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COVID Travel to Europe — 2020

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Though European borders are opening to some, those of us in the US will likely have a longer wait. My friends here at home all think I am an expert on this topic for some reason, but I had to go to google just like everyone else. This was a recent and seemingly reliable assessment. If you have better info, let me know.

Hope others will post because the different country regulations combine to create a constantly shifting landscape.


Buen camino, Laurie
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
It will help when the EU travel advisories are released, defining what marker a Nation needs to meet before their citizens are allowed to enter into the travel areas. (New diagnosed COVID-19 cases must be below ____ per million, over a given time period.)

A factor that might open things up a bit faster, is if quick testing is required at least 72 hours before boarding a flight.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Though European borders are opening to some, those of us in the US will likely have a longer wait. My friends here at home all think I am an expert on this topic for some reason, but I had to go to google just like everyone else. This was a recent and seemingly reliable assessment. If you have better info, let me know.

Hope others will post because the different country regulations combine to create a constantly shifting landscape.


Buen camino, Laurie
Well, the Nordic countries (Finland, Norway, Denmark, Iceland) agreed today to allow free travel between them. The exception is Sweden: No travel to and from that country, due to it being one of the worst hit countries in the world per capita, because of not having tried to shut it down. The same will go for many other countries, like US, Brazil, etc. You should also bear in mind that the situation can change in a blink: A new outburst in a country, and it will be excluded and have to go into lockdown again. This is not over. This is not a game: It is a matter of life and death. Personally for us, any travel (for me) to Spain, or us, to Crete (Greece) is out of the question as per now. Next year, if it is safe.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
I should also mention that the lock-up being suggested from many European countries now is not related to reduced risk; it is solely for econonomic reasons. Countries like Italy, Spain, France, England, are far out from being safe. Most of them are in desperate need of tourist money coming in. Economics are driving them (EU/Schengen) to loosen up, not health concerns. Sorry, won't go there.

Countries like the Nordic (except Sweden), Greece, Germany, are pretty safe now. But you should all remember that if you travel to a risk-country and a new outburst happens there, you may well be quarantined there or when you arrive back home. Flights may also be cancelled. Use common sense. See the definition of quarantine here:


Edit: Have extra money ready for a long stay if you're quarantened somewhere unsafe. It can be costly. Travel insurance won't cover it, for sure.
 
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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
...

Edit: Have extra money ready for a long stay if you're quarantened somewhere unsafe. It can be costly. Travel insurance won't cover it, for sure.
But not in Greece where the government will pay for your 2 weeks quarantine if get sick on Greece soil. But it will still be a quarantine, no beach, no cocktail bars in the evening etc ;)
 

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'CP, Frances,Norte,Salv/prim;Le puy, Inglés, CDM, Invierno, Fin/Mux, Vdlp 2019>Táb/ Prt Levante 2020
From Australia there is a travel ban in place on International travel out of Australia. - with no date given yet of when it will be lifted. Linked info refers to citizens and non citizens.


 

Galloglaigh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lycra tribe.
CF (2017/8), VF (2018/9), Old Way (2020), VFnS (2020), CP (rebooked) (2021), VdT (ToDo)
You might actually want to check with your insurance company prior to checking with a airline or embassy. Getting ill without cover could ruin not just your holiday but also your finances for a long time.

There are a number of insurance related court cases starting now where what people thought was insured turns out not to be - or so the insurance companies say.

Of course, you could always self-insure and run the risk.
 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
This is easily the most complete and most accurate overview over the confusing and ever changing situation for people trying to inform themselves about the current rules for crossing external or internal borders in Europe that I have seen lately. If they continue to update this article it deserves to be bookmarked.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
AT 65 most of us in the USA go onto medicare and have supplemental insurance. Because of no or very limited out of country insurance coverage on medicare, private insurance is necessary unless one self-insures. With regard to medical care abroad, most policies, IF they would even cover USA citizens for COVID 19 limit coverage for upper ages to $50,000.

So for me, personally, to consider going without a proven vaccine or verified theraputic is a non-starter. I live in hope of that time....
 
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D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
AT 65 most of us in the USA go onto medicare and have supplemental insurance. Because of no or very limited out of country insurance coverage on medicare, private insurance is necessary unless one self-insures. With regard to medical care abroad, most policies, IF they would even cover USA citizens for COVID 19 limit coverage for upper ages is usually $50,000.

So for me, personally, to consider going without a proven vaccine or verified theraputic is a non-starter. I live in hope of that time....
It is always good to check.

Supplemental Medicare plans can be widely varied. Mine will cover all costs that are normally covered when traveling domestically or internationally. They even have a wallet card with the contact number to use in such out of area travel. What is too bad, is that plans vary by area of residence, and good plans may not be available in other states or even in all counties within a given State.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
It is always good to check.

Supplemental Medicare plans can be widely varied. Mine will cover all costs that are normally covered when traveling domestically or internationally. They even have a wallet card with the contact number to use in such out of area travel. What is too bad, is that plans vary by area of residence, and good plans may not be available in other states or even in all counties within a given State.
Agree! My 20 percent supplemental plan comes from my former employer. The primary coverage is from traditional medicare. My former employer also covers most of the cost of the entire medicare plan so changing is not an option for me.

Interesting article on Travel Insurance
 
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Giantaxe

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese 2020
Agree! My 20 percent supplemental plan comes from my former employer. The primary coverage is from traditional medicare. My former employer also covers most of the cost of the entire medicare plan so changing is not an option for me.
So your supplement isn't a generally available "Medicare supplement" per se but something your former employer chooses to provide. As far as publicly available Medicare Advantage or Medigap plans go - which are regulated by the federal government - I think the previously mentioned $50k limit is correct. If not, I'd be very interested in hearing about specific insurers that provide more coverage.
 
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jayree

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to SdC 2012
Irun to Fisterra 2013
Shikoku 2015
CP 2016
Though European borders are opening to some, those of us in the US will likely have a longer wait. My friends here at home all think I am an expert on this topic for some reason, but I had to go to google just like everyone else. This was a recent and seemingly reliable assessment. If you have better info, let me know.

Hope others will post because the different country regulations combine to create a constantly shifting landscape.

Alaska has enacted a policy for those who want to visit. Often this may be only for a 3-5 day fishing trip so a 14 day quarantine is impractical. One fishing group I have used posted this info


You can read the Alaska Mandate 10 if you follow the link in the posting.

It seems most European countries are requiring a 14 day quarantine but do not offer the "pre-travel molecular-based test for SARS-CoV2" or the "StrataCLEAR option."
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
It seems most European countries are requiring a 14 day quarantine but do not offer the "pre-travel molecular-based test for SARS-CoV2" or the "StrataCLEAR option."
Perhaps because of things like the unreliability of those tests?
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2017
Primitivo 2018
Madrid 2019
Kumano Kodo 2019

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Though European borders are opening to some, those of us in the US will likely have a longer wait. My friends here at home all think I am an expert on this topic for some reason, but I had to go to google just like everyone else. This was a recent and seemingly reliable assessment. If you have better info, let me know.

Hope others will post because the different country regulations combine to create a constantly shifting landscape.


Buen camino, Laurie
Regardless of official rules re movement of people across continents aimed at boosting economies, we must consider the ethics of travel in a Covid infested world. This virus will not go away for a long time, if ever. I am concerned that pilgrim like travel styles are risky business. The potential for carrying the virus along the trails and infecting locals and other pilgrims, who then disperse all over the world and take it home is huge. More responsible travel would involve staying in one place, observing social distancing and do day walks. I know this is not what we want to hear...but it is a reality. I am longing to be back on pilgrim trails, but not under Covid conditions.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
Regardless of official rules re movement of people across continents aimed at boosting economies, we must consider the ethics of travel in a Covid infested world. This virus will not go away for a long time, if ever. I am concerned that pilgrim like travel styles are risky business. The potential for carrying the virus along the trails and infecting locals and other pilgrims, who then disperse all over the world and take it home is huge. More responsible travel would involve staying in one place, observing social distancing and do day walks. I know this is not what we want to hear...but it is a reality. I am longing to be back on pilgrim trails, but not under Covid conditions.

Your message is spot on. Should not, as true pilgrims, our ability to limit the spread of this disease be paramount, regardless of borders?
 
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D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Alaska has enacted a policy for those who want to visit. Often this may be only for a 3-5 day fishing trip so a 14 day quarantine is impractical. One fishing group I have used posted this info


You can read the Alaska Mandate 10 if you follow the link in the posting.

It seems most European countries are requiring a 14 day quarantine but do not offer the "pre-travel molecular-based test for SARS-CoV2" or the "StrataCLEAR option."
Most of the European quarantines were temporary, or are scheduled to be ended. They were put in place, as exceptions, for those traveling when the Border Lockdowns were first implemented: business, emergencies, family, etc.

These quarantines will not be practical for casual tourist travel, for the obvious reason, as mentioned, that vacations cannot add 14 days to scheduled time off . That is why tourism-related infection control will (after tourism is allowed) forgo quarantines (unless illness occurs while travelling) and include government-approved lists of countries from whom tourists will not be permitted to enter until specific epidemiological markers are achieved.

Testing could be added as an entry requirement for everyone. Airlines are discussing whether to separately require proof of testing, in both domestic and international carriers.

It helps if we get rid of the technical testing names when talking about testing.

1. A PCR test (Polymerase Chain Reaction) to detect the presence of an antigen via viral RNA, rather than the presence of the body’s immune system response, or antibodies. PCR Test is easier to say then Pre-travel molecular-based test" and COVID-19 is shorthand for "SARS-CoV2" Samples are the swab-up-the-nose-to-the-brain. . or a less aggressive variation :)

2. The Quick Test/Antibody test is based on the stuff pumped out in an immune system response to a pathogen. Antibodies. Processing the test for results is quick. Two to three hours.

The downside of the Quick Test: False Negatives. (yes false positives, too, but the primary concern is identifying infection even at the risk of a too sensitive test).

In reality, it takes time, after a new infection for the immune system to produce antibodies to fight a new intruder. It varies. But if it takes 3 to 7 days AFTER infection for antibodies to show, then an antibody test before 7 days may falsely show that no infection is present. when it actually is.

The downside of the PCR test: Time and expense. Although much quicker now, as lab testing processes have improved, it can take days, or even a week or more, to get results. And the handling and labor and processing costs are expensive.

An Antibody Quick Test is processed by adding reagents to a sample collection device. Let time pass, then read for the result. Think off the shelf pregnancy test, and it is similar to how easy and quick it is compared to PCR testing.

PCR testing involves 'growing' the teeny amount of viral RNA in a snot sample, to the point that the Rna can actually be detected. It's a mechanical machine reactor type of thing. Lots more time and handling are involved.

But an even BIGGER time-suck is caused by the lack of certified labs that are allowed to process PCR testing (expensive equipment and specific handling of specimens). Few labs, plus huge demands to process tests for patients and now tourists, means that once a test sample is taken, you will head to the back of a long queue to await your turn.

But is PCR necessary to decrease the risk of spreading infection? In practical terms, not really. It has to do with the practical realities of someone NOT having an infection long enough when they come for testing.

What we saw in Ganado, is that in random screenings of a patient using BOTH PCR and Antibody Quick Tests, no infections were missed from Quick Testing. Both PCR and Antibody tests identified infections.

It matches what a lot of health districts have seen in COVID-19 testing, as well as other diseases. It is highly probable that an individual is so recently infected that an antibody test will miss it. That is because it is the prolonged contact with a primary social or family group that is the highest risk for exposures.

Tourism Testing, for the purposes of screening with a high degree of accurate results, means that Antibody testing can work better than PCR testing. Costs, compliance, and usability add to the favorability of Antibody test.

For medical diagnosis of an illness, PCR testing is far better. Accurate diagnosis so that proper and effective management and treatment decisions can be made, require the level of results that PCR can provide.
 
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Tom Quinn

Happy walker
Camino(s) past & future
(2019)
(2020)
It will help when the EU travel advisories are released, defining what marker a Nation needs to meet before their citizens are allowed to enter into the travel areas. (New diagnosed COVID-19 cases must be below ____ per million, over a given time period.)

A factor that might open things up a bit faster, is if quick testing is required at least 72 hours before boarding a flight.
I do understand that a negative test result can be used, however it really is immunity to covid-19 that is desired, immunity by either a survival from this disease or a vaccination that insures and guarantees immunity from it. A negative test in my opinion is just a time snapshot. Its significance is not prophylactic.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I do understand that a negative test result can be used, however it really is immunity to covid-19 that is desired, immunity by either a survival from this disease or a vaccination that insures and guarantees immunity from it. A negative test in my opinion is just a time snapshot. Its significance is not prophylactic.
Your interpretation of a negative result is correct. It is a snapshot of infection status up to the point your sample is drawn or swabbed.

I mentioned testing because it is on the radar as a requirement. It provides evidence that the person is not likely infected, which is the concern for officials when admitting tourists. Beyond that, as you stated, the infection status today is not indicative of potential risk later. :)

With COVID-19, it is still unknown if there will be long-term, short-term, permanent or temporary immunity from either recovering from the disease, or vaccines.
 
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Steven B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 31 Aug (2016), Le Puy 24 Jun (2018)
From Australia there is a travel ban in place on International travel out of Australia. - with no date given yet of when it will be lifted. Linked info refers to citizens and non citizens.


Back to being imprisoned in the colonies. Even if other countries open we can't get out
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
we can't get out
I hadn't realised this until I read it here on the forum. Are there any other countries (of those widely "represented" by the forum members) who don't allow their nationals or their residents to leave their country in connection with Covid-19?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
I hadn't realised this until I read it here on the forum. Are there any other countries (of those widely "represented" by the forum members) who don't allow their nationals or their residents to leave their country in connection with Covid-19?
No one stops you from leaving. You just need to quarantine when you come back home. However, I do wonder why someone from NZ or Australia would want to leave.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
No one stops you from leaving.
Website Australian Government / Department of Home Affairs: If you are an Australian citizen or a permanent resident you cannot leave Australia due to COVID-19 restrictions unless you have an exemption. You can apply online but you must meet at least one of the following: [...]

I'm not interested in starting a discussion about why people want to leave or whether they should leave or not or anything of the sort. I was just expressing my surprise because departure travel restrictions and having to request a formal exemption to be allowed to travel abroad is not something I am familiar with, based on my own life experience.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)

Well the NZ government doesn't stop me or any other citizen from leaving.

They advise all citizens not to travel but no one prevents me from traveling. In addition, because of the travel advice, it is not possible to get travel insurance.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
Website Australian Government / Department of Home Affairs: If you are an Australian citizen or a permanent resident you cannot leave Australia due to COVID-19 restrictions unless you have an exemption. You can apply online but you must meet at least one of the following: [...]

I'm not interested in starting a discussion about why people want to leave or whether they should leave or not or anything of the sort. I was just expressing my surprise because departure travel restrictions and having to request a formal exemption to be allowed to travel abroad is not something I am familiar with, based on my own life experience.
I am sorry, I forgot that Australia is still under Covid-19 lockdown restrictions.

I have got used to there being no restrictions in NZ.
 

Karrad

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2020
I believe I read that as long as the US is closed to Portugal Citizens, Portugal is closed to US residents. Not sure if other European countries have the same policy.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Since this thread has morphed to include discussions of all travel to Europe, I’ve re-titled the thread to indicate its broader scope.

Another comprehensive recent update.

 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo, Norte, Francés, Volunteer Hospitalero.
Spain will reopen borders with the Shengen countries, except Portugal, on June 21 instead os July 1. It looks like for other countries remain the July 1, but still waitting a decision of EU Council about which restrictions should be applied to each country. I assume that in some few days we will have the full list of countries and restrictions.

 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
I believe I read that as long as the US is closed to Portugal Citizens, Portugal is closed to US residents. Not sure if other European countries have the same policy.
There is a general policy of reciprocity that usually gets applied to border controls. That is, if country A allows country B's citizens to enter then country B allows country A's citizens to enter on the same terms. Similarly if country A applies restrictions on country B's citizens then country B reciprocates.

This means that, for me in NZ that while my government doesn't prevent me from leaving I will probably be prevented from traveling anyway because NZ has closed it's borders to all countries except a small number of closely associated Pacific nation's and so if other countries choose to apply reciprocity then I am prevented from traveling because airlines departing NZ won't let me get on the plane unless I have the correct permission to get off at the other end. This also applies to stop over countries.

I have seen NZ on lists of countries that are permitted to travel to some European countries and so it appears that some countries are choosing not to apply reciprocity at this time. This is useful but complicates things and there is still the issue of transiting third party countries that do apply reciprocity.

For US citizens wanting to travel internationally there is an added complication if you don't already have a valid US passport that has at least 6 months of validity because the US passport office is currently only issuing or renewing passports if the holder is in imminent threat of life (72 hours), see https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/traveladvisories/ea/passport-covid-19.html

Also, the US still has an "all countries" advisory not to travel, see https://travel.state.gov/content/tr...ert-global-level-4-health-advisory-issue.html

This will also complicate travel insurance.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Back to being imprisoned in the colonies. Even if other countries open we can't get out
I know! Serves us right for emigrating in the first place. Having said that, for now I am utterly grateful to be stuck in NZ, which has so far avoided the Covid carnage through going hard and going early into lockdown.
We do face major job losses and economic downturn though, as we heavily rely on tourism.
 

Diane Borden

Member
Camino(s) past & future
July/August 2017 - Astorga to Finesterre
July/August 2020 - SJPP to Santiago
Back to being imprisoned in the colonies. Even if other countries open we can't get out
I laugh - but it is true! Being imprisoned in the colonies is how it totally feels! I want to be a responsible pilgrim, but I really do want to Camino this summer too!
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I laugh - but it is true! Being imprisoned in the colonies is how it totally feels! I want to be a responsible pilgrim, but I really do want to Camino this summer too!
I know! I discovered 31 Dept of Conservation tracks near Rotorua, so I am doing these over the next few months. My husband bought me a tent for my birthday and I have booked to walk the Queen Charlotte, Heaphy and Abel Tasman tracks in the South Island of NZ, followed by cycling the Hauraki Rail Trail. Not really like the Camino trails, as they are all just 4 day hikes and on 2 of them, you have to carry food....I am in for an adjustment, me thinks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
I know! I discovered 31 Dept of Conservation tracks near Rotorua, so I am doing these over the next few months. My husband bought me a tent for my birthday and I have booked to walk the Queen Charlotte, Heaphy and Abel Tasman tracks in the South Island of NZ, followed by cycling the Hauraki Rail Trail. Not really like the Camino trails, as they are all just 4 day hikes and on 2 of them, you have to carry food....I am in for an adjustment, me thinks.
I loved the Heaphy when I did it with two mates. I will wait until it stops raining before looking at other tracks.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
I know! Serves us right for emigrating in the first place. Having said that, for now I am utterly grateful to be stuck in NZ, which has so far avoided the Covid carnage through going hard and going early into lockdown.
We do face major job losses and economic downturn though, as we heavily rely on tourism.
Same here, except we didn’t lockdown early enough and had many more deaths as a result... and still... will suffer economic collapse. Woohoo 😱
 

Steven B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 31 Aug (2016), Le Puy 24 Jun (2018)
I laugh - but it is true! Being imprisoned in the colonies is how it totally feels! I want to be a responsible pilgrim, but I really do want to Camino this summer too!
totally agree Australia and NZ are the best places to be stuck in. In South Australia we have been essentially covert free for a while now as has the Northern Territory, Western Australia and New Zealand. I was to be walking from Canterbury to Rome now but may look at walking the Arles route for whenever travel becomes possible and we are welcome to return to Europe.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
An up-to-date, clear and detailed overview from Politico of this morning, Monday 15 June 2020, for EU+ internal and external borders and for the UK. An introductory quote: The bloc’s free-travel zone came to a screeching halt in March when countries chaotically imposed border restrictions to lock out the coronavirus. The European Commission wanted the reopening to be a much more orderly affair, but that’s not happening.

 

Diane Borden

Member
Camino(s) past & future
July/August 2017 - Astorga to Finesterre
July/August 2020 - SJPP to Santiago
Where I live in Connecticut, cases are dropping everyday, but that is certainly not the case everywhere here in the US. Just a few hours shy of a month til when my booked ticket to Europe is...
Praying safety for all and no more Covid-19 infections globally. That's not too much to ask.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
There has been a lot of speculation about whether travel insurance will cover people if they get covid abroad. I have an annual global travel policy with United Health Care, which I will probably not use this year, but I called to see what the coverage was with regard to covid, just for the heck of it. The customer service person I spoke with told me there is a lot of misunderstanding on the effect of a pandemic on coverage. He told me that as far as medical coverage goes, every UHC global travel policy’s coverage for medical expenses and evacuation extends to illness from covid. What might be excluded is trip cancellation coverage. I don’t ever include trip cancellation insurance in my policy, so I didn’t pursue it.

Anyway, just to suggest that people might want to get clear advice from their own travel insurance companies and not assume one way or the other.

Buen camino, Laurie
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
There has been a lot of speculation about whether travel insurance will cover people if they get covid abroad. I have an annual global travel policy with United Health Care, which I will probably not use this year, but I called to see what the coverage was with regard to covid, just for the heck of it. The customer service person I spoke with told me there is a lot of misunderstanding on the effect of a pandemic on coverage. He told me that as far as medical coverage goes, every UHC global travel policy’s coverage for medical expenses and evacuation extends to illness from covid. What might be excluded is trip cancellation coverage. I don’t ever include trip cancellation insurance in my policy, so I didn’t pursue it.

Anyway, just to suggest that people might want to get clear advice from their own travel insurance companies and not assume one way or the other.

Buen camino, Laurie
Thank you Laurie. That is a very important distinction.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Aegean Air just sent me a “welcome back” email. Don’t I wish! But I thought that Greeks’ covid strategy is pretty thorough. Though the email, which I have pasted in, says there are three groups of passengers, they only actually have two, Group A and Group B. So I am not sure where the third group is. ;)

All of us at AEGEAN try to serve you in the best possible way every day, having your health and safety as a priority.

Since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, we have been continuously adapting our flight schedule according to the restrictions imposed by the competent authorities that monitor the epidemiological data.

Today, as travel within Europe opens up and restrictions are being loosened, we are excited to be finally able to expand our network and connect again Greece to Europe and Europe to Greece. Therefore, as of June 15th, we start to bring back international destinations and will continue to gradually increase your travel choices the coming days, as to travel you again to your favorite places.

At this new start of ours, we must together ensure that travel remains safe. So, in addition to the extended health and safety measures we have put in place, you should also be aware of each country’s specific regulations regarding your entry and stay requirements at your departure, arrival and transit countries.

To help you plan your next travel, here are some key points of the flight restrictions currently imposed by the Greek Government for arrivals to Greece effective June 15th and until June 30th 2020.

Arriving passengers are categorized in accordance with their origin in three distinct groups as follows:

GROUP A:
Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxemburg, Malta, Norway, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Switzerland.

GROUP B: Albania, Belgium, France, Italy, North Macedonia, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, other non-EU countries.

- Passengers arriving at Athens International Airport originating from GROUP A will be subject to random Covid-19 testing upon their arrival.

- Passengers arriving at Athens International Airport originating from GROUP B, either with a direct flight or through a country included in Group A, will be subject to 100% Covid-19 testing upon their arrival.

- Passengers arriving at Thessaloniki Airport, will be subject to 100% Covid-19 testing upon their arrival.

All international passengers will be provided during check in or on board, with a Passenger Location Form, to be filled and provided to the authorities upon arrival.

Tested passengers have to compulsory self-isolate in the address they will declare for 24 hours, until the testing outcome is available.

Connecting Passengers are subject to COVID-19 testing upon their arrival in Athens or Thessaloniki and will be able to continue their trip to their final destination, where they will self-isolate until the testing outcome is available.

Furthermore, the Greek Goverment has extended flight restrictions from/to UK and Turkey until June 29th, 2020.

For more details please review our Travel Updates page.

We look forward to travelling together again. With safety and confidence.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
The European Union has launched a Re-Open EU website with information on entry restrictions for every EU country.
Thanks for that link. Very helpful.
i have one question: do any of you know if the UK is still considered part of Europe?
 

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