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Training, heavy rain for 2 weeks

philo

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
April 2023
Sorry if wrong place.

I'm 4 weeks out from starting the camino.
Starting to up the training kilometres.

Weather forecast for next 2 weeks is heavy rain.

Any tips for alternative training or is it a case of just suck it up and put on the rain gear and get out?
Main concern is walking for 2 weeks in rain and getting sick just before I start.

Thanks
 
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I hate walking in the rain and I do not train before my caminos. I don't think you need to walk every day in the run-up to your Camino in any case. Why not save your training walks for days when you can actually enjoy them?
I was increasing the walk distance. Haven't gotten to 20km yet. Just concerned that's all.
 
Be part of the Camino Cleanup team! Help us pick up litter from Ponferrada to Sarria.
I'm 4 weeks out from starting the camino.
Starting to up the training kilometres.

Weather forecast for next 2 weeks is heavy rain.

Any tips for alternative training or is it a case of just suck it up and put on the rain gear and get out?
Main concern is walking for 2 weeks in rain and getting sick just before I start.

For whatever It's worth, I only got two 20km walking days in during the month before I started my Camino, and managed pretty well walking that almost every day from SJPP to Fisterra.

As many people have noted in these forums, nothing can 100% prepare you for walking long distances every day for weeks on end - in a way, the Camino provides its own training as you're walking it, if that makes sense. So I wouldn't worry too much about the rain affecting your training now - in fact, experiencing what it feels like to walk in the rain with the kit you'll be using on your Camino might actually be a good thing so you can make adjustments if needed.

Maybe plan on easing up on your schedule somewhat and only walk on days when the rain less intense or forecast to let up a bit? (Indoor treadmills are also an option, but I'm sure you've thought of that already :) ) Buen Camino to you!
 
And now for the counter opinion.......

The weather forecast is what it is. I walk all winter in a place that is famous for soggy winters. I put on my rain gear. I get wet. Viruses make you sick, not rain. The old saying is you can never be too rich, too thin, or too well prepared to walk Camino:rolleyes:. That said, I don't walk when its bucketing, but when it lightens up, I find that I can dodge the rain drops sufficiently. Try and get some reps in while you are in the zone. It's going to rain on Camino too.........
 
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Sorry if wrong place.

I'm 4 weeks out from starting the camino.
Starting to up the training kilometres.

Weather forecast for next 2 weeks is heavy rain.

Any tips for alternative training or is it a case of just suck it up and put on the rain gear and get out?
Main concern is walking for 2 weeks in rain and getting sick just before I start.

Thanks
Hi
I’m also starting my Camino in 4 weeks. I hope to arrive to St Jean pied de port on April 14th. Yesterday was my first day of walking only 6 miles. At least I walk with my backpack full 🙄 it’s supposed to rain where I live in the San Francisco Bay area for the next eight days. I’ll try to get out there a few miles. I am watching the forecast because if it’s going to be raining for a number of days through the Pyrenees I may postpone my trip to September I don’t really want to . A few days of rain and some consecutive days is fine but I don’t want to go 10-12 days of rain straight like it’s been at home. I want to be able to enjoy the scenery.
Hope to meet you on the Camino 😎
Buen Camino
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
I would walk a couple of consecutive days in the rain maybe ; just to get some idea of how your rain gear holds up.
A couple of years ago my brand new Patagonia Torrent shell 3l was to be honest c*ap but the reviews on it were great!
It leaked and and the zip pockets had water in them after less than 2 hours in moderate rain!

This is just my thoughts regarding the 20k a day walk everyday.

Which does intimidate a lot of people!! (especially for those that don't walk anywhere regularly! )
Here i walk my dog everyday between five and seven miles sometimes ten!
But that is a continuous non stop walk along tow paths and tracks without services, abate without a full pack!
The point i would make here is that on the Camino a lot of pilgrims have a a second, then third breakfast followed by a coffee stop!
So that overall 20k total distance is there; but you walk it in bites (literally:))
Woody
 
I'm 4 weeks out from starting the camino.
Starting to up the training kilometres.

Weather forecast for next 2 weeks is heavy rain.

Any tips for alternative training or is it a case of just suck it up and put on the rain gear and get out?
Hi philo - so much depends on your current level of fitness. And surely even in Ireland you are going to have plenty of days in those 4 weeks where the rain is only light? You don't need to train every day, just accustom your body to a bit more strain by lifting your general level of stamina and core strength.
It's unclear whether you've been on the camino before, but if not, I'd say - so many talk about the Route Napoleon as an almighty struggle, but actually lots of people of all abilities do it without any prior fitness training. IMO the key is to start with a sensible pack weight that you are familiar with carrying, and take it nice an easy for the first couple of hours on the way up. If you have a bed booked you needn't be fazed by scores of young'uns powering past you..
I am watching the forecast because if it’s going to be raining for a number of days through the Pyrenees I may postpone my trip to September I don’t really want to . A few days of rain and some consecutive days is fine but I don’t want to go 10-12 days of rain straight like it’s been at home. I want to be able to enjoy the scenery.
Diane, rain or (even the thought of it) can make us unduly pessimistic. 10-12 days of consecutive rain in April would be some sort of a record. Thinking about the worst possible option is not really a good basis for changing your plans! And September, with the masses scrambling for beds, is that really a better alternative?
April is a great time to start - your aim is true.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I see you’re in Ireland; I’m in Cumbria. You’ll probably already be habituated to rain such as you might encounter.

To echo Woody, (and assuming you’re on the Frances) there are only a handful of sections where you’ll have 10k without a suitable stop.

Bring teabags.
 
I live in the Northeastern USA. It is quite cold still with lots of rain in March. Yesterday we had 50mph winds and temperatures in the 20 degree F range.

We focus on two aspects of preparation when we can't walk steadily outside. Hardening our feet to prevent blisters and cardio workouts. Then, if we can’t get sufficient miles in, before leaving, we just go extra slow the first few days…but are pretty confident we won’t get blisters and we have sufficient cardio endurance to get to our destination. Today its warm 32 degrees Fahrenheit…not raining. We are heading for our state park to walk!

Alternate plan day - Go to health club and use treadmill ( hill settings) and then ellipse for an hour. Great for aerobics but low impact. Then we head to a local Sam’s club or a Walmart super center and push a cart around for an hour. Floors are somewhat softer than cement but it provides more impact. We wear a heavy fanny pack as we push the cart around the stores (not weekends). Sometimes we go down to our local shopping mall. There are many people there walking. We actually bring our polls. Our mall has ceramic tile floors so we walk a bit slower with the poles..
 
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Sorry if wrong place.

I'm 4 weeks out from starting the camino.
Starting to up the training kilometres.

Weather forecast for next 2 weeks is heavy rain.

Any tips for alternative training or is it a case of just suck it up and put on the rain gear and get out?
Main concern is walking for 2 weeks in rain and getting sick just before I start.

Thanks
You can use this opportunity to check out your rain gear, make sure everything works how you like it. Do the best you can with what you are working with weather-wise. No matter how much training you do or not, the Camino always teaches you something new.
 
Be part of the Camino Cleanup team! Help us pick up litter from Ponferrada to Sarria.
Training for me usually starts on day 1 on the camino.
Fitness is increasing every day.
I usually beginn with shorter distances the first days.

My first camino I started completely untrained as a couch potato.
It took me 29 days from SJPdP to Santiago.

Don‘t worry … you‘re gonna make it. Step by step. 👍🙂
 
I feel the same way when it is -35 C outside for my training walks, but I bundle up and get on with it. Haven't missed a single day so far since January 1 this year.
Temperatures are finally in the -5 C range now, so almost 'balmy.'
I only walk about 5 km's a day as part of my work out, but I am close to 400 k's for the year now.
I would suit up and not let a little rain worry you. My last walk in 2019 had torrential rain on many days and heavy snow in O' Cebreio, so consider walking in the rain as training and determining how good your rain poncho or suit is.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Training for me usually starts on day 1 on the camino.
Fitness is increasing every day.
I usually beginn with shorter distances the first days.

My first camino I started completely untrained as a couch potato.
It took me 29 days from SJPdP to Santiago.

Don‘t worry … you‘re gonna make it. Step by step. 👍🙂
If one initially walks,, “slow” …with no rest days, and covers the camino in 29 days, one likely has a certain prior level of endurance, because most days one would be covering circa 30 km… congrats! But one shouldn’t assume others will make it without training . IMO the OP is rightly concerned and is asking for assistance. While some can just wing it and walk, we all know that there are many pilgrims who had to cut their caminos short because of initial blisters and lack of training.

If someone is completely unable to train in advance, my advice is not to start in SJPdP, and if you must, overnight in Orisson. In addition, take the downhill parts slow to Pamplona. The initial downhills are often worse on your feet, especially to Zubiri. Find a slowpace, be initially conservative with your pace. Send your pack ahead to Roncevalles and perhaps even as far as Pamplona if you've not trained sufficiently. Don’t be overcome by adrenaline! Walk your pace, pay attention to hotspots on yourfeet immediately! Maybe build in an extra day of rest in Pamplona..
 
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Hi Philo

I think age and your physical condition matter in the equation.

That being said I think training is key...I saw so many people with blisters and knee issues because their body just wasn't used to carrying a pack (up hills and rough roads) nor were their feet prepared for 20km+ per day, day in day out. Fact - training doesn't hurt it can only help.

As to walking in heavy rain, I wouldn't do it everyday. I would try and find windows (night/early morning?) and i would do indoor training like squats and stair steps and anything i could climb with weight on my back!

Buen Camino
 
Sorry if wrong place.

I'm 4 weeks out from starting the camino.
Starting to up the training kilometres.

Weather forecast for next 2 weeks is heavy rain.

Any tips for alternative training or is it a case of just suck it up and put on the rain gear and get out?
Main concern is walking for 2 weeks in rain and getting sick just before I start.

Thanks
There is a certain amount of skill in walking in rain. Practice while you are at home and can rejigger your setup with less hassle. Also this is your chance to see if your shoes will dump you on your behind if you walk on wet pavement. (Some do!) For alternatives, especially if you live in flatlands, you can do stairs laps.
All IMHO, of course.
BC
 
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Sorry if wrong place.

I'm 4 weeks out from starting the camino.
Starting to up the training kilometres.

Weather forecast for next 2 weeks is heavy rain.

Any tips for alternative training or is it a case of just suck it up and put on the rain gear and get out?
Main concern is walking for 2 weeks in rain and getting sick just before I start.

Thanks
I second Rick M. The more preparation and training, the more enjoyable will be your Camino. No US Marine would go into battle, no marathon runner would enter the race, no football player would get into a tournament without prior training and prep. Do a few walks in the rain to test your gear, pack carrying capability, pack protection of contents and just to deal with mud and slippery trails in general. The more appropriately your gear is sized, adjusted and dialed in, the less discomfort you will have in the rain. I actually walked with a guy who preferred the rain! 'course, he was from Ireland. For me, I shorten my training hikes by increasing my pack weight well above what I will actually take on Camino x 2 or 3 times. In the month before, I will go out a few times a week with a 40 pound pack for 2 to 8 mile hikes (less time in the rain for your case). Indoor training for me year-round is gym, elliptical machine, calisthenics and stretching...and you can wear your pack during a lot of this. I just step it up prior to Camino. It motivates me to have peppy music playing. Mrs. Mattythedog likes those high energy exercise videos with kettlebells and yoga pads. I find treadmills and stationary bikes just too boring, but they are options.

There are plenty of pilgrims who don't bother with any prep and do the camino. Some do OK. I meet a lot of them with blisters and other injuries, taking taxis and buses, and wasting time and money in clinics and recovering for days in a village.
 
Sorry if wrong place.

I'm 4 weeks out from starting the camino.
Starting to up the training kilometres.

Weather forecast for next 2 weeks is heavy rain.

Any tips for alternative training or is it a case of just suck it up and put on the rain gear and get out?
Main concern is walking for 2 weeks in rain and getting sick just before I start.

Thanks

Use a treadmill set to the highest incline it is able to reach. Put on a Camino walking video. Put on your backpack. Start.

Stairs
Bleachers
Stair stepper at gym
Do knee bends (if able without the pack) using a table chair to hold to for balance.

Use the time in the rain to test out rain gear.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Use a treadmill set to the highest incline it is able to reach. Put on a Camino walking video. Put on your backpack. Start.

Stairs
Bleachers
Stair stepper at gym
Do knee bends (if able without the pack) using a table chair to hold to for balance.

Use the time in the rain to test out rain gear.
Camino walking video? Any suggestions.
 
Sorry if wrong place.

I'm 4 weeks out from starting the camino.
Starting to up the training kilometres.

Weather forecast for next 2 weeks is heavy rain.

Any tips for alternative training or is it a case of just suck it up and put on the rain gear and get out?
Main concern is walking for 2 weeks in rain and getting sick just before I start.

Thanks
I just read through the comments and want to give a nod to the encouragement to find ways to train, even in the rain. I have been sucking it up and using rain gear and have been able to get up to 20 km a couple times. It is satisfying. My camino starts at the end of May so I hope there will be few rainy days but I know that I will be ready if there are.
Also, I am doing my second camino with the intention of 33 walking days. 11 years ago, I had to skip the Burgos to Leon stages to accommodate knee and foot problems. I am now 63 and better prepared than I was at 52 years.
Wishing you good luck!
Here's a photo from my 11 mile walk in Forest Park, Portland, Oregon US. I started in the rain last Saturday and it was glorious.
 

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And now for the counter opinion.......

The weather forecast is what it is. I walk all winter in a place that is famous for soggy winters. I put on my rain gear. I get wet. Viruses make you sick, not rain. The old saying is you can never be too rich, too thin, or too well prepared to walk Camino:rolleyes:. That said, I don't walk when its bucketing, but when it lightens up, I find that I can dodge the rain drops sufficiently. Try and get some reps in while you are in the zone. It's going to rain on Camino too.........
You got snow this year, Rick! I hope you had all seasons on your car, mitts, hat, and a scarf!
We here on PEI are in a three day snow plonk--good for the snowshoeing!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
You got snow this year, Rick! I hope you had all seasons on your car, mitts, hat, and a scarf!
We here on PEI are in a three day snow plonk--good for the snowshoeing!
Is that what that was? I remember suffering some sort of problem with my eyes that made the ground seem to turn white just before Christmas. It lasted for almost 10 days! The doctor said there was nothing wrong with me, and it would pass. He was right. By New years, my vision returned to normal, and the ground was green again.

It's possible that the condition is contagious though. My better half is visiting family on The Rock this week, and reported a similar condition started afflicting her yesterday........
 
Main concern is walking for 2 weeks in rain
Very, very unlikely on the Camino -- and as for training at home in those conditions, well OK, but don't be a masochist, and just take in your pack the bare minimum for it to have enough weight to settle down.

I take beers personally, but whatever floats your boat.

If you're fit enough, you won't need much pre-Camino hiking prep, but you might if you're not.

Try a 25K or so to somewhere with a handy bus stop, and preferably with a bar/café or something for a self-congratulatory tipple and/or munchie, in itself good training for Camino conditions, and if that works out OK, you'll be fine.
 
At least I walk with my backpack full
Unnecessary, and you can actually injure yourself during prep by doing that.

Better to prep your body for longer distances, and certainly carry your hiking pack, but lightly loaded.

Prep further and lighter.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Very, very unlikely on the Camino -- and as for training at home in those conditions, well OK, but don't be a masochist, and just take in your pack the bare minimum for it to have enough weight to settle down.

I take beers personally, but whatever floats your boat.
Beer works, but if you want something that you can dump to drop some pack weight, bring bottles of water. If it starts feeling too heavy you can dump the water out. Probably safer than imbibing too many beers. 😉
 
Beer works, but if you want something that you can dump to drop some pack weight, bring bottles of water. If it starts feeling too heavy you can dump the water out. Probably safer than imbibing too many beers. 😉
Or, heaven forbid, pouring the beer out😬
 
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No way I would walk 2 weeks in the rain simply for training (although I am heading out tomorrow for a couple of hours final "wet weather gear test" as we have heavy rain forecast). I travel from Amsterdam to St Jean next Wednesday, start walking on Thursday with two short days via Valcarlos to Roncesvalles. I see a lot of rain forecast and am contemplating walking with an umbrella if the rain is torrential (but I'll see how it goes first - it may depend on how much I like using the trekking poles during the first week - I have worked on my technique, but don't really like them & never use them on my summer Alpine walks) !

Btw, I don't agree with bringing your training pack up to weight with liquids - it does not accurately simulate correct weight distribution and when I stopped doing this after my first 20k training walk, my pack was both more comfortable and also realistic when I switched to carrying what I would be carrying on the Camino (with same weight, 8kg, although I am intending to bring this down to 7kg inc water).

Edit: a close friend who walked 4 caminos 20 or so years ago told me that on one of them, it rained relentlessly the first 2 weeks during April; he said it was tough to begin with, but they ended up absolutely loving it ... then it started snowing as they walked up to O'Cebreiro at the beginning of May !
 
Sorry if wrong place.

I'm 4 weeks out from starting the camino.
Starting to up the training kilometres.

Weather forecast for next 2 weeks is heavy rain.

Any tips for alternative training or is it a case of just suck it up and put on the rain gear and get out?
Main concern is walking for 2 weeks in rain and getting sick just before I start.

Thanks
Try mall walking, esp in the morning. Usually they open about 30 Mm b4 stores open. I heard it is fun, you start seeing the same people, and you can sit down for coffee afterward.
 
Is that what that was? I remember suffering some sort of problem with my eyes that made the ground seem to turn white just before Christmas. It lasted for almost 10 days! The doctor said there was nothing wrong with me, and it would pass. He was right. By New years, my vision returned to normal, and the ground was green again.

It's possible that the condition is contagious though. My better half is visiting family on The Rock this week, and reported a similar condition started afflicting her yesterday........
I'm sorry to hear that, Rick; I hope your better half (which half, I ask and wonder!?) took her snowshoes with her when visiting the east coast! Newfoundland (and Labrador) gets the worst of the weather, I think, especially hurricanes and snowstorms. Today here on this island, we're at a positively tropical 1°C! I think I'm seeing palm trees growing out of the snow on the ground! Only another 6-7 weeks left until mud season starts here on PEI, woohoo!
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I was increasing the walk distance. Haven't gotten to 20km yet. Just concerned that's all.
in a way, the Camino provides its own training as you're walking it
The old saying is you can never be too rich, too thin, or too well prepared to walk Camino
ensuring that you are fit for the task, especially carrying weight that is not a usual thing.
The more preparation and training, the more enjoyable will be your Camino.
There are plenty of pilgrims who don't bother with any prep and do the camino. Some do OK. I meet a lot of them with blisters and ... recovering for days in a village.
I am now 63 and better prepared than I was at 52 years.
@philo, kia ora (greetings, good health)

A selection of the better suggestions for you to mark, read, learn and inwardly digest.

While I was used to tramping in my youth (think a lesser version of the US Pacific Crest route) I had no idea what to expect in France and Spain. I just knew that if I was fit, any issues would be easier to deal with. And the common denominator was pack and shoes.

To my mind you need to have confidence that, when you start, you and your pack are like one. Know where everything is, resist temptations to stop, take something off and put it in your pack (and vice versa). That takes energy.

For the next two weeks, look for possible lessening of the rain and take an hour or two get comfortable with your equipment. This point is, you can sort issues at better near home.

So I say kia kaha, kia māia, kia mana'wa'nui (take care, be strong, patient and confident)

And would love to hear of you achievements during April.
 
Sorry if wrong place.

I'm 4 weeks out from starting the camino.
Starting to up the training kilometres.

Weather forecast for next 2 weeks is heavy rain.

Any tips for alternative training or is it a case of just suck it up and put on the rain gear and get out?
Main concern is walking for 2 weeks in rain and getting sick just before I start.

Thanks
The rain itself will not make you sick, it is the people. So, stay away from people who cough or look like they have some cold or flu symptoms.

Relax. Take it easy. You will train enough on the Camino. But if you want to train, be sure to not overdo it and train every other day by walking in increments of 3, 5 or 8 kilometers. For example, wake uo, walk 3 to 5 to 8 to 10 km to say a breakfast place and have a light breakfast, rest for 30 minutes, and walk another 3 to 5 to 8 or 10 km to a Cafe and order something like a small glass of orange juice, 15 minutes break and then walk back home stopping off at the 1st restaurant for a light lunch, rest for about 30 to 45 minutes, and walk the rest of the way home.

And STRETCH before, during and after.

Buen Camino,
Rick
 
Just a note about the utility of pre-training for a Camino, and honestly evaluating personal fitness. A particularly memorable time on one of my Pilgrimages was a time I and my son Caleb departed from St Jean Pied de Port.

After a short refreshment break at Orison, my son and I were about a kilometer up the road when we came upon two young women stopped alongside. One was crumped and sitting, sobbing, while her friend was standing and looking a bit helpless. We stopped and I knelt next to the crying woman asking if she were injured.

Her reply was in heavily accented English broken up between sobs, "Why do people say just anyone can do this?" I patted her shoulder and asked her friend what happened.

She said that they were both not fit for this kind of walking and began struggling when a ways out of St Jean. They had managed to make it to Orisson and had rested a while and were not sure if they should continue. A few other pilgrims told them that the rest of the way was not as hard from Orisson, so the two young women decided to keep going.

Obviously, they didn't make it very far before one had reached a limit. I asked them if they knew whether or not they wanted to continue or if they wanted to return to St Jean. The woman who was sitting was quick to say that she was done. I asked if they wanted to have Caleb and I help them back to Orrison to see if transport back to St Jean could be arranged, to which a grateful "yes" was given.

Caleb stayed with our backpacks, and I took the pack (gads, it was heavy) from the crying woman. Her friend carried hers and we started down to Orrison. Along the way, I told them to rest for the night before deciding to give up their pilgrimage. I explained that it was fine if they wanted to taxi or bus to Roncesvalles and start from there, but to get a good night's rest before deciding anything.

After we reached Orrison, the friend was able to talk to one of the staff there, so I left.

I have never started a season of wilderness backpacking or a Camino without a decent level of pre-training. How much pre-training? To a level where I know that I can enjoy my first steps of an anticipated hiking trip or Camino. That does not mean being in ultra-fit shape, but it does mean that I want to be able to enjoy my time walking from the very beginning, and to not be in a mental fog of huffing and puffing. . . . I want to enjoy the sights and sounds externally from myself, not having my mind focused on how miserable I feel.

YMMV. :)
 
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Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Just a note about the utility of pre-training for a Camino, and honestly evaluating personal fitness. A particularly memorable time on one of my Pilgrimages was a time I and my son Caleb departed from St Jean Pied de Port.

After a short refreshment break at Orison, my son and I were about a kilometer up the road when we came upon two young women stopped alongside. One was crumped and sitting, sobbing, while her friend was standing and looking a bit helpless. We stopped and I knelt next to the crying woman asking if she were injured.

Her reply was in heavily accented English broken up between sobs, "Why do people say just anyone can do this?" I patted her shoulder and asked her friend what happened.

She said that they were both not fit for this kind of walking and began struggling when a ways out of St Jean. They had managed to make it to Orisson and had rested a while and were not sure if they should continue. A few other pilgrims told them that the rest of the way was not as hard from Orisson, so the two young women decided to keep going.

Obviously, they didn't make it very far before one had reached a limit. I asked them if they knew whether or not they wanted to continue or if they wanted to return to St Jean. The woman who was sitting was quick to say that she was done. I asked if they wanted to have Caleb and I help them back to Orrison to see if transport back to St Jean could be arranged, to which a grateful "yes" was given.

Caleb stayed with our backpacks, and I took the pack (gads, it was heavy) from the crying woman. Her friend carried hers and we started down to Orrison. Along the way, I told them to rest for the night before deciding to give up their pilgrimage. I explained that it was fine if they wanted to taxi or bus to Roncesvalles and start from there, but to get a good night's rest before deciding anything.

After we reached Orrison, the friend was able to talk to one of the staff there, so I left.

I have never started a season of wilderness backpacking or a Camino without a decent level of pre-training. How much pre-training? To a level where I know that I can enjoy my first steps of an anticipated hiking trip or Camino. That does not mean being in ultra-fit shape, but it does mean that I want to be able to enjoy my time walking from the very beginning, and be in a mental fog of huffing and puffing. . . . I want to enjoy the sights and sounds externally from myself, not having my mind focused on how miserable I feel.

YMMV. :)
I liked your post so thank you.
 
Is that what that was? I remember suffering some sort of problem with my eyes that made the ground seem to turn white just before Christmas. It lasted for almost 10 days! The doctor said there was nothing wrong with me, and it would pass. He was right. By New years, my vision returned to normal, and the ground was green again.

It's possible that the condition is contagious though. My better half is visiting family on The Rock this week, and reported a similar condition started afflicting her yesterday........
On The Rock, so I've heard, there are beverages that may cause visions of white stuff. But I've only lived in Ontario so no real experience.
 

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