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Statistics for June 2018

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#1
It is a record June. Male/female is split at 50%. The USA tops the foreign pilgrim list. The Camino Frances still dominates, as does Sarria as a starting point.

Camino seguido.
Los caminos que han seguido la mayoría de los peregrinos son Frances-Camino de con 27.346 (59,86%); Portugues-Camino con 8.522 (18,65%); Norte-Camino de con 2.631 (5,76%); Primitivo-Camino con 1.958 (4,29%); Costa Camino Portugues con 1.789 (3,92%); Ingles-Camino con 1.737 (3,80%); Via de la Plata con 1.363 (2,98%); Muxia-Finisterre con 175 (0,38%); Invierno de Camino con 104 (0,23%); Otros caminos con 59 (0,13%); etc.

Extranjeros: 28.264 (61,87%); el país que mayor número de peregrinos aporta es Estados Unidos, con 4.089 (14,47%); Italia, con 3.917 (13,86%); Alemania, con 3.673 (13,00%); Portugal, con 1.806 (6,39%); Francia, con 1.524 (5,39%); Irlanda, con 1.157 (4,09%); Reino Unido, con 1.149 (4,07%); Brasil, con 939 (3,32%); etc.

La Peregrinación a Santiago en Junio de 2018

Durante el mes de Junio de 2018 en la Oficina de Peregrinaciones se recibieron 45.684 peregrinos; el anterior Año Santo en 2010 fueron 33.757. De estos peregrinos, 22.941 (50,22%) son mujeres y 22.743 (49,78%) hombres. A pie han llegado 41.783 (91,46%), en bicicleta 3.787 (8,29%), a caballo 78 (0,17%) y 27 (0,06%) en silla de ruedas.

Lugar de salida.
La mayor parte de los peregrinos llegados en este año 2018 ha iniciado su camino en Sarria con 11.793 (25,81%); S. Jean P. Port con 6.042 (13,23%); Oporto con 3.562 (7,80%); Tui con 2.587 (5,66%); León con 1.663 (3,64%); Ferrol con 1.561 (3,42%); Oviedo - C.P. con 1.318 (2,89%); Cebreiro con 1.243 (2,72%); Ponferrada con 921 (2,02%); Irún con 918 (2,01%); Valença do Minho con 904 (1,98%); Roncesvalles con 881 (1,93%); Oporto Costa con 781 (1,71%); Le Puy con 574 (1,26%); Pamplona con 572 (1,25%); Astorga con 530 (1,16%); Burgos con 462 (1,01%); Lugo - C.P. con 433 (0,95%); Ourense con 433 (0,95%); Lisboa con 407 (0,89%); Sevilla con 396 (0,87%)
 

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davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#3
Thank you for posting this, falcon. I ran a Google translation for the Spanish language parts to help me out with the context, so I did a quick copy -n- paste.

Road followed.
The roads that most pilgrims have followed are Frances-Camino de with 27,346 (59.86%); Portugues-Camino with 8,522 (18.65%); North-Camino de with 2,631 (5.76%); Primitivo-Camino with 1,958 (4.29%); Costa Camino Portugues with 1,789 (3.92%); Ingles-Camino with 1,737 (3.80%); Via de la Plata with 1,363 (2.98%); Muxia-Finisterre with 175 (0.38%); Camino Winter with 104 (0.23%); Other roads with 59 (0.13%); etc.

Foreigners: 28,264 (61.87%); the country with the largest number of pilgrims is the United States, with 4,089 (14.47%); Italy, with 3,917 (13.86%); Germany, with 3,673 (13.00%); Portugal, with 1,806 (6.39%); France, with 1,524 (5.39%); Ireland, with 1,157 (4.09%); United Kingdom, with 1,149 (4.07%); Brazil, with 939 (3.32%); etc.

The Pilgrimage to Santiago in June 2018
45,684 pilgrims were received during the month of June 2018 in the Pilgrimage Office; the previous Holy Year in 2010 were 33,757. Of these pilgrims, 22,941 (50.22%) are women and 22,743 (49.78%) men. On foot, 41,783 (91.46%) arrived, by bicycle, 3,787 (8.29%), on horseback 78 (0.17%) and 27 (0.06%) on a wheelchair.

Place of departure
Most of the pilgrims arrived in 2018 have started their journey in Sarria with 11,793 (25.81%); S. Jean P. Port with 6,042 (13.23%); Porto with 3.562 (7.80%); Tui with 2.587 (5.66%); Leon with 1,663 (3.64%); Ferrol with 1.561 (3.42%); Oviedo - CP with 1,318 (2.89%); Cebreiro with 1,243 (2.72%); Ponferrada with 921 (2.02%); Irún with 918 (2.01%); Valença do Minho with 904 (1.98%); Roncesvalles with 881 (1.93%); Porto Costa with 781 (1.71%); Le Puy with 574 (1.26%); Pamplona with 572 (1.25%); Astorga with 530 (1.16%); Burgos with 462 (1.01%); Lugo - CP with 433 (0.95%); Ourense with 433 (0.95%); Lisbon with 407 (0.89%); Seville with 396 (0.87%) uo - CP with 433 (0.95%); Ourense with 433 (0.95%); Lisbon with 407 (0.89%); Seville with 396 (0.87%) Lugo - CP with 433 (0.95%); Ourense with 433 (0.95%); Lisbon with 407 (0.89%); Seville with 396 (0.87%)
 

fraluchi

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
One every year since 2007
#5
And looking at the numbers from another angle (Pilgrims statistics – 1st half of 2018):
The overall number of pilgrim arrivals registered during the first half of 2018 exceeded 123’000. This is an increase of 11’158 (+10 %) compared to 2017 and repeats an overall yearly Camino pilgrims’ trend which we have been seeing since 2014.
The yearly ratio of Camino Francés (CF) walkers, compared to total arrivals in Santiago, has been slowing by 2 to 3 percentage points, from 68% in 2014 to 58% in 2018.
The number of CF arrivals show a shift in their starting points. Sarria was chosen by 47% of the CF walkers (+33’424), representing an increase of 12% compared to 2017. The other 53% of CF walkers (38’234) show a decrease of 2%, thus affecting the overall dynamics.
CF walkers, for example, increased by “only” 4% compared to the same period last year, whereas walkers steadily increased on the Portugués by 26%, the Norte 7%, the Primitivo 8% and the Inglés 25%. The Via de la Plata had +3%.
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016. Many more to come in my future God willing !
#6
And looking at the numbers from another angle (Pilgrims statistics – 1st half of 2018):
The overall number of pilgrim arrivals registered during the first half of 2018 exceeded 123’000. This is an increase of 11’158 (+10 %) compared to 2017 and repeats an overall yearly Camino pilgrims’ trend which we have been seeing since 2014.
The yearly ratio of Camino Francés (CF) walkers, compared to total arrivals in Santiago, has been slowing by 2 to 3 percentage points, from 68% in 2014 to 58% in 2018.
The number of CF arrivals show a shift in their starting points. Sarria was chosen by 47% of the CF walkers (+33’424), representing an increase of 12% compared to 2017. The other 53% of CF walkers (38’234) show a decrease of 2%, thus affecting the overall dynamics.
CF walkers, for example, increased by “only” 4% compared to the same period last year, whereas walkers steadily increased on the Portugués by 26%, the Norte 7%, the Primitivo 8% and the Inglés 25%. The Via de la Plata had +3%.
Scarey !
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Norte/Liebana (Planning)
#8
CF walkers, for example, increased by “only” 4% compared to the same period last year, whereas walkers steadily increased on the Portugués by 26%, the Norte 7%, the Primitivo 8% and the Inglés 25%. The Via de la Plata had +3%.
I wonder if that means first-time pilgrims are choosing other routes than CF to start with, or if the increase rate of people doing a 2nd and 3rd camino is faster than the rise in first-timers.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#9
It is a record June. Male/female is split at 50%. The USA tops the foreign pilgrim list. The Camino Frances still dominates, as does Sarria as a starting point.
Would be nice to see the bottom of the list too! Sadly the website does not give the full list...........I think. Couldn't find one.

I can verify that Thailand claimed a Pilgrim that month! My wife Pat.......

Certainly the CF is getting busy. I wonder at what point, if ever, it will reach saturation during peak periods.
It felt like it already had a couple of times this year. :oops:[/QUOTE]
 

martin1ws

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
From Somport Jul-Sep 2018
#10
Would be nice to see the bottom of the list too! Sadly the website does not give the full list...........I think. Couldn't find one.
...
The statistic site is here:
https://oficinadelperegrino.com/en/statistics/

But Thailand is part of "Resto paises".

...
The number of CF arrivals show a shift in their starting points. Sarria was chosen by 47% of the CF walkers (+33’424), representing an increase of 12% compared to 2017. The other 53% of CF walkers (38’234) show a decrease of 2%, thus affecting the overall dynamics.
....
So there is no increase on the Camino Frances before Sarria.
And if I walk the Camino de Invierno I will avoid the rush.
 
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falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#12
I wonder if that means first-time pilgrims are choosing other routes than CF to start with, or if the increase rate of people doing a 2nd and 3rd camino is faster than the rise in first-timers.
It would be interesting to know how many pilgrims are new, first time on a particular camino but have walked before, and repeating what they have done before. The data collection at the Pilgrim Office would be more complex, so it won't happen (the data should be of more interest to the Xunta than to the Cathedral. Forum Members would be interested because we are a curious bunch!).
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#13

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
#14
I recall telling Pat a couple of years ago that 3 Thais had walked that year.........
There are PDF's for the annual statistics on the the statisitcs page listing the numbers from each country. Usually the previous year goes up about February, but thus far 2017 has not appeared. I am waiting to see the statistics from each country, but thus far I am waiting in vain! That is probably where you saw how many Thai people walked in a year.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2017
#15
Did I get the math correct? If there were 45,684 pilgrims in June 2018, and 33,757 pilgrims in the last Holy Year, 2010, I calculated the increase at 35%.

I leave Saturday, arrive on Sunday, and start working at the Pilgrim Office on Monday, for a month. Need to get psyched for this...

We all knew the wave was building. Ready or not, here it comes!
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 20, 2016 to May 20, '16 SJPdP to Santiago d C.
#16
Did I get the math correct? If there were 45,684 pilgrims in June 2018, and 33,757 pilgrims in the last Holy Year, 2010, I calculated the increase at 35%.

I leave Saturday, arrive on Sunday, and start working at the Pilgrim Office on Monday, for a month. Need to get psyched for this...

We all knew the wave was building. Ready or not, here it comes!
Thank you for your kind work at the Pilgrim Office and on this forum t2andreo! Travel safe amigo!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (SJPP to SDC); Finisterre and Muxia; Portuguese; Primitivo; Norte (Irun to SDC); Ingles
#17
Notable again is the overall DECREASE in Pilgrims on the Frances if we subtract out those who only walked Sarria to Santiago. If we subtract out the Sarria - Santiago pilgrims, 15,520 pilgrims walked the Frances and received compostelas in June, 2017, while 15,373 pilgrims earned compostelas in June, 2018. This is consistent with a several year trend. Numbers on the Frances — the last stretch excepted — are going down.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2017
#18
The issue on the Frances is something called "Peak Pilgrim." This describes a situation where the carrying capacity of the Camino Frances becomes saturated and additional pilgrims worsen the overall experience by placing inordinate strain on accommodations and eating places. This stated, I do not think we are there yet.

What I see in the statistics is a trend to try alternative routes for the experience or to avoid crowds. Also, the summer season is just now arriving. Let us see what things look like by September.

My suspicion is that the Sarria - Santiago stretch will reach Peak Pilgrim first. Once this happens, those seeking to do as close to 100 km as they can will self-distribute to Tui (Portuguese), Monforte de Lemos (Invierno), and other places where you can get to by train or bus and do the required minimum 100 km distance. As most of the commercial tour companies sell packages for the minimum distance, I suggest these stretches will become progressively more congested, especially from May - early September.

Just my observations...
 
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Camino(s) past & future
St. Jean to Santiago (Apr to June 2014); St. Jean to Finisterre (Apr to May 2016); Via Francigena - Lausanne to Rome (Sep to October 2016)
#19
The issue on the Frances is something called "Peak Pilgrim." This describes a situation where the carrying capacity of the Camino Frances becomes saturated and additional pilgrims worsen the overall experience by placing inordinate strain on accommodations and eating places. This stated, I do not thing we are there yet.

What I see in the statistics is a trend to try alternative routes for the experience. Also, the summer season is just now arriving. Let us see what things look like by September.

My suspicion is that the Sarria - Santiago stretch will reach Peak Pilgrim first. Once this happens, those seeking to do as close to 100 km as they can will self-distribute to Tui (Portuguese), Monforte de Lemos (Invierno), and other places where you can get to by train or bus and do the required minimum distance. As most of the commercial tour companies sell packages for the minimum distance, I suggest these stretches will become progressively more congested, especially from May - early September.

Just my observations...
I agree with that. We walked in our third Camino in May and June this year and observed people collecting stamps from Sarria onwards who didn’t appear to complete each stage. I believe their statistics would also be included.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#21
Notable again is the overall DECREASE in Pilgrims on the Frances if we subtract out those who only walked Sarria to Santiago. If we subtract out the Sarria - Santiago pilgrims, 15,520 pilgrims walked the Frances and received compostelas in June, 2017, while 15,373 pilgrims earned compostelas in June, 2018. This is consistent with a several year trend. Numbers on the Frances — the last stretch excepted — are going down.
Ummmm. Not during May / June when we were there! The whole CF felt like the last 100 kms at times!
 

rappahannock_rev

Anglican Catholic Priest
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes, Burgos & SdeC 77 (by train); Frances 12, 15 & 17; Finisterre 17; Lourdes, Aragones 18
#23
I finished my 2018 hard-wonderful-quiet Camino Aragones in Puente la Reina Gares on 4 June -- and my eyes bugged out the following morning at the sight of the mighty army of Camino Frances peregrinos marching down the Calle Mayor.... Not exaggerating.

Given that, what Sarria-Santiago will look/feel this summer I can scarcely imagine....

I''ve walked Sarria-Santiago twice, now, and (God willing!) will walk it again someday.... But maybe in the off-season.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (SJPP to SDC); Finisterre and Muxia; Portuguese; Primitivo; Norte (Irun to SDC); Ingles
#24
Ummmm. Not during May / June when we were there! The whole CF felt like the last 100 kms at times!
Hi Robo: I didn’t say the CF wasn’t crowded, only that the numbers reflect it’s becoming less crowded in the past few years (Sarria - SDC section excepted). Still plenty of folk! To put crowded / not crowded in perspective, 6042 pilgrims finished the CF in June having started in the beginning (SJPP), while only 918 finished the Norte having started at its traditional starting point in Irun.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2013/2014)
Via Podiensis, Camino Francés (2015)
Camino del Norte (2017)
#25
Notable again is the overall DECREASE in Pilgrims on the Frances if we subtract out those who only walked Sarria to Santiago. If we subtract out the Sarria - Santiago pilgrims, 15,520 pilgrims walked the Frances and received compostelas in June, 2017, while 15,373 pilgrims earned compostelas in June, 2018. This is consistent with a several year trend. Numbers on the Frances — the last stretch excepted — are going down.
I wonder if there is an actual decrease. Sarria - Santiago walkers are compostela walkers (which other reason would you have to walk that stretch), while I guess there are many pilgrims on the SJPP - Sarria part that already got their diploma on an earlier pilgrimage or even don't bother to walk the last part.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (SJPP to SDC); Finisterre and Muxia; Portuguese; Primitivo; Norte (Irun to SDC); Ingles
#26
I wonder if there is an actual decrease. Sarria - Santiago walkers are compostela walkers (which other reason would you have to walk that stretch), while I guess there are many pilgrims on the SJPP - Sarria part that already got their diploma on an earlier pilgrimage or even don't bother to walk the last part.
That's true, but that hasn't changed over time. No reason to think more people are walking only a part of the Frances now than a few years ago.
 

David Tallan

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - central from Oporto (2018 - planned)
#27
No reason to think more people are walking only a part of the Frances now than a few years ago.
As a percentage, I agree with you. As absolute numbers, I am quite confident that there are more people each year now walking only a part of the Frances than in 1989.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (SJPP to SDC); Finisterre and Muxia; Portuguese; Primitivo; Norte (Irun to SDC); Ingles
#28
As a percentage, I agree with you. As absolute numbers, I am quite confident that there are more people each year now walking only a part of the Frances than in 1989.
Hi David: Obviously, if you go back to 1989 there are far more pilgrims walking on the Frances - all of it -now. But if you read the previous posts, you'd see we're only talking about a decrease in the number of non Sarria - Santiago pilgrims in the last few years (since 2015, to be precise).
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#29
Would be nice to see the bottom of the list too! Sadly the website does not give the full list...........I think. Couldn't find one.

I can verify that Thailand claimed a Pilgrim that month! My wife Pat.......

Certainly the CF is getting busy. I wonder at what point, if ever, it will reach saturation during peak periods.
It felt like it already had a couple of times this year. :oops:
[/QUOTE]

We are in Hostal Antolin on Portuguese Robo.
Tomorrow Pontovedra then the normal stops.
In Padron we will get the train , have walked this Camino before so not interested in papers etc.
From Vigo today we saw not one person in the 20 something km until Redondela.
The Portuguese from Caminha , via ferry to A' Guarda was peace and leisure combined. Many nationalities (15) and a great vibe. We deliberately chose short days as the island visit from Vigo is beautiful.
Heading to Muxia -Lires- Finisterre in a weeks time , it will be crowded.

I think Laurie is on the right track with Invierno .
**** The only thing that will stop the carnage is a 200 km Compostela which all would love ( including clergy in Spain / France) except the bosses in SDC.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#30
Notable again is the overall DECREASE in Pilgrims on the Frances if we subtract out those who only walked Sarria to Santiago. If we subtract out the Sarria - Santiago pilgrims, 15,520 pilgrims walked the Frances and received compostelas in June, 2017, while 15,373 pilgrims earned compostelas in June, 2018. This is consistent with a several year trend. Numbers on the Frances — the last stretch excepted — are going down.
Many are now realising you walk 680 km at your own pace in your own zone to be hit with the Travel Agents Tour for the last 100 km.
I think many now avoid this section and just walk on to Muxia /Finisterre especially if repeating any Caminos .
 
Camino(s) past & future
May, 2017; return, leaving SJPP May 24, 2018
#31
I finished on June 21, and I didn't find the trail too busy until after Sarria. It all changed there.
It was my impression that the vast majority of the bikers were men, so, if I am correct, the women have a greater majority of hikers than the statistics show.
After I finished, I went down and did part of the Portuguese Coastal Camino, and one albergue was so full that many slept on the floor, some camped outside, and some were picked up by an albergue from a neighboring community. Indeed, the Camino did provide, but bathrooms were busy---and the clotheslines were full....
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#32
Was it Tui ?
Odds on look on it was.
 

NewBeginning

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall (2017)
#33
We are in Hostal Antolin on Portuguese Robo.
Tomorrow Pontovedra then the normal stops.
In Padron we will get the train , have walked this Camino before so not interested in papers etc.
From Vigo today we saw not one person in the 20 something km until Redondela.
The Portuguese from Caminha , via ferry to A' Guarda was peace and leisure combined. Many nationalities (15) and a great vibe. We deliberately chose short days as the island visit from Vigo is beautiful.
Heading to Muxia -Lires- Finisterre in a weeks time , it will be crowded.

I think Laurie is on the right track with Invierno .
**** The only thing that will stop the carnage is a 200 km Compostela which all would love ( including clergy in Spain / France) except the bosses in SDC.[/QUOTE]

I would love to know how many of those people doing Sarria to SdC are at their physical limits. Would requiring 200 km for a Compostela deny many people due to age or infirmity?
 

Glamgrrl

New Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Travel318
#34
Our 88 year old mother is hoping to walk from Sarria to Santiago. The 200km makes it impossible for her to get a Compostela.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#35
I would love to know how many of those people doing Sarria to SdC are at their physical limits. Would requiring 200 km for a Compostela deny many people due to age or infirmity?
The compostela is an acknowledgement of a pilgrimage to the tomb of St. James, nothing more. It is a creation of the Church/Cathedral, which decided a few decades ago to establish criteria after being overwhelmed by requests from the 5 million plus supplicants each year for it, particularly in the Jubilee years. At one time, the compostela was for anyone who showed up at the tomb. Any change in distance requirements would be to solve a perceived problem with crowding from Sarria, not a solution to a desire for the minimal salvation offered by the compostela. I fail to see why the Archdiocese would care a great deal about albergue capacity problems. The private sector has done a decent job of containing the problem. The xunta might, but I also fail to see why it would be motivated to solve the problem by limiting eligibility for a compostela. Is it possible that the issue in the Forum is more one of the ego of pilgrims who want to make the compostela more important to them by preventing others from getting it? If three hundred thousand can get a compostela annually, perhaps the task is not the pinnacle of achievement we believe it to be, merely a triumph of hubris over humility?

The easiest way for the Cathedral to accommodate age and infirmity would not be to make them walk great distances; it would be an alternative paperwork solution! A triumph of humility over hubris, maybe.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#37
Minimum distance for Compostela based upon age?

Distance = -8*Age + 660

Age in years; distance in Km.
8x 90 yrs =(720) less 660 =60 km for 90 yrs?
8x 70 yrs =560 less 660 = 100 km for 70 yrs?

I like it

8x40 yrs =320 less 660= 340 km for 40 yrs

I love it.

Well done , hope you are enjoying the wine when reading the replies you will receive.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#42
[QUOTE = "andycohn, post: 636206, member: 19805"] Notable again is the overall DECREASE in Pilgrims on the Frances if we subtract out those who only walked Sarria to Santiago. If we subtract out the Sarria - Santiago pilgrims, 15,520 pilgrims walked the Frances and received compost in June, 2017, while 15,373 pilgrims earned compost in June, 2018. This is consistent with a several year trend. Numbers on the Frances - the last stretch excepted - are going down. [/ QUOTE]

Not sure this is the only explanation. First time I walked to Santiago got a compostela. Second time, again on CF into Santiago did not get to compostela ... many pilgrims may not be going to the office ...
 
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alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
#43
Many years since I had a Compostela. In 10 years, I have obtained only 3. I consider myself sin-free... ;)
 

David Tallan

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - central from Oporto (2018 - planned)
#44
8x 90 yrs =(720) less 660 =60 km for 90 yrs?
8x 70 yrs =560 less 660 = 100 km for 70 yrs?

I like it

8x40 yrs =320 less 660= 340 km for 40 yrs

I love it.

Well done , hope you are enjoying the wine when reading the replies you will receive.
I think your math is off there. The original post said "Distance = -8*Age + 660"
That is basically 660 - (8*age).

So you are right for 40 years and 70 years but off for 90 years. For a 90 year old, the requirement wouldn't be 60 km but negative 60 km.

With the original formula, the requirement reaches zero at age 82.5. At that point, you can just fly to Santiago and take a taxi to the cathedral. Once you are older, they start owing you kilometers!

On the other hand, a three year old would have to walk 636 km.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#45
And a new born 660
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#46
I think your math is off there. The original post said "Distance = -8*Age + 660"
That is basically 660 - (8*age).

So you are right for 40 years and 70 years but off for 90 years. For a 90 year old, the requirement wouldn't be 60 km but negative 60 km.

With the original formula, the requirement reaches zero at age 82.5. At that point, you can just fly to Santiago and take a taxi to the cathedral. Once you are older, they start owing you kilometers!

On the other hand, a three year old would have to walk 636 km.
I could be right if the 780 km sign is allocated for the old bloke.
Have noticed today that there are many , many groups of young school kids entering the city.
I think the numbers have dropped compared to 10 yrs ago.
Not the number in the outdoors areas at night like years ago.
It is still a beautiful feeling.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#47
[QUOTE = "sunwanderer, post: 639024, member: 48910"] Yes. And phony Credentials too. This would keep the riff-raff off the trails - they all have to show up at Santiago.

I really do not understand who you are referring to as riff-riff? Do you think that people who are walking the trails now would forego the experience to buy a fake credential? Really?
 
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