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Outer Wear

Archie 47

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Starting the Camino Frances 20th May 2018.
#1
This post is making me feel like a proper muppet.
I am having a blank in trying to figure out a jacket to wear with walking trousers?
As the weather is unpredictable in mid May my hope is to have lightweight clothing that won’t cost the earth!
Waterproof? Wind proof?
I am planning to walk for 7 days with the bare minimum weight.
Because of health issues I will have to stay in hotels but I have prepared pretty well.
Thanks very much. Archie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#2
I love Frogg Toggs. They are definately waterproof, but would mainly use them for rain, not as a daily jacket. They are ultra light, reasonably priced, take up very little room in your pack and absolutely keep you dry. I know from experience on three long caminos. They are available on Amazon for approx $20 US, and come in either a rain jacket w/pants or a poncho.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#3
Camino Chris gave some good advice. Frogg Toggs are a decent rain jacket, and can be used as a windshell if the winds are strong and chilly. If you get too warm after it has been on, then you can unzip it to add ventilation. If it is still too warm, remove it.

Layering is designed to be flexible for the immediate weather condition and body temperature needs. The idea is to keep from being too chilled, too warm, and limit becoming sweaty -- which will lead to becoming chilled.

So, as you warm up, peel off whatever layer(s) are needed to keep your perspiration at a minimum. When you halt for breaks, you can add a layer to keep from being chilled. Wearing layers is not a static process, it is a dynamic response to what your body needs in the moment.

With a long sleeved base layer top, a long sleeved shirt, a lightweight vest, and your lightweight rain jacket or poncho, you have what you need to cover a wide range of temperatures and conditions during the spring, and can be used while walking or for around town after you are done for the day.

With an eye on the weight of each item, even on a budget, the total weight for those 4 items will be under 2 pounds.... and probably closer to 1.5 pounds.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#9
can anyone recommend a poncho (for a short lady -me!)
ideally not heavy of course!
This is a well designed poncho, made from a durable and lightweight waterproof and somewhat breathable nylon, which will last a long time. It will work well in the rain during windy conditions as well as calm. 8 ounces. $115.00
https://mountainlaureldesigns.com/product/silnylon-rain-poncho/

My current favorite. This is another extremely well designed, tough and long-lasting poncho made from Cuben Fiber and is the lightest you will find. The "Solo Plus" size. $175.00. 4 ounces (Actual measurement on a calibrated scale)
http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/groundsheet_poncho.shtml

A nice economy poncho from Frogg Toggs. More fragile than the above, but will likely last just fine on Camino(s). 9 ounces
https://www.amazon.com/Frogg-Toggs-...srs=12734534011&ie=UTF8&qid=1524675357&sr=8-2
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes please!
#10
The lightweight and not bank-breaking Marmot Precip waterproof and breathable jacket has pit zips, making it pretty much perfect for the Camino - open zips even in driving rain to get some ventilation, and zip them up for cool days to wear as a windbreaker or going around town.
If you look at ponchos, try some that have room for your pack, like an Altus or a Ferrino Hiker (not the ones with the silvery inside, they reflect heat and become a mobile peregrino cooker!)
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#11
The lightweight and not bank-breaking Marmot Precip waterproof and breathable jacket has pit zips, making it pretty much perfect for the Camino - open zips even in driving rain to get some ventilation, and zip them up for cool days to wear as a windbreaker or going around town.
If you look at ponchos, try some that have room for your pack, like an Altus or a Ferrino Hiker (not the ones with the silvery inside, they reflect heat and become a mobile peregrino cooker!)
Good point, nidarosa :) . Make sure the poncho is for backpacking (or wearing a backpack).All backpacking ponchos have a slight offset cut that is a bit longer in back allowing for a backpack. The nice thing about a poncho is that, because they fit over a backpack, they can be put on without having to stop and remove a pack.

When it looks like a potentially rainy day, I keep my poncho in a side pocket of my pack. When it does start to rain, I can reach into the side pocket, even while still walking, grab the poncho and put it on. Same thing in reverse when it stops raining. This is a real plus when the day quickly changes numerous times between raining and not raining.

Although some love Altus, I never particularly cared for the Altus-style of poncho. Having spent time wearing one on a three day, rain-filled backpacking trip in the Olympic Mountains, I found that they are a bit more involved to put on, not as ventilated as a regular backpacking poncho (despite the front ventilation), and are a bit heavier at around 11 ounces.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#13
The Packa also has pit zips for ventilation.
Yup, it does. I still found that it didn't provide the same level of ventilation for me as a regular poncho. Which makes sense because the Altus has more of the DNA of a big rain jacket than it does of a poncho.... sort of a hybrid. I find that same weakness in most of the rain jackets I've tested; pit zips and ventilation openings covered with loose flaps help, but they can't reproduce the same level of air movement as a poncho.

A lot of the time, what one will find comfortable in rain gear is directly proportional to the activity level and energy output of the user. Those who are producing a lot of sweat need more ventilation to minimize getting soaked from perspiration. Others can literally wrap themselves in greenhouse plastic and stay dry from perspiration and water vapor. :)

That is why rain gear preferences, like most gear, are so individual. And why the only real universally applicable recommendations have to do with the quality and durability of a piece of gear, and not whether one will like it.
 

Archie 47

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Starting the Camino Frances 20th May 2018.
#14
I love Frogg Toggs. They are definately waterproof, but would mainly use them for rain, not as a daily jacket. They are ultra light, reasonably priced, take up very little room in your pack and absolutely keep you dry. I know from experience on three long caminos. They are available on Amazon for approx $20 US, and come in either a rain jacket w/pants or a poncho.
Thanks very much for your help. Froggs on their way to me.
 

Archie 47

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Starting the Camino Frances 20th May 2018.
#15
Camino Chris gave some good advice. Frogg Toggs are a decent rain jacket, and can be used as a windshell if the winds are strong and chilly. If you get too warm after it has been on, then you can unzip it to add ventilation. If it is still too warm, remove it.

Layering is designed to be flexible for the immediate weather condition and body temperature needs. The idea is to keep from being too chilled, too warm, and limit becoming sweaty -- which will lead to becoming chilled.

So, as you warm up, peel off whatever layer(s) are needed to keep your perspiration at a minimum. When you halt for breaks, you can add a layer to keep from being chilled. Wearing layers is not a static process, it is a dynamic response to what your body needs in the moment.

With a long sleeved base layer top, a long sleeved shirt, a lightweight vest, and your lightweight rain jacket or poncho, you have what you need to cover a wide range of temperatures and conditions during the spring, and can be used while walking or for around town after you are done for the day.

With an eye on the weight of each item, even on a budget, the total weight for those 4 items will be under 2 pounds.... and probably closer to 1.5 pounds.
davebugg thank you so much for your very informative reply to me. I really appreciate your breakdown on layering. Perfect for a novice who is trying to do this with a lot of replacement parts like knees shoulders and wrist.
Thanks again.
 
#16
Archie,

Easy peasy. I find Regatta Outdoors to be excellent stuff. Purchase a half zip fleece and a rain jacket and you are well covered. In addition, I do suggest a rain kilt, very light and inexpensive. Search here on, "RAIN KILT," and you will find a link to where it can be found. Do not pay more than C$10. for it.

Hope this helps. :cool:
 

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