addicted. Even for the readers, some are okay reading on our phones (count me in this group). Some find that untenable and want a Kindle. Some want the paper.

In short, only you can say whether the extra weight is worth it to you.

I would advise taking the poles, though.
 
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I read on the plane, on the bus, if i am alone at night or in a bar eating alone. I cannot read on my very small phone.
Take Kindle, power bank. poles, earphones if you want Audible or music
Sarong for all the uses above, mine is thread bare and invaluable.
I've been known to carry/read a book I've found along the way,
 
I'm asking because I CAN live without these.

I'll keep it short; should I bring...?

Sleeping liner - (don't albergues have at least one sheet? for me that will be enough)
Kindle + Kindle charger
Earphones + charger (my phone only takes bluetooth earphones)
power bank (I love taking pictures and videos and I will rely heavily on my phone for the camino app, and well everything, I really don't want to end up without battery mid walk or when trying to find accommodation)
hair brush ? (my hair is thick and long, don't want to end up with dreadlocks by the end of my 45 day camino)
travel towel, vs rayon sarong (the second has more uses, pretty much same size and weight, still have to try how they compare in the drying time)
Apple Watch ?
head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am

trekking poles (this one I'm more on the yes side)
water bladder (more on the yes side, I'm not a water drinker, so having a bottle all the way up to my backpack will prevent me from drinking often)
IMO, take the water bladder and drink periodically. I also usually have a plastic bottle that I refill; it lasts the whole trip. I keep it in the side pocket of my backpack because when I stop for a break, you get more volume in a hurry than with the bladder. .
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
Yes - take what is important for you - judging weight vs comfort item. . Sometimes hearing the reasons people take things helps clarify decision making.

I always take ….
* Liner and very lightweight sleeping bag - I like sleeping in my own stuff and being guaranteed warm a nights ( Maybe leave the bag if it is high summer.
* Earbuds- on a lead. Listening to music or inspiring talks or an audio book in the day but even more essential at night to help me drop off to sleep in a noisy albergue
* No power bank - I do a lot on my phone but then again last Camino it had a brand new battery.
* Teeny tiny towel and/or sarong - there is not much weight saving if you only take one item
* Poles - used correctly they save a lot of wear and tear on hips, knees and feet. I wouldn’t be without them.
*. Water bladder - mine is very lightweight from Decathlon and stays clean through long Caminos. I read it is better sip water regularly than take big amounts of water from time to time. Apparently there is a limit to the amount of water the body can absorb at one time. Bottle(s) with the tube thingy would work too.
* Headlamp only if I will be walking way before sunrise
* Hairbrush - lightweight - it is good to brush or comb your hair a couple of times a day. 😂

PS I borrow audio books from my local library through an app called BorrowBox. It’s free and I can download audio an ebooks from anywhere in the world.

Buen Camino.
 
I am Team Sarong! Last year I used mine as: a towel, headwrap, instant skirt, shawl, scarf, pillow cover, mattress cover, and one time as an extra layer inside my sleeping bag liner.
I thought of another purpose. I hear that walking the same direction that people get sun burned on one side of their body. I think I could use my sarong scarfy thing to tie at my ankle and at my waist and cover one leg while walking. Heck mine is so stinkin lightweight. Don't forget too that it is useful if wearing shorter shorts or have bare shoulders and can cover up to go inside churches.
 
I think this sarong thing must not be a popular item here in Wyoming. Looks like you can order one online, but mainly all I have are large scarves.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
I think this sarong thing must not be a popular item here in Wyoming. Looks like you can order one online, but mainly all I have are large scarves.
I have a bunch of sarongs/pareos that I bought in Mexico - they are great for laying on the beach because the sand shakes out of them so easily. I have also seen them in our local Walmart.
I brought one of my sarongs one year on the Norte, and it worked great as a curtain on my lower bunk. Unfortunately, I forgot to take the curtain down one night, which I didn't realize until I had been walking for more than an hour. Fortunately, the Camino through Bilbao went very close to a Decathlon store, so I was able to buy a towel there.
I found that I never used the sarong for anything other than a towel or a curtain, and my PackTowl Ultralite works better at drying me, and can be hung as a curtain, plus it's lighter weight.
 
I just throw everything on top of my bag or liner, gather it up and carry the whole thing out of the bunk room in one fell swoop to pack in the common room. I can't pack my CPAP up the night before so this ends up being the best way for me to make a quick exit with the least amount of noise and with very little light. Just quick look with the red light around and under the bunk is needed.
Thank you. You are one of the few.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
I'm asking because I CAN live without these.

I'll keep it short; should I bring...?

Sleeping liner - (don't albergues have at least one sheet? for me that will be enough)
Kindle + Kindle charger
Earphones + charger (my phone only takes bluetooth earphones)
power bank (I love taking pictures and videos and I will rely heavily on my phone for the camino app, and well everything, I really don't want to end up without battery mid walk or when trying to find accommodation)
hair brush ? (my hair is thick and long, don't want to end up with dreadlocks by the end of my 45 day camino)
travel towel, vs rayon sarong (the second has more uses, pretty much same size and weight, still have to try how they compare in the drying time)
Apple Watch ?
head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am

trekking poles (this one I'm more on the yes side)
water bladder (more on the yes side, I'm not a water drinker, so having a bottle all the way up to my backpack will prevent me from drinking often)
No sleeping liner.
No kindle. You can download the kindle app on your phone.
Yes to power bank.
No to hair brush. I also have long thick hair and just use a comb and no conditioner.
I bring a travel towel and sarong. Sarong has many uses including a robe after the shower and a pillow cover. Both weigh so little it shouldn’t be too much weight to bring both.
No to headlamp if you don’t have one.
Yes to poles!
 
A few clothes pegs and a length of line. You'll be thanked continuously. Needle and a bit of thread and last but not least a Swiss Army Knife credit card size multi tool especially for the little knife and the scissors.
And one change of clothes.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Hi Nina. These are my personal views - not fact, not necessarily right or correct, just from my viewpoint.

Sleeping liner: - ? something to sleep in - liner, lightweight bag (you don't say when you are going so don't know climate for you). In the UK Trail do a fleece envelope liner that opens fully, under 500gms and they claim gives same warmth as a 2 season bag.
Kindle + Kindle charger: - no. Use your phone
Earphones + charger: - no - switch off gadgets, hear the Camino (or take wired ones for your phone?).
power bank: ? keep a track of your usage at home taking pics to see if you get more or less than a day. At many refugios power sockets are at a premium so if taking a wall charger you could take a multiple so others could also plug in from the same socket - like this -
View attachment 167589

Also, a small USB solar panel is good - pin it to rucksack, charges slowly but you are walking for hours, really useful.
I use this one - I don't think is actually 10W but works very well, so many others on Ebay are rubbish.
View attachment 167590

hair brush: No idea - comb for African heritage hair? Made for pulling through tight curls. Is that lighter?
travel towel, vs rayon sarong: ? Both? Female users seem to rave about sarongs and I can see why; elegant, multiple uses from cool comfort in the evenings to modesty in refugios, I have seen one worn as a draped head cover in super hot weather and they are light and pack small. I can't bear travel towels, they seem to stick to my skin, so I carry an old worn thin regular smallish towel - but that is me.
Apple Watch: Why? No, really, why?
head lamp: Not usually necessary unless walking in the dark, your phone has a torch - but it is really bright! what about one of those super-tiny key ring torches 'just in case'? You can cover it with your hand so only shows a tiny glimmer, doesn't wake sleeping pilgrims.
trekking poles: A pair? Nooooooooooooooooo ghastly things - but do take one pole or staff to give you tripod stability on steep descents and ascents.
water bladder: Nooooooooo ghastly things - it isn't a star wars hi tech route march .. with bladder you don't stop to drink, can't water a dying plant or give some to a dog or share with someone thirsty. With a bottle you stop, look at the view, take pack off, wriggle toes, pour it over your head, enjoy.

So - there my views - in the end do take what you decide to take, just remember - pack what you need, not what you think you may need.

Buen Camino!
I'm bringing a 4 x USB outlet similar to what you have pictured. I figure if there are only limited power sockets I may be able to convince someone to "share" using the USB slots. I'm also bringing a battery pack. These are my "luxury" items. I'm coming a long way, I want lots of photos.

For me personally, not bringing a torch, but will use my cellphone if I have to go outside in the dark (not likely I will want to do this). I can use my phone torch to get to the toilet, covering most of the torch with my hands and being careful not to direct the light at anyone.
 
A few clothes pegs and a length of line. You'll be thanked continuously. Needle and a bit of thread and last but not least a Swiss Army Knife credit card size multi tool especially for the little knife and the scissors.
And one change of clothes.
I'm unlikely to bring any type of knife tools, I'm traveling overseas, so...I will buy tiny scissors at a pharmacy and that's it. No point in investing in a Swiss army tool that I can't bring back home anyway.
 
I'm unlikely to bring any type of knife tools, I'm traveling overseas, so...I will buy tiny scissors at a pharmacy and that's it. No point in investing in a Swiss army tool that I can't bring back home anyway.
I got a nice sharp pocket knife at one of the Asian Bazaars this winter. We usually buy a knife (sometimes with a corkscrew and sometimes not) to cut bread, cheese, apples, chorizo, etc. Or to prepare a lunch and occasionally an evening meal in an albergue. Albergue knives are hit and miss. We just donate ours at the end of the Camino to an albergue kitchen
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
I'm asking because I CAN live without these.

I'll keep it short; should I bring...?

Sleeping liner - (don't albergues have at least one sheet? for me that will be enough)
Kindle + Kindle charger
Earphones + charger (my phone only takes bluetooth earphones)
power bank (I love taking pictures and videos and I will rely heavily on my phone for the camino app, and well everything, I really don't want to end up without battery mid walk or when trying to find accommodation)
hair brush ? (my hair is thick and long, don't want to end up with dreadlocks by the end of my 45 day camino)
travel towel, vs rayon sarong (the second has more uses, pretty much same size and weight, still have to try how they compare in the drying time)
Apple Watch ?
head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am

trekking poles (this one I'm more on the yes side)
water bladder (more on the yes side, I'm not a water drinker, so having a bottle all the way up to my backpack will prevent me from drinking often)
I bought wired headphones that connect with USB-C for my phone, which I previously thought would only take Bluetooth.
 
I bought wired headphones that connect with USB-C for my phone, which I previously thought would only take Bluetooth.
And I prefer a water bottle pocket or carabiner clipped water bottle (like Vapur) hooked to my backpack straps instead of a bladder. The water is instantly available.
 
I bought wired headphones that connect with USB-C for my phone, which I previously thought would only take Bluetooth.
this is life changing!! and yes! I already own a vapur but unfortunately is at my mom's house; so I'll get another one, and bring an extra bottle. so vapur for easy access and the other for refilling. :)
 
A guide to speaking Spanish on the Camino - enrich your pilgrim experience.
Water bladder requires more intensive cleaning due to all the parts, and if such intensive cleaning is not performed there is a risk of harmful bacteria accumulation because of the bladder. Bladders are very nitpicky,

This post was written to dispel some common misinformation which is sometimes used to claim that hydration or water reservoirs/bladders are either less sanitary to use or are less convenient to use than bottles. Oft times there is a difference with which someone 'perceives' or approaches a products usability, but this is typically more of a subjective preference, than a real world objective and functional difference.

I'm NOT writing this post to suggest that I and others who prefer reservoirs are making the superior choice; I am posting this to preempt those who misstate facts, or who have insufficient facts to claim that using hydration reservoirs is the WRONG way to go.

1. Sanitation. With water carry, bottles have no advantage. Reservoirs stay just as sanitary. They do not require cleaning every day, nor do they need to be dried.

As with plumbing, it is the change of water and water flow through frequent use which keeps bottles, reservoirs, and tubing fresh and sanitary. With normal use, both bladders and bottles are constantly refilled and emptied That keeps them sanitary UNLESS contaminated water is introduced, or other fluids with sugars (juices, energy drinks, soda pop, etc.) are put into a bottle or a reservoir.

While working for a public health district, I did a review of the literature, which I again did in 2016 and 2022. Comparisons of bacterial contamination levels between bottles and hydration bladders were indistinguishable -- both had equally low rates of bacterial contamination. And both were at about equal risk for developing significant levels of bacteria and mold if not cleaned and dried properly prior to storage. In the last few years, the hydration reservoirs have become more modular in nature and have wider openings to access the water compartments, making it much easier to clean and prepare for storage than previous generations of the product.

One example study, from 2009:
https://www.wemjournal.org/article/S1080-6032(09)70419-3/fulltext

When it is time to store bottles or bladders away for the season, they can be sanitized if desired with a bit of bleach added to the final rinse water during cleaning. It is not necessary, but there is no harm in doing so. Then they can be rinsed out and be allowed to dry.

Molds and other nasty things occur if either container is stored with water over a period of time, or have contained other fluids which might have sugars and then are not properly washed out prior to long term storage. Mold may also form in the shorter term when fluids with sugars are exposed to warmth and sun.

Also, not all discolorations are harmful molds. Most times, it may be an algae growth from leaving stagnant water exposed to light.

2. Ease of Use. I find it personally easier to raise the mouth tube on my shoulder strap to drink from. I do not like to reach around to a side pocket, or even need to take off my pack to do so. I definitely do NOT like stuff hanging on my shoulder straps like bottles of water.

Again, this is personal preference, not an issue of something being 'better'. Access water bottles is not an issue of usability for bottle users.

3. Weight. Here is where two major claims are made, one is correct and the other is not.

A typical empty 2 liter reservoir weighs around 4 to 6 ounces. The equivalent in bottles around 1.5 to 3 ounces. Depending on bottle material used, though, bottles can weigh up to 8 ounces.

So while it is correct that bottles can weigh less, it is not a significant issue of consideration with overall backpack weight.

The other issue is reservoir water capacity and total weight.

You do not have to fill a reservoir to the tippy top. I will carry as much water as I need to carry from water source to water source. If the next water source is 32 kilometers distant under a hot sun, I will carry up to 4 liters. If the next water source is a few kilometers distant in cool weather, I might carry a half liter.

4. Refills. This is actually a subheading under 'ease of use', but it is frequently pointed to as why bottles are better than reservoirs.

I can refill my reservoir without even removing my backpack. One does not need to pull a reservoir out of the pack. It is a matter of using a quick disconnect system which is a simple and cheap add on accessory. My water filling process goes something like this if I want to refill or do a bit of a top off:

1. I pull the collapsible bottle from my side pocket and unscrew the Quick Disconnect lid from the bottle
2. I Fill the bottle and replace the Quick Disconnect lid.
3. Quick Disconnect the mouth piece from the feed tube and connect the water bottle to the feed tube.
4. Gently squeeze the water in the collapsible bottle into the feed tube, filling the water bladder.
5. Disconnect the bottle and reconnect the mouthpiece. Stow the water bottle

For those interested in adding a Quick Connect adapter to your hydration reservoir/bladder, I've added a link below. With the quick disconnect added, I don't even need to remove my backpack or daypack to do a quick and easy refill of the bladder.

NOTE: The video shows the quick disconnect being used with a water filter as used when wilderness backpacking. For a camino I leave off the filter altogether. The refill cap is simply attached to my collapsible water bottle, after it is filled with water from a fountain or faucet.

For refill bottles.... I use an extremely lightweight collapsible bottle (click the bold blue wording) that can hold up to 1.5 liters. Empty, it rolls down to a small bundle that are easily stashed in an outside pocket.

Many times, I will carry 1/2 liter in the collapsible bottle as a quick backup as the weather or the distance between water refills dictates. So, if I decide to, say, carry 1 liter of water between water resupply points, I will fill the reservoir with 1/2 liter, and then carry 1/2 liter in the bottle, keeping the bottle partially collapsed and tucked into a side pocket.

By doing the above I do not need to see the water bladder itself in order to be assured of adequate water or to avoid accidentally running out of water.

The collapsible bottle I use is just one container option. The refill adapter with the Quick Connect kit can also fit on a variety of empty bottled water containers.

So those are the major issues that always seem to come up. There are others, but those above are the major ones I keep seeing pop up..


 
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@davebugg Hi and thanks for that clarification and data on water bladders. Much appreciated.
I have used a bladder for my last two Caminos and definitely prefer it to bottles because of the easy access etc. I know others use a ‘suction’ system on their bottles for the same effect.
I just wanted to add that my water bladder is from decathlon and is super light. It has a wide opening at the top with a slide to seal the opening. I can fill it from the top using my spare water bottle even when my pack is nearly full.
I make sure it is clean and completely dry before storage where it now sits ready for my next Camino.
 
"head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am"
This is Spain, sunrise in July is 6.30am. The anachronistic time zone throws people who expect sunrise about 4am mid summer
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
"head lamp... I'm going in summer so I think light will be enough to walk by around 5 - 6 am"
This is Spain, sunrise in July is 6.30am. The anachronistic time zone throws people who expect sunrise about 4am mid summer
Yes, I did check the sunrise time, but still, it's not pitch black before sunrise, so 6 am...I think will be doable.
Plus, as someone else said: if I'm not sure I will need it or I'm bringing it for "just in case" then don't.
So I'm not. If I end up waking up to leave at 4:30 and I can't see anything, then I'll buy it there.
 
Yes, I did check the sunrise time, but still, it's not pitch black before sunrise, so 6 am...I think will be doable.
Plus, as someone else said: if I'm not sure I will need it or I'm bringing it for "just in case" then don't.
So I'm not. If I end up waking up to leave at 4:30 and I can't see anything, then I'll buy it there.
Sorry, just that you said 5am. I was never up at that time but assume quite dark. Anyway, plans change on Camino. I actually slept better than I have in years, didn't go to bed earlier, just slept later so had a later start
 
Last winter walking in the dark between 8 and 9 am, one of my colleagues and two of our students missed an arrow even with headlamps on coming out of Melide. They went at least a km and even climbed over a downed tree on the rain before it was light enough to see that they were on the wrong path.

Just be careful in the dark.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
oh my god! This community is giving me so much energy and I haven't started!
Thank you ALL so so much for your input!! You make it way easier for me now!

YES Bringing:
Sleeping liner - Will buy one at decathlon once I get to France.
power bank - I just can't risk it.
hair brush -
Rayon sarong - I will do a drying test soon just to compare with microfiber travel towel.
trekking poles - I will start with one, and if needed at some point, I can buy another one.

NOT bringing:
Kindle - Not taking it, using my phone if I so desperately need too read.
Earphones - Not taking them
Apple Watch - using strava app instead, or some other.
Head lamp - only if I find a cheaper one

Still indecisive : Water bladder.
I can go days without drinking water; so I definitely will dread taking down my pack for drinking some (my side pockets are not useful, water bottles fall out); but it IS an expensive item that I do not own.

I sincerely thank you and appreciate everyone's time :)
buen camino!
I got a super lightweight water bottle holder that clipped onto my backpack strap. My water was always right there in front of me and easy to get to. I’d highly recommend it.
 
Just two quick additional notes:
I loved to leave early most days as one of my favorite parts of the Camino was watching the sun come up on the trail.

If you are intending to leave at 5 or 6:
I highly recommend bring your Apple Watch. I used my Fitbit for the vibrating alarm so that I could wake up early without disturbing anyone else in the albergue.
Also, I used my headlamp each morning. I found the red light setting much less bothersome to others and allowed me to gather all of my belongings up without missing anything (to carry out to the common room to pack, of course 😃)
Finally, a few morning were foggy, and i did use the headlamp outside occasionally as well. As an avid pole user, I liked the headlamp to keep my hands free.
Buen camino!
 
Oh and in terms of earphones—I had some issues sleeping with all of the snoring, but earplugs weren’t comfortable and were too silent for me.
Although i didn’t use earphones on the trail, I’d typically listen to music or a sleep podcast while falling asleep, which drowned out the snorers for me!
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
Just two quick additional notes:
I loved to leave early most days as one of my favorite parts of the Camino was watching the sun come up on the trail.

If you are intending to leave at 5 or 6:
I highly recommend bring your Apple Watch. I used my Fitbit for the vibrating alarm so that I could wake up early without disturbing anyone else in the albergue.
Also, I used my headlamp each morning. I found the red light setting much less bothersome to others and allowed me to gather all of my belongings up without missing anything (to carry out to the common room to pack, of course 😃)
Finally, a few morning were foggy, and i did use the headlamp outside occasionally as well. As an avid pole user, I liked the headlamp to keep my hands free.
Buen camino!
I used my cell phone in the same way. Usually I don’t have my phone that close to me, but on Camino, my phone was in my sleeping bag with me, so the vibration of my silent alarm would wake me up.
 
Oh and in terms of earphones—I had some issues sleeping with all of the snoring, but earplugs weren’t comfortable and were too silent for me.
Although i didn’t use earphones on the trail, I’d typically listen to music or a sleep podcast while falling asleep, which drowned out the snorers for me!
That’s exactly what I did, too!
 
Also, I used my headlamp each morning. I found the red light setting much less bothersome to others and allowed me to gather all of my belongings up without missing anything (to carry out to the common room to pack, of course 😃)

I am always appreciative of folks who do whatever they can to lessen potential disruptions to others. Well done.

That genuinely stated, I still find lamplight of any color flashing around a room from head movements still bothersome. So to add on to your suggestion , folks can further this by keeping the headlamps holder mechanism pointed down as sharply to the ground as possible. If a hand is free, hold the headlamp partially cupped in the hand and pointed to the ground.

When walking, I have been blinded by the headlamps of passing pilgrims as the light follows their heads as they look toward me when passing, or if they look backwards when ahead. To help preserve my night vision, I started wearing a patch over one eye when I was aware of approaching pilgrims.

For those who want to be accommodating to others and still have great lighting of your walkway, make a couple of simple adjustments,.
  • Plan on keeping a slower pace, sometimes much slower, than you would normally keep during full daylight. Regardless of how much brightness you use, you can still outwalk the illumination before your brain can properly interpret what your eyes are seeing or may have missed, You want to be able to stop in time to avoid obstacles in the path.
    • Ruts and depressions are sometimes hard to distinguish from the shadows cast by rocks and small ripples in the walkway which are created by your light. Be cautious.
  • Always use the lowest setting on your headlamp. This not only will generally help you see the overall path in front of you better by an increased ability to distinguish things like holes and ruts, it also is more friendly to others and helps lengthen the usable life of your headlamp's battery.
    • Also, if walking in the dark, a low light level helps you to better see the star canopy that you are walking under. Retaining a bit more of your night vision helps to see the heavens with a bit more sharpness and crispness.
  • Before walking, adjust the headlamp's holding frame to pivot downward a bit. While looking straight ahead and level, pivot the headlight downward just enough to light the pathway most brightly that is five-foot ahead of where you are standing. This does two things that are important:
    • When looking toward someone, your headlamp's direct light will not shine in the other persons eyes.
    • When walking, you do not need to keep your head looking sharply downward in order to see the lit pathway. You have a better ability to look around and have the light automatically illuminate what you need to try and see.
 
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Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
I had some issues sleeping with all of the snoring, but earplugs weren’t comfortable and were too silent for me.

I sometimes find the issue of an earplug cutting off too much sound a bit 'too much silence' for me too. I'd never heard anyone else describe that bothersome phenomenon. :)

If you haven't tried a variety of different earplugs using a variety of materials, and which have varying levels of decibel noise reductions, it could be worth your while to give it a go at shopping around.

The issues of discomfort and of an earplug being too quiet can sometimes be helped by using a different ear plug materials. If your experience is based on the most 'quiet' of over-the-counter earplugs, you used a closed-foam earplug material like those made by 3M. These are also used in factories and other loud decibel work environments.

These highly-quiet, closed-cell foam varieties also exert a lot more pressure against the ear canal when they re-expand after compressing them for ear insertion. They also have very little air circulation from these properties of closed-cell materials and pressure.

There are open-celled, soft foams that will place far less pressure against the ear canals and also have better air circulation. It also solves the issue of being too quiet as they usually have a decibel reduction rating in the low to mid 20 decibel range, as opposed to the 32 to 34 decibel range of the closed-cell foam earplugs.

For those open-cell foam earplugs, you will hear sounds that are effectively muffled, but not aggressively 'gone'. By comparison between the materials:
-- Whenever I go to a 1200 meter compatible range for target and sport shooting for distance, using ahigh caliber rounds, I use closed cell foam 3M earplugs. Even with existing hearing loss I want to effectively control damaging noise levels by reducing the sharp and loud 'booms' into a muffled 'Pffft'.
-- With open-cell foam ear plugs, that same 'pffft' would become a somewhat lessened 'boom', but not enough to make that loud report comfortable.
 
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Yes, I did check the sunrise time, but still, it's not pitch black before sunrise, so 6 am...I think will be doable.
Plus, as someone else said: if I'm not sure I will need it or I'm bringing it for "just in case" then don't.
So I'm not. If I end up waking up to leave at 4:30 and I can't see anything, then I'll buy it there.
My preference is to let my eyes adjust rather than walk with a headlamp, which I find gives me "tunnel vision". On the rare occasions when I really need more (e.g to read something), I'll pause and pull out my phone and use its flashlight.
 
I think this sarong thing must not be a popular item here in Wyoming. Looks like you can order one online, but mainly all I have are large scarves.
Technically mine is a large airy scarf. Sold as a scarf. But it is certainly big enough to use around the waist. I bought it in a gift shop years ago, so I don't have a link to share.
 
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