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Need help with shoe debate

Camino(s) past & future
March 2018
#1
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
 

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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#2
@Lulumom I walked the Le Puy twice and the Camino Frances three times, in lightweight Asics runners. When the model changed to something that was more enclosed, I went to Ecco sandals, which is what I wore on the wet and muddy Camino del Norte (in early April), the CF a couple of times, and the Madrid.

Looking at the Flyknits, my only concern would be if the soles will last the distance, but as your also intend having hiking boots you are more than adequately covered. I'd not be surprised if you find yourself carrying your boots most of the way.

When I first walked the Camino Frances (in 2001) almost all the Spanish peregrines wore lightweight joggers, and they could not understand the penchant of foreigners for boots and heavy footwear.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#3
A good deal of the Camino Frances is on roadway. Concrete. Blacktop, etc. It's a walk, not a hike. Many pilgrims wear shoes just like yours. I really don't think you need to carry both the shoes and the boots. I think you would quickly be wondering why you did.
 

Anamiri

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
#4
@Lulumom I walked the Le Puy twice and the Camino Frances three times, in lightweight Asics runners. When the model changed to something that was more enclosed, I went to Ecco sandals, which is what I wore on the wet and muddy Camino del Norte (in early April), the CF a couple of times, and the Madrid.

Looking at the Flyknits, my only concern would be if the soles will last the distance, but as your also intend having hiking boots you are more than adequately covered. I'd not be surprised if you find yourself carrying your boots most of the way.

When I first walked the Camino Frances (in 2001) almost all the Spanish peregrines wore lightweight joggers, and they could not understand the penchant of foreigners for boots and heavy footwear.
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
I have walked with a few different people over 2 caminos.
I walked in Brooks runners, no problems they were really great.
My sister bought Asics runners - she had issues as they were too tight and didn't allow for her feet to swell, she ended up wearing a pair of flat dressy leather shoes (she absolutely wrecked them) from Ponferrada to Santiago. They were completely flat, no support, she pronates, the sole was really really thin and stones poked through and gave her bruises! Not the fault of the Asics they just needed to be a half or full size bigger to begin with.
My cousin bought running shoes in London just before the Camino, wore them one day in London, they gave him blisters, so he wore flip flops from Leon to Ponferrada! He had no trouble at all, not even coming down the mountain to Molineseca. People couldn't believe it.
My friend bought Asics. The first Camino she had the chance to wear them beforehand and they were great for that Camino, but the last time she bought new shoes a few days before we left. She didn't get the chance to walk in them, and once she started walking in them, they seemed narrower than her old pair. She ended up in Teva sandals which she still wears hiking now. She loves them
Even though my Brooks shoes were great, I'm think I'm going to go for sandals next time too. No socks to wash, and your feet dont get so hot, (but they do get filthy) and less weight because you only need one pair. I always took flips flops as well, with sandals that will be all I need. Of course this only works for a warm weather Camino.
As I walked out of Leon, I walked for a while with a Canadian woman who was on her 5th pair of shoes, and hoping her latest purchase would work out!
No-one ever swaps their shoes for boots though..
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances , St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra May/ June 2017
Le Puy en Velay - Ales [2018]
#5
I saw so many pairs of boots abandoned on the side of roads and trails last year , new pairs hanging from trees , single ones with holes cut out at the toe end and one that had part of the heel cup cut out .
What I didn't see were cast off trail runners , flip flops [ thongs ] , apart from ones that had snapped , or trail sandals .
I wore trail runners the entire way , I could easily have walked in the Tevas I took for after hours wear . Unless you have real ankle joint issues there is no need for boots at all .
Ten km on a hot day on a nasty '' Roman road '' with no give in it at all will have you joining the ranks of the ' boot chuckers ' quick smart .
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#6
Just to clarify, are you proposing to take the boots and asking if you can take the Flyknits as a second pair (or if you need more substantial shoes as a second pair)? My answer would be no, the Flyknits should be quite adequate as your second pair.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#7
I saw so many pairs of boots abandoned on the side of roads and trails last year , new pairs hanging from trees , single ones with holes cut out at the toe end and one that had part of the heel cup cut out .
What I didn't see were cast off trail runners , flip flops [ thongs ] , apart from ones that had snapped , or trail sandals .
I wore trail runners the entire way , I could easily have walked in the Tevas I took for after hours wear . Unless you have real ankle joint issues there is no need for boots at all .
Ten km on a hot day on a nasty '' Roman road '' with no give in it at all will have you joining the ranks of the ' boot chuckers ' quick smart .
I wore my leather boots from Seville to Santiago in the fall; about 1000 km, much of them on Roman roads and for the first half in temperatures in the mid 30's. I didn't have a single blister. They work for me. But I would strongly suggest that any long distance walker should work out for him/herself all the details of boots/shoes, inserts, socks, foot care, probable weather and walking surfaces, before leaving. I would hate to risk spring rains and mud with really lightweight shoes. If footwear is sturdy enough for the weather and surfaces and to not wear out before arrival, it makes sense to wear whatever is comfortable for you.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
#8
I walked summer/fall caminos in Nike running shoes. My only concern, late April may still be muddy in places. My Nike running shoes failed miserably in all that mud during winter camino. I ended up getting hiking boots.
Maybe take Nikes and something else.

Buen camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPdP-Burgos, 2015)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Sarria, 2018)
Sarria-Santiago (fall 2018)
#9
I wore low boots on the Camino in October. I need the ankle support and the weather was cool. I plan to wear them again in April. My trails here at home are very similar to what I found on the Camino. Lately we've had a lot of rain and melting snow, so they've been extremely muddy and very wet. I can't imagine being out there in anything but boots! I expect the meseta in mid-April to be more if the same. So..... Time of year and personal needs drive the decision.
 

scruffy1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Holy Year from Pamplona 2010, SJPP 2011, Lisbon 2012, Le Puy 2013, Vezelay (partial watch this space!) 2014; 2015 Toulouse-Puenta la Reina (Arles)
#10
Remember the sunscreen song, "Be knd to your knees, you will miss them when they are gone"! I know I do. Wear that which is most comfortable and which gives support for your ankles your knees your back. Now you can walk the Camino even in flip flops but do check back into the Forum ten years from now and let us know how things are,
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
#11
Anamiri: [[No-one ever swaps their shoes for boots though..]]

Exactly. And there are sporting goods stores along the way in cities to buy new lightweight trail shoes.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#12
Lulumom, nobody can realistically respond to your query without knowing :

1) your height

2) your weight (including relative muscle mass)

3) how far you'll be walking daily

4) how heavy a pack you'll be shifting

--

Having said that, it's rather likely that if in training you're happiest with your "extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes", then these are VERY LIKELY to be your best possible option -- except if you are bigger, or heavier, and/or perhaps planning on shifting an onerous weight of kit on a daily basis

If it were earlier in the year I'd suggest some closed shoe near-equivalent, as I would also do BTW if it should happen that those running shoes are bad for you in rainy or muddy conditions -- if that's the case then perhaps some light hiking shoes or light hiking boots might be right for you, comfortable, free, and non-restrictive, but enclosed for the protection of your toes and socks against the elements.

But then, looking at images online, those shoes might very well constitute exactly that, provided that they work well in the wet. :p
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#13
I wore my leather boots from Seville to Santiago in the fall; about 1000 km, much of them on Roman roads and for the first half in temperatures in the mid 30's. I didn't have a single blister. They work for me. But I would strongly suggest that any long distance walker should work out for him/herself all the details of boots/shoes, inserts, socks, foot care, probable weather and walking surfaces, before leaving. I would hate to risk spring rains and mud with really lightweight shoes. If footwear is sturdy enough for the weather and surfaces and to not wear out before arrival, it makes sense to wear whatever is comfortable for you.
Lighter footwear is best for most pilgrims -- I think you, like me, are among the exceptions to the general rule ; of course, for me it's size 13½ army boots, which I would NOT recommend to others !!!
 

Mick McQueen

https://www.facebook.com/groups/
Camino(s) past & future
I am escorting the Roll of Honour (Afghanistan) on Camino France on 20 May from SJPDP
The Roll of Honour details the 41 young Australians who died on Active Service in Afghanistan. In the centenary of the ANZAC’s, the Roll of Honour will be escorted to 41 prominent places and events around the World, laying 41 Poppies at each location.
#14
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
Don’t listen to your husband and use your runners I did and they were perfect. All this rubbish about needing hiking shoes is confusing people.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF June 2015
CP June 2017
Del Norte, Finisterre / Muxia Oct 2017
VDLP 2018
#15
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
I f you have to take only one pair, It is worth looking into the Saucony Peregrine RunShield. It will most likely serve both purposes ( Unless you have long and extreme weather conditions). It is water repellent, 9oz each and good for over 500 miles. If you are walking April 2018, you may just have enough time to break them in.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (09-10.12) Portuguese(05-06.13) Norte (05-06.15)
#16
R.I.P Patagonias
patagonia.jpeg

Best I've ever worn: lightweight; strong; reinforced stitching; breathable; leather & gortex; vibram soles; rubber toe cap; super comfy...
Tragically, Patagonia don't manufacture them anymore, or I'd have bought up a few pairs.

Have hiked a lot, done 3 caminos, worn a range of types of footwear over the years from buckskin books to
hiking sandals... it pays to take your time & make a choice that's right for you. After all, you spend pretty much half your time on your feet & the other half in bed, so it makes sense that that's where it pays to spend wisely.

Merrills are comparable, have similar specs &, unless I find a secret stash of Patagonias, will be my next pair.

https://www.sportsdirect.com/merrel...MIqeDPo-a02QIVBZPtCh1Bdg7SEAQYASABEgLq2vD_BwE

My advice: trainers may work for some, but if that's your current pick, you may wanna reconsider.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances (09-10.12) Portuguese(05-06.13) Norte (05-06.15)
#17
That said, a pair of jandals tucked away somewhere for when the day's done are worth their weight in gold - just don't wear them crossing the Pyrenees!
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#18
Exactly. And there are sporting goods stores along the way in cities to buy new lightweight trail shoes.
Good point.
I've brought this up before in a different thread, I would say to anyone that while on the Camino, if the footwear you brought with you is just not working well and causing pain, blisters etc, you need to get rid of them and buy some new ones first chance you get or you risk actual injury or ending your Camino early. Throw the old ones in a rubbish bin and don't look back. They're just shoes or boots. Things.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2012 SJPP-Burgos, 2014 Burgos-Leon, 2018 Leon-Santiago
#19
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
Hi Lulumom,
I walked the Camino Frances in Nike Free Run shoes, and will do the same when I resume walking this May. I carried a pair of Inovate waterproof trail runners, but only wore them one time on a rainy day. I will carry waterproof Salomon shoes this time, but prefer the light weight of a running (not necessarily “trail” running) shoe.
The only down sides for me were dusty socks and feet at the end of the day, and pebbles wedged between the treads. Pluses included an airy footbed and little or no shin and ankle fatigue. There were no real other issues for me. Of course everyone is different, and your mileage may vary, but I’ve been very happy with a more minimal shoe.

Buen Camino,
Paul
 

hotelmedicis

Commercial Interests
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2001 (+more)
VDLP 2013, 2018
#21
I've encountered numerous people who ship their heavy leather boots home and buy running shoes or Teva sandals and continue in those. I've never met anyone who shipped their running shoes home and bought boots. o_O

I wear non waterproof Merrell Moab Ventilators with Dr Scholl's Active Gel insoles which, for me, are crucial in providing some substantial shock absorbing between my feet and the hundreds of miles of asphalt, concrete, cobble stones and hard-packed trails. I looked at your Flynknit shoes and they don't look strong enough to last 500-600 miles nor do they appear to offer much support. I knew a man who brought both leather boots and Brooks runners and swore by the combination but as many people have commented, a good pair of running shoes or trail shoes is really all you need, however, if you like wearing your boots then by all means go for it! ;)

IMG_2009.JPG
 

rorerich

CaminoLifer
Camino(s) past & future
2015, 2016, 2017, (2018)
#22
I took a boot and running shoe combo on one of my Caminos expecting that I would mostly wear my shoes based on all the comments like many of the ones above.
I actually preferred my boots and ended up purchasing flip flops for the warm fall evenings.
It seems there is a huge misconception that boots are heavy and unpleasant to wear. My boots rival trail shoes for weight, flexibility, and comfort - and I like the little bit of ankle support they give me. And though I love my running shoes, they just didn't work for me on the Camino.
As usual, there is no one easy answer that fits everyone!!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago
#23
A bit off topic but
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
a bit off topic but have you thought of adding a pair of Scholl pads to whatever boot/ shoe you buy. They get fitted off those stands in Walmart in US. Not cheap as far as inserts go but they claim to reduce heal shock by 40% from memory. I added them my last camino. A huge difference. Just a thought.
I agree with comments where a lot depends on your ankles. It’s not 10 days that’s the issue. It’s at the 20 day mark.
Thongs are very comfortable at night. Letting air get at your foot.
Toughen that skin on your foot. To me it’s half about getting skin on your feet toughened up then the boot.
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#24
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
There is no 'Best Shoe', only a shoe that fits well and provides the level of comfort and stability that you need. The biggest differences between the Flyknit and a trail running shoe -- which are also very lightweight -- are the levels of support and cushioning and protection provided, based on the terrain they are designed for.

The Flyknit is designed for pavement and easy terrain. Trail running shoes are designed for, well, off-road running like on trails. Trail runners have firmer cushioning, more stability control -- even for someone with a neutral gait -- and a protective 'rock plate' placed between the shoe and the sole. The rockplate is usually a lightweight piece of thermoplastic which provides more protection from feeling sharp rocks, pebbles, and debris which would poke at a foot and create undo soreness.

So, if you want to know if your Flyknits will work for you, then wear a backpack and walk along trails. Walk 10 miles a day for a few days in a row.

Trail shoes are not going to be quite as lightweight as the Flyknit, but the Flyknit was designed as a road running shoe. Trail runners are a bit heavier because of the support and durability required for 'hardier' terrain. I wouldn't expect the Flyknit to last nearly as long and be as durable on a long walk as a trail runner.

Buy a shoe that feels good to you while under the load weight you will be carrying, and with the same socks and third party insoles you will be wearing. Allow for sizing which will allow for your feet to expand in width as the day goes on. Allow for sizing that will keep your toes from banging the front of the shoe while going down long, steep stretches -- unless you love losing toenails and getting blisters on the ends of your toes :) A shoe that has a good tread -- like trail runners -- is far preferable to a shoe with a smoother outer sole, which will be slippery on the wet and muddy terrain.

Buy the shoe that makes your feet cry out in joy.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#25
It seems there is a huge misconception that boots are heavy and unpleasant to wear.
Very true. A few days ago I went for test walk with a low Salomon trail shoe on one foot and a Salomon boot (same model except for height, size, age, wear) on the right foot. I knew that both were excellent on my feet, but I wanted to compare for general "feel" and tiredness. After the walk (only 8 km) I simply could not say one was better than the other. I will probably go with the boot for various reasons, but would switch to a low one if I found it more comfortable.

I do think that heavy hiking boots are unnecessary and not usually a good choice, but neither would I wear most shoes on a long walk!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#26
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
If the Nikes are what you prefer to hike in at home why are you bringing boots? The Camino is a walk, not a technical hike. Many pilgrims (including me) have walked in trail runners. The important thing is to wear what's comfortable for you, not your husband. Let him lift those heavy boots with every step. :D
 
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davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#27
I took a boot and running shoe combo on one of my Caminos expecting that I would mostly wear my shoes based on all the comments like many of the ones above.
I actually preferred my boots and ended up purchasing flip flops for the warm fall evenings.
It seems there is a huge misconception that boots are heavy and unpleasant to wear. My boots rival trail shoes for weight, flexibility, and comfort - and I like the little bit of ankle support they give me. And though I love my running shoes, they just didn't work for me on the Camino.
As usual, there is no one easy answer that fits everyone!!!
I believe that folks should choose whatever footwear works best and feels best for their feet. That being said, I'd like to add to some observations to a couple of the subjective points posted.

It depends on what is meant by 'boots'. Yes, there are lightweight boots, but they are far less substantial than are the traditional leather boots which I used to wear in my mountaineering days. The traditional boot is usually the stereotype that most people imagine when they think hiking 'boots'. There can be a good 3 to 4 pound difference in weight between the traditional boot and the lightweight boot.

Modern trail boots are more akin to trail shoes -- which are no more than a low cut trail boot where the weight difference is somewhere around a pound -- than they are to the traditional boot.

While the trail shoe and trail boot share similar traits, the trail runner is lighter in weight still, and is more flexible while still providing a high level of support, stability and rock protection.

Although the claim of protective ankle support with a boot is common, when studies are done which actually compare the incidents of ankle injuries -- and their severity -- between boots and shoes, it shows little corroboration of that belief. There simply is not enough stiffness to the material to provide that level of splinting. Only a proper ankle splint will provide certain support, and splints can be used in shoes just as effectively as in boots. Anecdotal reports aside, the biggest factor in avoiding ankle injuries when hiking or doing other outdoor sports, is exercising to strengthen the ligaments and supporting structures.

Interestingly, walking is one of the better ways to strengthen ankles, along with doing one-legged balance exercises.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago, St Jean to Santuago, 2015
Camino Portuguese, 2018
#28
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
I tried some boots before leaving home and my feet totally rebelled. Then walked with shoes like those you showed. Okay for awhile but not really comfortable. So, got some Keen sandals in Burgos. Love them and still use them.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances/Invierno May/June 2018
#29
Fwiw, I plan to walk barefoot for as much of the Camino (starting in SJPP) as I can. I'm bringing Xero sandals and/or a pair of Vapor Glove 3 as backup. I absolutely love barefoot hiking and am inspired by the barefoot pilgrims gone before me. I'm aware that it's an ostentatious choice of "footwear" and I don't covet the attention. I simply find it the best choice for myself. In addition to how it has really strengthened my feet and greatly reduced injury and blisters, I absolutely love the light feeling of freedom and connection to the ground beneath me.

I intend not only to take in all the sights, smells, sounds, and tastes of the Camino, but also feel all the textured surfaces, soft delights and poking tribulations that the way will greet me with.

The feet have the most nerve endings anywhere in the body. At first this cacophony of feeling can be a bit "noisy," but with time, barefooting attunes the body to the most beautiful of symphonies-the hum of the Living Earth. Can't wait to hear her song in Spain! :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#30
I took a boot and running shoe combo on one of my Caminos expecting that I would mostly wear my shoes based on all the comments like many of the ones above.
I actually preferred my boots and ended up purchasing flip flops for the warm fall evenings.
It seems there is a huge misconception that boots are heavy and unpleasant to wear. My boots rival trail shoes for weight, flexibility, and comfort - and I like the little bit of ankle support they give me. And though I love my running shoes, they just didn't work for me on the Camino.
As usual, there is no one easy answer that fits everyone!!!
Indeed! The same for me. My Hanwag , lightweight ( well in their category ) boots for winter and summer Caminos.
http://www.hanwag.com/products/special-editions/hallux/alta-bunion-lady-gtxa

My running shoes are just a no go for me when on a Camino.
 

Crook401

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
French October 2016
Portuguese May 2017
#31
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!

Choose footwear based on 1) a good, comfortable but snug fit, and 2) a thick sole. You will be walking some pavement, but also on rocks and gravel paths. I have walked both the French and Portugese routes wearing Soloman GTX hiking shoes, and they are good; however, in the first two weeks, seems like I felt every rock I stepped on. After that, your feet will toughen up and you will be ok. Also, you will only need one pair of shoes.
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#32
Choose footwear based on 1) a good, comfortable but snug fit, and 2) a thick sole. You will be walking some pavement, but also on rocks and gravel paths. I have walked both the French and Portugese routes wearing Soloman GTX hiking shoes, and they are good; however, in the first two weeks, seems like I felt every rock I stepped on. After that, your feet will toughen up and you will be ok. Also, you will only need one pair of shoes.
The Solomon GTXs are a great shoe. Lots of backpackers and trekkers like them a lot; though, for those with wide feet -- like me -- good luck finding them in an extra wide width. :)

Allow me to explain why I disagree about the snug fit, though:
  1. Feet will swell width-wise when walking. This will put pressure at the metatarsal area along the sides of the foot which can cause pain and bruising.
  2. Blisters are caused by friction. Friction is caused by skin shear. Studies demonstrate that snug shoes are more likely to cause skin shear. It is now common for backpackers to wear trail shoes or trail runners and keeping them looser on the foot.
  3. Protection from skin shear occurs when something against the skin buffers it from friction. That can be anything from a thin tight fitting sock, to tape, to moleskin, to lubricants like Body Glide.
  4. A snug shoe forces the sock to shear against the skin. A looser shoe will allow the sock to remain in place on the skin while the shoe easily moves over it. This allows the shear friction to occur between the sock and the shoe.
  5. Since pressure forces are greatest on downhill grades, shoes should then be tightened enough so that the toes on the foot make no contact with the front of the shoe. This is a common cause of blackened and lost toenails.
  6. Because of the above, a shoe should be measured after having been on one's feet for most of the day. Also:
    • Wear your backpack to the shop loaded with 15 to 20 pounds of weight.
    • Wear the sock(s) you will be wearing on Camino.
    • Stand up while wearing your gear, with your weight centred over your feet, when having your foot measured.
    • Bring the third party insole which you will be using and put in the shoe you are trying on.
    • If, when trying on the shoe, you can force your toes to even barely touch the front of the shoe, add one size up from the length of the shoe. Try to find an incline to stand on while doing this. Most outdoor stores with good shoe departments -- like an REI -- will have an incline and 'rock pile' setup so you can do this 'toe touch' test.
    • If the shoe is snug on the width of your feet, try a wider width or two.
 
Last edited:

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
#33
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
Early April can still be wet and muddy. If Napolean is open, it is likely you will find parts of the trail on the Spanish side still have a snow covering. As it will be melting, there will be a lot of mud. Last time I crossed in early April, I saw a lot of folk struggling to find spots to put their feet where they did not sink up to their ankles. The next wet spot though not as bad was Perdon known at the time as mudslide mountain. After Burgos crossing the meseta from Hornillos to Hontanos was the worst of all. Thick clinging ankle deep mud churned up by farm machinery caused havoc for those in boots never mind shoes. For me at this time of year, lightweight Scarpa boots are the best footwear. Later in the year when it is drier, shoes are fine
 

zrexer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15 & 16 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo (Sept.)
#34
My wife and I have walked in early April the last four years and the 'weather gods' largely smiled on us. I think in four years we have had our rain poncho's on maybe half a dozen times. Last year in Portugal, we had zero rain for 2 1/2 weeks.

In year 1 and 2 I wore different hiking boots and had continual blister issues with both sets of boots. Halfway through year two I gave up on my boots and bought a pair of runners to finish. Truly the best decision I have ever made Camino wise. It was either this or quit walking.

I will never attempt long distance walking in boots again, well unless maybe someone points a gun at me and makes me. I would still have to think about it I guess! Been there, done that, got the blisters!

Approximately 80% or more of the Camino Francis is very trail shoe friendly. I will grant boots are better on the odd day on the roughest terrain or if you hit a really wet day, but going with one pair of primary footwear, trail shoes easily win out for me

So go with your Nikes and get something like Croc's for evening wear. Your feet will appreciate it very much.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF15, CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF17, CP17, CdN, CM, CF18, LePuy19
#35
I have walked my last 4 Caminos in Salomon ankle high boots. I do this because I have nerve damage in my right foot and I need the ankle support these boots offer me. They give me the firmness of a great ski boot but they are light and comfortable. I just bought a new pair for 2018.
For several years before adopting the Salomon boots I walked in shorter Merrell boot which shredded from the stress of the length of the Camino, that being said I wear the same style Merrell for everyday use. thumbnail.jpg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances "2016"
#36
Hi Lulumom,
I walked the Camino Frances in Nike Free Run shoes, and will do the same when I resume walking this May. I carried a pair of Inovate waterproof trail runners, but only wore them one time on a rainy day. I will carry waterproof Salomon shoes this time, but prefer the light weight of a running (not necessarily “trail” running) shoe.
The only down sides for me were dusty socks and feet at the end of the day, and pebbles wedged between the treads. Pluses included an airy footbed and little or no shin and ankle fatigue. There were no real other issues for me. Of course everyone is different, and your mileage may vary, but I’ve been very happy with a more minimal shoe.

Buen Camino,
Paul
Hi you can get cloth gaiters that just reach up to your ankle that stop little stones getting into your shoes. You can get them online. They are called dirty girl.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#37
After 10 Camino's i use Sandals ,
Ecco or Merrell , one on the feet the other as reserve.
Merino socks in the morning if chilly .
Nothing better than just loosening the steps when having a coffee and letting the feet breathe and relax ,

My feet told me so , wonderful conversation ;)
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#38
People seem to fixate on blisters and ankle support, but everyone's feet are different and so are the mechanics of how they walk. I have paddle shaped feet (like a duck), narrow at the heel but very wide at the front. So anything that constricts my forefoot is uncomfortable. But even more important, any footwear that is rigid, that does not allow my foot to flex and my foot muscles to behave "normally", causes intense internal pain after about 12km. Don't ask me why, but my podiatrist picked it immediately when I told her my feet (first camino) started to ache after about 12km. She looked at my boots, tried to flex them and said: "too rigid for your foot. Get something more flexible". Problem solved!

Other people have the opposite problem; if they have too much movement they finish up with tendonitis. And on the subject of tendonitis, watch for too tight lacing or boots that are too tight across the front of the foot and ankle - rubbing against or constricting the tendons.

So anyone's experiences of footwear will only ever be a guide. It is a trial and error process to find the footwear that really suits you best.

PS (added) like Thornley, I now wear sandals. Regardless of the mud!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#39
After some years on this forum, it’s my observation that it doesn’t matter whether you prefer boots, walking shoes, trail runners, joggers, sandals, clogs, stilts, rollerskates, whatever. What matters is that if they are in any way uncomfortable on your practice walks before you leave home, chances are they will get even more uncomfortable once you start the camino. :D:D:D
Trust yourself.
Buen camino
 
Last edited:

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#41
Fwiw, I plan to walk barefoot for as much of the Camino (starting in SJPP) as I can. I'm bringing Xero sandals and/or a pair of Vapor Glove 3 as backup. I absolutely love barefoot hiking and am inspired by the barefoot pilgrims gone before me. I'm aware that it's an ostentatious choice of "footwear" and I don't covet the attention. I simply find it the best choice for myself. In addition to how it has really strengthened my feet and greatly reduced injury and blisters, I absolutely love the light feeling of freedom and connection to the ground beneath me.

I intend not only to take in all the sights, smells, sounds, and tastes of the Camino, but also feel all the textured surfaces, soft delights and poking tribulations that the way will greet me with.

The feet have the most nerve endings anywhere in the body. At first this cacophony of feeling can be a bit "noisy," but with time, barefooting attunes the body to the most beautiful of symphonies-the hum of the Living Earth. Can't wait to hear her song in Spain! :)
Ummm....ok.
Buen Camino
 

Jodean

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago (2018)
17.09-31.10 CF (2018
#42
I really liked my Meindl boots and wear them all year round as a walking tour guide. Probably put 4000km on them before noticing they were starting to wear through on the soles.
They work well on asphalt, cobblestones, muddy paths and rock strewn hills. On the 4 rainy days we had in 2015, was really glad to have them as my feet stayed dry and one of those days was a total mucky mud day. No blisters either.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via Francigena (Zwolle, Netherlands to Rome) 2013
Camino Vienna to Santiago de Compostela 2018
#43
Meindl shoes are the best for me as well, walked my last pilgrimage on them. 2000 km without blisters. I'm wearing them this year too.
 
#44
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
I've walked 7 camino's and the last 2 with trail runners both times with plenty of rain and snow What a difference!! , Go with what's comfortable, Just as important: I highly recommend a quality light cushion wool sock (I use Darn tough brand), they will keep your feet dry when the runners get wet. Water proof boots are a waist of time in my opinion they end up wet anyway and take forever to dry. wool socks and runners dry out while you walk. I would leave the boots at home and pack an extra pair of your nikes instead. I will be heading out for number 8 on April 11 (del Norte+Primitivo) Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
#45
Hello,

My husband and I are doing our first Camino in early April. I have been breaking in a pair of lightweight waterproof hiking boots but whenever we walk (we live in northern CA and have done some fairly intense hikes, including Lassen) I always find myself leaning towards wearing my extremely comfortable Nike Flyknit Free running shoes.

I was planning to bring these as my back up shoes but my husband says I need to get trail runners or something more substantial. I've looked at some of the trail runners and don't see a massive difference between these and the Nikes. I feel like if I need support or it's wet, I could wear the boots and if it is dry and mainly flat, I could wear the Nikes.

So...I am asking those with experience. What do people think? Here is a link to Flyknits on amazon just in case you're interested. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJP1JL/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A23KAG5GKM0NLF

Thank you!
My personal favorite boots and shoes are from Hanwag and I use Icebreaker socks.
But at the end you and you alone have to make a choice.

Wish you well,Peter.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#46
I really liked my Meindl boots and wear them all year round as a walking tour guide. Probably put 4000km on them before noticing they were starting to wear through on the soles.
They work well on asphalt, cobblestones, muddy paths and rock strewn hills. On the 4 rainy days we had in 2015, was really glad to have them as my feet stayed dry and one of those days was a total mucky mud day. No blisters either.
I live in my Meindl boots and shoes.
 

zrexer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15 & 16 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo (Sept.)
#47
Fwiw, I plan to walk barefoot for as much of the Camino (starting in SJPP) as I can. I'm bringing Xero sandals and/or a pair of Vapor Glove 3 as backup. I absolutely love barefoot hiking and am inspired by the barefoot pilgrims gone before me. I'm aware that it's an ostentatious choice of "footwear" and I don't covet the attention. I simply find it the best choice for myself. In addition to how it has really strengthened my feet and greatly reduced injury and blisters, I absolutely love the light feeling of freedom and connection to the ground beneath me.

I intend not only to take in all the sights, smells, sounds, and tastes of the Camino, but also feel all the textured surfaces, soft delights and poking tribulations that the way will greet me with.

The feet have the most nerve endings anywhere in the body. At first this cacophony of feeling can be a bit "noisy," but with time, barefooting attunes the body to the most beautiful of symphonies-the hum of the Living Earth. Can't wait to hear her song in Spain! :)
Sounds interesting, please report back how this has worked out for you when you have completed your Camino.
I have witnessed a few pilgrims walking barefoot on their last day into Santiago, but have never encountered anyone in my four years in Spain or Portugal walking barefoot other wise.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#48
I will be heading out for number 8 on April 11 (del Norte+Primitivo) Buen Camino!
Keep warm , don't or can't start too early re mist , its a very beautiful way
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances/Invierno May/June 2018
#49
Sounds interesting, please report back how this has worked out for you when you have completed your Camino.
I have witnessed a few pilgrims walking barefoot on their last day into Santiago, but have never encountered anyone in my four years in Spain or Portugal walking barefoot other wise.
Will do @zrexer.

I've barefoot hiked for a few years now in all sorts of terrain but have never done so on a long multi-day hike. Never done a long multi-day hike period ;)

I'm bringing backup minimalist sandals/shoes just in case (and for restaurants etc.) and will be sober about expectations. That said, I'm hoping most of the walk will be unshod.

Stay tuned!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#50
Will do @zrexer.

I've barefoot hiked for a few years now in all sorts of terrain but have never done so on a long multi-day hike. Never done a long multi-day hike period ;)

I'm bringing backup minimalist sandals/shoes just in case (and for restaurants etc.) and will be sober about expectations. That said, I'm hoping most of the walk will be unshod.

Stay tuned!
I don’t know the Invierno and I don’t know the sort of walking you usually do but for the Francés I do know that you need to factor in walking on lots and lots of paths made of small gravel. I have walked it in very early Topo Athletic, zero drop, minimal tread, trail runners and managed without complaining but only just.:p:p:p The next time I walked it was in Altra with 2.5 cm soles and fantastic tread. Like walking on air and as stable as anything on slippery scree, but still zero drop and with an ultra wide, toe box for a natural foot shape for those of us with hobbit feet.
Did meet a young man walking in those weird shoes that look like rubber toe socks. He was OK but not having an easy time. It’s not the big rocks, its the little sharp ones that make it tough and there is lots of that on the Francés.
Buen camino, peregrino.
 
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Oravasaari

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Fistera (2015), Leon to Fistera (2016), CF, Salvadore, Primitivo (2017), CF run/walk 2018
#51
I'd like to make the observation that (I think DaveBug touched on above in his excellent posts) and that's that "trail shoes" and "trail runners" are two different animals. Trail shoes are the cutdown shoe version of lightweight hiking boots but trail "runners" are designed specifically for jogging / running on soft terrain (forest tracks, snow, mud etc) and therefore have an agressive tread, minimal cushoning and a stiff middle plate to guard against landing full force on sharp rocks/stones. I am a runner and have both road running shoes (gel cushoining) as well as firm trail runners. I would not run in my trail runners on any tarmac, concete or even firm gravel paths unless I wanted to give myself a really hard time and risk injury. Neither would I attempt to walk long distances in them either. I think walking in gel cushioned running shoes could work as long as you are very fit and have very good lateral stability in your ankles (fitness and strength). The problem with ( very expensive) running shoes is they are only good for 700-800 km. I take an old retired pair of my running shoes on camino to wear in the evening as they feel like walking on marshmallows and are a tonic for tired feet around town.
 

stgcph

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
#52
I live in my Meindl boots and shoes.
So do I and I love them.

There are pros and cons for different options and the main thing is to find something that feels comfortable when walking and wearing for many hours. For me the main advantage of (lightweight) boots is, that with boots you are prepared for anything; rough surfaces, gravel and mud. There may be days where boots seems to be “overkill” and then there may be days where trail runners will be “underkill”.

Someday someone will invent the perfect footwear merging the best of both (all) worlds, but then we would lose one of the best debate subjects on this forum :D
 
Camino(s) past & future
March 2018
#53
Wow! Thanks everyone! So much information and valuable feedback!

I think the main message I heard was to go with what feels best but keep in mind durability, weather, etc. The thing I like about the flyknit is that the shoes are basically another pair of socks so your feet can swell and air circulates and after years of wearing the flyknits on many miles, not even a hint of a blister....but yes - there is not a huge amount of support. Technically they are running shoes, but I need more cushion on the heal if I am actually running.

That being said I started looking again and low and behold found a pair of Merrill trail runners (Bare Access Flex Knit) that have all the features of the Nike that I like with waay more durability. I ordered them and we will see.

I will report back! Screen Shot 2018-02-28 at 3.00.49 PM.png
 
#55
I walked the camino frances in April. It was rainy and muddy. I was thankful to have waterproof boots. I can understand a summer Camino may offer drier/hotter weather and then my shoe selection would change.

Here's a video of the mud that my help a future pilgrim make the shoe decision.

 

Mick McQueen

https://www.facebook.com/groups/
Camino(s) past & future
I am escorting the Roll of Honour (Afghanistan) on Camino France on 20 May from SJPDP
The Roll of Honour details the 41 young Australians who died on Active Service in Afghanistan. In the centenary of the ANZAC’s, the Roll of Honour will be escorted to 41 prominent places and events around the World, laying 41 Poppies at each location.
#56
Hi Lulumom,
I walked the Camino Frances in Nike Free Run shoes, and will do the same when I resume walking this May. I carried a pair of Inovate waterproof trail runners, but only wore them one time on a rainy day. I will carry waterproof Salomon shoes this time, but prefer the light weight of a running (not necessarily “trail” running) shoe.
The only down sides for me were dusty socks and feet at the end of the day, and pebbles wedged between the treads. Pluses included an airy footbed and little or no shin and ankle fatigue. There were no real other issues for me. Of course everyone is different, and your mileage may vary, but I’ve been very happy with a more minimal shoe.

Buen Camino,
Paul
Finally someone who knows what they are talking about, well done mate nailed it
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPdP-Burgos, 2015)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Sarria, 2018)
Sarria-Santiago (fall 2018)
#57
I walked the camino frances in April. It was rainy and muddy. I was thankful to have waterproof boots.

Here's a video of the mud that my help a future pilgrim make the shoe decision.

[/QUOTE

Ugh. This is going to be me. :mad: I leave from Burgos mid-April. Already have my boots.
 

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