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Rucksack Alternative

Simon B

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles and Camino Frances. VDLP Spring 2019

JoroAtanasof

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF may 2018
CP july 2018
CP Coastal august 2019

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
I don't want to open the link, it requires TMI!
 

Katia Taam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Every year, since 2000. Most times portuguese camino also twice the french camiño. Two time Le Puy .
Can´t open the link...
 

Stephan the Painter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2020)
This link works:

This link says it's at fundraising stages. They expect it to retail for 1000 Euros. It seems like a lot of money for one wheel and some metal. It doesn't even seem to have brakes, which you need on these things for going downhill. The designers are living in a fantasy world if they think they would sell more then a few.
 
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Jean Ti

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
This link works:

This link says it's at fundraising stages. They expect it to retail for 1000 Euros. It seems like a lot of money for one wheel and some metal. It doesn't even seem to have brakes, which you need on these things for going downhill. The designers are living in a fantasy world if they think they would sell more then a few.
You can also purchase a bycicle for a 1000 Euros...
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
It's not exactly an alternative to a rucksack. You still need the rucksack to put your stuff into. This just helps you tote it. Others have noted the cost and the lack of brakes. I wonder about stability with the single wheel. It seems to require you to constantly hold a pair of handles to keep it stable, which doesn't leave any hands free. An alternative might be what Efren used on his Via Francigena trip. It had the handles but you could also strap it to your waist, and the two wheels seem a little more stable: https://www.radicaldesign.com/wheelie-v-cargo-walking-trailer
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
sorry but it is a Terrible! design. A mono-wheel has half the weight (of trailer and load) on the body, they are also unstable, having only one wheel at the rear - needs both hands to keep it from rolling side to side.

If you are going to use a trailer it must have two wheels and the load must sit squarely over the axle - this then means that there is no weight on the body, only on the trailer. Then, to stop it pitching one loads very slightly forward to give about a pound or so at the hip-belt, which gives good contact and stabilises it -

Trust me on this - a mono-wheel is a terrible design.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Finisterre 2014
Camino Frances,Muxia and Finisterre 2015
Camino del Norte,Arzua to Ribadeo 2015
sorry but it is a Terrible! design. A mono-wheel has half the weight (of trailer and load) on the body, they are also unstable, having only one wheel at the rear - needs both hands to keep it from rolling side to side.

If you are going to use a trailer it must have two wheels and the load must sit squarely over the axle - this then means that there is no weight on the body, only on the trailer. Then, to stop it pitching one loads very slightly forward to give about a pound or so at the hip-belt, which gives good contact and stabilises it -

Trust me on this - a mono-wheel is a terrible design.
I couldn't agree more David. As the owner of a Radical Designs Wheelie V,which I have used at home in Scotland and on camino in Spain,a two wheeled hiking trailer is the only sensible way to go.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Twin wheel trailers - weight over the axle, long draw bars - they all fold down - perfect balance, no weight on the body.

IMG_6350.jpg

The latest one I have made - twin wheels, weight over the axle, no weight on the body -

trailer a.jpg

If you did Meccano as a child you can build your own - easy - but whatever you do stay away from any design that is one wheel at the rear!!!
The Americans make them because before the Indian wars in the late 1800's that put the original nations onto reservations, when the native American Indian nations were still free, the plains Indians used a travois - two poles hung from a pony to carry weight such as a tepee (they didn't use wheels) - so the modern mono-wheel design - bad enough for a pony back then, terrible now for a hiker!
 

lindam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
As another option, I recently saw this design: https://trekkersfriend.com. Seems to offer a fair bit of flexibility in terms of its use and is lightweight.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
This link works:

This link says it's at fundraising stages. They expect it to retail for 1000 Euros. It seems like a lot of money for one wheel and some metal. It doesn't even seem to have brakes, which you need on these things for going downhill. The designers are living in a fantasy world if they think they would sell more then a few.
Thanks for a working link. The fundraiser, and some specifications, are here, and it has a brake. But it appears that there is only one 'order' so far.

I can understand a single wheel design for more extreme trail conditions, such as some of the legs of the St Olavs Way routes that I have walked, but not for the routes that I have walked in Spain.

Also, as others have pointed out, it is possible to design a trailer to give much less than 50% of the load on the walker, but that is so much easier to achieve in a two wheel design where the load is both between the wheels and over the axle.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
It's not exactly an alternative to a rucksack. You still need the rucksack to put your stuff into. This just helps you tote it. Others have noted the cost and the lack of brakes. I wonder about stability with the single wheel. It seems to require you to constantly hold a pair of handles to keep it stable, which doesn't leave any hands free. An alternative might be what Efren used on his Via Francigena trip. It had the handles but you could also strap it to your waist, and the two wheels seem a little more stable: https://www.radicaldesign.com/wheelie-v-cargo-walking-trailer
It does have a brake and connects to a harness with the weight carried on a hip belt. The handles are for additional stability over rough ground or when going downhill.

As previously mentioned it is overkill for a Camino but would be useful for some wilderness treks where extensive food and water are required.

It is expensive.

I did pass someone using a similar device when I did my Camino.

It could be useful for families with young children or for walking companions who take their companions pack for them for some reason.
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
My trailer, Spot, so kindly made and gifted by David here on the Forum and featured in David’s post No.13 above, packs down very neatly into my suitcase for airline travel to Europe and the UK from Australia and for further non-camino travels while in the Northern Hemisphere. Last year I was able to fit Spot, my backpack, camino gear and non-camino gear into the suitcase.

The day before I started my camino I posted the suitcase with all the non-camino gear etc to the post office in Santiago, headed off with Spot and collected the suitcase several weeks later. Once I dismantled Spot I gave him a shower in the hotel bathroom (cleaning up thoroughly afterwards) and packed him in the suitcase.

Here’s a photo:

5257186C-A7D2-4BCA-A0F9-B3B98994432B.jpeg

And walking with him is a dream! There’s no weight and no sweaty back from a backpack when lugging the pack. My backpack fits snugly into Spot’s cart, as does a couple of large water bottles, and, on the odd occasion, a bottle of wine! 😀

With tenting caminos being a frequent topic of conversation on the Forum recently, a trailer can make a tenting camino a very attractive option - pilgrims won’t be loaded down with the extras needed for such a camino if carrying a backpack - everything can go into the trailer.

Cheers from Oz -
Jenny
 
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