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Water shoes instead of sandals?

ncwep

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Spring 2023
Hola! I will be starting my first Camino in late April (Frances). I'm wondering if anyone has had any tried using water shoes as an alternative to sandals for the shower and walking around after arriving at the albergue? I'm thinking for the spring, they might be a little warmer on cool evenings, and the newer ones are very light and squishable, so could pack easily...? Any input appreciated!
 
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I've been pondering the same thing. I've always taken Crocs for the evenings because they are very light, I can wear them with socks, and they have some support so I'm not damaging my feet while I'm resting. Last summer I bought a pair of Xero Aqua X for a kayak camping trip and they were great for that purpose but I didn't do much walking on land in them. They will fit in my backpack much better than the Crocs (I sometimes hang the Crocs on the outside of my backpack but I prefer to not have to).

You've given me an idea - on our next evening walk around the neighborhood I'll wear the Xeros (with socks) and that should make the decision for me.

I will say that I wouldn't wear them in the shower because they would not dry fast enough for me to be able to walk around town - that's one benefit to the Crocs, they don't absorb water so you can just dry them off with a towel.
 
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At the moment I am wearing a pair of cheap Croc lookalikes as my post-walking footwear. In the past I have often used neoprene beach shoes with a fairly chunky rubber sole. Both work pretty well.
 
I just use my Tevas or Xero Sandals. Yes - the straps get wet but they dry if I use them in the shower. Doesn't bother me - but they are more comfortable to walk and hike in if needed. Crocs would be fine too - but I prefer my sandals to hike in if needed.
 
I bought a pair of hoka recovery sandals last year to wear in the shower and walking about town. I'm happy with them. I've previously worn crocs but feel I get a bit more support with the hokas.
 
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I am taking water shoes on my next walk. I walk in sandals but if they get wet the soles take a while to dry so it’s nice to have an alternative. The water shoes are light and look quite dressy! I can add socks if it is cold in the evening. A dual purpose.
 
I am taking water shoes on my next walk. I walk in sandals but if they get wet the soles take a while to dry so it’s nice to have an alternative. The water shoes are light and look quite dressy! I can add socks if it is cold in the evening. A dual purpose.
Kanga, can you provide a link, a picture or brand/style?
 
Hola! I will be starting my first Camino in late April (Frances). I'm wondering if anyone has had any tried using water shoes as an alternative to sandals for the shower and walking around after arriving at the albergue? I'm thinking for the spring, they might be a little warmer on cool evenings, and the newer ones are very light and squishable, so could pack easily...? Any input appreciated!
Yes. I took water shoes instead of flip flops when I walked the LePuy last spring and that's what I'lll do from now on. Lighter weight than flip flops. Easy to carry in outside pocket of back pack and pull out quickly when taking off boots when I got to gites. Could wear socks with them after showering and walking around gite or town in coolish evening. I'm sold.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
My "water shoes" for sailing have holes in the sole for draining. So they are totally unsuitable for around town evening wear. Suck a puddle right up into your sock. After carrying Crocs and flip flops I have settled on Birkenstock EVA foam sandals for shower and evening wear. SUPER LIGHT! Buen Camino
 
Kanga, can you provide a link, a picture or brand/style?
I saw a picture of water shoes. I have never worn them. I see also that they are not that expensive. Are they ok to walk around on cobblestone and do you have to worry more about rocks or glass or any of the other things one might step on?
 
I prefer sandals as a back-up for my walking shoes as well as “wet wear” and around town. Last year on the camimo I got a hot spot on one heel from a long day’s walk. I walked in my sandals the next two days and it cleared up. I also like sandals for the easy, low-mileage days on smooth trails. Just my preference,
 
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My husband has a pair of Crocs water sandals. Best of both worlds?
I've been pondering the same thing. I've always taken Crocs for the evenings because they are very light, I can wear them with socks, and they have some support so I'm not damaging my feet while I'm resting. Last summer I bought a pair of Xero Aqua X for a kayak camping trip and they were great for that purpose but I didn't do much walking on land in them. They will fit in my backpack much better than the Crocs (I sometimes hang the Crocs on the outside of my backpack but I prefer to not have to).

You've given me an idea - on our next evening walk around the neighborhood I'll wear the Xeros (with socks) and that should make the decision for me.

I will say that I wouldn't wear them in the shower because they would not dry fast enough for me to be able to walk around town - that's one benefit to the Crocs, they don't absorb water so you can just dry them off with a towel.
Good point about absorbing water. I don't want to take yet another pair of shoes for shower, so maybe not a good idea for me.
 
I just use my Tevas or Xero Sandals. Yes - the straps get wet but they dry if I use them in the shower. Doesn't bother me - but they are more comfortable to walk and hike in if needed. Crocs would be fine too - but I prefer my sandals to hike in if needed.
I like the idea of having something I can also hike in when my feet are tired of my shoes. Thank you!
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I bought a pair of hoka recovery sandals last year to wear in the shower and walking about town. I'm happy with them. I've previously worn crocs but feel I get a bit more support with the hokas.
Thanks for the input, I'll look into these. I'd not heard of recovery sandals, but it makes sense after hiking a long day.
 
Yes. I took water shoes instead of flip flops when I walked the LePuy last spring and that's what I'lll do from now on. Lighter weight than flip flops. Easy to carry in outside pocket of back pack and pull out quickly when taking off boots when I got to gites. Could wear socks with them after showering and walking around gite or town in coolish evening. I'm sold.
Hi John, It's Pam, from the Raleigh Camino group. Thank you for the input! Peligro, above, said that he found the water shoes don't dry from the shower in time to wear them out for dinner....what is your experience with this?
 
OK, what are water shoes? A term I havent heard before. When I google they come up as neoprene slip ons.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I've walked whole caminos in something Keen was marketing as a water shoe. They're no longer made, which is a pity. They were much lighter than regular sandals. So just for the shower? Why not?
 
Hi John, It's Pam, from the Raleigh Camino group. Thank you for the input! Peligro, above, said that he found the water shoes don't dry from the shower in time to wear them out for dinner....what is your experience with this?
Hey, Pam. Not a problem if you buy water shoes like these, don't wear them in the shower 😂, and dry your feet off when you get out 😉. And you'll get lots of "wows" from fellow pilgrims and hospitaleros!!! 😁IMG_8676.jpg
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
See my comment to Pam (below).I
I was as uncertain as @anamari above.

I take it these are neoprene (or similar) slip-ons? No structure or support, but with a grippy sole? I’ve no interest whatsoever in what they look like, but in what respect would you recommend them over (for Eva example) Birkenstock EVA sandles?
 
I was as uncertain as @anamari above.

I take it these are neoprene (or similar) slip-ons? No structure or support, but with a grippy sole? I’ve no interest whatsoever in what they look like, but in what respect would you recommend them over (for Eva example) Birkenstock EVA sandles?
Lightweight, take up no space, can access easily from side pocket of pack, quick dry, very inexpensive, can wear with socks (vs. flip flop or sandals with toe strap). Love them.
 
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Hey, Pam. Not a problem if you buy water shoes like these, don't wear them in the shower 😂, and dry your feet off when you get out 😉. And you'll get lots of "wows" from fellow pilgrims and hospitaleros!!! 😁View attachment 140027
Well, you just got a Wow from me too! ..... very snazzy! But you said don't wear them in the shower.....I was hoping for whatever I get to be my shower + going out to get dinner after the shower, to avoid multiple shoes. Do you bring a separate something for the shower?
 
I met a woman on the Camino last year that was walking in water shoes because the other shoes that she brought weren't really working for her. She did say that the water shoes weren't ideal for Camino walking though. 😉
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
There are various brands of water shoes.... I replaced my Hoka recovery slipons with these Aleader Xdrain water shoes on my last Camino. As well as draining water very quickly, they are super light. I found them really comfortable (even on cobble stones) because they have a spongy sole. Silly me only discovered (duh!) that the holes of course work both ways when my socks got wet after walking through a puddle on my way to town one evening. Even remembering that brought me a smile just now, so thanks for the prompt/question @ncwep.

men-s-xdrain-classic-knit-water-shoes-28655554297890_2048x2048.jpg
 
I tested my Xero water shoes with insoles (I have Morton's Neuromas in both feet) on a two mile walk and they were very comfortable. With the insoles they are a tad heavier than the classic Crocs I usually take, but they take up less room in the backpack. I would not walk any real distance in them, but they should work well for seeing the towns in the evenings.

This is the model I have:

 
Well, you just got a Wow from me too! ..... very snazzy! But you said don't wear them in the shower.....I was hoping for whatever I get to be my shower + going out to get dinner after the shower, to avoid multiple shoes. Do you bring a separate something for the shower?
You could wear them in the shower but then you'd want to let them dry. I wear them to the shower but go bare foot in the shower because I want to wash my feet, too. Get your feet mostly dry after the shower, slip them on and even if they're a little wet you'll be fine I think.
 
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I am not a big fan of water shoes and the older ones from years ago were a big disappointment as they invariably would get sand trapped in them, rubbing on my feet and felt awful.

I realize they have come a long way since those early days of thirty years ago, especially in attractive appearance, but they would not be my choice for a combo wet shower shoe, then adding socks on cool evenings to wear at dinner. The attractive one shown in post #28 with the drain holes on the soles seem a potential nuisance to clean out any clogged sand or dirt. Drying the shoes out takes a bit of time, too, if that matters.
 
You could wear them in the shower but then you'd want to let them dry. I wear them to the shower but go bare foot in the shower because I want to wash my feet, too. Get your feet mostly dry after the shower, slip them on and even if they're a little wet you'll be fine I think.
Thanks for the input, John!
 
I tested my Xero water shoes with insoles (I have Morton's Neuromas in both feet) on a two mile walk and they were very comfortable. With the insoles they are a tad heavier than the classic Crocs I usually take, but they take up less room in the backpack. I would not walk any real distance in them, but they should work well for seeing the towns in the evenings.

This is the model I have:

Thanks for the input, Peligro!
 
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I am not a big fan of water shoes and the older ones from years ago were a big disappointment as they invariably would get sand trapped in them, rubbing on my feet and felt awful.

I realize they have come a long way since those early days of thirty years ago, especially in attractive appearance, but they would not be my choice for a combo wet shower shoe, then adding socks on cool evenings to wear at dinner. The attractive one shown in post #28 with the drain holes on the soles seem a potential nuisance to clean out any clogged sand or dirt. Drying the shoes out takes a bit of time, too, if that matters.
Thanks for the input, Chrissy. The issue for me is that I want to be able to use whatever second shoe I bring for both shower and evening wear. I may be best with just a pair of slides that can accomodate socks if it's cold.
 
In Hawaii, water shoes are everywhere now, especially in beachside resorts and towns. The design and comfort (and durability) have improved greatly over the past 20 years and now you see them in everyday wear, particularly among the Ironman athletes and surfers and snorkelers (coulda' just said water sports folks). Many old-timers go barefoot, but the volcanic nature of the rocky areas and coral shelves near some beaches makes water shoes a must have for most people.
Personally, I wear Oofos everywhere (we call them "slippahs"), including on three Caminos (for evening foot recovery). Note: since our Samoan priest goes barefoot during Mass, I consider slippahs to be dress shoes, no?!!
The Hokas mentioned above are popular as well, but there are dozens of types and styles. Go to a running or athletic store and try them out, and you might be glad you did. Weight is an issue, so blown foam or other synthetics with a high durability factor are important and they have the added advantage of drying very quickly when out of the water (or out of the shower, if that is how you choose to wear them).

Aloha and Buen Camino
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
In Hawaii, water shoes are everywhere now, especially in beachside resorts and towns. The design and comfort (and durability) have improved greatly over the past 20 years and now you see them in everyday wear, particularly among the Ironman athletes and surfers and snorkelers (coulda' just said water sports folks). Many old-timers go barefoot, but the volcanic nature of the rocky areas and coral shelves near some beaches makes water shoes a must have for most people.
Personally, I wear Oofos everywhere (we call them "slippahs"), including on three Caminos (for evening foot recovery). Note: since our Samoan priest goes barefoot during Mass, I consider slippahs to be dress shoes, no?!!
The Hokas mentioned above are popular as well, but there are dozens of types and styles. Go to a running or athletic store and try them out, and you might be glad you did. Weight is an issue, so blown foam or other synthetics with a high durability factor are important and they have the added advantage of drying very quickly when out of the water (or out of the shower, if that is how you choose to wear them).

Aloha and Buen Camino
Thanks for the input!
 

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