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Small juicer, vegetarians and heating element?

SlowCamino2024

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
sept 2024
I realize every ounce matters when carrying backpack and not shipping luggage ahead. However,
I know that the Spaniards are big into meat and potatoes, and not so much produce. I am thinking of
bringing a very light-weight chargeable juicer and also a mug-size heating element for making juice,
tea and coffee at off hours. Has anyone had experience doing these things? Gracias amigos!
 
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I understand your concerns to a point, but the Spanish make great salads. It's not known as 'the salad bowl of Europe' for nothing. With a bit of basic Spanish you can check the ingredients, and get them to omit anything you don't want.
Not sure if this helps or not 🤔
 
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I understand your concerns to a point, but the Spanish make great salads. It's not known as 'the salad bowl of Europe' for nothing. With a bit of basic Spanish you can check the ingredients, and get them to omit anything you don't want.
Not sure if this helps or not 🤔
I understand your concerns to a point, but the Spanish make great salads. It's not known as 'the salad bowl of Europe' for nothing. With a bit of basic Spanish you can check the ingredients, and get them to omit anything you don't want.
Not sure if this helps or not 🤔
Thanks for this. Good to know. I enjoy a limited amount of meat. The issue is more about juicing and making my own coffee and tea during off hours. All input welcome... Glad to know about the option of salads, have not seen much over there on an earlier visit!
 
I realize every ounce matters when carrying backpack and not shipping luggage ahead. However,
I know that the Spaniards are big into meat and potatoes, and not so much produce. I am thinking of
bringing a very light-weight chargeable juicer and also a mug-size heating element for making juice,
tea and coffee at off hours. Has anyone had experience doing these things? Gracias amigos!


Spain produces a great amount of fruit and vegetables. You’ll have no problem, and you can pick up fresh produce from stores as you pass through/stay overnight if you want to whip up salads in kitchens (assuming you might be staying in places where guests can use the kitchens ie albergues).

Ensaladas will be widely available on menus, and if you’re going to be eating ‘menu del peregrino’, an ensalada mixta is pretty much always an option as a starter.

EDIT: re-reading your reply to the 2nd poster, I see that you’ve already experienced maybe a bit of a challenge with your first trip to Spain? Ok, yes, I can see how it can happen. Depending on the route one takes, the quieter routes do take pilgrims through places where there might be little choice when it comes to eating options…my choice has been to pick up spinach etc and make a salad if I’ve gone a day or two without much in the way of vegetables
 
Last edited:
Spain produces a great amount of fruit and vegetables. You’ll have no problem, and you can pick up fresh produce from stores as you pass through/stay overnight if you want to whip up salads in kitchens (assuming you might be staying in places where guests can use the kitchens ie albergues).

Ensaladas will be widely available on menus, and if you’re going to be eating ‘menu del peregrino’, an ensalada mixta is pretty much always an option as a starter.

EDIT: re-reading your reply to the 2nd poster, I see that you’ve already experienced maybe a bit of a challenge with your first trip to Spain? Ok, yes, I can see how it can happen. Depending on the route one takes, the quieter routes do take pilgrims through places where there might be little choice when it comes to eating options…my choice has been to pick up spinach etc and make a salad if I’ve gone a day or two without much in the way of vegetables
Thank you!
 
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Thanks for this. Good to know. I enjoy a limited amount of meat. The issue is more about juicing and making my own coffee and tea during off hours. All input welcome... Glad to know about the option of salads, have not seen much over there on an earlier visit!
A limited amount of meat is all you are going to get in the average Menu Peregrino! Limited vegetables too, apart from the inevitable insalada mixta. Nonetheless carrying a juicer is, IMO, overkill to the point of derangement. (Offered with the best of intentions). You’ll find cartons of Gazpacho and blended vegetable juices in virtually any supermarket. Fresh fruit abounds. On my last amble along the Camino Frances it seemed every third bar ( and there’s lots of them) was listing more fruit smoothies and kale drain cleaners than drinkable wine.

Anyways, I’ve always regarded meat&potatoes as more a Brit thing. The Spanish are obsessed by seafood and rice
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Spain has lot of veggies available usually, but on the camino I also find it hard to eat enough veggies. I can only eat so many iceberg tuna salads before they drive me nuts. They do often offer vegetable side dishes, usually very basic. Spanish also eat lots of legumes.
I myself take AG1 to make sure I get my vitamins, makes me feel better.

There are lots of vegetable/fruit stores around. Easy to cook yourself a nice meal if you find a kitchen.
 
THANKS so much everyone for your kind feedback and suggestions already listed and more to come!
I guess nobody has brought their own cheap, light-weight juicer with them as I will try to do...easy to
toss or gift to someone.. .In order to make juices out of all the great produce. Also sometimes make my tea
or coffee with one of those metal coils at weird hours?
 
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The Spanish eat loads of salad and veggies - visit any mercado and prepare to be overwhelmed.

They often don’t feature on a menu Peregrino ‘mystery meat and fries’ though.
Have usually found the good old ensalada mixta as a starter on such delightful menus…but as @Sacha says, the iceberg lettuce (no political quips from other Brits, pls) does wear a bit thin quite quickly
 
Unless you're staying in a hotel/casa/private home, you'll need to carry your coil , juicer, and converter(!) to the albergue kitchen to use it...and some albergues have quiet hours, wherein the use of * any* appliance is not encouraged.

A coil at 5 AM, quietly...and what will you drink your beverage from (?)...is probably fine. Don't bet on a juicer being welcomed....
 
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but in the end did not.
An people still tease them about it.
@SlowCamino2024, do you want to be forever remembered as the juicer person? 🙃 And not just by us. People walking with you will definitely remember.

More seriously, if we're carrying our stuff, first and foremost the Camino teaches us what we really need. And albergue free boxes are full of stuff that people realize (very quickly) that they don't need. Take a small heating coil and leave the heating element and juicer at home. Your back will thank you.

Vegetarian here. You will not lack fresh veggies unless you try to subsist off pilgrims' menus. Forget that - it's awful food by any reckoning. Go with the menu del dia instead - or the grocers along the way. Spain has lots of veggies, and not just potatoes.
 
I realize every ounce matters when carrying backpack and not shipping luggage ahead. However,
I know that the Spaniards are big into meat and potatoes, and not so much produce. I am thinking of
bringing a very light-weight chargeable juicer and also a mug-size heating element for making juice,
tea and coffee at off hours. Has anyone had experience doing these things? Gracias amigos!
Quite a few people carry good cameras which can weigh quite a bit. Others carry books, town shoes, dresses, or other luxury items.

If the juicer is small enough and only weighs 2-300 grams why not? If it truly does become more nuisance than it's worth you can always opt to leave behind.

As to the coil there are quite a number of very experienced pilgrims on here that carry a coil and mug for their morning beverage. Although to be fair they tend to walk the less travelled trails.

Put them in your pack, walk with them on your training walks for a week or two. Too heavy? Then leave them behind.
 
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There is a thread about the cult of the heating coil.

Stray thoughts:
Not everyone is a hardcore fan of ultralight packing. If you are happy walking with the weight of your backpack, go for it.
Spanish supermarkets, even quite small ones, have lots of vegetable options, not to speak of the weekly markets in the small towns.
I've asked several restaurants, when they didn't seem to busy and the menu suggested there would be vegetables in the kitchen, to make me a parrillada de verduras, and I've almost always received something good.

(And Alvalle is the best ready-made gazpacho, in my opinion.)
 
Have usually found the good old ensalada mixta as a starter on such delightful menus…but as @Sacha says, the iceberg lettuce (no political quips from other Brits, pls) does wear a bit thin quite quickly
My ensalada mixtas have not been overwhelmingly iceberg lettuce. In fact, I found a great variety of spring lettuces and other vegetables in my salads this trip.
 
I realize every ounce matters when carrying backpack and not shipping luggage ahead. However,
I know that the Spaniards are big into meat and potatoes, and not so much produce. I am thinking of
bringing a very light-weight chargeable juicer and also a mug-size heating element for making juice,
tea and coffee at off hours. Has anyone had experience doing these things? Gracias amigos!
I walked 4 caminos being a vegetarian, the last two were off-season and on unpopular routes so I mainly cooked from the supermarket/market produce and was quite happy with a choice of fruit/veg on the road and also sourced some from nature, like wild herbs, mushrooms, fruit and berries. I brought water coil and a metal mug and used it daily for making tea, coffee, heating soups, etc - that was very handy and was one of the best decisions ever! As well as bringing some spices with me from home. About the juicer: although I enjoy occasional juicing at home it I think it would be too much bother for me to handle on the camino and I also felt I had enough fiber and vitamis from what was available there already. I cook very well at home and adapt my cooking for the road, and even if it's not the same quantity or quality of food that's ok for me as well. Bom Caminho! :)
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

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Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
In rural Spain and much of Europe, the availability and choice of vegetables in restaurants and shops is more seasonal than in a UK (and I suspect US) supermarket. In spring, my experience in Navarra and the Basque country has been a great choice of fabulous fresh salad vegetables, whereas in September and October there are more cereals, pulses and fruits. I agree with others that while Pilgrim Menus may contain enough calories, they can offer lean pickings in terms of fresh veg. Better to seek a Menu del Dia or at least occasionally to buy ingredients and prepare your own.
I don't know how much a lightweight juicer weighs, but if you can manage with fewer clothes or minimal toiletries then .... Seriously, it is up to you to prioritise what you carry, and what you can decide you can leave at home or in an early albergue.
Buen Camino!
 
I realize every ounce matters when carrying backpack and not shipping luggage ahead. However,
I know that the Spaniards are big into meat and potatoes, and not so much produce. I am thinking of
bringing a very light-weight chargeable juicer and also a mug-size heating element for making juice,
tea and coffee at off hours. Has anyone had experience doing these things? Gracias amigos!
I just finished Camino Portuguese (Porto to Santiago). There are not only grocery stores (Mercardo's), there are also fruit stores everywhere. When I walked the Camino Francis, I was amazed of how many tiny bars could even squeeze their own juice. Really worry about bringing a juicer or a mug. Some of the hostels have talking machines – – yes I know some people don't like the coffee out of the machines but I don't really mind in a pinch.
Some places also have café open nearby, but not all. So you may want to bring a few two bags and a few packers for those times.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
You can buy individual juices in grocery stores. My students did last winter. Many albergues have microwaves to make hot water for coffee or tea.
Thanks for letting me know. However, some say microwaves alter the molecular structure of food and water and I do not use them. I am bringing my own heating element LOL!
 
I walked 4 caminos being a vegetarian, the last two were off-season and on unpopular routes so I mainly cooked from the supermarket/market produce and was quite happy with a choice of fruit/veg on the road and also sourced some from nature, like wild herbs, mushrooms, fruit and berries. I brought water coil and a metal mug and used it daily for making tea, coffee, heating soups, etc - that was very handy and was one of the best decisions ever! As well as bringing some spices with me from home. About the juicer: although I enjoy occasional juicing at home it I think it would be too much bother for me to handle on the camino and I also felt I had enough fiber and vitamis from what was available there already. I cook very well at home and adapt my cooking for the road, and even if it's not the same quantity or quality of food that's ok for me as well. Bom Caminho! :)
Thanks, Surya. Yes, planning to carry the coil and mug for coffee, tea and soup... I know this will be a worthy investment. I will start carrying around the cheap 1 lb juicer to see if it is worth carrying to make my own gazpacho and juices from those wild food options...
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
In rural Spain and much of Europe, the availability and choice of vegetables in restaurants and shops is more seasonal than in a UK (and I suspect US) supermarket. In spring, my experience in Navarra and the Basque country has been a great choice of fabulous fresh salad vegetables, whereas in September and October there are more cereals, pulses and fruits. I agree with others that while Pilgrim Menus may contain enough calories, they can offer lean pickings in terms of fresh veg. Better to seek a Menu del Dia or at least occasionally to buy ingredients and prepare your own.
I don't know how much a lightweight juicer weighs, but if you can manage with fewer clothes or minimal toiletries then .... Seriously, it is up to you to prioritise what you carry, and what you can decide you can leave at home or in an early albergue.
Buen Camino!
Gracias!
 
YEP! It sure will be an adventure! In contrast to many who have kindly responded, I am coming from a country with prolific year-round produce and consume a lot of it. When I was in Scotland and the UK it was a real challenge LOL!
 
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I just finished Camino Portuguese (Porto to Santiago). There are not only grocery stores (Mercardo's), there are also fruit stores everywhere. When I walked the Camino Francis, I was amazed of how many tiny bars could even squeeze their own juice. Really worry about bringing a juicer or a mug. Some of the hostels have talking machines – – yes I know some people don't like the coffee out of the machines but I don't really mind in a pinch.
Some places also have café open nearby, but not all. So you may want to bring a few two bags and a few packers for those times.
thanks for all the feedback :)
 
A guide to speaking Spanish on the Camino - enrich your pilgrim experience.
YEP! It sure will be an adventure! In contrast to many who have kindly responded, I am coming from a country with prolific year-round produce and consume a lot of it. When I was in Scotland and the UK it was a real challenge LOL!

Amazing, we all have scurvy in the UK, we’re known for it
 
Juego de naranja is very popular and available.
Not juego, which means game. You are thinking of jugo, which means juice in Spanish, but is not used for fruit or vegetable juice in Spain. Zumo is the word used for fruit and vegetable juice in Spain.
 
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Will you have a converter (they are heavy!) for your juicer and heating element? I don’t think an adapter will be enough. I’m thinking that if you don’t, you may fry them the first time you go to use them.

There is amazing produce in Spain, last spring on Camino I had lots of fresh salads, and experienced fresh asparagus season, got to try cardos (an edible thistle), eat delicious cherries and strawberries and almost daily fresh squeezed orange juice, available at almost every bar. (A daily banana and OJ were my electrolytes, along with drinking plenty of water, instead of tablets with artificial sweeteners.) If there isn’t a fruit/vegetable market in a town there is usually at least a small supermarket with fruits and vegetables. And at restaurants, lentil and chickpea dishes are usually loaded with other vegetables. Oh, and don’t forget the pimientos de Padrón and the roasted red peppers on many menus. Yum!
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Will you have a converter (they are heavy!) for your juicer and heating element? I don’t think an adapter will be enough. I’m thinking that if you don’t, you may fry them the first time you go to use them.

There is amazing produce in Spain, last spring on Camino I had lots of fresh salads, and experienced fresh asparagus season, got to try cardos (an edible thistle), eat delicious cherries and strawberries and almost daily fresh squeezed orange juice, available at almost every bar. (A daily banana and OJ were my electrolytes, along with drinking plenty of water, instead of tablets with artificial sweeteners.) If there isn’t a fruit/vegetable market in a town there is usually at least a small supermarket with fruits and vegetables. And at restaurants, lentil and chickpea dishes are usually loaded with other vegetables. Oh, and don’t forget the pimientos de Padrón and the roasted red peppers on many menus. Yum!

THANKS SO MUCH for this, Kathy! YES, all to look forward to . I am going to experiment with this cheap 1 lb mini bullet blender in order to concoct some of my own juices, gazpacho, raw soups, etc! What the
heck? It's only a pound ha ha!
 
Thanks for this. Good to know. I enjoy a limited amount of meat. The issue is more about juicing and making my own coffee and tea during off hours. All input welcome... Glad to know about the option of salads, have not seen much over there on an earlier visit!
Instead of juicing them, why not just eat the veges and fruit you buy? Much healthier.
 
What off-hours are you concerned about? Early morning? Late night?

My experience was that coffee and tea were always available to me when needed either on the road or near the albergue. I drink ALOT of coffee.

Don't be afraid.

Are you coming from the U.S.? If so, make sure that your device will run on 220 and that you bring an adapter (two separate issues).

I am all in favor of a pilgrim bringing one lightweight, luxury item, whether a book, makeup, special cream, etc. As long as you can carry it, it's up to you. But don't bring anything you would be devastated to lose or to have to leave behind.

By the way, are you starting from SJPDP? Sarria? Another place? It may make a difference in your packing plans.

Don't dismiss the issue of weight, especially on your first Camino.
 
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I realize every ounce matters when carrying backpack and not shipping luggage ahead. However,
I know that the Spaniards are big into meat and potatoes, and not so much produce. I am thinking of
bringing a very light-weight chargeable juicer and also a mug-size heating element for making juice,
tea and coffee at off hours. Has anyone had experience doing these things? Gracias amigos!
I will leave it to others more knowledgeable than I to comment on the availability of vegetarian or vegan food on the Caminos. In terms of a portable heating element for making tea and coffee at off hours, this has come up more than once on the forums. Just fo a search on "coil". There are quite a few members in the "coil club". This is probably the first time I've heard anyone talking about bringing a portable juicer (although there was a discussion a while ago of bringing a portable rice maker). Myself, I would not do so. But for me the fresh-squeezed orange juice so readily available throughout is sufficient for my juice needs. Or the gazpacho also readily available in grocery stores for liquid vegetables. YMMV.
 
What would be the suggestion to buy the coil IN Spain so no need for an adaptor? What types of stores might have one? Decathalon, perhaps?
How common are mugs and microwaves in albergues (on CF)? I wasn't going to bring any of these things, but I need my morning tea when I wake up. And would love to have my tea before leaving the albergue and setting out on the road. (Yes, some Americans do drink tea. :D ) I was also hoping to microwave some veg from the market occasionally.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
What would be the suggestion to buy the coil IN Spain so no need for an adaptor? What types of stores might have one? Decathalon, perhaps?
How common are mugs and microwaves in albergues (on CF)? I wasn't going to bring any of these things, but I need my morning tea when I wake up. And would love to have my tea before leaving the albergue and setting out on the road. (Yes, some Americans do drink tea. :D ) I was also hoping to microwave some veg from the market occasionally.
I have asked at some places in Spain and could not find one. (Hardware store, Asian Bazaar) Maybe others have been more successful. I have seen them on Amazon, but make sure they have the euro plug.
 
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THANKS so much everyone for your kind feedback and suggestions already listed and more to come!
I guess nobody has brought their own cheap, light-weight juicer with them as I will try to do...easy to
toss or gift to someone.. .In order to make juices out of all the great produce. Also sometimes make my tea
or coffee with one of those metal coils at weird hours?
Fellow vegetarian here. Just curious as to what juicer you're talking about. I've never heard of any kind of juicer remotely light enough to carry in a pack on my back. Care to share the brand and model?
 
Yes, I use Duolingo to learn Spanish but that seems to be aimed at Latin American Spanish. Duolingo uses jugo for juice.

When I asked for jugo de naranja in Spain I was corrected and told that zumo is the correct word.
i also used Duolingo to learn sufficient Spanish to get by, and also got strange looks every time I ordered Jugo de Naranja (which was fairly often). Usually, I just got Que? And then when I repeated myself they went off and brought me back the O.J.
 
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I realize every ounce matters when carrying backpack and not shipping luggage ahead. However,
I know that the Spaniards are big into meat and potatoes, and not so much produce. I am thinking of
bringing a very light-weight chargeable juicer and also a mug-size heating element for making juice,
tea and coffee at off hours. Has anyone had experience doing these things? Gracias amigos!
One of the few things that I missed being able to enjoy on my first Camino was a fruit and veg smoothie. I researched and bought a USB rechargeable blender to make smoothies, shakes and even plant-based milk on the go on my Camino Ingles. There are several brands on Amazon that weigh less than a pound. Just remember that you'll have to check your bag for airport travel because of the blades.
 
There are several brands on Amazon that weigh less than a pound. Just remember that you'll have to check your bag for airport travel because of the blades.
Wah. That's really light.
I take it back. Maybe worth taking if you usually have a smoothie or green drink for breakfast.
 
THANKS so much everyone for your kind feedback and suggestions already listed and more to come!
I guess nobody has brought their own cheap, light-weight juicer with them as I will try to do...easy to
toss or gift to someone.. .In order to make juices out of all the great produce. Also sometimes make my tea
or coffee with one of those metal coils at weird hours?
You could always the kettle in the albergue kitchen to make tea and coffee at weird hours . . .
#Justsaying 😉
 
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I apologise in advance, I can't help myself.

Everytime I read the heading for this thread I see "small, juicier vegetarians",

not "small, juicer vegetarians".

It makes me smile every time 😊😊.

Thank you!
 
Thanks for this. Good to know. I enjoy a limited amount of meat. The issue is more about juicing and making my own coffee and tea during off hours. All input welcome... Glad to know about the option of salads, have not seen much over there on an earlier visit!
Microwaves for boiling water in most albergues.
 
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I am hearing mixed viewpoints on whether there are microwaves or not in most albergues.
Mixed views from mixed experiences.
Many have them, but not all. Some have a jug but no microwave. Some Albergues have no kitchen. Some, like the Xuntas's in Galacia have a kitchen but no pots, utensils etc. Some will have everything, including coffee machines.

etc, etc.
 
You could always the kettle in the albergue kitchen to make tea and coffee at weird hours . . .
#Justsaying 😉
I have rarely seen a kettle in an albergue . . . often a microwave though ;)
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
If you look on Gronze.com it will generally say what is available at each place (kitchen for pilgrim use or not) As @Peterexpatkiwi notes, once you enter Galicia there are nice kitchens with microwaves, stovetops, etc., but no cookware, tableware, etc. I have not seen an electric kettle or toaster at any of them in Galicia either.

Private albergues in Galicia, yes, I have seen a kettle, toaster, etc.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
I understand your concerns to a point, but the Spanish make great salads. It's not known as 'the salad bowl of Europe' for nothing. With a bit of basic Spanish you can check the ingredients, and get them to omit anything you don't want.
Not sure if this helps or not 🤔
Where in Spain is this? I have been travelling in Spain since the 90s and live here permanently since 2017, but I still haven't found those great salads. Apart from the occasional vegan restaurant in the bigger cities. Spanish salads are boring: iceberg lettuce, tomato and onions. Everything a bit more creative contains meat or fish.

Yes, the Spanish grow vegetables, and yes, you can buy them everywhere. But in restaurants they are hard to find. I have been a vegetarian for more than 30 years and eating out in Spain mostly means living on a diet of potatoes, bread, eggs and iceberg lettuce.
 
Where in Spain is this? I have been travelling in Spain since the 90s and live here permanently since 2017, but I still haven't found those great salads. Apart from the occasional vegan restaurant in the bigger cities. Spanish salads are boring: iceberg lettuce, tomato and onions. Everything a bit more creative contains meat or fish.

Yes, the Spanish grow vegetables, and yes, you can buy them everywhere. But in restaurants they are hard to find. I have been a vegetarian for more than 30 years and eating out in Spain mostly means living on a diet of potatoes, bread, eggs and iceberg lettuce.
I've had lots of great salads. Yes, they often come with tuna, but, as was said, you can ask them to omit the tuna and that leaves everything else.

Here is just one example from last year's Camino.
20230702_200708.jpg
 
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I've had lots of great salads. Yes, they often come with tuna, but, as was said, you can ask them to omit the tuna and that leaves everything else.

Here is just one example from last year's Camino.
View attachment 171041
Wow, I have never seen anything like that in the villages on the Camino. Could that have been on the Francés?
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Wow, I have never seen anything like that in the villages on the Camino. Could that have been on the Francés?
That was on the Salvador, in Bendueños. But I had plenty of other salads that went well beyond iceberg lettuce, tomatoes, (tuna) and onions: eggs, asparagus, olives, corn, shredded carrots, raisins, capers, nuts, beets, and, of course, other types of lettuce all made repeated appearances in my first course menu salads (well, maybe not the raisins and capers).
 
Hello, interesting discussion :). Vegan here, went two camino - Portuguese litoral and Del norte from Biariz to Bilbao. It wasn't easy :). But possible. Asian and indians restaurants are always have vegetarian/vegan options. Do you have Happycow app? There you can check places to eat around if there are vegetarian options. We made our own meals in albergues sometimes - legumes with pasta, with ris, soups. I love to have hummus, quacamole och gaspacho with me, when I am going. And fresh baguette - so delishious in Spain! They have everything in supermarkets, veges, fruts, fresh juices. I would not take juicer and heater, if I am on your place. But if it is important to you, then take it.
 
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my own experience so far with private room lodgings on the CF is that access to self-serve tea/coffee making equipment is not a thing in many hostals and casa rurales. With hindsight I would have packed a coil & cup.
 

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We often read that Merino clothing does not smell as much with use, compared to other fabrics. Since my first Camino 9 years ago, I have always worn very lightweight (120 gsm) Merino shirts (by...
So, whatcha all buying? The sale and coupons are burning a hole in my pocket but I can’t decide what I want/need.
Hi all ... I have known for years that Goretex doesn't breathe when it is high humidity (or raining) .. noted because of how damp I would always become inside, as my sweat vapour turned back to...
We fly out in 4 days. I’ve tried major branded socks, three brands, and can’t wear wool. It feels hot and makes my feet hurt for three or four days after. Walking in cotton blend toe socks.. I...
Laundry Masher - Hmmm... on one hand may come very handy. on the other not sure we'll be able to make it through the plane security with that Grenade-looking contraption
I’m leaving in a week and the weather through the Meseta looks pretty cool at night 45 to 50°F. Is that too cold for a sleeping bag liner?

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